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    San Jose Mayor Matt Mahan’s office announced this week that his public inauguration will be Feb. 1, when he will most likely spell out his vision for leading the Bay Area’s largest city. “The inauguration will be a celebration of all our city is, and all it can be,” Mahan wrote in an email blast to supporters. “It marks a renewed focus on common sense and accountability — and brings us together to imagine a better future.” Now, you may wonder — has he not already been mayor for the past month? Indeed he has. Mahan was officially sworn into office in a private ceremony Dec. 29, 2022 and assumed his duties at midnight New Year’s Day, stepping immediately into one of the worst series of rainstorms San Jose had seen in six years. This 6 p.m. event at the Center for the Performing Arts in downtown San Jose is a public celebration, which — if he follows his predecessors’ tradition — will include performances by local artists and acknowledgement of other elected officials. Former Mayor Sam Liccardo held his...
    It could take several more months, or even up to another year, for Cupertino to submit its compliant housing plan to the state. During a status update on its state-mandated housing plan, acting Community Development Director Luke Connolly said the city aims to submit only a draft of the plan by the Jan. 31 deadline. He noted that would still allow the city to receive feedback from the state Department of Housing and Community Development by April and incorporate it into Cupertino’s housing element in the following months. As a result, the city is not likely to have a plan in compliance with the agency’s requirements for quite a while, Connolly said at Tuesday night’s Cupertino City Council meeting. “We have a long process ahead of us — nine months is probably the shortest, but I would say nine months to a year,” Connolly said. “Our goal is to get something to HCD by the certification date – that does not mean we have a certified housing element.” The city released a first draft of its housing element — or its...
    By Carla Bridi and Matalia Scarabotto | Associated Press BRASILIA, Brazil — Brazil’s capital prepared for the possibility of more violent demonstrations Wednesday by people seeking to overturn the presidential election, with local security officials blocking access to buildings trashed four days earlier by a horde of rioters. A flyer promoting a “mega-protest to retake power” circulated on social media platforms, particularly Telegram, and urged protesters to turn out in two dozen cities, including the capital. It was unclear how large or violent such demonstrations might shape up to be, but skittish authorities took no chances. Speaking to journalists in Brasilia, the federal appointee who has assumed control of the capital’s security said police were shutting down the main avenue to traffic and limiting pedestrian access with barricades. They are blocking all access to the square that was the site of Sunday’s mayhem, said the official, Ricarado Cappelli. He said a small area on the avenue has been reserved for peaceful demonstrations, but will be surrounded by police and the national guard and all protesters searched upon entry. “The right...
    Editor’s Note: This article was written for Mosaic Vision, an independent journalism training program for high school students who report and photograph stories under the guidance of professional journalists. While some Bay Area retailers were wringing their hands over sluggish holiday sales, one group of sellers defied this trend. Their hot merchandise: handmade crafts. A record number of shoppers flocked to the San Jose Made Holiday Craft Fair where over 400 craft makers showcased their wares. Vendors were caught by surprise by the large crowds who waited in line for the fair to open at the Santa Clara Convention Center. Emily Tran, a Silver Creek High junior, was willing to pay more for handmade items. “[I] didn’t really watch my budget because I didn’t mind paying if it meant supporting these small businesses,” Tran said. After shutting down in 2020 due to the pandemic, the craft fair roared back, experiencing the largest increase in attendance by both shoppers and vendors this year, according to organizers. “I don’t know how the recession will impact the event in the long term. But...
    MARTINEZ — The Contra Costa Board of Supervisors passed an ordinance on Tuesday allowing for the sale and delivery of non-flavored cannabis vaping products, a partial repeal of legislation adopted three years ago that also banned sale of flavored tobacco products. The new law is intended to ensure that seniors and other adults — in particular those who rely on cannabis for medicinal reasons — have access marijuana vaping products. Proposed by Supervisor Diane Burgis, the ordinance allows permitted cannabis retailers located in unincorporated areas to sell and deliver the products. The ordinance passed 3-2 with supervisors Federal Glover and Candace Anderson voting no. During the first reading of the ordinance on Dec. 6, Burgis said the motivation behind the revised ordinance was that the 2019 law hurt seniors and other adults who rely on cannabis vaping products for both recreational and medical reasons. In particular, it affected homebound seniors in unincorporated areas, she said. “What we’re trying to do by having policies here in Contra Costa County is to give people a way to access safe products,” Burgis said. At the December...
    ALAMEDA – A number of East Bay volunteers have been busy passing out donations to local food banks in recent weeks. The donations were from their annual Diwali food drive, which collected more than 4,200 pounds of food for Alameda County organizations. The national Sewa Diwali Food Drive is an annual event run by organizations rooted in Indic cultures across the country. Diwali, or the Festival of Lights, is an Indian celebration that took place during the last week of October. From the beginning of the festival until the end of November, volunteers for the Alameda County chapter of the drive were busy knocking on doors and collecting donations for those in need. The volunteers collected more than 4,200 pounds of food and have spent the past few weeks distributing the items to nonprofit organizations such as the Alameda County Community Food Bank and The Tri-City Volunteers Food Bank in Fremont. Donations were also made to Burmese refugees in Oakland and to a number of families with children in local schools. “People don’t realize it, but we can live in...
    DUBLIN – Sport often brings young people together, and some Dublin high school students is showing just how much good it can do for the wider community through their nonprofit basketball program, DubShot. Meghana Dwaram, Aadya Tomar, Anjana Kidambi and Rhea John met through their basketball team in middle school. Now seniors at Dublin High School, the 17-year-olds’ love of the game has become infectious. They’ve all played since they were children, and say that the game has taught them discipline, teamwork and connection. In 2020, they decided that they wanted to share that with younger athletes. Lockdown provided them with the spare time to make a plan, and soon DubShot, a basketball skills camp for grades two to seven, was born. “We wanted to help others learn what we had learned through the sport,” Dwaram said in a group interview. “Toward the end of quarantine, we started going door to door and putting fliers up. We really weren’t expecting more than five or six kids but on the first day of camp 30 kids showed up. We just started...
    Since 1890, the Rose Parade has been an American tradition for welcoming the new year with a display of beauty and abundance. In 2022, more than 28 million people across the country tuned in to watch sunny Southern California’s parade. If you’ll be among them in 2023, the staff at The Pasadena Star-News compiled a list of everything you need to know as you watch the floral extravaganza. The basics Traditionally, the parade takes place on New Year’s Day. This year, it’s on Jan. 2. Here’s why. The parade kicks off at 8 a.m. PST on Monday. Here’s how to watch on TV, apps or stream it. Also, if you’re on Twitter, be sure to follow @PasStarNews for live behind-the-scenes tweets or answers to your questions! Want to see a specific float or band march by? Here’s the full parade line up in order of appearance. And here’s more about every float, every band and every equestrian unit. The people  This year’s theme is “Turning the Corner.” No one represents that better than former U.S. Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, who survived...
    LIVERMORE — A light will, quite literally, always shine over the Livermore Fire Department. The Centennial Bulb, the world’s longest-burning lightbulb, has been aglow in Livermore for over a century, and the city is celebrating its 122nd anniversary in the new year. It’s something that Livermore takes pride in, having been awarded a Guinness World Record for the bulb. The bulb, located at Fire Station #6 on 4550 East Ave., has also been the subject of a documentary and a book, and it has its own committee. You can even buy replicas of the bulb on its website, centennialbulb.org, visit it on a tour, and watch a livestream of it from the station’s ‘Bulbcam’. “The oldest known working lightbulb has become an enduring symbol of the American spirit of invention,” wrote former President George W. Bush in a letter in 2001. The letter was sent to the organizers of an event celebrating the centenary of the bulb that year. A letter dated June 1, 2001 from former U.S. President George W. Bush is framed underneath the Centennial Bulb as it continues to...
    It looks like mean old Mr. Potter is winning again, as the Stanford Theatre has announced it won’t have its traditional Christmas Eve screening of “It’s a Wonderful Life” for the third year in a row. While the 2020 and 2021 screenings at were scrapped because of COVID-19, the culprit this year is the classic Palo Alto movie theater’s HVAC system. The theater, which originally opened in 1925 and was restored to great applause in the late 1980s by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, is expected to remain closed until early 2023 while the heating and ventilation system is replaced. (You can check for updates on the theater’s reopening at www.stanfordtheatre.org.) “It’s a Wonderful Life,” the Frank Capra-directed 1946 holiday classic, had been an annual event at the Stanford Theatre since its reopening in 1989, consistently playing to a sold-out house on Dec. 24. Some fans lamented the news on Facebook, expressing their willingness to bring blankets to the unheated theater rather than miss George Bailey’s struggle with faith for another year, while others said they would just look...
    “Mork & Mindy” played a big role in igniting Jarod Lyke’s passion for acting. His grandfather introduced him to the famous ABC sitcom, which made its debut in 1978 — several decades before Lyke was born. He was immediately taken with legendary Bay Area comedian Robin Williams, who played Mork from Ork in the series. “He was my introduction into, I guess you could say, wacky acting,” says the 22-year-old Crockett native. Lyke followed up “Mork & Mindy” by watching Williams razzle-dazzle his way through 1995’s “Jumanji” and other films. “I just loved everything about it,” he says. “I’m like, ‘I want to do that. I want to be like Robin Williams. I don’t know if I can ever live up to that potential. But I will sure try.” Now Lyke, who is on the autism spectrum and has ADD, is pursuing his dream of an acting career with the help of Futures Explored, the Bay Area nonprofit that works to create equitable access to programs, support and advocacy for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Lyke is one of 45...
    Free parking The holiday season can be expensive, so the Town of Los Gatos is helping alleviate some of the financial strain of gift shopping this December. The town is offering unlimited, free valet parking at the public lot off North Santa Cruz and University avenues between Grays Lane and Elm Street, giving shoppers easy access to the Old Town Los Gatos mall and other local stores. Valet parking will remain free through Dec. 24. Town report card Civic-minded residents can now peruse the 2021-22 annual report online at https://tinyurl.com/LGAnnualReport. The report covers the Town’s growth, accomplishments and hurdles over the past year, spanning topics of public safety, infrastructure, finances and more. Holiday events Los Gatos-Saratoga Recreation is hosting a slate of family-friendly festive activities this December. Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 10-11, kids and parents can have breakfast with Santa. On Tuesday, Dec. 13, residents can channel their holiday spirit into crafting with guided classes on building gingerbread houses and sugar cube igloos. These events will take place at the Los Gatos Youth Recreation Center, each with an entry...
    SAN LEANDRO — Majorie Ritchie is 98 years old and perfectly willing to share the secret to her longevity. “I am so attached to this house — that’s the reason I’m still here,” Ritchie said. “I don’t want to leave it.” The house, in the Fremont Terrace neighborhood of San Leandro, has been her home for 75 years. But Ritchie isn’t shy about admitting that her advanced years have added difficulties to still be able to stay there. She stopped driving around 2010 and she hasn’t been able to cook for about five years. It was then that Service Opportunities for Seniors Meals on Wheels (SOSMOW) stepped in. “I don’t know what I’d do without Meals on Wheels,” Ritchie said. Service Opportunities for Seniors Meals on Wheels started in 1966 in Hayward and has expanded north over the years to serve San Lorenzo, Castro Valley, San Leandro and Oakland. Whatever the place, the objective remains the same. “The overarching mission is to keep people in the homes that they enjoy for as long and as safely as possible,” said Dan Ashbrook,...
    In one year, the production of meat and dairy products generates as many carbon emissions as the entire transportation sector, according to the University of California Los Angeles. Los Gatos residents Lisa Wade and Karen Rubio are spearheading Plant-Based Advocates, a local public information campaign to promote a vegan lifestyle and combat consumer-caused climate change. The group will host monthly events at the Los Gatos Public Library and is working on a community cookbook of vegan recipes. “People ask us all the time for recipes, and we find a lot of people really want to give a plant-based diet a try, but they just don’t know where to start,” Wade said of the latter effort. “So we thought creating a cookbook with our favorite recipes would be a really useful thing for people.” The group was recently designated as a nonprofit organization and lobbied the Los Gatos Town Council to include plant-based education efforts in its 2040 General Plan earlier this year to teach residents about the health and environmental benefits of a plant-based diet. “As humans, we fall into...
    Former San Jose Vice Mayor Frank Fiscalini turned 100 years old last Saturday, and he did it in style by arriving at his party in the Rose Garden neighborhood in a parade of vintage Ford Model A cars. “It was a wonderful ride,” Fiscalini said upon his arrival in a 1931 Model A town sedan owned by Jill and Mark Barrett. “It reminded me of the one I used to have, which was a ’29.” Lisa Hausle, one of Fiscalini’s three daughters, said the family gave a lot of thought to what would be an appropriate gift for their dad — an educator who served as the first superintendent of the East Side Union High School District and CEO of Alexian Bros. hospital and later was on the boards of Opera San Jose and History San Jose. Remembering his old Model A, they hit on the idea of getting him a ride in one of the classic cars. That’s where the Santa Clara Valley Chapter of the Ford Model A Club of America entered the picture. The chapter’s president, Jill...
    Despite all outward appearances — the faux plumage, the yellow beak, a pair of wings at the ready — Soyoung Kim proved to be no turkey on a sunny Thanksgiving morning. Even if she appeared, in her own words, overly cooked. “I’m going to become a dry-as-a-bone turkey after this,” said Kim, laughing while wearing a sweltering, head-to-toe turkey outfit for a morning run before sitting down for the big meal. Thousands of people — many of them dressed in turkey outfits accented with pairs of running shoes — galloped along Lake Merritt and through downtown Oakland on Thursday morning for the Oakland Turkey Trot. The annual 5-kilometer race was among several pre-Thanksgiving meal running events held Thursday across the Bay Area, including in San Francisco, San Jose and Walnut Creek. OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 24: Ken Gutman, right, and his daughter Scarlett, 7, of Oakland, stretch as his wife and mother Shanon Hogan looks on before the start of the annual Oakland Turkey Trot at Lake Merritt in Oakland, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022. (Ray...
    Reflecting on 2022 this Thanksgiving, there is a lot of change on the horizon for San Jose. As we continue to recover from the lingering effects — both medical and social — of COVID-19, it’ll be interesting to see where that change takes us in a year or two. With that in mind, here’s my annual list of the people and things I’m thankful for this year: • San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, who will leave City Hall at the end of the year after 16 years — eight as a downtown councilman and eight as mayor. Whether or not you agree with how he handled the numerous crises during his tenure — COVID, homelessness, Black Lives Matter, the Coyote Creek flood — he worked hard to keep San Jose moving forward and succeeded more often than not. • Scott Knies, who stepped down this year as CEO of the San Jose Downtown Association after 34 years with the organization. His background as a fencer no doubt helped keep him on his toes as he navigated city hall for downtown...
    Sherie Williams was working a job she loved and approaching the home stretch of parenthood, with two pre-teens and a 19-year-old, when her life was turned completely upside down. Her sister, who was going through a rough patch, could no longer take care of her own children, and Williams felt like she had no choice but to step up and adopt her two little nieces. So she quit her job of 11 years as a security guard at Wells Fargo to take care of the girls. Three years later, her sister had a son, and Williams adopted him too. It wasn’t how Williams pictured her life turning out. Just as she should be preparing to become an empty-nester, she instead is now 45 and raising 3-year-old Shawn, 7-year-old Renyce and 9-year-old Makalah as a single mom with no income apart from child-support payments. It might have been impossible if it weren’t for one organization: Saint Vincent’s Day Home. The West Oakland daycare, preschool and kindergarten offers affordable care and education for low-income children while their parents work or search for...
    Christmas in the Park has been part of Genevieve Hismatullin’s holiday memories in San Jose for as long as she can remember. And when she returns to Plaza de Cesar Chavez for Christmas in the Park’s opening night and tree-lighting Friday, she won’t be just as one of thousands of San Jose families continuing a holiday tradition. Kyla and Action Urgent Care, the AI-driven telemedicine app and in-person urgent care company she and her husband Garick Hismatullin founded, is the presenting sponsor. The story of how her family-run local business ended up in a spot normally held by big corporations like Southwest Airlines brings together both Genevieve Hismatullin’s memories and her family’s experience through COVID-19. Genevieve Hismatullin, left, and Garick Hismatullin are the founders of Action Urgent Care, which is the presenting sponsor of Christmas in the Park for 2022. (Photo by the Wild Bloom Studio)  “It was always just a really fun holiday tradition with my abuelito and my abuelita,” she said. “We would go with my parents and my cousins and everybody. We would see all the displays...
    Instead of YETI coolers or Apple products, major companies in Silicon Valley and across the country are gifting their employees and clients handmade, high-quality goods — like leather backpacks or hand engraved charcuterie boards — that support women around the world. Peace by Piece International, a Los Gatos-based social impact company, connects underserved women artisans around the world with corporations to source their employee and client holiday gifts. Founder Lauri Pastrone, who has a background in market research and financial services, said she chose to focus on corporate gifting and event merchandise because it opens the makers and artisans up to a huge, formerly inaccessible market. “I really believe that for a community of people to be impacted, they need volume,” Pastrone said. “Just selling one item at a time doesn’t do it, doesn’t move the needle. Companies who can buy the gifts 50, 500 or 5,000 at a time, that can make an enormous difference.” A study from Coresight Research estimated that in 2021, the corporate world spent $242 billion on gifting, Forbes reported. Peace by Piece “is just...
    Local journalism is a cornerstone of democracy and a vital source of information for communities across the country, with newsrooms covering local politics, high school sports, local business openings, cultural events and other matters that help a community remain vibrant and connected. But the industry is facing an existential crisis because of the unyielding power of Big Tech platforms such as Google and Facebook.   With less than four weeks left in this Congress, now is the time for the Senate to pass the Journalism Competition and Preservation Act (JCPA). The JCPA was favorably reported out of committee on Sept. 22 with strong bipartisan support and now must head to the floor for a vote. The JCPA would hold tech giants accountable and provide a necessary lifeline for local papers, requiring Big Tech to compensate small and local outlets for the use of their content.   Big Tech benefits tremendously from journalism content, yet they refuse to pay local publishers fairly for the journalistic content that fuels their platforms. As a result, local papers are being replaced by tech...
    RICHMOND — Environmental justice projects in neighborhoods next to some of the city’s heaviest industrial areas have gotten an injection of financial support. The state has awarded Richmond $35 million to plan and implement nine different community initiatives that aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve public health, specifically in the Iron Triangle, Santa Fe and Coronado neighborhoods. Richmond Rising — a collaboration of Trust for Public Land, Rich City Rides, GRID Alternatives, Urban Tilth and Groundwork Richmond nonprofits — will work with the city to provide residents more affordable options to walk, bike and get around town; renewable energy-powered homes; gray water systems; urban greening and cooling; and enhanced food security. These projects are concentrated in a 3-square-mile section of Richmond, where 56% of the population is Latino and 19% is Black, according to grant application documents. Additionally, the area has an average median household income of $49,882. Guillermo Rodriguez, California state director of the Trust for Public Land, said he is proud that this collaborative effort will help make Richmond a healthier place to live. “We know...
    Halloween is, by nature, a spooky holiday. It is a time when kids put on scary costumes and go to elaborately decorated households to score sweet treats after the sun goes down. For kids with sensory disorders such as autism, this can be a very overwhelming experience for them, but one family has made it a mission for the last five years to provide them with a space where they can experience the joy of the holiday without any of the scares. It is appropriately called “Not So Spooky Halloween.” Abe and Maria Jackson have been hosting this event out of their garage in Vacaville on Shady Glen Court, a street where you can expect houses to be lavishly decorated with lights and inflatables around December as part of the neighborhood’s designation as Candy Cane Lane and Lollipop Lane. These neighbors also put up big displays for Halloween, and the Jacksons are no exception. They also do so with a sense of goodwill. Maria said the idea for the Not So Spooky Halloween came from a friend whose daughter has...
    The future of innovation appears to be female, at least based off the roster of honorees at the Tech for Global Good awards ceremony last Saturday night. Chris DiGiorgio, chair of the Tech Interactive’s board of trustees, proudly announced that this year’s laureates were all organizations founded and led by women, a first in the awards’ 21-year history, which earned a loud roar of applause from the audience at the Signia by Hilton hotel. As usual, the Tech for Global Good celebration was an inspiring evening, as the crowd of more than 300 people watched videos illustrating how the laureates were working to solve big problems: India-based Strawcture Eco makes building materials out of leftover straw;  MicroByre uses data and robotics to turn bacteria into factories that turn bio-waste — rabbit poop, in one case — into helpful chemicals like life-saving cancer drugs; Goodr uses an app to reduce food waste by connecting restaurants and other venues with nonprofits; and Blue Ocean Barns adds red seaweed to the diet of dairy cows to reduce greenhouse gases by getting them to...
    Students at Santa Clara University want to help save the planet, and a new scholarship and fellowship aims to support them along the way. The debut of the Silicon Valley Power Sustainable Futures Program — launched in partnership with the university, the city of Santa Clara and Silicon Valley Power — was celebrated Wednesday during an on-campus ceremony, where university faculty and city leaders welcomed the inaugural class of seven students and discussed the pressing need for creative, equitable and transformative solutions to environmental problems. “We recognize that there are many sustainability solutions that are yet to be dreamed of, and that’s where we look to students in this program,” Santa Clara Mayor Lisa Gillmor said at the ceremony. “The unique partnership that you have right here in your own backyard … is a tremendous opportunity, not only for now, but in the future.” The new venture will support 35 students over the course of five years by providing them with scholarships for sustainability-related disciplines and fellowships for research at the university’s Center for Sustainability. Each year, four students will be...
    Antioch moved ahead with plans to establish an alternate response to nonviolent, non-life-threatening 911 calls with the selection on Tuesday of a provider to do just that. The City Council unanimously selected the Felton Institute of Alameda, one of two organizations to apply, to launch the city’s first 24/7 non-police crisis response team. Councilmembers also unanimously agreed to name it the Angelo Quinto Crisis Response Team after a young man who died several days after an encounter with Antioch police after his family called for help during a mental health crisis. First proposed by Councilwoman Monica E. Wilson in 2020, the Antioch mobile crisis response team pilot program will be the first of its kind in Contra Costa County and one of only few in the Bay Area. Though the final fee has yet to be negotiated, the program, estimated at between $1.8 and $2.2 million a year, will be paid from $3.6 million in federal American Rescue Plan Act monies allocated for the purpose last April. “Over the past two years, a lot of cities across the United States...
    Antioch City Council has approved Interim City Manager Cornelius “Con” Johnson’s contract as the city’s permanent city manager. Council members voted 3-2, with Mayor Pro Tem Mike Barbanica and Councilwoman Lori Ogorchock dissenting. The move on Tuesday came after three closed-door council sessions in which there was no reportable action, followed by a vote to draft a contract offer some 10 months after Johnson was named interim manager. Johnson, 62, whose interim contract expires Dec. 21, will be paid $266,400 a year for a two-year term. He will become Antioch’s first Black city manager. A longtime Antioch resident, Johnson has 30 years of police experience, along with 17 years of managerial experience at the San Francisco Police Department. He served as managerial assistant to the chief of police, as a night supervising captain and platoon commander among other positions before retiring in 2016. Though on the job for nearly a year, Johnson’s qualifications still came into question by some residents who wanted the city to conduct a nationwide search for a new manager as often is done. “No one can...
    Supporters of the Magical Bridge Foundation’s plan to bring a socially inclusive playground to Santa Clara are celebrating a cash infusion from the state that will allow the project to finally come to life. The Magical Bridge Foundation was founded by Olenka Villarreal in 2009 after she realized that most playgrounds she visited with her two daughters did not meet their differing needs. The first Magical Bridge playground opened in Palo Alto in 2015, and the organization launched officially as a nonprofit in 2016, according to the Magical Bridge Foundation’s website. Since then, the foundation has built several more custom playgrounds throughout the Bay Area, and in 2023, one will be coming to Santa Clara. Efforts to build one of the parks in the area were greenlit in early 2019, when the city of Santa Clara entered into a grant agreement with the county to approve the construction of the park. The project received $1.8 million in funding from the city and another $1.765 million from the county that year, but still needed around $700,000 in additional funding from donors...
    For nearly two decades, residents in one of San Jose’s oldest neighborhoods have pushed for historical recognition. And now a new book just might help their chances. “Schiele Subdivision and Alameda Park” by Krista Van Laan and Kay Gutknecht is an in-depth look at the homes in 23-acre tract east of downtown San Jose — some were built in the late 1800s but most came after the creation of the Alameda Park residential park in 1922. And, Saturday, neighbors held a block party to celebrate the publication of the book. Historian Krista Van Laan, right, talks to neighbors on Schiele Avenue at a block party for “Schiele Subdivision and Alameda Park,” a new book she wrote with Kay Gutknecht that provides an in-depth look at the San Jose neighborhood, on Saturday, Cct. 15, 2022 (Sal Pizarro/Bay Area News Group)  Ken Yeager, who represented the area when he served on the San Jose City Council, wrote the book’s foreward. “It’s the first of its kind in San Jose — a neighborhood history that builds awareness and understanding of the neighborhood’s historical...
    Five candidates are vying for three open seats on the Los Gatos-Saratoga Union High School District board in the Nov. 8 election, and board president Katherine Tseng said the newly elected board will be making important decisions in the coming years. “It’s going to be very important for our board composition,” Tseng said of the election. “I’m hoping that our community makes a good decision, gets to know the candidate profiles to see which candidates can really help us to move forward,” . Along with Tseng, board member Theresa Bond’s term expires in 2024. David Guidry is the only incumbent running for re-election. The other four candidates include two retired teachers and one current teacher, which Tseng said is fairly rare in that there’s only been one teacher who has run for the school board in the last 10 years, . “During the pandemic, the teachers union had a lot of publicity in terms of the education and direction,” Tseng said. “Maybe more of the teachers wanted to be a part of the democracy, decision making for the school district.” Most...
    San Jose State’s ambition to honor its “Speed City” legacy with a new track and field facility at the Santa Clara County Fairgrounds got a major boost thanks to $9 million of state funding secured by Assemblyman Ash Kalra. And the university celebrated the good fortune Thursday along with the 54th anniversary of the Olympic victory and Black Power protest by SJSU alums Tommie Smith and John Carlos. “It is important that we celebrate the heroism of John Carlos and Tommie Smith who shined a light on injustices happening at home while in the spotlight of the Olympic stage at great personal sacrifice to themselves,” he said. “The Speed City Legacy Center will be a testament to their sacrifice and an opportunity for future generations to learn from the important stand they took for human rights.” SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 13: Speaking at a press conference near the Tommy Smith and John Carlos statues at San Jose State University, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2022, Assemblymember Ash Kalra announces initial funding for the Speed City Legacy Center and Track and Field...
    Local and international artists teamed up to create 15 ocean-themed murals in Emeryville over the past week. From September 12th to 17th, artists from California, New York, Miami, New Zealand and Greece converged on Emeryville to create art on various giant building walls throughout the city. PangeaSeed Foundation’s global Sea Walls: Artists for Oceans festival was presented by Stasher and Oxford Properties and meant to increase interest and engagement around marine stewardship and action within the community. There was also a film screening and panel talk with the artists at Public Market Emeryville on Friday, a California Coastal Clean-Up on Saturday, and Emeryville Mayor John Bauters led a guided mural tour on Saturday. Here’s a roundup of the mural artists and their work. To learn more about the project and view a map of the murals, click here. • Georgie Nakima  • Sonny Behan   • Steffi Lynn • Evoca1 • Apexer • Felicia Gabaldon • Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya • Kelly Ording • Liv Losee-Unger • Insane 51 • Last Ones Crew • Cracked Ink • Mila Moldenhower •...
    Parking rules might change soon for RV and commercial vehicle owners in Saratoga. Saratoga City Council tasked staff with reworking its local ordinance on parking commercial and recreational vehicles within city limits after the city received 10 complaints in the past two years, saying these vehicles are a safety hazard for drivers. Council didn’t set a timeline for staff to return with a reworked ordinance, intended to clarify what a violation entails. However, in the last two years there have been no reports of accidents or collisions caused by RVs or commercial vehicles, Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Capt. Rich Urena told this newspaper. Saratoga staff said all code complaints are considered significant, especially those that threaten public safety. The current rule states that RVs and commercial vehicles cannot be left for 72 hours or more on commercial streets, or between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. on residential streets. But in most cases, leaving these vehicles parked isn’t considered a code violation because they are not wide or tall enough. Urena said at a council meeting last week that most of...
    You may not know the San Jose Center for Peace and Justice by name. But if you’ve driven past the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Main Library in the past 20 years, you’ve probably seen their volunteers holding signs and asking drivers to “Honk for Peace.” Joan Simon, one of the Peace Center’s volunteer leaders, says weekly demonstrations bring awareness to its mission — and while they’ve gotten a few jeers over the years, most people are supportive as they go by. On Sept. 23, the Peace Center is hoping to draw a larger than normal crowd for its one-hour vigil to end all wars — and not just conflicts between nations, but wars on women or the poor, too. Expect a lot of honking. “Being quiet could be peaceful,” Simon said, “but there needs to be justice as well.” The Peace Center has been working toward both goals since 1957, when it was founded by Barby Ulmer and Dorothy Goble, members of the Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom, along with the Rev. George “Shorty” Collins from Grace...
    ANTIOCHAntioch Vice Mayor Mike Barbanica and Councilwoman Lori Ogorchock have for the second time in six months called for Antioch Mayor Thorpe to resign. The announcement came following the report of a $350,000 settlement in an employment matter involving the now-defunct Los Medanos Healthcare District and its former executive director, who was not named though Thorpe was the last person to serve in that capacity. The council members previously called for his resignation after he was arrested for suspected driving under the influence, a charge in which he has pleaded not guilty. In the latest case, the Contra Costa Board of Supervisors, acting as successor agency for the District, on Aug. 16 unanimously approved the settlement, which had included claims from two former employees of a hostile work environment and sexual harassment. The money will be paid out from the district’s liability insurance carrier, minus a $29,000 deductible from the District’s healthcare fund. According to the settlement, all claims were disputed and the allegations were denied by the county to avoid expenses and inconveniences of further legal proceedings. County counsel...
    For the second time behind closed doors, the Antioch City Council took no action on the hiring of a new permanent city manager. Cornelius “Con” Johnson, a retired San Francisco police lieutenant, has served as the interim city manager since last fall and it was expected the council would either name him to the permanent position on Tuesday or announce a method to conduct a search for the new top city leader. The meeting came two weeks after Mayor Lamar Thorpe called for a special meeting to appoint a permanent manager, noting he was supporting Johnson in that role. The mayor said given the FBI and District Attorney’s investigation into eight police officers – 15% of the force – the city needs to quickly get strong permanent police chief in place, whom the permanent city manager would appoint. “Antioch residents expect to see a city government, which every day, every department is held accountable for their actions,” Thorpe said during the August press conference meeting. “With Mr. Johnson and Dr. Ford at the helm, that is precisely what they will...
    OAKLEYOAKLEY — With only three candidates running for office, including one running unopposed, it’s shaping up to be a quiet city council race for two seats this year in Oakley. This will be the first time residents will cast their votes in district elections after having switched from at-large elections in 2021. Two of the seats are up for election in November. By the filing deadline, only one candidate had qualified for District 4. The council could have appointed a new member, but instead agreed to hold an election, giving write-in candidates a chance to enter the race. Shannon Shaw, a property manager for a senior community, was the only candidate to qualify for District 4, while Hugh Henderson and Rachelle “Shelly” Fitzgerald both qualified in the District 2 race. Shaw is the chairman of the Planning Commission and Henderson is a member. Hugh Henderson, 59, is running for a District 2 seat in the 2022 Oakley City Council election.  Fitzgerald, 51, is running for public offce for the first time, having immersed herself in politics last year, opposing a...
    Springtime in San Jose just got a little more dull, as one of its most colorful and delightful attractions won’t be coming back. Rich Santoro, known to all as “The Bulb Guy” says he’s decided to put away his hoe and will no longer open his backyard garden to visitors. Since 1985, Santoro has planted thousands upon thousands of bulbs — tulips, lilies, irises and more — in the backyard of his home in San Jose’s Berryessa neighborhood. Every year, he would open his gate for about a week to folks, who came daily by the hundreds to enjoy the natural beauty. SAN JOSE, CA – MARCH 22: Various bulbs bloom at Rich Santoro’s backyard garden on March 22, 2019. (Dai Sugano/Bay Area News Group)  “After much consternation and some constipation I’ve decided to hang up my Bulb Guy Cape,” Santoro said, with a bit of humor. “Not an easy decision, as you can imagine.” Now that he’s not digging holes in his spare time, Santoro says he wants to focus on his family and on performing. You may not...
    We can finally start closing the door on summer with the return of the Mountain View Art and Wine Festival, which is going all out to celebrate its 50th anniversary this weekend. The fundraiser for the Mountain View Chamber of Commerce was launched in 1971, and if you’re sitting there doing the math, you’re right that the 50th anniversary came and went. But with the COVID-19 pandemic, last year’s event was reduced in size — though not in fun — and dubbed the 49½ Mountain View Art and Wine Festival. But things are back full speed this year, with the usual food, wine and arts and crafts vendors filling Castro Street on Saturday (11 a.m. to 7 p.m.) and Sunday (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.). The Houserockers will headline the Civic Center Plaza stage Saturday, just one of seven acts playing there through the weekend. There are a few anniversary additions this year, too, including an Italian street painting block party on California Street and a collaborative painting event on Dana Street. Bay Area artist Richard Art Felix will bring...
    By Robert Channick | Chicago Tribune Proposed legislation that would force Big Tech to pay publishers for aggregating news content online stalled in the Judiciary Committee Thursday after an amendment introduced by Sen. Ted Cruz to prohibit censorship “collusion” narrowly passed, sharply dividing the bipartisan sponsors of the bill. “I don’t think we can support this bill anymore,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., a co-sponsor of the bill. “I think the agreement that we had has been blown up.” The Journalism Competition and Preservation Act, which would temporarily exempt newspapers, broadcasters and other publishers from antitrust laws to collectively negotiate an annual fee from Google and Meta/Facebook, will be held over for a future committee hearing to determine if it moves to the Senate floor for a vote. Google and Meta/Facebook, which dominate the nearly $250 billion U.S. digital advertising market, are the only two platforms targeted by the proposed legislation, which seeks to level the online playing field and boost struggling local news media. A Meta spokesperson declined to comment, while a Google spokesperson did not respond to a...
    Did you ever wonder how car manufacturers pick the names for their car and truck models? Related Articles Local News | Me & My Car: Oakland man’s 1941 Chevy Suburban definitely a keeper Local News | Me & My Car: Pleasant Hill owner’s 1938 Dodge coupe nearly all original Local News | Me & My Car: 1980 BMW M1 in Alamo was never legally imported into U.S. Geographic locations, major cities, numbers, letters and made-up words are all considered. Sometimes manufacturers like to connect the new model with a successful model they’re already producing. This issue’s featured car is called a Chevrolet Chevelle, and while there’s no obvious proof, it’s believed by some that the Chevy model name came about because managers thought the smaller, graceful gazelle would tie in with the medium-sized impala, the name used for their very successful model. So it’s said that by combining “Chevrolet” with “gazelle” the new model was called the Chevelle, which turned out to be a good choice. The first generation of Chevelles started in...
    When Neil Farris took over San Jose’s Hijinx Comics in 2010, he couldn’t foresee how much comic books would become an essential cornerstone of the pop culture landscape. “It has been really great seeing comic books evolve from a niche product on the outskirts of the book industry, to a full-fledged mainstream media choice,” he said on Wednesday, the day new comic books are sold and his last behind the counter at Hijinx. After 12 years as its owner, Farris sold the Lincoln Avenue business to Alan Bahr and Phil Schlaefer, who own Heroes and Champions in Sunnyvale. It’s the end of an era for the Willow Glen business, which Mike Gamble opened in 1982 as Mike’s Coliseum. It became Hijinx Comics in 1982 and is now expected to transform again into Heroes and Champions Willow Glen. The new owners plan to spruce things up in the shop but don’t plan to close during the renovation period. “I have known Alan and Phil for decades and am more than confident that they will do a great job moving forward,” said...
    There’ll be lots of cool cars and aircraft on display at Hot San Jose Nights’ 14th annual Airport Day at Reid-Hillview Airport on Saturday. And you can bet that they’ll be cooler than the temperatures, expected to be at least in the 90s. Fortunately, the annual extravaganza featuring classic cars, aircraft and military vehicles will have an early start, with tethered hot-air balloon rides starting before 8 a.m. and display cars arriving after that. If you’ve never been before, the event — produced by Mike and Susan Hennessy — has a little bit of everything, with a remote-control air show, military vehicles, aircraft and lots of hot rods, muscle cars and antique autos. There’s a Battle of the Food Trucks planned, too, with the winner declared by audience acclaim. (Pro tip: If there’s a sno-cone truck there, it’s gonna win.) There’s also live music, courtesy of the San Jose Metropolitan Band — playing in the Trade Winds hangar at 10 a.m. —  and Duke Mantee and the Gold Money Band on the main stage. Vocalist Lauren Halliwell will sing the...
    Redistricting Success The Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, or Midpen, has received kudos from a major statewide agency for its redistricting efforts. The California Special Districts Association awarded the South Bay agency the 2022 Excellence in Technology Award for its ward boundary redistricting project. Throughout the redistricting process, Midpen used interactive mapping tools to help keep residents informed and get public feedback. To view the tools, visit openspace.org/redistricting. Community Give Back Day Oak Meadow Park’s Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad is utilizing the busy summer months at the park to raise funds for local nonprofits through its “Community Give Back Program.” On August 21, the park shared its donations with VIA Services, a longstanding Bay Area nonprofit that helps people with disabilities. The nonprofit is the latest to benefit from the park’s charitable push—Silicon Valley Monterey Bay Boy Scouts Council 055 and Hope Services have previously been chosen. Health fair for all ages The Saratoga Area Senior Coordinating Council and Counseling and Support Services for Youth are hosting a health fair for all ages at Los Gatos High School next...
    While the San Jose Sharks have never won the Stanley Cup, one of their former coaches will be bringing the famous silver trophy home to the South Bay for a day. Brett Heimlich, who worked with the Sharks for nine years, helped the Colorado Avalanche win the Hockey Championship last June. And — per tradition — each member of the winning team gets 24 hours with the historic trophy. Heimlich chose to spend his day with the 35-and-a-quarter-inch-high cup hosting a private victory party on Sept. 4 at his parents’ home in Los Gatos where he grew up. “It’s the same Stanley Cup that Wayne Gretski’s touched, Lou Robinson’s touched, some of the greats. It’s the same exact trophy,” Heimlich said. “My name will be on it. It’s an honor to be a part of it. It’s still surreal, it’s still sinking in.” The cup will fly in that Sunday morning from Southern California after spending the previous night with one of the players. Heimlich said he already has plans to serve popcorn and a batch of margaritas out of the...
    By Robert Channick Chicago Tribune The newspaper industry, which has been struggling with deep ad revenue declines in the digital age, is backing proposed legislation that would force Big Tech to pay publishers for aggregating their news stories online. The Journalism Competition and Preservation Act seeks to level the playing field by allowing local newspapers, broadcasters and other online publishers to negotiate collectively for an annual content fee from Google and Meta/Facebook, which dominate the digital advertising market. The full text of the Senate bill, released Monday, cites a power imbalance that has benefited Big Tech at the expense of the shrinking newspaper industry, which has lost thousands of publications and tens of thousands of journalists during the new millennium, creating local “news deserts” across the U.S. The proposed legislation would both recapture digital revenue and incentivize local news publishers to hire more journalists. “There is a ton of revenue that the platforms receive from our content that is not paid back to news publishers,” said Danielle Coffey, executive vice president and general counsel of the News Media Alliance, a...
    Water Summit The Santa Clara Valley Water District, also known as Valley Water, is hosting a “Water Summit” on Friday, Aug. 26. The event will focus on the state of water — or lack thereof — in the Bay Area. Several groups including the San Jose Chamber of Commerce and Sustainable Silicon Valley, collaborated to put it on. The event runs from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Santa Clara Convention Center, located at 5001 Great America Parkway in Santa Clara. Attendees will have the option to attend in-person or tune in via Zoom. To register for the free event, visit https://delivr.com/2y2zw. New Bevmo! location opens The Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce is celebrating the newest location of Bay Area-headquartered liquor retail giant Bevmo! to the town. Vice Mayor Maria Ristow will perform a ribbon cutting at the new location—636 Blossom Hill Rd.—on Monday, Aug. 29, at 10 a.m. Environmental Summit Santa Clara County is hosting an Environmental Summit in the South Bay on Sept. 10, with keynote speakers Nancy Pelosi and Nuria Fernandez, to discuss green transportation and...
    Don’t be surprised if you see quite a few uniforms around San Jose over the next few days as Navy Week has come to the city for the first time. The Navy Band Southwest Woodwind Quintet publicly kicked things off by performing for shoppers and diners at Santana Row on Monday night in their summer whites. But earlier in the day, another contingent of naval personnel — sans instruments — volunteered at Second Harvest Food Bank. SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 15: Teresa Perrin, right, of San Antonio, Texas, plays the flute with Justin Laukat, of Draper, Utah, who plays the clarinet for the US Navy Band Southwest Woodwind Quintet at Santana Row’s Valencia Plaza in San Jose, Calif., on Monday, August 15, 2022. The quintet played two 45-minute sets to to help kick off Navy Week in San Jose. (Shae Hammond/Bay Area News Group)  More than 75 sailors, led by Rear Adm. Anne Swap, will be part of events throughout the city and elsewhere in the Bay Area. They’ll help Turning Wheels for Kids with bike repairs, work at...
    The Campbell-based Los Gatos Therapy Center opened the South Bay’s first and only residential eating disorder treatment center for teenagers earlier this month after seeing a spike in local cases. The center, located in San Jose, can accommodate six teens who need extra monitoring and support while they heal from their eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia and binge eating. Eating disorders “have been an issue for a long time, but I feel like with COVID, it was really a catalyst for a lot of kids and adults to get confronted with what already has been happening with them,” program director Azhar Sultanova said. “That’s when we’ve seen a huge increase in people actually realizing that they need help and asking for that help.” There have been similar increases nationwide. Emergency department visits for teenage girls dealing with eating disorders doubled nationwide during the pandemic, according to a study published earlier this year from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Teen rates of anxiety and depression are on the rise as well. During lockdown, Sultanova said, it was harder for...
    Awareness and preparedness are the Oakland Firesafe Council’s top priorities when it comes to keeping the city’s approximately 452,000 residents safe during emergencies. Related Articles Local News | Piano great Dick Hyman comes to Stanford Jazz Fest with an old friend The nonprofit founded in 2014 by Sue Piper and Ken and Dinah Benson to protect local residents and business owners during wildfires and other emergencies continues to be powered by a small band of volunteers. Location-specific programs, workshops, neighborhood projects, community town halls, partnerships with the city of Oakland, homeowner associations and other emergency preparedness organizations have resulted in a resource-rich, impressively informative website (oaklandfiresafecouncil.org) and other achievements. Among the landmark strides made recently are the establishment of the Oakland Community Preparedness & Response (OCP&R) program and certification as Oakland’s first Firewise USA Recognized Community. Doug Mosher is a 21-year resident of Montclair, an OCP&R program manager and is active on the Oakland Firesafe Council (OFC). “Firewise certification is very important,” said Mosher, 63, who owns tech company SeniorFusion.org. “Wildfire is most often in Oakland associated with the...
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