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    By DON THOMPSON SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — More than half of substantiated California child abuse reports in recent years were not in the state’s database, which could result in child abusers being allowed to care for children, state auditors said Tuesday. The unreliability of the database “puts children at risk,” auditors said. The database is used by state and county social services and welfare departments, adoption agencies, medical workers treating possible victims of child abuse, agencies conducting background investigations of applicants for law enforcement jobs, and agencies conducting background investigations on those who want to work or volunteer in positions that would give them access to children, like day care centers or group homes. But the flaws in the database mean those agencies “cannot depend on the database to help protect children,” Acting California State Auditor Michael Tilden said in an opening letter to the governor and legislative leaders. The state’s Child Abuse Central Index, run by the state Department of Justice, contains more than 25,000 reports of sexual and physical abuse and neglect that are backed by county records....
    CHICAGO (CBS) — After court battles and calls for transparency, Mayor Lori Lightfoot and city aldermen have reached a deal to create a new public database of Chicago police officer misconduct files. The database, to be created and maintained by Inspector General Joseph Ferguson’s office, would include both sustained and dismissed misconduct complaints, dating back to the year 2000. READ MORE: Getting Hosed: City Offers 91-Year-Old Retired CPS Teacher A "Payment Plan" For A $57,000 Water Bill Originally, the ordinance proposed by Finance Committee chairman Ald. Scott Waguespack (32nd) and Public Safety Committee chairman Chris Taliaferro (29th) would have required the database include all closed misconduct files dating back to 1994, but the aldermen agreed to a compromise. “This database is long overdue, and I thank Mayor Lightfoot and Chairman Taliaferro for their leadership and support on this important issue,” Waguespack said in a statement Wednesday morning. “Shining a light on police misconduct and the consequences is always the right decision. This ordinance aims to build upon the accountability and transparency that Chicago deserves.” Lightfoot opposed the original plan, arguing...
    by Todd Feurer and Dana Kozlov CHICAGO (CBS) — An effort to create a public database of decades-worth of Chicago Police Department misconduct files stalled on Friday, amid questions from several aldermen about how much the project would cost, clearly frustrating the city’s top watchdog, who criticized “ridiculous numbers that have been put out there.” READ MORE: FBI Interviewed Indianapolis FedEx Shooting Suspect Brandon Scott Hole Last Year Mayor Lori Lightfoot has said she opposes the current plan for Inspector General Joseph Ferguson’s office to establish a database of closed CPD misconduct files dating back as far as 1994, arguing it would cost tens of millions of dollars. Although Ferguson did not call out Lightfoot specifically during a public hearing on the proposed database, he was clearly frustrated after several aldermen raised questions about the costs, even after a top deputy in his office told them the project would cost about $2 million over five years. “There’s some ridiculous numbers that have been put out there previously with no substantiation, no analysis, no information, just wild numbers,” Ferguson said. When...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – After a recent appeals court decision, some disciplinary records of New York City police officers have been released online and are searchable by anyone. Some argue the database doesn’t post all the information owed to the public. READ MORE: Expert: Bidens American Rescue Plan Could Make Historic Impact On Child Poverty As of Monday, you can search NYPD officer records online. Just type in the officer’s name to see disciplinary history, a training summary and awards, among other categories. To do so, CLICK HERE. “When they have a police officer and they respond and they want to know, you know, get a sense of who that person is, now they have a way to do it,” said Chuck Wexler, executive director of Police Executive Research Forum, an independent, nonprofit police think tank in Washington, D.C “This goes a long way. There’s not many departments that have taken on this,” Wexler said. But New York Civil Liberties Union Director Donna Lieberman says it doesn’t go far enough since it only shows matters that resulted in a guilty finding...
    By MICHAEL R. SISAK, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Disciplinary records of New York City police officers are now a matter of public record — but critics say officials are still keeping the vast majority of misconduct hidden. The NYPD, acting Monday on a recent appeals court decision, posted a long-awaited online database of officer disciplinary histories, as well as decisions from the department’s internal disciplinary hearing process. The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals last month lifted a temporary restraining order that paused the release of disciplinary records while public safety unions sued to block the city from posting them online. The lawsuit, filed after state lawmakers last June reversed a law that kept disciplinary records secret for decades, is still pending. The appeals court, in its ruling, said it wouldn’t keep the public waiting any longer. The NYPD’s disclosures came days after the city’s police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, posted a database of complaints it's received about officers. Advocates criticized the NYPD for limiting its disclosures to matters that resulted in a guilty finding by...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Disciplinary records of New York City police officers are now a matter of public record — but critics say officials are still keeping the vast majority of misconduct hidden. The NYPD, acting Monday on a recent appeals court decision, posted a long-awaited online database of officer disciplinary histories, as well as decisions from the department’s internal disciplinary hearing process. The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals last month lifted a temporary restraining order that paused the release of disciplinary records while public safety unions sued to block the city from posting them online. The lawsuit, filed after state lawmakers last June reversed a law that kept disciplinary records secret for decades, is still pending. The appeals court, in its ruling, said it wouldn’t keep the public waiting any longer. The NYPD’s disclosures came days after the city’s police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, posted a database of complaints it’s received about officers. Advocates criticized the NYPD for limiting its disclosures to matters that resulted in a guilty finding by the police commissioner, which they said...
    A massive trove of disciplinary records on NYPD police officers is expected to be made public on Thursday. The digital database is expected to include all misconduct complaints from the Civilian Complaint Review Board against all current officers and their dispositions. A CCRB source told The Post it was slated to go live by the early afternoon. Mayor Bill de Blasio confirmed during his daily press conference the database would be public by the end of this week following a final clarification by the Second Circuit of Appeals, lifting the stay on the records late Wednesday. De Blasio announced the publication of the database last June following the repeal of the state secrecy law 50a, but the project was stalled due to a months-long court battle with the police unions. The legal challenge ended last month when a federal panel of three appeals judges ruled the unions’ arguments were “without merit.” During that process, the NYCLU obtained and published its own searchable database with 323,911 “unique complaint records” involving nearly 82,000 active and former cops.
    HOME Office officials have blamed 'housekeeping processes' after 400,000 fingerprint, DNA and arrest records were lost in an unprecedented technical blunder. Cops and officials are scrambling to recover the data - but there are fears it has been permanently erased. 5Some 400,000 fingerprint, DNA and arrest records have been lost from a police database 5It's been claimed by a former police chief that fiasco may compromise public safetyCredit: PA:Press Association A statement from Crime and Policing Minister @kitmalthouse on the Police National Computer. pic.twitter.com/tYgmMtn21d— Home Office (@ukhomeoffice) January 16, 2021 The vital records were wiped from the national police database during a weekly data purge. The issue has thrown the UK visa system into chaos, while there are fears some criminals could walk free because biometric evidence left at crime scenes will not be flagged up. Policing Minister Kit Malthouse has admitted that he's "not entirely sure" if the mistake was having an effect on policework. But Naveed Malik, of the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), says cops are already aware of a investigation which has been "potentially impeded" by...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – San Francisco Public Defender Mano Raju on Wednesday unveiled his office’s new data collection tool CopWatch SF, which contains a list of local police officers and their publicly available records, including complaints, lawsuits and news articles. According to Raju, the database was previously used by public defenders but is now available to the public through a new law, 2019’s Senate Bill 1421. The law makes some records public around individual officers’ conduct, including whether they’ve been involved in an officer-involved shooting and complaints of sexual assault or use of force that resulted in bodily injury. So far, the database includes records of more than 2,000 active San Francisco Police Department officers, gathered from the police department, the Department of Police Accountability, the District Attorney’s Office, and the San Francisco Police Commission, Raju said. “This database was designed by our Integrity Unit to shine a light on police conduct and encourage greater accountability. Everything included is available publicly, but nowhere else is it consolidated into an easily searchable online resource,” Raju said in a statement. “We...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — A key mayoral ally has introduced an ordinance that would require the city to set up a public database of Chicago Police Department misconduct files, nearly two months after progressive aldermen balked at a proposed settlement of a lawsuit that sought to force CPD to release decades’ worth of misconduct reports. Ald. Scott Waguespack (32nd), who chairs the City Council Finance Committee, introduced the proposal to require the Inspector General’s office to create “a user friendly, publicly accessible and searchable digital repository” of CPD’s closed misconduct complaints. CPD, the Civilian Office of Police Accountability, and the Chicago Police Board would be required to provide the Inspector General’s office with access to all relevant records, although the ordinance does not lay out a specific timeline for releasing those records through the database that would be established. The Inspector General’s office would also be required to provide semiannual reports to the Public Safety and Finance committees on the city’s progress toward releasing those misconduct records. The proposal from Waguespack comes after a proposal to settle a lawsuit that sought...
    NEW YORK - Days after a federal judge paused the public release of New York City police disciplinary records, a news website has published a database containing complaint information for thousands of officers. ProPublica posted the database Sunday, explaining in a note to readers that it isn't obligated to comply with Judge Katherine Polk Failla's temporary restraining order because it is not a party to a union lawsuit challenging the release of such records. Deputy Managing Editor Eric Umansky said ProPublica requested the information from the city's police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, soon after last month's repeal of state law that for decades had prevented the disclosure of disciplinary records. Unions representing police officers and other public safety workers sued the city on July 15 to block Mayor Bill de Blasio from making good on a pledge to start posting misconduct complaints on a government website. The unions argue that allowing the public to see unproven or false complaints could sully officers' reputations and compromise their safety. A state judge who first handled the case had...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Days after a federal judge paused the public release of New York City police disciplinary records, a news website has published a database containing complaint information for thousands of officers. ProPublica posted the database Sunday, explaining in a note to readers that it isn’t obligated to comply with Judge Katherine Polk Failla’s temporary restraining order because it is not a party to a union lawsuit challenging the release of such records. Deputy Managing Editor Eric Umansky said ProPublica requested the information from the city’s police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, soon after last month’s repeal of state law that for decades had prevented the disclosure of disciplinary records. Unions representing police officers and other public safety workers sued the city on July 15 to block Mayor Bill de Blasio from making good on a pledge to start posting misconduct complaints on a government website. The unions argue that allowing the public to see unproven or false complaints could sully officers’ reputations and compromise their safety. A state judge who first handled the case had...
    Days after a federal judge paused the public release of New York City police disciplinary records, a news website has published a database containing complaint information for thousands of officers. ProPublica posted the database Sunday, explaining in a note to readers that it isnt obligated to comply with Judge Katherine Polk Faillas temporary restraining order because it is not a party to a union lawsuit challenging the release of such records. Deputy Managing Editor Eric Umansky said ProPublica requested the information from the city’s police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, soon after last months repeal of state law that for decades had prevented the disclosure of disciplinary records. Unions representing police officers and other public safety workers sued the city on July 15 to block Mayor Bill de Blasio from making good on a pledge to start posting misconduct complaints on a government website. The unions argue that allowing the public to see unproven or false complaints could sully officers’ reputations and compromise their safety. A state judge who first handled the case had issued a narrower restraining...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Days after a federal judge paused the public release of New York City police disciplinary records, a news website has published a database containing complaint information for thousands of officers. ProPublica posted the database Sunday, explaining in a note to readers that it isn’t obligated to comply with Judge Katherine Polk Failla’s temporary restraining order because it is not a party to a union lawsuit challenging the release of such records. Deputy Managing Editor Eric Umansky said ProPublica requested the information from the city’s police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, soon after last month’s repeal of state law that for decades had prevented the disclosure of disciplinary records. Unions representing police officers and other public safety workers sued the city on July 15 to block Mayor Bill de Blasio from making good on a pledge to start posting misconduct complaints on a government website. The unions argue that allowing the public to see unproven or false complaints could sully officers’ reputations and compromise their safety. A state judge who first handled the case had...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Days after a federal judge paused the public release of New York City police disciplinary records, a news website has published a database containing complaint information for thousands of officers. ProPublica posted the database Sunday, explaining in a note to readers that it isn't obligated to comply with Judge Katherine Polk Failla's temporary restraining order because it is not a party to a union lawsuit challenging the release of such records. Deputy Managing Editor Eric Umansky said ProPublica requested the information from the city’s police watchdog agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, soon after last month's repeal of state law that for decades had prevented the disclosure of disciplinary records. Unions representing police officers and other public safety workers sued the city on July 15 to block Mayor Bill de Blasio from making good on a pledge to start posting misconduct complaints on a government website. The unions argue that allowing the public to see unproven or false complaints could sully officers’ reputations and compromise their safety. A state judge who first handled the case had...
    NYPD members’ disciplinary records will be published in a public database, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday — in what he called a “massive” measure to peel back the curtain and shine more light on the department. First the city will publish trial details and information on the 1,100 pending internal cases, which are prosecuted by the department’s oversight agency, the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the mayor said. “We’re going to start a massive effort to make public information regarding complete discipline,” de Blasio said. “This is historic because it will cover every active member of the police force, all records, all records for every active member available in one place, online publicly.” The “long-term” plan is for the NYPD to publish a database of all current and former cops discipline. That effort will start over the next few weeks — but officials couldn’t say how long it would take to compile the data. “We’ll get you constant updates on the timing,” the mayor responded when asked about the release time. “The point is that I want you know everything...
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