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    Turning left on an aircraft is a pricey experience, usually costing thousands of pounds. Those who fork out for it expect peace of mind and relaxation. So should airlines make it an adults-only treat? Here two of the Mail's travel editors go head to head on the issue, with The Mail on Sunday's Sarah Hartley arguing for children to be banned from the pointy end of planes, and MailOnline's Ted Thornhill arguing that adults shouldn't throw their toys out of the pram if kids fly in the posh seats. Let them in, he says. BAN THEM, SAYS SARAH HARTLEY Children should be banned from business class, says Mail on Sunday Travel Editor Sarah Hartley (stock image) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 2 Next Inside one of Britain's most elite hotels: MailOnline's... Black pudding bon bons and duck liver meringues: MailOnline... Heavenly bedrooms, a sublime pool and in one of the most... From poo explosions to breast milk being rejected at... Revealed: THIRTY-SIX YEARS after its release, Chris Rea's... ...
    The New York Times currently runs like a 'high-risk venture' that could go out of business in the next decade or two, its former media columnist said.   Ben Smith, who worked for the company for two years, warned that NYT's muddled identity and lack of clear plans for the future could be detrimental as its starting to be viewed as a 'tech company.' But the NYT's publisher AG Sulzberger said that the 'bundle' of additional features the company is providing readers is 'not a shift away from news — it’s a shift back toward the newspaper.' However, there is now a 'frozen conflict' within the walls of the newsroom, after a cultural 'civil war' among staff and editors broke out during the pandemic.  Smith - who also used to be editor-in-chief at Buzzfeed - broke away from the newspaper earlier this year, and is now spearheading a new media platform called Semafor, which launched on October 18.  Along with Bloomberg Media's former Chief Executive Officer Justin Smith, the platform will be fighting for readers' attention by providing innovative article formats alongside journalists'...
    Tegucigalpa / New York, Aug 7 (.) .- The 20 years that the Honduran Maribel Lieberman has been selling her fine chocolates in New York have been “learning” because she has survived disasters such as the demolition of the Twin Towers in 2001, the crisis global financial situation of 2008 and the covid-19 pandemic that has affected the world since 2020. “It has been 20 years of learning, of ups and downs; in all these years I experienced the fall of the Twin Towers, that was a downturn for everyone, here in New York, especially,” Maribel told . in her store chocolates, in Soho, Manhattan. He added that in 2008, due to the global financial crisis, companies in New York suffered a lot, and that in 2020 the covid-19 pandemic was added, which it continues to face without giving in. IT DEPENDS TO GO FORWARD, SAYS THE BUSINESSWOMAN “Every experience teaches you what you can do to survive; as a businesswoman I have the personality that I never let myself fall, I may go down, but I immediately go up...
    An Alabama woman has shared her stunning transformation after getting clean following years of drug addiction. Jessica Mays, 36, started dabbling in drugs at the tender age of 11, escalating quickly from marijuana to meth. For years, her life was chaotic, filled with unplanned pregnancies, and overdose, and multiple stays in jail — until, she told the local paper Cullman Daily, she found God and was able to reclaim her life, ultimately becoming a homeowner and running her own cleaning business. Sobriety story: Jessica Mays, 36, started dabbling in drugs at the tender age of 11, escalating quickly from marijuana to meth Journey: She got pregnant for the first time at age 15 and went on to have two more children while using, but got clean during each pregnancy Mays' history with drugs started at an early age when she began smoking marijuana at just 11 years old.  As a pre-teen, she struggled with low self-esteem and wanted to feel worthy of others, and soon she'd graduated from pot to harder drugs.   By age twelve, she was smoking meth,...
    Startup Lordstown Motors says it may not be in business a year from now as it tries to secure funding to start full production of an electric pickup truck. The electric-vehicle maker warned that the $587 million it had on hand at the end of March isn't enough to start commercial production and begin selling its full-size pickup. "These conditions raise substantial doubt regarding our ability to continue as a going concern for a period of at least one year," the company said in a filing Tuesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Shares of the company, which is set up in a former General Motors plant east of Cleveland, tumbled $1.70, or 15%, on Wednesday, following a 16% decline on Tuesday. On May 24, CEO Steve Burns warned that production could be cut by over half to only 1,000 vehicles this year unless Lordstown raised an undisclosed amount of new capital.  Tuesday's SEC filing appears to be much more dire. "Going concern" is a term companies typically use when noting that their outside auditors are questioning their ability...
    More On: electric cars Elon Musk announces in tweet that premium Tesla model has been canceled Texas-built Teslas must be shipped away before Texans can buy them Biden reportedly looking to import materials for electric vehicles Tesla faces massive fine in Norway for ‘throttling’ battery performance Embattled electric truck maker Lordstown Motors has revealed that there’s “substantial doubt” about its ability to stay in business through the end of the year. Lordstown, which is backed by General Motors, revealed a going-concern notice Tuesday in a regulatory filing that amended its annual report. Going-concern notices can warn investors of threats to their survival unless additional funding or other solutions to the uncertainty are found. The two-year-old company has been struggling to convert a former GM plant in Ohio to produce its electric pickup trucks. It has previously said its first model, called the Endurance, will start production in September. “The company believes that its current level of cash and cash equivalents are not sufficient to fund commercial scale production and the launch of sale of such vehicles,” Lordstown said in...
    New York (CNN Business)Lordstown Motors, the startup electric truck maker, warned Tuesday it is close to running out of cash and may be forced out of business in the next year.The news, which sent Lordstown shares down nearly 8% in after-hours trading, is a blow to not only the company but also to the gritty industrial town from which it gets its name. For 53 years, Lordstown, Ohio, was home to a massive General Motors plant, which GM closed in 2019. It sold the 6.2 million square foot factory, nearly twice the size of the Pentagon, to start-up Lordstown Motors later that year, which promised to pay union-level wages to workers to build its Endurance pickup truck. It is due to start production of that truck in September.But Tuesday the startup said it no longer has enough money to start commercial production. It warned there is now "substantial doubt" about its ability to stay in business over the course of the next 12 months.The company filing said it had $259.7 million in cash on hand as of March 31, after...
    Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry said Wednesday that Texans would voluntarily go even longer without power during freezing temperatures just to keep federal regulators out of their state. "Texans would be without electricity for longer than three days to keep the federal government out of their business," Perry said in a blog post on the website of House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. "Try not to let whatever the crisis of the day is take your eye off of having a resilient grid that keeps America safe personally, economically and strategically." AOC SAYS GREEN NEW DEAL WOULD HAVE HELPED TO PREVENT TEXAS BLACKOUTS  In Texas, just under 500,000 homes and businesses remained without power Thursday, down from about 3 million on Wednesday. The state's grid manager, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), said the remaining outages are largely weather-related, rather than forced outages that were made early Monday to stabilize the power grid. Perry and other Republicans, including Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, have criticized the operations of the state's power grid and pushed back on suggestions by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., that...
    New York City is essentially only handing out COVID-19 vaccine shots during regular business hours, an official has claimed - as Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed to have 250 additional sites by the end of the month and another 100,000 vaccinated this week.  110,241 vaccine doses have been administered in NYC so far since vaccinations started three weeks ago, according to the city's health department data. The city currently has 443,000 vaccine doses available.  De Blasio said on Monday that he expects the city to administer 400,000 doses per week by the end of the month with 250 new vaccine sites set to open in that time frame.  NYC Councilman Mark Levine has slammed the current rate of vaccine distribution, saying shots need to be handed out 24/7.   Just over 110,000 vaccine doses have been administered in NYC so far, according to the city's health department data 110,241 vaccine doses have been administered in NYC so far, according to the city's health department data. The city currently has 443,000 doses available 'Vaccination in New York City is basically...
    VIDEO4:2704:27Restaurateur Danny Meyer on the need for more stimulus for restaurantsClosing Bell Famed restaurateur Danny Meyer told CNBC on Wednesday that the dining industry desperately needs government aid due to the coronavirus pandemic, warning of significant economic damage without it.  "We cannot reemploy people if we go out of business," Meyer said "Closing Bell," one day after President Donald Trump put an end to broader Covid-19 stimulus negotiations "until after the election." Trump later expressed support for smaller bills targeting the airline industry, small business and stimulus checks for individual Americans. Meyer, who is CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group and founder of burger chain Shake Shack, called the halt to relief talks a "crushing blow" for those in the restaurant business. He said that is especially true as restaurants grapple with the uncertainty around colder weather, complicating the pandemic-era lifeline of outdoor dining.   "I think that the country needs to understand that this is an industry with 600,070 members. We are too broad to fail," he said. "We're not like the auto industry or airline industry, where you can get your arms around...
    I once heard someone say you’ve beaten the odds if your small business is still open after five years, profitably or not. If so, then my wife, Grace, and I did something right. We opened a hair salon in 2002 just outside Austin, Texas. We’re still in business now, though a lot has changed recently. We were a good team to start this business. She’d been doing top-level hair design for 20-plus years. I had a few financial and marketing skills. We named it “Transformation” because change was our specialty. COVID-19 was a change we didn’t expect. Small business in a pandemic Because I watch the economic news and saw what happened in China and then Italy, we acted early in February to enhance our already high salon-hygiene standards. We made some physical changes to simplify cleaning and looked (unsuccessfully) for medical-grade protective gear. On the financial side, I started to build cash reserves and confirm our credit lines in case sales dropped. Normally, the hair business is highly predictable. People tend to cut and color every...
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