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    BERKELEY — University of California officials announced Monday that former acting U.S. Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman will assume leadership of the campus police department in February. Pittman, who announced her retirement last week from the Capitol Police effective early next year, served as that department’s acting chief after the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection, during a time when it drew scrutiny over intelligence assessments in the run-up to thousands of rioters’ storming of the Capitol grounds and clashes with law enforcement during certification of the 2020 presidential election’s results. UC officials offered their praise for Pittman’s tenure during a tumultuous time, as well as support for her potential in guiding the department in the wake of current UC Police Chief Margo Bennett’s retirement, announced in October. “Nothing is more important than the safety and well-being of our community, and I am  confident that Yogananda Pittman has all of the skills, qualities and experience necessary to excel as our next police chief at UC Berkeley,” UC Chancellor Carol Christ said in a statement. “Chief Pittman’s remarkable record of achievement and her...
    Capitol Police Assistant Chief Yogananda Pittman will retire from the force next February, according to multiple reports. Following the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, Pittman was briefly elevated to acting Capitol Police chief, filling a void left by the abrupt departure of Steven Sund in the aftermath. She held that role from Jan. 8, 2021, to July 22, 2021, when J. Thomas Manger was appointed to the post. She will leave the Capitol Police on Feb. 1, 2023, Just the News reported. WATCHDOG WEIGHS UP SUING SAN FRANCISCO DA FOR PAUL PELOSI ATTACK RECORDS "We thank her for her 22 years of service and her committed to the United States Capitol Police and our critical mission," Manger said in an internal announcement, per the report. Assistant Chief for Protective and Intelligence Operations Yogananda Pittman, center, flanked by U.S. Capitol Police Chief Tom Manger, left, and Acting Assistant Chief for Uniformed Operations Sean Gallagher, speaks during a news conference to discuss preparations for a weekend rally planned by allies of Donald Trump who support the so-called "political...
    (CNN)The US Capitol Police official who was in charge of intelligence operations on January 6 before briefly becoming acting chief has returned to her previous role despite criticism over security breakdowns during the insurrection.Yogananda Pittman is back in her position as assistant chief of protective and intelligence operations, where she oversees the physical security of the US Capitol and the intelligence operations, according to the department's website.Pittman held that position from 2019 until early January, when she was promoted to acting chief following Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund's abrupt resignation after the January 6 riot. Tom Manger was sworn in as the new chief last month.Pittman has endured criticism from the union representing rank-and-file Capitol Police officers, who feel she was one of the leaders responsible for intelligence failures leading up to the riot and the security breakdowns that day. Earlier this year, an overwhelming majority of officers who participated in a union-organized vote chose to vote no-confidence in her leadership.Read MoreGus Papathanasiou, chairman of the US Capitol Police Labor Committee, told CNN via text on Wednesday that it is...
    Yogananda Pittman, the Capitol Police official who led intelligence operations when thousands of pro-Trump rioters descended Jan. 6, is back in charge of intelligence as officials prepare for what’s expected to be a massive rally at the Capitol to support those who took part in the insurrection. Pittman — elevated to acting chief after then-Chief Steven Sund was forced to resign in the aftermath of the deadly insurrection — was passed over last month for the role of permanent chief. The Capitol Police Board, which oversees the force, instead picked J. Thomas Manger, the former chief of the police departments in Fairfax County, Virginia and Montgomery County, Maryland. Pittman’s tenure as assistant chief was marred by a vote of no-confidence from rank-and-file officers on the force and questions about intelligence and leadership failures — specifically, why the agency wasn’t prepared to fend off a mob of insurrectionists, even though officials had compiled intelligence showing white supremacists and other extremists were likely to assemble in Washington on Jan. 6 and that violent disruptions were possible. But more than six months after...
    A former Maryland and Virginia law enforcement official was picked to be the U.S. Capitol Police's new chief more than six months after the Jan. 6 riot rocked the federal law enforcement agency. J. Thomas Manger, who served from 2004 to 2019 in Montgomery County, Maryland, was selected for the role after an intensive search from the department's board, which includes the House and Senate sergeant-at-arms and the Architect of the Capitol, according to the Associated Press, which cited four sources. Before his stint in Maryland, Manger presided over the Fairfax City Police Department in Virginia during the investigation into Beltway sniper attacks, a series of shootings that killed 10 and injured three throughout October of 2002. Manger will replace acting Chief Yogananda Pittman, who was chosen for the role after Steven Sund vacated the position one day after the U.S. Capitol riot on Jan. 6. Capitol police officer Brian Sicknick, 42, died on Jan. 7, one day after facing off rioters who broke into the Capitol as lawmakers counted electoral votes to affirm President Joe...
    More On: capitol riot First Capitol rioter to be sentenced in breach learns his fate Man who dangled from Senate chamber in Capitol riot pleads guilty House Democrat-led Jan. 6 select panel schedules first hearing An erector and elector set of lies: Devine A new chief has been selected to lead the US Capitol Police in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 riot where a mob violently stormed the building. J. Thomas Manger, a longtime police official who has run large departments in Maryland and Virginia, will be named to the post after an extensive search, the Associated Press reported, citing two people briefed on the matter. The agency’s top official, Steven Sund, was forced out a day after the riot, and Yogananda Pittman was elevated to the role of acting chief. Pittman — who was in charge of intelligence leading up to the insurrection — wasn’t expected to get the job permanently. She faced criticism from her own cops that she had shown little to no leadership on the day of the siege. She conceded to Congress that security...
    More On: capitol riot Nancy Pelosi’s Jan. 6 commission is a partisan ploy Ex-senator says Capitol riots were worse than Benghazi in shot at GOP Trump riddles followers with strong message: ‘Who shot Ashli Babbitt?’ Capitol fence coming down July 8, six months after riot: report Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman laid out the strides the department has taken to enhance security at the Capitol complex on the six-month anniversary of the Jan. 6 riot — including expanding operations outside of the Capitol and better coordinating intelligence sharing between agencies.  Pittman said they have implemented a number of recommendations laid out in reports following probes into the security shortcomings that lead to the breach, noting they are continuing their work to strengthen capabilities to prevent similar instances in the future. She noted that intelligence sharing and working with other law enforcement agencies is a key component in their efforts to protect the Capitol campus.  “It has been six months since rioters attacked the United States Capitol and our brave police officers and law enforcement partners who fought valiantly to...
    The Capitol Police union is calling on acting Capitol Police chief Yogananda Pittman and the force's other senior leaders to step down in the wake of a Senate report this week that outlined the security failures leading up to and on the day of the Jan. 6 riot. The joint report from the Senate Rules Committee and Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs panel found that warnings of violence were poorly circulated and underestimated by top leaders in multiple security agencies, including the Capitol Police. Capitol Police union chairman Gus Papathanasiou said in a statement late Wednesday that the report confirmed how Capitol Police leadership failed to protect rank-and-file officers on the day of the Capitol attack. "If our leaders had done their jobs, we would not have suffered more than 80 serious injuries within the [Capitol Police] and an additional 70 injuries suffered by [Metropolitan Police] officers," Papathanasiou said. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick died a day after engaging with the mob of former President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer House Republican to challenge DeWine for Ohio gubernatorial nomination GOP senators press...
    U.S. Capitol Police Assistant Chief Chad Thomas resigned Monday prior to the release of a report regarding the January 6 capitol riot, according to a memo. According to a memo obtained by Politico from Capitol Police Chief of Staff Salley Wood, Thomas would be “separating from the department.” In the memo, Wood thanked Thomas for his service and announced efforts “to bring in additional resources to assist with the enhancement of its Uniformed Operations in the coming weeks.” News of Thomas’s resignation comes as the Senate Rules Committee and the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee prepare to release a report on failed security and intelligence measures from January 6. Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman has served since the resignation of former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund following the Capitol riot. The Capitol Police Labor Committee stated in February that at least 96 percent of the union’s members voted no confidence in Chief Thomas and 92 percent in Acting Chief Pittman. “The past week of the impeachment trial showed members of Congress, and the entire country, devastating details of the violence that Capitol Police officers faced...
    San Francisco Police Chief William “Bill” Scott offered a rare public apology this week for a recent police shooting of an unarmed car burglary suspect. Xavier Pittman Jr., 23, was shot in the wrist by plainclothes Officer Zachary McAuliffe as he was being arrested May 7. Pittman is a suspect in a series of car burglaries. He was treated at a hospital for injuries that were not life-threatening, officials said. An examination of the officer’s gun showed that a single round was fired. “The shooting of Mr. Pittman quite simply should not have happened,” Scott said during an online town hall on Thursday. “I’m deeply sorry that Mr. Pittman was shot during this incident, and I would like to take this opportunity to publicly apologize to Mr. Pittman, his family and his friends.” Scott added a wider public apology, saying, “We know you expect us to get this right, and we know how traumatic it is to see these types of incidents — especially when they should not have happened.” The chief said the shooting remains under...
    By JULIET WILLIAMS | The Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO  — In a rare police apology Thursday, San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott apologized for a police shooting last week that injured a burglary suspect. The man, 23-year-old Xavier Pittman, was shot in the wrist by a plainclothes officer as he was being arrested. “The shooting of Mr. Pittman quite simply should not have happened,” Scott said during an online town hall. “I’m deeply sorry that Mr. Pittman was shot during this incident, and I would like to take this opportunity to apologize.” He also apologized to the public, saying “we know you expect us to get this right, and we know how traumatic it is to see these types of incidents — especially when they should not have happened.” The shooting occurred just before 1 p.m. Friday in the city’s South of Market neighborhood as officers were tracking a stolen silver Mitsubishi carrying three men they described as known burglary suspects. Police said the car was seen at vehicle burglaries at several tourist areas earlier in the day and they...
    SAN FRANCISCO (BCN) — Police in San Francisco on Thursday released more details surrounding an officer-involved shooting last week in the city’s South Beach neighborhood that SFPD Chief Bill Scott denounced as unnecessary. The incident left a 23-year-old auto burglary suspect injured. READ MORE: UPDATE: Bear in Tree Near Downtown San Anselmo Forces Shelter in Place on Tamalpais Avenue “The shooting of Mr. Pittman, quite simply, should not have happened,” Scott said during a Town Hall meeting on Thursday. “I want to say to Mr. Pittman and his friends and family that I’m deeply sorry that Mr. Pittman was shot during this incident.” The shooting happened May 7 at about 12:45 p.m. near the corner of Varney Place and Jack London Alley as plainclothes officers sought auto burglary suspects who allegedly burglarized at least five vehicles earlier that, police said. The investigation first began around 11:45 a.m. when witnesses reported to police a group of suspects inside an SUV, described as silver Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross, breaking into another vehicle in Golden Gate Park. The suspects allegedly broke a vehicle’s window...
    SAN FRANCISCO (BCN) — Police in San Francisco on Thursday released more details surrounding an officer-involved shooting last week in the city’s South Beach neighborhood that SFPD Chief Bill Scott denounced as unnecessary. The incident left a 23-year-old auto burglary suspect injured. READ MORE: UPDATE: Bear in Tree Near Downtown San Anselmo Forces Shelter in Place on Tamalpais Avenue “The shooting of Mr. Pittman, quite simply, should not have happened,” Scott said during a Town Hall meeting on Thursday. “I want to say to Mr. Pittman and his friends and family that I’m deeply sorry that Mr. Pittman was shot during this incident.” The shooting happened May 7 at about 12:45 p.m. near the corner of Varney Place and Jack London Alley as plainclothes officers sought auto burglary suspects who allegedly burglarized at least five vehicles earlier that, police said. The investigation first began around 11:45 a.m. when witnesses reported to police a group of suspects inside an SUV, described as silver Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross, breaking into another vehicle in Golden Gate Park. The suspects allegedly broke a vehicle’s window...
    Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman said Wednesday that threats against members of Congress have increased nearly 65 percent in the first four months of this year compared to the same period in 2020. Pittman also reiterated in testimony before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee with oversight of the Capitol Police budget that threats have more than doubled overall - 118.7 percent - from 2017 to 2020. Pittman previously testified before a House Appropriations subcommittee in early March that threats against lawmakers were up 93.5 percent in the first two months of 2021 compared to the same period a year ago. The police chief's latest appearance before a congressional committee comes after three Capitol Police officers have died and dozens more have been injured this year as a result of threats to the Capitol. One officer, Brian Sicknick, died after engaging with the mob during the Jan. 6 insurrection, while a second, Howard Liebengood, died of suicide days after the attack. A third police officer, William Evans, died on April 2 after a man rammed his vehicle into a security barricade...
    Loading the player... The board that oversees the U.S. Capitol Police is beginning a search for a permanent police chief, a person familiar with the matter said, as the fallout from the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol continues. Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman has faced scrutiny from Capitol Hill leaders and congressional committees over law enforcement failures that allowed thousands of rioters to overtake police officers during the insurrection. The search for the permanent leader of the force, which has more than 2,300 sworn officers and civilian employees, will be nationwide, and while Pittman can apply for the position, she is not guaranteed it, according to the person, who had direct knowledge of the search. This person was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Read More: Feds investigating communications between members of Congress, Capitol rioters The department’s eventual permanent leader will face calls to improve the force’s intelligence gathering and sharing and its ability to respond to threats like the insurrection. In a draft report obtained by The Associated Press, a task force charged...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The board that oversees the U.S. Capitol Police is beginning a search for a permanent police chief, a person familiar with the matter said, as the fallout from the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol continues. Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman has faced scrutiny from Capitol Hill leaders and congressional committees over law enforcement failures that allowed thousands of rioters to overtake police officers during the insurrection. READ MORE: Two Injured In Separate Shootings Across Baltimore Overnight Sunday The search for the permanent leader of the force, which has more than 2,300 sworn officers and civilian employees, will be nationwide, and while Pittman can apply for the position, she is not guaranteed it, according to the person, who had direct knowledge of the search. This person was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. The department’s eventual permanent leader will face calls to improve the force’s intelligence gathering and sharing and its ability to respond to threats like the insurrection. In a draft report obtained by The Associated Press, a task force...
    (CNN)The acting chief of the US Capitol Police department acknowledged command and intelligence failures the day insurrectionists stormed the Capitol, but dodged questions from lawmakers trying to understand how the request for an increased budget would address those failures. Leaders of the department responsible for protecting Capitol Hill and federal legislators reevaluated their funding needs in the wake of the insurrection and asked for a 21% increase over last year's funding, from $512 million to $619 million. Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman, who took over the department after her predecessor resigned, testified before one of the US House of Representatives committees that oversees the police force on Wednesday morning. Other than her testimony, Pittman hasn't provided information about the day's events or changes to departmental operations in the two months since the attack. She's held no press conferences. She also testified to a need for money to fund, among other things, an increase in the number of officers available to work as "dignitary protection" and in analyzing intelligence. Read MoreDuring an exchange with Rep. Dan Newhouse, Pittman acknowledged "command and control"...
    Capitol Police acting Chief Yogananda Pittman testified before a House Appropriations subcommittee Wednesday that threats to members of Congress have increased by 93.5% within the first two months of 2021, compared to the same time period last year. And from 2017 to 2020, Pittman said there has been a 118.66% increase in "total threats and directions of interests," with the overwhelming majority of suspects residing outside the National Capital Region (NCR) in Washington, D.C. CAPITOL RIOT HEARING: DC NATIONAL GUARD GENERAL SAYS 3 HOURS PASSED BEFORE ARMY APPROVED REQUEST ON JAN. 6  "On the Capitol Complex, the level of existential threats to the U.S. Capitol and Grounds are increasing as well," Pittman said in her opening statement before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch. "This was abundantly clear on January 6, 2021, when insurrectionists attempted to prevent the Congress from certifying the 2020 Electoral College results by storming the U.S. Capitol." U.S. Capitol Police was forced to reevaluate its budget justification for the 2022 fiscal year following the events of Jan. 6, Pittman said. Instead of its...
    Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman plans to tell lawmakers on Wednesday that threats against members of Congress have nearly doubled in the past year. In testimony prepared for a hearing before a House Appropriations subcommittee on the Capitol Police budget, Pittman said that there has been a 93.5 percent increase in threats to members in the first two months of 2021 compared to the same period last year. She also plans to say that threats have more than doubled overall -- by about 119 percent -- from 2017 to 2020, with most suspects living outside the Washington region. Pittman will say that a "significant focus" of the Capitol Police's budget request will be centered on member security and more personnel will need to be hired to meet the needs. "While we have complemented our increased posture with the leveraging of federal, state and local law enforcement partnerships with the collective goal of protecting the Congress away from the Capitol Grounds, the number of agents required to provide an appropriate level of analysis, protection and enforcement necessitates a significant increase in...
    Lawmakers questioned Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman Thursday, pressing her on why the department wasn't prepared to take on insurrectionists who stormed the Capitol on January 6, despite multiple intelligence reports warning of armed white supremacists and extremist groups. "Although we knew the likelihood for violence by extremists, no credible threat indicated that tens of thousands would attack the U.S. Capitol, nor did the intelligence received from the FBI or any other law enforcement partner indicate such a threat," Pittman told the House Appropriations Committee Thursday. The invasion of the Capitol was worse than police predicted, leaving them unprepared to lock down the building and confused about use of force protocols as invaders engaged in hand-to-hand combat with officers safeguarding the perimeter. The department's Intelligence and Interagency Coordination Division produced four intelligence assessments leading up to the riot January 6, prompting extraordinary protection measures, including the special arming of officers and interception of radio frequencies used by rioters. Three days before the attack, Capitol Police circulated an internal document warning that armed extremist groups posed a violent threat...
    By Zachary Cohen, Marshall Cohen and Whitney Wild | CNN Acting US Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman warned Thursday that militia groups involved in the January 6 insurrection want to “blow up the Capitol” and “kill as many members as possible” when President Joe Biden addresses Congress. Pressed by House lawmakers to provide a timeline for removing the razorwire fencing and other enhanced security measures installed after the US Capitol attack, Pittman said law enforcement remains concerned about threats by known militia groups “with a direct nexus to the State of the Union” address. “We know that members of the militia groups that were present on January 6 have stated their desires that they want to blow up the Capitol and kill as many members as possible with a direct nexus to the State of the Union, which we know that date has not been identified,” she told House lawmakers during Thursday’s hearing on security failures related to January 6. “We know that the insurrectionists that attacked the Capitol weren’t only interested in attacking members of Congress and officers,” she...
    Lawmakers questioned Acting Capitol Police chief Yogananda Pittman Thursday, pressing her on why the department wasn't prepared to take on insurrectionists who stormed the Capitol on January 6, despite multiple intelligence reports warning of armed white supremacists and extremist groups. "Although we knew the likelihood for violence by extremists, no credible threat indicated that tens of thousands would attack the U.S. Capitol, nor did the intelligence received from the FBI or any other law enforcement partner indicate such a threat," Pittman told the House Appropriations Committee Thursday. The invasion of the Capitol was worse than police predicted, leaving them unprepared to lock down the building and confused about use of force protocols as invaders engaged in hand-to-hand combat with officers safeguarding the perimeter. The department's Intelligence and Interagency Coordination Division produced four intelligence assessments leading up to the riot January 6, prompting extraordinary protection measures, including the special arming of officers and interception of radio frequencies used by rioters. Three days before the attack, Capitol Police circulated an internal document warning that armed extremist groups posed a violent threat...
    A Wednesday hearing before the House Appropriations Committee brought in the acting chief of the Capitol Police Yogananda Pittman and acting House Sergeant-at-Arms Timothy Blodgett for questioning on incidents surrounding the Jan. 6 insurgency. This followed a Tuesday hearing before a joint Senate committee, where former chief Stephen Sund and former Sergeants at Arms Paul Irving and Michael Stenger were interviewed. The questioning by the House—conducted in a hearing that shows that, one year later, Congress still has trouble managing a Zoom meeting—sometimes became belligerent. Pittman, the first woman and first person of color to be questioned around events related to the assault on the Capitol, faced more more aggressive questioning than any of the white men who spoke on Tuesday. She was quizzed about details of staffing on the day of the insurgency and a breakdown in communications, as well concerns about how the police had prepared for the event. However, the questioning moved toward the goal of answering some of the questions raised in Tuesday’s hearing. That was particularly true when it came to an FBI document that was issued on the evening of Jan. 5. Still, there...
    There is new intelligence suggesting militia groups have expressed a desire to "blow up" the Capitol building and "kill as many members as possible" on the day President Biden addresses Congress, U.S. Capitol Police Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman revealed Thursday during a House hearing regarding the Jan. 6 insurrection. "We know that members of the militia groups that were present on Jan. 6 have stated their desires that they want to blow up the Capitol and kill as many members as possible with a direct nexus to the State of the Union, which we know that date has not been identified," Pittman said before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch.  "We know that the insurrectionists that attacked the Capitol weren’t only interested in attacking members of Congress and officers: they wanted to send a symbolic message to the nation as to who was in charge of that legislative process," she added.  CAPITOL POLICE UNION SLAMS 'DYSFUNCTION' AT RIOT HEARING AS COPS SUFFER CRUSHED SPINAL DISCS, BRAIN INJURIES  The U.S. Capitol Police did not return an email and voicemail left by Fox News Thursday.  Pittman...
    WASHINGTON - The acting U.S. Capitol Police chief was pressed to explain Thursday why the agency hadn't been prepared to fend off a violent mob of insurrectionists, including white supremacists, who were trying to halt the certification of the presidential election last month, even though officials had compelling advance intelligence. Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman denied that law enforcement failed to take seriously warnings of violence before the Jan. 6 insurrection. Three days before the riot, Capitol Police distributed an internal document warning that armed extremists were poised for violence and could attack Congress because they saw it as the last chance to try to overturn the election results, Pittman said. But the assault was much bigger than they expected, she said. "There was no such intelligence. Although we knew the likelihood for violence by extremists, no credible threat indicated that tens of thousands would attack the U.S. Capitol, nor did the intelligence received from the FBI or any other law enforcement partner indicate such a threat." FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2019, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate...
    By Michael Balsamo, Mary Clare Jalonick and Nomaan Merchant | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The acting U.S. Capitol Police chief was pressed to explain Thursday why the agency hadn’t been prepared to fend off a violent mob of insurrectionists, including white supremacists, who were trying to halt the certification of the presidential election last month, even though officials had compelling advance intelligence. Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman denied that law enforcement failed to take seriously warnings of violence before the Jan. 6 insurrection. Three days before the riot, Capitol Police distributed an internal document warning that armed extremists were poised for violence and could attack Congress because they saw it as the last chance to try to overturn the election results, Pittman said. But the assault was much bigger than they expected, she said. “There was no such intelligence. Although we knew the likelihood for violence by extremists, no credible threat indicated that tens of thousands would attack the U.S. Capitol, nor did the intelligence received from the FBI or any other law enforcement partner indicate such a threat.” Later, under...
    Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman revealed Thursday that certain militia groups present during the Jan. 6 Capitol attack later discussed plans to “blow up” the building during the State of the Union. “We know that members of the militia groups that were present on Jan. 6 have stated their desire that they want to blow up the Capitol and kill as many members as possible, with a direct nexus to the State of the Union,” Pittman said during her testimony to a House Appropriations subcommittee. “Based on that information, we think it’s prudent that Capitol Police maintain its enhanced security posture until we address those issues going forward.” Pittman stressed that news of potential future attacks have prompted the Capitol Police to maintain a increased presence near and around the building, adding that the security will decrease once the remaining threats pass. Pittman also noted that existing intelligence has failed to highlight the fact that rioters who stormed the Capitol were not exclusively targeting politicians and officers, further stressing the need for heighten security in Washington D.C. “They wanted to...
    WASHINGTON -- The acting Capitol Police chief on Thursday strongly denied that her department failed to heed intelligence reports ahead of the Jan. 6 attack warning of potential violence.In her opening statement to a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing investigating security failures, acting Chief Yogananda Pittman addressed new focus on questions about intelligence failures that have triggered finger-pointing over who was responsible, saying nothing warned of something so overwhelming."The department was not ignorant of intelligence, indicating an attack of the size and scale we encountered on the 6th," Pittman said. "There was no such intelligence.""There's evidence that some of those who stormed the Capitol were organized, but there's also evidence that a large number, were everyday Americans, took on a mob mentality, because they were angry and desperate," she said."It is the conduct of this latter group that the department was not prepared for. The department did face some operational challenges that we are addressing."EMBED More News Videos National Geographic photographer Louie Palu documents the siege inside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6. Pittman was the assistant chief of police...
    Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman said Thursday that security will remain tight because of intelligence that some militia groups that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6 have threatened to "blow up" the complex when President BidenJoe BidenKlain on Manchin's objection to Neera Tanden: He 'doesn't answer to us at the White House' Senators given no timeline on removal of National Guard, Capitol fence Overnight Defense: New Senate Armed Services chairman talks Pentagon policy nominee, Afghanistan, more | Biden reads report on Khashoggi killing | Austin stresses vaccine safety in new video MORE delivers a joint address to Congress. A date for when Biden will deliver a joint address to Congress in a State of the Union-like speech has not yet been established. But Pittman said that officials want to maintain the current security posture while that threat remains. "We know that members of the militia groups that were present on Jan. 6 have stated their desires that they want to blow up the Capitol and kill as many members as possible with a direct nexus to the State of the...
    Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman made her first public appearance before frustrated lawmakers Thursday in a heated hearing where she acknowledged that the police force was unprepared for the violent mob on Jan. 6 and that its protocols broke down. Pittman was joined by acting House Sergeant-at-Arms Timothy Blodgett in the hearing before a House Appropriations subcommittee, during which members from both parties frequently alleged that Capitol security forces were doing more to protect their jobs than to explain how they could better respond to a similar attack in the future.  Pittman said that the Capitol Police’s incident command protocols were “not adhered to as they should have” when a large mob breached the Capitol in an attempt to stop Congress from counting the Electoral College votes.  Rep. Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerRiot probe to likely focus on McCarthy-Trump call Congressional Democrats say Trump acquittal was foregone conclusion Sunday shows - Trump acquittal in second impeachment trial reverberates MORE (R-Wash.) brought up video footage that seemed to indicate the Capitol Police officer who shot an insurrectionist trying to break...
    By MICHAEL BALSAMO, MARY CLARE JALONICK and NOMAAN MERCHANT, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police is testifying before Congress on Thursday as lawmakers press for answers about intelligence and procedural failures that allowed thousands of supporters of then-President Donald Trump to storm the Capitol last month. Yogananda Pittman and the acting House sergeant-at-arms, Timothy Blodgett, faced questions from members of a House subcommittee investigating the riot on Jan. 6, when rioters invaded the Capitol aiming to stop Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s election victory over Trump. Pittman planned to tell lawmakers that Capitol Police knew there was a possibility that armed extremist poised for violence could be heading to the Capitol that day, but the invasion was worse than expected and law enforcement was unprepared. The subcommittee chairman, Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, said he wants to know what are the most important “institutional and cultural reforms” that Congress can make to keep the Capitol campus as accessible to the public as possible. The panel’s top Republican, Washington Rep. Jaime Herrera-Beutler, said the top...
    The acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police just came with the receipts. Testifying before a House Appropriations subcommittee about the catastrophic breakdown that allowed thousands of MAGA rioters to breach the Capitol, Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman revealed that her predecessor called the House sergeant-at-arms, Paul Irving, at 12:58 p.m. to request the National Guard as rioters breaching the building and forced lawmakers into hiding. Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, who resigned after the riot, called Irving again seven minutes later, according to phone records pulled by Pittman—and then called him at least three more times until 1:45 p.m. “When there’s a breakdown you look for those commanders with boots on the ground to provide that instruction,” Pittman said. “That did not happen, primarily because those operational commanders at the time were so overwhelmed, they started to participate and assist the officers… versus providing that guidance and direction.” The receipts–which support the narrative that a series of unanswered calls, withheld information, and conflicting orders led to complete malfunction—directly contradicted Irving’s testimony. On Tuesday, Sund testified that...
    The new House sergeant at arms blasted 'intelligence missteps' in testimony before the latest probe into the January 6th riot, and said Capitol Police were not 'adequately prepared' for what happened.  Acting Sergeant at Arms Henry Blodgett told a House Appropriations subcommittee that there was an intelligence failure leading up to the riot – with the substance of one dire security warning not making it into subsequent briefings and preparatory memos in the days before the riot. 'Intelligence requires finding the needles in a haystack,' Blodgett told Congress. 'On January 6th, there was a failure to either gather, synthesize, or disseminate intelligence and there were indications that the intelligence was muddled or contradictory,' he said. 'Intelligence requires finding the needles in a haystack,' Acting Sergeant at Arms Henry Blodgett told a House Appropriations subcommittee 'The intelligence provided to the Capitol Police and other law enforcement did not anticipate a coordinated attack,' he told the Legislative Branch subcommittee. 'Warning should not be qualified or hidden. Bad information, conflicting information or missing information leads to poor decisions,' he added.   He said...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on congressional testimony about the Capitol insurrection (all times local): 10:55 a.m. The acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police says cellphone records back up the account of former Chief Steven Sund that he repeatedly asked his superiors for National Guard help during the Jan. 6 insurrection. Testifying before Congress Thursday, acting Chief Yogananda Pittman listed several times she says Sund called the sergeants-at-arms of the House and Senate as a violent mob was surging outside the Capitol building. Pittman says Sund’s phone records show he called former House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving at 12:58 p.m. to request the Guard, then called ex-Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger at 1:05 p.m. Pittman says Sund made at least four more calls in the next 40 minutes. Sund and Irving disagreed earlier this week on when the chief asked for the Guard. Sund testified he requested the Guard at 1:09 p.m., while Irving denied receiving a call at that time. The Guard didn't arrive for several hours, leaving overwhelmed Capitol Police officers fighting rioters who in many cases were better...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on congressional testimony about the Capitol insurrection (all times local): 11:10 a.m. The acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police says the agency’s incident command protocols “were not adhered to” on the day of the Capitol insurrection. Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman says commanders in charge of supervising the officers were supposed to be giving directions as the violent mob stormed the Capitol. But she says there was a “multi-tiered failure.” Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler on Thursday laid out a series of leadership failures at the U.S. Capitol Police as thousands of pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol while Congress was meeting to vote to certify Joe Biden’s presidential win over Donald Trump. Beutler says officers were operating without proper communication or strong guidance from the supervisors. Pittman says officials are working on communications and have streamlined communication with other agencies. Five people died in the riot, including a Capitol officer. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SECURITY OFFICIALS TESTIFYING ON THE CAPITOL INSURRECTION: Acting U.S. Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman and acting House Sergeant...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police is testifying before Congress on Thursday as lawmakers press for answers about intelligence and procedural failures that allowed thousands of supporters of then-President Donald Trump to storm the Capitol last month. Yogananda Pittman and the acting House sergeant-at-arms, Timothy Blodgett, faced questions from members of a House subcommittee investigating the riot on Jan. 6, when rioters invaded the Capitol aiming to stop Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s election victory over Trump. Pittman planned to tell lawmakers that Capitol Police knew there was a possibility that armed extremist poised for violence could be heading to the Capitol that day, but the invasion was worse than expected and law enforcement was unprepared. The subcommittee chairman, Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, said he wants to know what are the most important “institutional and cultural reforms” that Congress can make to keep the Capitol campus as accessible to the public as possible. The panel’s top Republican, Washington Rep. Jaime Herrera-Beutler, said the top Capitol Police officials “either failed to take seriously the intelligence received...
    More On: capitol riot Disinformation hearing witness has history of falling for disinformation Geophysicist Capitol rioter worked as minesweeper: court papers Pence meets with House GOP, says he has good relationship with Trump House committee holds domestic terror hearing in wake of Capitol riot Two of the top acting Capitol security officials will largely place blame for their lack of preparedness during the Jan. 6 riot on a lack of adequate intelligence from other agencies when they testify before Congress Thursday. Acting House Sergeant-at-Arms Timothy Blodgett and acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman will appear Thursday at 10 a.m. EST before the House Appropriations Committee as part of Congress’ broader probe into the siege. “At the end of the day, the USCP succeeded in its mission. It protected Congressional leadership. It protected members,” Pittman’s testimony reads, “And it protected the Democratic process. At the end of a battle that lasted for hours, democracy prevailed.” While Pittman, who was assistant chief of police for the department’s protective and intelligence operations at the time of the riot, plans to defend the...
    (Reuters) - U.S. Capitol Police were aware of the possibility of violence from armed extremists when the Capitol was attacked by supporters of former President Donald Trump, but quickly became overwhelmed by "insurrectionists", the acting police chief said. Intelligence collected ahead of the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol suggested that the gathering would have the participation of armed "militia members, white supremacists, and other extremist groups," Yogananda Pittman said in a prepared testimony to be delivered Thursday before the House Appropriations Committee. Pittman was the assistant chief of police of the department's Protective and Intelligence Operations on Jan. 6 and said she was responsible for its Intelligence and Interagency Coordination Division (IICD). Trump supporters saw Jan. 6 as the last opportunity to overturn the results of the presidential election and their sense of desperation and disappointment "may lead to more of an incentive to become violent," the IICD said in an assessment issued on Jan. 3, according to Pittman. "While the Department was prepared to neutralize and remove individuals or groups engaging in civil disobedience or violence among the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Police officers who defended the Capitol during the Jan. 6 insurrection did not properly lock down the building and were unsure of the rules for using deadly force against the rioters, according to the acting chief of the Capitol Police. In a statement submitted for a House hearing Thursday, Yogananda Pittman provides new details about the law enforcement response to the Capitol riot and the problems that hobbled the police’s response. The statement fills in crucial new details as lawmakers begin investigating what went wrong the day of the attack. Pittman emphasizes the heroism of officers during the “ugly battle” on Jan 6 and states that Capitol Police had compiled an internal intelligence assessment ahead of the insurrection, when thousands of pro-Trump rioters stormed Congress as lawmakers were certifying Joe Biden’s presidential win. That assessment, she says, warned that militia members, white supremacists and members of other extremist groups were likely to participate, that demonstrators would be armed and that it was possible they would come to the Capitol to try to disrupt the vote. “Based on...
    (CNN)Acting US Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman said Wednesday that the agency had taken action ahead of the January 6 riot based on intelligence that extremists planned to participate in the preceding rally and planned to be armed, but that the intelligence failed to predict the scope of the attack, which would ultimately overwhelm officers when the Capitol was breached. Had there been better intelligence of the coordinated attack, Pittman suggested, the US Secret Service might not have brought Vice President Mike Pence -- a target of the insurrectionists -- to the Capitol to oversee the certification of the November election that day, according to her testimony released ahead of a House Appropriations Committee hearing on Thursday.Takeaways from the Senate hearing on the US Capitol attack"The Department's preparations were based on the information it gathered from its law enforcement partners like the FBI and others within the intelligence community, none of which indicated that a mass insurrection of this scale would occur at the US Capitol on January 6th," Pittman said in her testimony. "Nor did the intelligence received from...
    By MICHAEL BALSAMO and NOMAAN MERCHANT, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Police officers who defended the Capitol during the Jan. 6 insurrection did not properly lock down the building and were unsure of the rules for using deadly force against the rioters, according to the acting chief of the Capitol Police. In a statement submitted for a House hearing Thursday, Yogananda Pittman provides new details about the law enforcement response to the Capitol riot and the problems that hobbled the police’s response. The statement fills in crucial new details as lawmakers begin investigating what went wrong the day of the attack. Pittman emphasizes the heroism of officers during the “ugly battle” on Jan 6 and states that Capitol Police had compiled an internal intelligence assessment ahead of the insurrection, when thousands of pro-Trump rioters stormed Congress as lawmakers were certifying Joe Biden's presidential win. That assessment, she says, warned that militia members, white supremacists and members of other extremist groups were likely to participate, that demonstrators would be armed and that it was possible they would come to the Capitol...
    Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman and acting House Sergeant at Arms Timothy Blodgett will appear before the House Appropriations Committee on Thursday to testify about the security breakdown on Jan. 6 when rioters stormed the Capitol. The committee launched its investigation into the attack the day after the riot, and the hearing is the first Congressional appearance for each after stepping into their roles following the resignation of their predecessors. Pittman, who became chief on Jan. 11, started her tenure with an apology to lawmakers. "I am here to offer my sincerest apologies on behalf of the department," Pittman testified during a closed briefing in January with members of the committee. "On Jan. 6, in the face of a terrorist attack by tens of thousands of insurrectionists determined to stop the certification of Electoral College votes, the department failed to meet its own high standards as well as yours," she said. The hearing comes as the Senate is also seeking a sit down Tuesday with those responsible for security on the day of the riot. Former Senate Sergeant...
    The Capitol Police Union overwhelmingly voted no-confidence on acting Chief Yogananda Pittman and six other agency leaders last week, NPR reported. The U.S. Capitol Police Labor Committee announced in a press release that 92% of Capitol Police officers voted no-confidence in Pittman and 97% voted no-confidence in Capitol Police Captain Ben Smith, NPR reported. The majority of officers also voted no confidence in six other department leaders, according to CBS News. “Capitol Police offers have delivered an overwhelming vote of No Confidence in the senior leadership of the U.S. Capitol Police… The Executive Board of the Capitol Police Union called for rank-and-file members to consider a vote of no confidence late last week following the senior leadership’s mishandling of the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6th,” the union announced in a press release, according to CBS. “The board took this unprecedented step after reviewing details of the events on, and leading up to, January 6th and the subsequent deaths of 6 people, and injuries to approximately 140 Capitol and Metropolitan Police officers.” The union also said in a statement...
    Capitol Police Acting Chief Yogananda D. Pittman sent out an internal memo to rank-and-file officers ahead of Thursday’s vote of no confidence called for by the U.S. Capitol Police's labor union.  The planned vote of no confidence is against multiple department officials, including Pittman, who became acting chief two days after the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Her memo, dated Feb. 9 and titled "We’re in This Together," was meant to be read at roll calls and posted on all bulletin boards before the vote. "Though the vote does not compel any specific action, it does speak to the sentiment and concerns of some of our offices that I am working to address," Pittman said in her memo, obtained by Fox News Wednesday. "I understand the anger and frustration officers are experiencing. Two of our own died any many others were maimed, injured and subjected to inexcusable violence by a riotous mob." CAPITOL POLICE UNION REBUKES TOP BRASS AFTER OFFICERS AT RIOT SUSTAIN BRAIN INJURIES, ONE WILL LOSE EYE  The cause of death for Capitol Police Officer...
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