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    Robert F. Kennedy’s grandson and New York native Conor Kennedy, spent time fighting in Ukraine, the 28-year-old revealed on Instagram. In the Friday, Oct. 14 post, Kennedy, a former resident of Bedford in Northern Westchester County, revealed that he secretly fought as part of Ukraine’s International Legion, a branch of foreign volunteers from around the world helping in the country’s ongoing war against Russia. Accompanying the post is a picture of a fellow fighter, whom Kennedy identified only as Nick. “Like many people, I was deeply moved by what I saw happening in Ukraine over the past year,” he said. “I wanted to help.” As soon as he found out about the International Legion, Kennedy went to the embassy to enlist the following day, he said. Not wanting to draw attention to himself, Kennedy said he only told one person where he was, and only revealed his real name to one person while in Ukraine. “I didn’t want my family or friends to worry, and I didn’t want to be treated differently there,” he wrote. Kennedy added that he...
    Connor Kennedy, 28, revealed on Instagram that he fought in Ukraine earlier this year Robert F. Kennedy's grandson, Connor, has revealed he secretly fought in Ukraine earlier this year despite having no military experience.  In an Instagram post, Connor, 28, said he was 'moved' to enlist in the Ukrainian International Legion - a branch of foreign volunteers - earlier this year after the Ukrainian forces made a desperate plea for help.  He didn't say when he fought, nor did he specify how long he was there, but he said he 'liked being a soldier' more than he'd expected.    'I wanted to help. When I heard about Ukraine’s International Legion, I knew I was going, and I went to the embassy to enlist the next day.  'I told one person here where I was, and I told one person there my real name.  'I didn’t want my family or friends to worry, and I didn’t want to be treated differently there. 'Going in, I had no prior military experience and wasn’t a great shot, but I could carry heavy things...
    Ukraine has destroyed the headquarters of Russia's shadowy Wagner mercenary group in Donbas after a war propagandist gave away its location online.  Sergei Sreda, a so-called 'war reporter', posted pictures online last week of himself at the base - in the city of Popasna - and shaking hands with a man who appeared to be Yevgeny Prigozhin, the oligarch dubbed 'Putin's chef' who owns Wagner. But the pictures also included details - such as the address of a nearby bomb shelter - that allowed experts to quickly pinpoint its location. On Sunday, Russian Telegram channels with links to Wagner confirmed it had been hit. 
    One of Vladimir Putin's closest cronies claims Russia could destroy all NATO countries 'in half a hour'. Dmitry Rogozin, head of the Kremlin's space agency, Roscosmos, also admitted the strongman's aim is to defeat the 'enemy' West and expunge Ukraine from the map. 'NATO is waging a war against us,' said the former deputy premier of the 30-state Western military alliance. 'They didn't announce it, but that doesn't change anything. Now it's obvious to everyone.' The hardliner, 58, said: 'In a nuclear war, NATO countries will be destroyed by us in half an hour. 'But we must not allow it, because the consequences of the exchange of nuclear strikes will affect the state of our Earth. 'Therefore, we will have to defeat this economically and militarily more powerful enemy with conventional armed means.' He hinted that Putin would put Russia on a war footing amid speculation that a mass mobilisation is on the cards to bolster his flagging war effort. 'Such a victory is possible with the full solidarity of the whole country with the army, the mobilisation of the...
    I DON’T keep a journal, but when something remarkable happens, I make a point of writing it down in the back of my diary. Sometimes that is once a month. Sometimes it’s once a year. 6President Zelensky's speech to Parliament was truly remarkableCredit: EPA I had one of those moments last week when, in my role as a member of the House of Lords, I was invited to the Commons to watch Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s historic address. All business in both houses stopped so we could hear him speak, and translation was provided. And it was truly remarkable. As I waited for the address to start, I sat chatting to Lord Fellowes (who wrote Downton Abbey and the fantastic new Sky series The Gilded Age). It no doubt struck us both that we were chatting about such ordinary things when everything in the world seems so far from ordinary at the moment My first impression was that the poor man looked exhausted. Zelensky said he hadn’t slept and it showed. READ MORE KARREN BRADYKarren Brady Barring Russian sport won’t...
    Russian gymnast Ivan Kuliak says he has no regrets over wearing a symbol in support of the invasion of Ukraine on the podium following a World Cup event in Doha on Saturday. Kuliak attached a letter 'Z' to his chest before receiving his bronze medal in the parallel bars, an event won by Ukraine's Illia Kovtun.  The letter has been seen daubed on the sides of Russian tanks, and has come to be regarded as a sign of support for the invasion. The 20-year-old's move was condemned as 'shocking behaviour' by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG), which has asked its Gymnastics Ethics Foundation to launch an investigation. But Kuliak, who faces the prospect of a lengthy ban, was unrepentant on Tuesday, telling Russia Today: 'If there was a second chance and I had a choice whether to go out with the letter "Z" on my chest or not, I would do the same. 'I saw it on our military and looked at what this symbol means. It turned out to be "for victory" and "for peace". I just wanted to...
    Ukraine's ambassador to the United Nations on Monday read out what he aid were the final text messages from a Russian soldier to his mother - describing his horror at the unfolding war before he was killed. It came during an emergency session of the United Nations General Assembly to discuss the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Ukraine's representative, Sergiy Kyslytsya, made an impassioned plea for help, holding up a screenshot of the soldier's texts.      'Mom I'm no longer in Crimea,' they began. 'I'm not in training sessions.' His mother asks: 'Where are you then? Papa is asking whether I can send you a parcel.' 'What kind of a parcel mama can you send me,' he responds 'What are you talking about? What happened?' 'Mama, I'm in Ukraine,' he responds, before describing the horror unfolding. 'There is a real war raging here. I'm afraid. We are bombing all of the cities together, even targeting civilians.  'We were told that they would welcome us and they are falling under our armored vehicles, throwing themselves under the wheels and not allowing us to pass. ...
    I was in Eastern Europe in 1989, reporting on the revolutions that overthrew the ossified communist dictatorships that led to the collapse of the Soviet Union. It was a time of hope. NATO, with the breakup of the Soviet empire, became obsolete. President Mikhail Gorbachev reached out to Washington and Europe to build a new security pact that would include Russia. Secretary of State James Baker, along with West German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher, assured the Soviet leader that if Germany were unified NATO would not be extended beyond the new borders. The commitment not to expand NATO, also made by Britain and France, appeared to herald a new global order. We saw the peace dividend dangled before us, the promise that the massive expenditures on weapons that had characterized the Cold War would be converted into expenditures on social programs and infrastructures that had long been neglected to feed the insatiable appetite of the military. This article originally appeared at ScheerPost. There was a near universal understanding among diplomats and political leaders at the time that...
    Embattled GOP Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger shared a chilling warning on Monday night, claiming he believes the United States could be on the brink of civil war.  He added that it would be 'naive to think it's not possible' after his own national party rebuked him and Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel branded the violent events of January 6 last year as 'legitimate political discourse.' The Illinois lawmaker joined CNN's Situation Room after he was formally censured Friday by the Republican National Committee along with Rep. Liz Cheney over their work on the Democrat-led House select committee Capitol riot probe.  Despite being one of the most vocal members of Congress about the insurrection, Kinzinger suggested he understood the anger coming from people who genuinely believed the 2020 election was rigged -- but that the tension could conceivably spill into violence.     Kinzinger explained the rioters -- specifically one man captured on video wishing to drag lawmakers 'through the streets' and 'cut their head off' because he believed they were certifying a false electoral victory -- probably 'really believes what he's saying' about election...
    The notion that there is a far-reaching “War on Christmas” is ludicrous. But that doesn’t stop Fox News and other right-wing media outlets from promoting the nonsense claim that liberals and progressives are out to destroy Christmas as we know it. Daniel N. Gullotta, a religious scholar at Stanford University, addresses the “War on Christmas” theme in an article published by the conservative website The Bulwark on December 20 — and stresses that when there really was a “War on Christmas” in the past, it didn’t come from liberals. Gullotta points out that centuries ago, the “War on Christmas” came from severe Christian fundamentalists. “The ‘war on Christmas’ has become as much a part of the annual tradition in America as the tree, the tinsel, and the tracking of Santa on NORAD,” Gullotta observes. “The incidents that seem to rile people up, from workers saying ‘happy holidays’ instead of ‘merry Christmas’ to winter-but-not-quite-Christmas-themed Starbucks cups, while cringe-inducing, are largely harmless nontroversies.” "As strange as it might sound, the original \u201cwar on Christmas\u201d was among Christians."\n\nCheck out my last guest essay...
    Craig Whitlock’s The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War is a hallmark achievement of primary source reporting. It gathers interviews, documents, memos, and cables to tell the story of U.S. involvement in Afghanistan in the words of those in charge of the war, who tried, who failed. This book indicts the mission we sent our men and women to accomplish, in retaliation for what happened 20 years ago. It lays out how our efforts began with patriotic resolve and became a failure in planning, strategy, commitment, and imagination. An investigative reporter for the Washington Post, Whitlock wrote the book assisted by a team of Post reporters and others, first for a 2019 series at the Post. Much of the material was gathered through lawsuits and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to access thousands of government documents, creating this comprehensive account of deception and delusion. “The gold standard are these public records and documents. This is exactly what we’re reaching for—records that haven’t been made public before, that are revelatory. That’s the whole point when you’re an...
    A TALIBAN leader has said there’s “no proof” Osama bin Laden was behind 9/11 – despite the al-Qaeda leader admitting responsibility. Zabihullah Mujahid claimed the US blamed bin Laden as an “excuse” to invade Afghanistan in order to hunt the terror mastermind in the wake of the attacks. 3Osama bin Laden admitted responsibility for the 9/11 attacksCredit: Alamy 3The attacks claimed the lives of nearly 3000 peopleCredit: Getty Al-Qaeda forged close alliance with the Taliban when the fanatics last ruled Afghanistan, which they used as base for launching a series of terror attacks on US targets, culminating in the September 11 onslaught. The Taliban refused an American demand to handover bin Laden, prompting US forces to enter Afghanistan and drive them from power with the help of the Northern Alliance of local warlords. Mujahid has promised that Afghanistan will no longer be a safe haven for terrorists but has also insisted bin Laden had no involvement with 9/11. “When Osama Bin Laden became an issue for the Americans, he was in Afghanistan,” he told NBC News “Although there was no...
    A Taliban spokesperson says there's no proof Al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden was behind the various attacks against the US on September 11, adding that the US used him as an 'excuse' to invade Afghanistan in 2001.    'When Osama Bin Laden became an issue for the Americans, he was in Afghanistan,' said Zabihullah Mujahid in an interview aired on NBC Nightly News Wednesday in which he promised the country will no longer be a safe haven for terrorists. 'Although there was no proof he was involved, now we have given promises that Afghan soil won't be used against anyone.' Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid made the comments on NBC Nightly News Wednesday As the Afghanistan evacuation speeds up, @RichardEngel presses a Taliban spokesperson over their claims that things will be different. pic.twitter.com/Gy7Rj4R7U4— NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt (@NBCNightlyNews) August 25, 2021 Al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden admitted to planning the September 11 attacks in a 2004 taped statement, but a Taliban spokesman says there's 'no proof' he was behind the attacks  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    A debate over the meaning of the U.S. national anthem's obscure third stanza is swirling once again, after Olympic hammer thrower Gwen Berry slammed the lyrics as blatantly racist.  The controversy relates to the phrase 'hireling and slave' in the third stanza, which is never sung in practice. Historians for years have debated whether author Francis Scott Key intended the words as an insult to British troops generally, or as a specific comment on formerly enslaved persons fighting for the British in the War of 1812. In an interview on Tuesday, Berry responded backlash over to her response to the anthem at the Olympic trials in Oregon, where she turned her back on the U.S. flag and draped a T-shirt over her head as the anthem played.  Berry insisted that she does not hate America and does want to represent the country at the Games in Tokyo, but said she had a specific problem with the Star-Spangled Banner.  'If you know your history, you know the full song of the National Anthem, the third paragraph speaks to slaves in America,...
    Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on Sunday said the U.S. may have been too trusting of the Chinese government in the beginning days of the COVID-19 pandemic. “Were [U.S. officials] too accommodating of China, in the sense that early on we were told the Chinese are on top of it? I can't imagine during the Cold War, U.S. government ever saying ‘well the Russians have told us they're on the case, everything's fine.’ Were we too trusting of the Chinese?” Host John Dickerson asked Rice on CBS's "Face the Nation."  “That's a really good point, John,” Rice said, adding “maybe there was a little bit too much of trusting of the Chinese.” She said former President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump touts record, blasts Dems in return to stage Trump demands China pay 'reparations' for role in coronavirus pandemic Trump endorses Rep. Ted Budd for Senate MORE’s decision to enact border closures and travel restrictions with China in the beginning days of the pandemic was “incredibly appropriate.” “I think there were even those who said that President Trump's early decisions about border closures and travel...
    The first time there was war in Syria, ten years ago
    CAPITOL rioters reportedly came "prepared for war," but there was no FBI warning about the coordinated attack, the police chief said. Testifying publicly for the first time about the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol, former security officials say that bad intelligence was to blame for the disastrous failure to anticipate the violent intentions of the mob. 1Former US Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund testifies before the SenateCredit: EPA They say that left them unprepared for the attack that was unlike anything they had ever seen before. The officials, including the former chief of the Capitol Police, are blaming other federal agencies — and each other — for their failure to defend the building. Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund described a scene that was “like nothing” he had seen in his 30 years of policing. “When the group arrived at the perimeter, they did not act like any group of protestors I had ever seen,” the ousted chief said, arguing that the insurrection was not the result of poor planning but of failures across the board from many...
    Pfizer submitted to the FDA for emergency approval on November 23. This is how many people have died since then from COVID A Johns Hopkins professor has slammed the FDA for taking so long to review the Pfizer vaccine while thousands of Americans continue to die from COVID.  Pfizer announced in early November that its vaccine was effective after a widespread global trial involving 44,000 volunteers,  It submitted its findings to the FDA for approval on November 23 but has still not been approved. Since then, 34,000 Americans have died from the virus.  Writing for Med Page Today on Thursday, Martin Makary MD said there was no reason for the delay.  'There's a war on, but you'd never know it from the agency's weeks-long review.  'We are in a health emergency. The U.S. will soon exceed 3,000 deaths per day from COVID-19 and in the time that the FDA has been reviewing the vaccine trial data, some 35,000 people will have died in the U.S. from the virus.  'That's more Americans than died during the Iraq and...
    THE first trailer for His Dark Materials season two has warned of the 'greatest war there ever was' as the hunt for Lyra rages on. The hit HBO and BBC series returns next month, and the trailer teases an all mighty clash between those protecting Lyra and her friend Will Parry, and Lord Boreal and the Magisterium. 7The 'greatest war that ever was' has been teased in the trailer for season two of His Dark Materials Lyra is crucial to the 'prophecy' mentioned by her evil mother Marisa Coulter, who says: "The world’s changing. We’ve all sensed it. The prophecy is clear.” Thankfully, Lyra has the support of a group of witches, who pledge to protect her and say: "The child will bring the end of the great war." Dafne Keen reprises her role as Lyra, as does Ruth Wilson as Marisa and Lin-Manuel Miranda as Lee Scoresby. Joining the cast for season two is Fleabag's 'hot priest' Andrew Scott, who plays Will's dad John Parry. 7The hunt for Lyra is on 7Her sinister mother Marisa Coulter is determined...
    JERUSALEM (AP) — For the first time in more than a quarter-century, a U.S. president will host a signing ceremony between Israelis and Arabs at the White House, billing it as an “historic breakthrough” in a region long known for its stubborn conflicts. But while the optics of Tuesday’s event will evoke the groundbreaking agreements that ended decades of war between Israel and neighboring Egypt and Jordan, and that launched the peace process with the Palestinians, the reality is quite different. The United Arab Emirates will establish diplomatic relations with Israel, a fellow U.S. ally it has never gone to war with, formalizing ties that go back several years. The agreement cements an informal alliance against Iran and could pave the way for the UAE to acquire advanced U.S. weapons, while leaving the far more contentious Israeli-Palestinian conflict as intractable as ever. That hasn’t stopped President Donald Trump from referring to the UAE deal, which was announced last month, as heralding a “previously unthinkable regional transformation.” A similar agreement announced Friday with Bahrain, which welcomed a visiting Israeli Cabinet minister...
    A former Imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan has predicted there WON'T be a race war in America because the power of the Black Lives Matter and Antifa movements is 'nothing'. Bill Wilkinson, 77, from Denham, Louisiana – once the most powerful white supremacist in the world - told DailyMail.com: 'They don't have a pot to p**s in or a window to throw it out of, they're nothing. There won't be a race war, they've just got nothing better to do.' The white supremacist's comments come as President Donald Trump slammed the chairman of Black Lives Matter's New York chapter Hawk Newsome for threatening to 'burn down this system' unless the United States changes its ways. Trump labeled the comments 'treason, sedition, insurrection' in a tweet Thursday.  Bill Wilkinson, 77, from Denham, Louisiana was once the most powerful white supremacist in the world known as the Imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan The white supremacist's comments come as President Donald Trump slammed the chairman of Black Lives Matter's New York chapter Hawk Newsome, Chairman...
    New York Times writer and opinion editor Bari Weiss offered insight about the internal battle among her colleagues following the publishing of an op-ed written by Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark that sparked a major backlash from its own staff. Hours before the Times offered a mea culpa for running Cotton's piece that called for the troops to be sent in to quell the George Floyd riots, Weiss claimed that a "civil war" was brewing within the paper "The civil war inside The New York Times between the (mostly young) wokes the (mostly 40+) liberals is the same one raging inside other publications and companies across the country. The dynamic is always the same," Weiss began a thread on Twitter. "The Old Guard lives by a set of principles we can broadly call civil libertarianism. They assumed they shared that worldview with the young people they hired who called themselves liberals and progressives. But it was an incorrect assumption." NY TIMES ISSUES 'MEA CULPA,' SAYS TOM COTTON OP-ED ON GEORGE FLOYD RIOTS 'RUSHED,' FAILED TO MEET STANDARDS  She continued, "The New...
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