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January storms:

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    Now that the shock of a series of January storms has worn off, Los Angeles County officials face a herculean chore: Five reservoirs along south-facing San Gabriel Mountain slopes are filled with so much debris and soupy mud that they pose a flood risk to the communities below. Another intense storm, they say, could unleash new surges of dirt, toppled trees and boulders down canyons stripped of their binding vegetation by the 2020 Bobcat fire, sending chocolate-colored floodwaters over the dams and into the cities of Arcadia, Sierra Madre, Pacoima, Sun Valley and Sunland. An urgent concern is emptying the reservoir behind 96-year-old Santa Anita Dam of about 600,000 cubic yards of muck more than 80 feet deep. Two of the three valves that control releases of stormwater from the 20-story-tall dam are blocked with silt. “It could flood, and we’re busting our tails to make sure that doesn’t happen,” said Sterling Klippel, principal stormwater engineer at the L.A. County Department of Public Works. Built in 1927, the structure is a critical component of a sprawling network of...
    Related Articles California News | Bay Area storms: Rain storm bound for California could be ‘light at the end of the tunnel’ California News | ‘Death by a thousand cuts’: Saratoga’s tree canopy faces several threats California News | Storms send sewage pouring into streets, creeks, San Francisco Bay and Pacific Ocean California News | ‘There’s never enough.’ Surge in need for shelter, housing overwhelms Bay Area providers California News | ‘The football gods were smiling on us’: Rain stays away from 49ers’ playoff win vs. Seahawks The final round in a three-week siege of deadly winter storms is expected to depart the Bay Area by Monday evening, capping a devastating run of atmospheric rivers that caused flooding and mudslides across California, filled once-parched reservoirs and pounded the Sierra Nevada with heaps of snow. The storm likely will mark the final major blast of precipitation for the foreseeable future, offering the region a chance to recover from deluges that have killed at least 19 people across California since late December....
    We needed the rain, but now we need to know: When will we get a break? The powerful train of Pacific storms battering California with record rainfall and major flooding will slow, perhaps even stop, meteorologists say — but not until the second half of January. In the meantime, expect the weather drama to continue. At least three more storms – ranging from moderate to significant — are predicted over the next seven to 10 days, flooding more landscapes that are already saturated with rainwater. On the distant horizon is a ridge of high-pressure air that may help block incoming storms — and weaken those that do get through, according to state climatologist Michael Anderson. High-pressure ridges deflect storms north toward British Columbia, away from California. “After January 19th, the storms die down and we see that high pressure resuming its ‘blocking stance’ of shunting storms back to the north,” said Anderson, although there’s uncertainty in such a long-term forecast. Monday’s storm was the sixth in a series of atmospheric rivers, plumes of tropical moisture that are responsible for...
    A series of atmospheric river storms brought California heavy rains and an above-average snowpack across the Sierra Nevada, but experts say the state still needs many more storms to begin to emerge from drought. Snowpack across the Sierra Nevada now measures 174% of average for this time of year. But there are still three months left in the snow season, and the snow that has fallen to date remains just 64% of the April 1 average. “It’s definitely a very exciting start to the year and a very promising start to the year. But we just need the storm train to keep coming through,” said Andrew Schwartz, the lead scientist at UC Berkeley’s Central Sierra Snow Laboratory. Storms swept in from the Pacific last week, bringing torrential rains and triggering flooding in the Central Valley and other areas. The biggest of the storms, on Friday and Saturday, was a large and warm atmospheric river, called a Pineapple Express, which dumped rain and snow across the mountains. Nearly 6 feet of snow had piled up as of Tuesday at the snow...
    DONNER PASS (CBS SF) — Mother Nature has taken the Sierra on a wild ride over the last three months. Just ask the researchers at the UC Berkeley Central Sierra Snow Lab nestled in the mountains near the famed Donner Pass. In mid-December a series of storms swept though the mountains dumping snow measured in feet, not in inches. By Dec. 16, the 7-day total had reached more than 6 feet and flurries were still falling. The photo posted on social media by the UC lab staff was a wintry scene that brought joy and relief to Northern Californians mired in an extreme drought. A new 16.3" (~41cm) of #snow over the last 24 hours, which brings our 7 day total to nearly 80" (203 cm)! We still have flurries this morning and clouds are starting to break up, which will lead to a couple days of calm weather. More snow on the way though!#CAwx #CAwater pic.twitter.com/2N2bK5GQTk — UC Berkeley Central Sierra Snow Lab (@UCB_CSSL) December 16, 2021 READ MORE: Class-Action Lawsuit With 3 Million Plaintiffs Seeks $1.2B From...
    DAVIS (KPIX) — The recent dry spell in the Bay Area is having a major impact on our water supply and could put us back where we started when it comes to the drought crises. At the end of December, California took stock of a glorious month of rainfall on top of the October storm. It could have been fairly said the winter was off to a strong start. Now, on the first day of February, the state is one month closer to another year of drought. READ MORE: Lunar New Year: Celebrations Begin As San Francisco Set To Apologize To Chinese Community For Past Discrimination“This year has really been a great example of how we can go from wet to dry very quickly, from month to month,” says Jay Lund with the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences. With the storm door slammed shut for a month, October and December rains now amount to more of the same, and a possible third year of drought. “So far, precipitation this year is almost, slightly less, then total precipitation for...
    Epic Games Although Fortnite hasn’t gotten major update with downtime for quite a while now, that hasn’t stopped Epic from adding things to the game each week. This past week introduced the new weather elements into the mix, something that was first shown to us back in the Chapter 3 trailer. Instead of dropping everything at once, Epic decided the best method was to drip feed us the content, and that has meant we have waited for a variety of things like Spider-Man’s Web Shooters and now the tornadoes. Now that the tornadoes are here, players are discovering that these aren’t exactly a bad thing and they can add a ton to the game. Instead of being something straight out of the film Twister, these twisters aren’t going to hurt you, but can actually be a boon to your gameplay by allowing quick rotation options by sucking you up and launching you far distances. If you were somebody who thought these storms didn’t spawn enough, then we have good news for you.More Tornadoes it says "Random Activation Chance",...
    A January 2011 snowfall that would become known as Carmaggedon produced several inches of snow and sleet at the worst possible time. The storm itself wasn’t memorable, but the nightmarish rush hour traffic that formed during the heavy snow will live in infamy. Every few years, D.C. area drivers relearn the hard way that a snowstorm’s societal impact cannot always be measured in inches. The most disruptive snowstorms near the Beltway aren’t the big ones. Memorable winter storms like the record-breakers that produced more than two feet of snow in January 1996, February 2010 and January 2016 were well predicted. During major snowstorms, the forecast is clear and most travel is rightfully postponed or canceled. The storms that can lead to traffic disasters are those that produce rapidly-accumulating snow during peak travel periods. For densely populated areas, the high snowfall rates and a poor collective reaction to the weather forecast can lead to extreme traffic disruptions. Three inches of snow in one day is manageable. Three inches of snow in one hour can be disastrous. More Transportation News ...
    If you are a fan of snow, get ready for a bit more of it this winter compared to last, but that doesn’t mean you’ll be sledding down your neighborhood hill a lot this time around. “This is not going to be a very big winter,” said NBC4’s Chief Meteorologist Doug Kammerer. More Local News More Weather News Kammerer is out with his predictions for the 2021-2022 winter season, and he’s only expecting 7 to 13 inches of snow all season along the I-95 corridor. Areas that include Loudoun County, Warrenton and Culpeper in Virginia, as well as western Montgomery County and Howard County in Maryland, could see 12 to 18 inches. “As a snow lover, I’d love to see more, but I don’t think we are going to see any of the big storms this year,” Kammerer said. Toward the Blue Ridge Mountains, the snow totals he expects will exceed 20 inches, with areas west of the mountains possibly seeing up to 100 inches, which he said is typical in the ski resort areas. Toward the Blue...
    Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) curiously dredged up the storming of the U.S. Capitol as he raged against Attorney General Merrick Garland before calling for his resignation. In Garland’s appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, he faced a multitude of questions over a Department of Justice memo saying they will take action against threats and harassment directed at school officials. The memo came after the National School Boards Association called for action against “threats and acts of violence,” and Senator Tom Cotton (R-AK) was among the Republicans who interrogated Garland for the DOJ and the FBI’s alleged weaponization against concerned parents. As Hawley questioned Garland at the hearing, he repeatedly interrupted the attorney general while peppering him with inquiries and accusations about the DOJ’s actions. The senator arrived at the conclusion that Garland is either “not in control of your own department,” or “knew [that prosecuting parents] was the likely outcome.” From there, Hawley copied Cotton by referring to the case of Scott Smith, who was arrested at a Virginia school board meeting earlier this year as...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers spending slumped 1% as severe winter storms raked portions of the U.S. and personal incomes fell sharply as well in February. The drop in spending came after a big 3.4% gain in January, the Commerce Department reported Friday. Consumer spending is closely watched because it accounts for two-thirds of economic activity. Personal incomes, which can fuel spending going forward, plunged 7.1% last month after a 10.1% surge in January, when the U.S. was sending out $600 individual payments to help Americans during the pandemic. Incomes are expected to rebound in March with millions of $1,400 individual payments being distributed. Economists had expected declines in February due to severe weather that hit large swaths of the country and left millions in Texas without power for days. Since so much of the weakness was weather-related, economists believe economic activity will remain solid overall in the January-March quarter. The expectation is that the economy will receive a boost from the $1.9 trillion spending bill signed into law by President Joe Biden on March 11. It provides direct payments...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Recent winter storms in the San Francisco Bay Area didn't wash away California's drought, but the rain did help, according to ABC7 News Meteorologist Mike Nicco."Let's check what happened with all that rain we received last month," said Nicco. "January rains, while below average, did improve our Bay Area drought." #GoodNews - January rains, while below average, did improve our #BayArea #drought pic.twitter.com/zIXS4yXlAb— Mike Nicco (@MikeNiccoABC7) February 4, 2021One hundred percent of the state is still in a drought, but California's drought map now shows less red."What you are going to notice is more yellow, which means the moderate has turned to dry," explained Nicco. "The red, the extreme, has turned to severe. That's the biggest change."RELATED: California's Sierra snowpack lags despite recent big stormsLocally, Nicco says, the Santa Cruz Mountains received the biggest benefit after receiving the most rain in January.As a result the Santa Cruz Mountains now fall in the "dry" category, "while most of the Bay Area now is in moderate," said Nicco. "Severe to extreme is mainly confined to Contra Costa County...
    Massive storms walloped California on Friday, leaving at least two people dead. In Northern California, drone footage captured the extent of the damage on Highway 1 near Big Sur, where a landslide caused by an atmospheric river of moisture took out a portion of the historic roadway. California's transportation department Caltrans posted drone footage of the washout on Highway 1 at Rat Creek, about 15 miles south of Big Sur.  Check out this amazing drone video of #Hwy1 washout at Rat Creek about 15 miles south of #BigSur. Our crews are on site securing it, assessing damage & starting clean-up/ repairs. Reminder: the road is OPEN from #Carmel thru town of Big Sur. @bigsurkate @BigSurCC @CHP_Coastal pic.twitter.com/rB193DzXhL— Caltrans District 5 (@CaltransD5) January 29, 2021 The highway had been closed along the Big Sur coastline since Tuesday and evacuation warnings were issued in parts of Monterey County and in areas downhill from land scarred by wildfires last year. The storms were fueled by an atmospheric river weather system which caused flooding as well as mud and debris flows, forcing the evacuation of...
    Weather today in Buenos Aires and Greater Buenos Aires. The National Meteorological Service (SMN) reported that this Saturday it is presented in the city of Buenos Aires and surroundings with unstable sky and a minimum temperature of 18 degrees and a maximum of 23. Buenos Aires Extended Forecast For tomorrow Sunday in Buenos Aires it remains stable and partially cloudy skies are expected, and a minimum temperature of 15 degrees and a maximum of 27. The humidity will be 57%. On Monday, clear skies are forecast, a minimum temperature of 16 degrees and a maximum of 28. Climate today in Córdoba. This Saturday he is presented in the city of Cordoba and surroundings unstable sky, and a minimum temperature of 19 degrees and a maximum of 27, according to the National Meteorological Service (SMN). For tomorrow Sunday a minimum of 16 degrees and a maximum of 30, on Monday a minimum of 16 degrees and a maximum of 32. Today’s weather in Mendoza. This Saturday he is presented in the city of Mendoza...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS/AP) — Local politicians are responding on Twitter after angry supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in a chaotic protest aimed at thwarting a peaceful transfer of power, forcing lawmakers to be rushed from the building and interrupting challenges to Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory. Trump issued a restrained call for peace but did not call on his supporters to leave. The deliberations inside were still in their early stages when they were overcome by raucous demonstrations outside, as protesters who clashed with police entered the building, shouting and waving Trump and American flags. They abruptly interrupted the proceedings in an out-of-control scene that featured eerie official warnings directing people to duck under their seats for cover and put on gas masks. In a statement, U.S. Senator Pat Toomey said, “This is an absolute disgrace. I appreciate the work of the United States Capitol Police under difficult circumstances. I am currently safe as are the few members of my staff that are currently at the Capitol complex.” U.S. Senator Bob Menendez tweeted, “My staff...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO/AP) — The U.S. Capitol locked down Wednesday with lawmakers inside as violent clashes broke out between supporters of President Donald Trump and police. An announcement was played inside the Capitol as lawmakers were meeting and expected to vote to affirm Joe Biden’s victory. Due to an “external security threat,” no one could enter or exit the Capitol complex, the recording said. Both chambers abruptly went into recess. The skirmishes occurred outside in the very spot where president-elect Biden will be inaugurated in just two weeks. Protesters tore down metal barricades at the bottom of the Capitol’s steps and were met by officers in riot gear. Some tried to push past the officers who held shields and officers could be seen firing pepper spray into the crowd to keep them back. Some in the crowd were shouting “traitors” as officers tried to keep them back. Some of Minnesota lawmakers tweeted amid the lockdown: I am safe, but heartbroken about what we are enduring at our nation’s Capitol. Running for our lives as Members of Congress in the United States...
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