Web Analytics Made Easy - Statcounter
Sunday, Jan 29, 2023 - 04:06:16
72 results - (0.008 seconds)

It’s like a virus:

latest news at page 1:
12
    An outbreak of student-led protests across China has sent a sharp message to Chinese General Secretary Xi Jinping and the broader population, according to analysts and some dissidents. “We haven't seen that since 1989,” said American Enterprise Institute nonresident fellow Michael Mazza, referring to the Tiananmen Square protests. “The fact that this could happen in an environment in which the tools of government surveillance and control are so much more pervasive and effective than they were in 1989 is a really striking and really interesting development.” CHINA INTENSIFIES CENSORSHIP IN RESPONSE TO 'ZERO-COVID' PROTESTS, LEAKED DIRECTIVES SHOW Those surveillance mechanisms also allowed Chinese security forces to identify many of the protesters, easing the regime’s task of deterring additional displays. Yet Xi seems to have recognized the need for a course correction, judging from leaks from his meeting on Friday with European Council President Charles Michel. “And the response we got from the president was explaining why there was protests, claiming that after three years of COVID he had an issue because people were frustrated,” a senior European Union official told...
    A Covid-like virus discovered lurking in bats in southern China is one of five with the potential to jump to humans, scientists say.  The virus, known as BtSY2, is closely related to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid, and is 'at particular risk for emergence'.  It's one of five 'viruses of concern' found in bats across China's Yunnan province that are 'likely to be pathogenic to humans or livestock', the scientists say.  The team warn of potential new 'zoonotic' diseases – those caused by pathogens that pass to humans from other animals.  A Covid-like virus discovered lurking in bats in southern China is one of five with the potential to jump to humans, scientists say. Evidence already suggests SARS-CoV-2 originated in horseshoe bats (pictured)  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Climate change could drive the emergence of the next... Will the next pandemic come from a GLACIER? Killer viruses... Fluturistic: Scientists create super-influenza vaccine that... World Cup 'camel flu' warning: Experts list MERS - which... Share this article Share 11 shares WHAT IS A...
    COMPUTER users are being informed of a fake popup that looks like a real Microsoft warning - something that should never be clicked on as it gives hackers control over the device. The unseemingly sketchy "Virus Alert from Microsoft" popup is a fake user alert and scam created by hackers. 2The scam is created with the intent of hackers breaking into your computerCredit: Getty 2The 'Virus Alert from Microsoft' popup is a fake user alert and scam created by hackersCredit: Not known, clear with picture desk And the scam is created with the intent of hackers breaking into your computer. Safety Detectives explains: "Windows does have a built-in antivirus, but its notifications never say 'Virus Alert from Microsoft.' "If you see 'Virus Alert from Microsoft” on your computer, you’re either on a sketchy website that is trying to hack your device, or you have a malware file on your computer that is issuing false pop-ups." In order to protect your PC from potential threats, an antivirus program like Norton is beneficial for scanning and removing threats. Read More on TechnologyWATCH...
    A news story on a Boston University preprint has, predictably, sent right-wing pundits, politicians, and public health personalities into a tizzy over the possibility that government-funded research created a deadlier strain of COVID-19. Deadlier than what, though, ended up being the key question. On Monday, The Daily Mail posted an inflammatory story about new research not yet peer-reviewed in which BU scientists merged a gene from the Omicron variant into the backbone of a much earlier SARS-CoV-2 virus and infected mice. To the scientists who were interviewed, it seemed like the study represented “gain-of-function” research, defined by the Department of Health and Human Services as work that improves the ability of a pathogen to cause disease, either by enhancing its transmissibility (spread) or its pathogenicity (harm). After the article was posted, the usual suspects, like noted anti-vaxxer Robert F. Kennedy Jr., came out of the woodwork on Twitter to decry the research—but so did powerful politicians, including U.S. Senator Roger Marshall (R-KS) who on Thursday called for viral gain-of-function research to be halted “until proper guardrails can be put in...
    CHOOSING a name for your baby is one of the toughest decisions you'll make. It can take parents years to think of the perfect name, but one mum has revealed she regrets the name she gave her daughter. 1The mum now regrets the name she picked for her daughter 18 months agoCredit: Getty Now the mum is debating whether to change her daughter's name, who is now 18 months old. She said she wasn't sure what the right decision was and was concerned she might get bullied at school if she keeps the name. Taking to Reddit, she revealed her daughter's name was Genevieve Iris, two pretty normal names separately, but there's an issue when they're together. The mum questioned whether the names sounded like a 'virus' when spoken together. READ MORE ON BABY NAMESBABY LOVE I’m a baby name expert - the monikers that are going to be popular in 2023 She added: "I find myself 18 months after my daughter's birth still feeling regret and sadness around the name we chose. "We chose Genevieve Iris after months of...
    A NEW Covid-like virus has been discovered in a bat - raising fears it could infect humans. Scientists in the US have warned that the illness could be resistant to current vaccines. 1The current Omicron strain has been proven to be milder than othersCredit: Reuters Covid-19 has now been circulating for over two years and millions of Brits have been vaccinated or have some sort of protection from prior infection. The current Omicron strain has been proven to be milder than others and globally, many are learning to live with the bug. But this new development adds to a growing body of evidence that sarbecoviruses - members of the coronavirus family - are rife across Asia and eastern Europe. Study lead author Dr Michael Letko, of Washington State University in the US, said: "Our research further demonstrates that sarbecoviruses are circulating in wildlife outside of Asia - even in places like western Russia where the Khosta-2 virus was found - also pose a threat to global health and ongoing vaccine campaigns against SARS-CoV-2." Read more on Covid-19BREATH OF LIFE How...
    Share this: Imagine inhaling just a few drops of liquid or mist to get protected from COVID-19. That is the idea behind nasal COVID-19 vaccines, and they have been getting a lot of attention recently as a spray or liquid. These nasal vaccines would be based on the same technology as normal vaccines given by injection. But as Mayuresh Abhyankar, a University of Virginia researcher who studies infectious diseases and works on nasal vaccines, explains, vaccinating someone right where the coronavirus is likely to start its attack comes with many immunological benefits. 1. What are nasal vaccines? Nasal vaccines are administered, as the name suggests, through the nose. More accurately called intranasal vaccines, these vaccines are liquids that can be given as a spray or through a dropper or syringe. The most common nasal vaccine is FluMist, a nasal spray that uses inactivated flu virus to protect against influenza. An intranasal vaccine could be a weakened live virus similar to FluMist, a nucleic acid vaccine like mRNA coronavirus vaccines or a protein vaccine like Hepatitis B vaccines or the CorbeVax...
    The first American monkeypox patient to go public with his battle against the tropical virus has slammed health officials for a 'lackluster' job of testing for the virus, which has left many cases undiagnosed. Matt Ford, a self-employed actor who splits his time between Los Angeles and New York City, has spoken out to warn people that the disease 'sucks' and they should take it 'seriously.' He blasted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for their poor testing efforts, saying it took officials three days to diagnose his illness by which point he 'already knew' what they would say. Revealing his diagnosis to Buzzfeed, Ford said he caught the virus after having 'skin-to-skin contact' with another patient. Matt Ford, from Los Angeles, is the first patient to come forward to talk about his monkeypox diagnosis. He is pictured above with three spots due to the virus on his face @jmatthiasford sry the sound was too appropriate #monkeypox #monkeypoxvirus #monkeypoxoutbreak #monkeypoxvaccine #CDC #WHO #greenscreen #fyp #fypシ ♬ Monkeys Spinning Monkeys - Kevin MacLeod & Kevin The Monkey The actor and...
    Pride parades pose little risk of spreading monkeypox because most transmission is linked to 'enclosed spaces' such as nightclubs, a World Health Organization adviser has hinted. Andy Seale, from the agency's department for HIV, hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections, said in a briefing yesterday there was 'no reason to be concerned' about catching the virus at these events. He added that many cases recorded so far had been traced back to gatherings indoors leading to physical touch, the main transmission route for the virus. The WHO adviser added that condoms would not stop someone from becoming infected, pointing out infectious skin lesions could appear anywhere on the body including in the genital area. Pride parades are due to be held across the U.S. in June, amid concerns from organizers over cases of the virus endemic to West Africa. The outbreak in Europe — which has now reached more than 400 cases — has been driven in part by unsafe sex after a Pride event in Spain and at a fetish festival in Belgium WHO chiefs have suggested. In the...
    Hong Kong (CNN)Hazmat suit-clad workers spraying clouds of disinfectant over city streets, building fronts, park benches and even parcels have become an everyday scene in pandemic-era China.In Shanghai, the epicenter of the country's largest outbreak, state media report that thousands of workers have been organized into teams to disinfect areas, with a focus on those known to have hosted Covid patients -- a move the government sees as key to curbing the spread of the Omicron variant.But the practice often extends much further. Seemingly any outdoor area is at risk of being targeted by workers wielding leaf-blower-style disinfectant machines, as China's rigorous "zero-Covid" policy drives an obsession with sanitizing everything. Flying into Beijing is tougher than ever as China ramps up its zero-Covid measuresIn Shanghai, fire fighters have been plucked from their duties to take up roles as disinfectors, a local youth league has recruited volunteers for disinfection squads, and emergency rescue teams from far-flung parts of China have been enlisted in the drive -- often strapping on heavy equipment and full hazmat.In some Shanghai neighborhoods, special chemical producing stations...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- As the BA.2 subvariant of omicron continues to spread, researchers are focused on understanding how to treat this coronavirus variant and how it works."They looked at how long the virus remains on a surface and can still be recoverable. They used both plastic and skin from cadavers," said Dr. George Rutherford, UCSF Professor Epidemiology.The study by researchers in Japan was held in a lab which could influence its outcome. Researchers tested multiple COVID variants and noticed that Omicron lasted the longest. If you're on the ABC7 News app, click here to watch liveDr. Rutherford and UC Berkeley Infectious Disease Expert Dr. John Swartzberg agree that the greatest risk of infection continues to be by droplets in the air."At least with the cadaver skin experiments, they were all neutralized within 15 second without ethanol alcohol," said Dr. Rutherford."Either close to somebody where larger droplets can get onto our mouth or nose, or eyes or even distances. Particularly inside 30 feet away if the virus gets inside and floats and we inhale it," said Dr. Swartzberg.VIDEO:...
    A FURTHER 226,524 Brits have tested positive for Covid over the last three days, government data has revealed. It comes as Health Secretary Sajid Javid today urged Brits to treat the virus 'like the flu'. 1Brits have now been told to treat Covid-19 like the flu and to use common sense when it comes to the bugCredit: Getty He previously calmed Brits and said that the rise in cases seen over the last few weeks had been expected after the remaining restrictions were lifted. Omicron is a milder strain of the virus, with studies showing it is less deadly than the Delta and Alpha strains that have come before it. Vaccines are still the best way to protect yourself from severe complications and millions of Brits are now able to get their spring booster shot from today. This morning Mr Javid said scientists are working on plans to give all over-50s an extra booster jab this Autumn. Read more on Covid-19LOVELY JABBLY Millions can get Spring booster jabs from TODAY - are you eligible?COVID 'LINK' Our kids caught Covid & were...
    Sign up here to get our updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. Now that the surge of omicron cases seems to be winding down, a lot of people — even those who were pretty careful throughout the course of the pandemic — are talking about being done with always masking indoors, avoiding crowds and mostly staying home. Governments are relaxing rules, too. On Thursday, the mayors of Minneapolis and St. Paul each lifted the indoor mask mandates in their respective cities (though masks are still required in government buildings). The U.K. is removing its remaining restrictions designed to slow the spread of the virus. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has said it’s time to live with the virus, and is putting resources into trying to detect and quash outbreaks. Even institutions that have long maintained COVID-19 mitigation measures are starting to let them go: The DFL-controlled Minnesota House, which has long mandated masks, is now only requesting they be worn (few appear to be taking that guidance). Target,...
     A top infectious diseases expert has predicted Covid will haunt Australians for years but says the worst is behind us with the virus soon to be treated like the flu. Professor Peter Collignon, from ANU Medical School, told 3AW that Australia is in 'a much better position than we were a year ago'. The professor said that due to the efficacy of Covid vaccines, fewer people were dying or being hospitalised with the Omicron variant despite high infection rates. 'Are we out of the woods? No we're not. Is this all going to go away, no it's not, but the consequences for individuals and for society are a lot less than a year ago,' he said. Professor Peter Collignon, from ANU Medical School, told 3AW radio host Neil Mitchell that Australia is in 'a much better position than we were a year ago' (pictured, people in Sydney) The professor said due to the efficacy of Covid vaccines less people were dying or being hospitalised despite high infection rates (pictured, a pop-up Covid clinic in Melbourne's north) He stated it was...
    (CNN)The world feared the worst when a worrying new coronavirus variant emerged in late November and ripped through South Africa at a pace not seen before in the pandemic.But two months later, with Omicron dominant across much of the globe, the narrative has shifted for some."Levels of concern about Omicron tend to be lower than with previous variants," Simon Williams, a researcher in public attitudes and behaviors towards Covid-19 at Swansea University, told CNN. For many, "the 'fear factor of Covid' is lower," he said.Omicron's reduced severity compared to previous variants, and the perceived likelihood that individuals will eventually be infected, have contributed to that relaxation in people's mindsets, Williams said. This has even caused some people to actively seek out the illness to "get it over with" -- a practice experts have strongly warned against. But some within the scientific community are cautiously optimistic that Omicron could be the pandemic's last act -- providing huge swathes of the world with "a layer of immunity," and moving us closer to an endemic stage when Covid-19 is comparable to seasonal illnesses...
    HAVING an unusual name can make life a little more entertaining or challenging, especially when you first introduce yourself. But for Kovid Kapoor, from Bangalore, Karnataka, India his name has brought him such bizarre responses he has had to adjust to getting more attention since the pandemic began. AFP 5 Kovid poses with a bottle of Corona beer In early 2020 Kovid realised he now shares his ‘special’ name with a deadly virus that continues to cause a global health crisis. The 31-year-old trip agency owner said: “It is crazy how I am getting all this attention for my name. “Before the pandemic, I’ve always thought it was a unique name. “I have met just one another Kovid in college and we instantly connected because I never found anyone with the same name.” FABULOUS BINGO: GET A £5 FREE BONUS WITH NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED He added: “I was amused when the WHO first announced Covid in 2019. Friends and relatives started sharing the reports with me. It was surprising at first.” Kovid has since had his fair share of...
    Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez proposed treating COVID-19 as an "endemic disease" rather than a pandemic this week, saying that the country is considering a move to start tracking the virus like the flu instead of counting every case.  "I believe that we have the conditions for, with precaution, slowly, opening the debate at the technical level and at the level of health professionals, but also at the European level, to start evaluating the evolution of this disease with different parameters than we have until now," Sánchez told a Spanish radio station on Monday.  Sánchez's comments come after El País reported that Spanish health officials are preparing to roll out a new system to track COVID-19 like other respiratory illnesses by not testing every mildly symptomatic case and using smaller samples to monitor the spread.  "We are going to have to learn to live with it [the coronavirus] as we do with many other viruses," Sánchez said Friday, noting that the virus's lethality has decreased, according to the Spanish newspaper.  Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez speaks during a news...
    A video of a Florida testing line summed up the explosion of the Omicron variant of the coronavirus in America this week, with hundreds lined up for testing in Miami Thursday. With cars lined up for seemingly over a mile, one Twitter user had to clarify, 'It is from today. It is not from last year.' It also comes after samples taken from sewage revealed that Omicron is now the dominant strain of Covid in Florida's Orange County. Line weren't long in just the Sunshine State: In New York City, people were lined up a long way outside testing sites as the city saw cases have reached over 3,500 the last two days.  CityMD, New York's urgent care provider that stations clinics throughout the Big Apple, said testing volume grew more than 25 percent the past two weeks, with results taking as many as three to five days to come back from their labs.   COVID cases are up 31 percent nationwide over the past two weeks, with 124,413 people testing positive for the virus. Deaths have increased by 28 percent...
    3D structure of omicron spike protein with amino acid changes highlighted. The idea that viruses have a tendency to become weaker over time is simply not true. Smith’s “law of declining virulence” was a 19th century construct that has been thoroughly debunked again and again. Without going into the details again, just take it as a given — there is no evolutionary pressure that tends to make viruses milder over time. Viruses tend to get more contagious. Whether they cause more serious disease, less serious disease, or say about the same is all a roll of the genetic dice. If the virus could care about things, it wouldn’t care about this. It’s the contagious part that counts. So stories that the COVID-19 will inevitably turn into a cold need to be taken with a grain of salt roughly the size of the Great Pyramid.  All that said … a new study (that’s still in preprint, not peer reviewed) suggests that the omicron variant may not be evolving to be “like a cold,” but be different from other COVID-19 variants because it’s is...
    Amid growing fears over a new super-mutated COVID-19 variant that looks to be quickly spreading across the world, Dr. Anthony Fauci said over the weekend that Americans are “going to have to start living” with the virus as “we’re not going to eradicate” it. Nearly two years into an ongoing pandemic that’s killed millions worldwide and over 750,000 in the U.S., global markets were spooked last week after coronavirus cases dramatically surged in South Africa. The spike has been blamed on the Omicron variant and has prompted the United States to place travel restrictions on eight African countries. At the same time, however, the new virus strain has already been detected in several European countries and Hong Kong, sparking concern among health officials that Omicron is not only highly transmissible but could evade current COVID-19 vaccines. Making the Sunday show rounds, Fauci warned that “we really need to be prepared” for increased Omicron transmission. Explaining on NBC’s Meet the Press that Omicron has “32 or more variants in that very important spike protein of the virus,” the nation’s top infectious...
    Some children are developing 'long Covid', a mysterious condition where a person feels symptoms of the virus long after recovery. The condition has baffled experts, usually appearing in healthier children who do not suffer from severe cases of the virus. Symptoms can be wide ranging, from anosmia - lost of taste and smell - to suffering cognitive issues such as 'brain fog', just like they are in adults. Experts are not quite sure why the condition develops, and how to effectively treat it.  Adam Estrada (pictured) begin to experience severe symptoms of long Covid after a bout with the virus that left his hospitalized. He has experienced hair loss and lost the ability to stand on his own at some points Estrada was treated by Dr Katharine Clouser in New Jersey at one of the state's only pediatric long Covid treatment clinics. Pictued: Estrada with his mother during a CBS News interview Dr Katharine Clouser is a hospital pediatrician from Hackensack, New Jersey, and her team at Hackensack Meridian Health are operating one of the few pediatric Covid recovery centers in...
    Acclaimed screenwriter and director Paul Schrader has condemned woke cancel culture, calling it “infectious” and comparing it to the coronavirus Delta variant. Paul Schrader — who wrote Taxi Driver and The Last Temptation of Christ and directed American Gigolo, Affliction, and First Reformed — said cancel culture has created a climate of fear even among friends. “Cancel culture is so infectious, it’s like the Delta virus,” he said in an interview with Deadline. “If your friend says, ‘they’re saying these terrible things about me that aren’t true’, you’re afraid to come to their defense, because you might catch that virus too.” US director and president of the jury Orrizonti, Paul Schrader attends the opening ceremony of the 70th Venice Film Festival and the screening of the movie “Gravity” presented out of competition, on August 28, 2013 at Venice Lido. (TIZIANA FABI/AFP via Getty Images) Schrader said he thinks the cancel mob won’t come after him. “I think I’ve been fairly honest and upfront, kept my hands to myself,” he said, though he noted that his 1978 movie Blue Collar, starring Richard...
    Chinese students and supporters hold a memorial for Dr. Li Wenliang outside the UCLA campus on February 15, 2020 In the first week of February 2020, Dr. Li Wenliang died from complications due to COVID-19. The young doctor had been praised for his self-sacrifice in fighting Chinese authorities to get word of the “novel coronavirus” out to the world after many of his colleagues had been silenced. In death, Li became a martyr to the cause of transparency when it comes to health information, and to the importance of sharing this information quickly in an emergency. That it took people like Dr. Li to get the information on what would eventually be tagged COVID-19 out to the world was clear testimony from the opening stages of the pandemic that China was being far less than completely open with information. Whether decisions were made locally or at a national level, for some reason China chose not to report the initial cases of COVID-19 in Wuhan hospitals, and to push back against medical personnel who tried to share that information.  That initial action, along with concerns that China was being less...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- As the Delta variant takes hold in Los Angeles County and severe illnesses rise, many health care workers say they feel like they're reliving the start of another nightmare.Inside hospitals, the halls are filled with a collective anguish."We are so frustrated. We are so upset and so frustrated because I think this feels like it shouldn't have to be this way," said Dr. Oren Friedman, an ICU physician at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.He said nearly a hundred percent of hospital admissions are unvaccinated. Many expressed remorse. One man's story haunts Friedman."I could see unbelievable regret. He was nervous. He's anxious. I can tell you he's not expected to survive, and I think," he said, "All I can say to the public is you don't want to be in this situation. Trust us. You don't want to be in the hospital saying, I regret not getting a vaccine. Just do it."Breakthrough COVID cases: Doctor explains your chances of contracting virus after vaccinationEMBED More News Videos New numbers help put into perspective what the chances are of getting COVID-19...
    HAVANA (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic is slamming Cuba like never before, even as the country races to roll out its homegrown vaccines — the only locally developed shots being widely used in Latin America. The island had seen far fewer infections that most other Latin American nations over the first year or so of the disease, imposing strict quarantines, isolating the infected and shutting down its tourism industry despite devastating economic consequences. But new cases have been soaring in recent weeks, with an average of about 6,000 a day being reported in the country of 11 million people. The first three weeks of July have accounted for about 100,000 of the nearly 300,000 infections recorded altogether in Cuba since the first case arrived some 16 months ago. Cuba’s national director of epidemiology, Francisco Durán, said Tuesday that 717 people have died so far this month in Cuba — a heavy share of the 2,019 who have died in all. Anxiety over that spread was one of the factors that fed into the wave of street protests that broke out...
    Sophia Ankel Two months after I got COVID-19, I started to smell a mix of garbage and onions everywhere I went. I suffer from parosmia, a partial distortion of smell, which is usually unpleasant.  One expert said it might take up to three years to regain my ability to smell again. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. When I completely lost my sense of taste and smell in March 2020, it was the first thing I noticed.  It was a completely surreal experience, even more so because, at the time, loss of sense or smell — otherwise known as anosmia — wasn't officially recognized as a COVID-19 symptom yet. So when my nose started to pick up some aromas three months later, I was elated. Only this time, it wasn't the same and hasn't been the same since.  Read more: Silicon Valley is split about the return of the handshake, which has some delighted and others disappointed, disturbed, and grossed out For more than a year now, my nose has been plagued with what I like to...
                      by Thomas Catenacci  The U.S. and other nations can hold the Chinese government accountable for the 2020 outbreak of coronavirus and ensuing global pandemic through a variety of legal, financial, and diplomatic means. Republican senators and Asian policy experts have proposed a range of options for punishing the Chinese government for its alleged negligence responding to the outbreak and overseeing the Wuhan Institute of Virology, where coronavirus potentially leaked from in late 2019. Since the World Health Organization declared coronavirus a pandemic in March 2o20, the virus has killed more than 4 million people worldwide, nations have experienced economic devastation and the prevalence of other health issues such as depression has increased. “The United States and other nations must hold China to account not because of anger or a desire for retribution,” American Enterprise Institute Senior Fellow John Yoo wrote in December. “By making China pay, they can impose the incentives for the Chinese Communist Party to improve its behavior the next time.” “Nations may well need to inflict even more forceful measures to compel China to realize the full costs of...
    The U.S. and other nations can hold the Chinese government accountable for the 2020 outbreak of coronavirus and ensuing global pandemic through a variety of legal, financial and diplomatic means. “The United States and other nations must hold China to account not because of anger or a desire for retribution,” American Enterprise Institute Senior Fellow John Yoo wrote in December. “By making China pay, they can impose the incentives for the Chinese Communist Party to improve its behavior the next time.” China has repeatedly said it isn’t responsible for the pandemic and has blamed the U.S. for the outbreak, but mounting evidence suggests that the virus originated from the Wuhan Institute of Virology rather than a wet market. The U.S. and other nations can hold the Chinese government accountable for the 2020 outbreak of coronavirus and ensuing global pandemic through a variety of legal, financial and diplomatic means. Republican senators and Asian policy experts have proposed a range of options for punishing the Chinese government for its alleged negligence responding to the outbreak and overseeing the Wuhan Institute...
    SINGAPORE could become one of the first countries to stop recording daily Covid case numbers in a bid to get life back to normal by treating the virus "like the flu". The south-east Asian country has recorded just 36 deaths since the start of the pandemic by implementing draconian rules to curb the infection rate, and officials now wanting to ditch measures such as counting infection numbers each day. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest updates 3Singapore could stop counting daily Covid case numbersCredit: EPA 3Proposals have been made to let people in Singapore 'get on with their lives'Credit: EPA A blueprint has now been laid out by three leading members of Singapore's Covid-19 taskforce to end 18 months of tough restrictions in order to restore quarantine-free travel and public gatherings. The city-state, which has a population of 5.7million, has to date recorded 62,617 cases - but this proposal would see an end to a daily tally count. The hope is to let people "get on with their lives" by scrapping tough rules and instead controlling the virus...
    (CNN)Boston Celtics wing Evan Fournier has compared the long-term side effects of Covid-19 to a concussion, saying he has "been feeling really weird" weeks after contracting the virus. Fournier was traded from the Orlando Magic to the Celtics in March, but admitted he has been struggling with focus and depth perception as he continues to recover from the virus. Visit CNN.com/sport for more news, videos and features"It's like I have a concussion," 28-year-old Fournier told reporters after the Celtics' 129-119 loss to the Portland Trail Blazers on Sunday. "Right now, it's actually doing a little bit better. But at first it's like the bright lights were bothering my eyes and my vision was blurry and everything was just going too fast for me. Read More"At times, I'm really struggling to focus and my eyes keep struggling to focus on one thing. My depth perception is really bad right now. But I saw a specialist, she gave me some exercises and hopefully it will get better."Fournier looks on during the Celtics' game against the Charlotte Hornets on April 28.Fournier, who scored...
    We have a new epidemic of mixed messages on our hands. On the one side are those experts who remain very worried about another surge before the vaccine delivers us to the promised land and on the other those who see the vial as half-full and rising with each jab. One thing’s certain: The most highly contagious B.1.1.7 variant that brought Britain to its knees over the winter and is now ripping through Europe has landed in all 50 states in no time at all. Michigan’s been thrown back to its worst days. A dozen states and counting are walloped. That’s why Dr. Mike Osterholm warned last Sunday on Meet the Press that in the next two weeks, we will have “the highest number of cases reported globally since the beginning of the pandemic” and have to act accordingly. Although one in four adults is vaxxed and everyone will be eligible come April 19, he concluded, “we are at the beginning of a fourth COVID surge.” At the same time, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former FDA head with a polished...
    MSNBC contributor Kurt Bardella blamed the inflamed rhetoric from former President Donald Trump for the recent spike in anti-Asian violence, suggesting that Tuesday’s mass shooting at several Atlanta-area Asian spas came as a result of Trump-promoted xenophobia. Eight individuals are dead, most of which have reportedly been identified as Asian, and while local authorities have not yet described the investigation as looking at a hate crime, the correlation with a rise in violence against Asian-Americans has raised concerns. Appearing on Morning Joe, Bardella opened by citing a number of anti-Asian-American attacks across the nation of late, saying “this is a systemic problem right now that’s reached crisis point.” He then asked “Why is this happening? Why have we seen, according to new data, this huge uptick in violence against Asian Americans?” The answer? The 150% rise in anti-Aisan-American hate crimes “all coincides with the rhetoric of the Republican party using terms like ‘China Virus’ and ‘Kung-Flu,'” Bardella explained. He then cited the 164 Republicans who voted against a resolution put forward by Rep. Grace Ming to condemn violence against Asian Americans. “Like, how...
    There was one narrative that wasn't featured in Russell T Davies' recent Channel 4 drama, It's a Sin, which documented the devastation wreaked by the HIV/AIDS crisis in the eighties - a woman with the virus.  UK HIV charity The Terence Higgins Trust says that the search term 'Can women get AIDS?' soared following the five-part drama about a group of gay friends living - and dying - in London's Soho at the start of the outbreak.   The charity told FEMAIL that the idea that HIV is a disease that only affects gay men still lingers on despite Public Health England reporting that 28 per cent of new HIV diagnoses in 2019 were in women. Globally, there are more women living with HIV than men. Scroll down for video   Russell T Davies' recent drama It's a Sin for Channel 4 has put HIV back in the spotlight...but no women with the virus featured in the 80s drama. Around a third of new cases diagnosed in the UK are amongst heterosexual women Prior to 1996, a HIV diagnosis often meant an early...
    New York : The British government recently said it hopes transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease, like the flu. Vaccines and new treatments, argue ministers and their scientific advisers, will reduce the death rate and allow us to live with the virus, instead of constantly fighting against it. But is this possible? Unattainable goal Wiping COVID off the face of the Earth would be great, of course, given the deaths and destruction it causes. But the only problem is that eradication has only been achieved with one virus: smallpox, in 1980. It took decades to get to this point, and scientists and governments were only able to do it thanks to a series of unique circumstances. First, the vaccine was so stable that it did not need to be refrigerated, and when it was supplied it was immediately obvious whether it had worked or not. It was also evident when a person had been infected. It was not necessary to do a laboratory test, which was a great advantage when it comes to containing outbreaks. Covid, as we all...
    A SOUTH African Covid patient has warned Brits SHOULD be scared of the mutant strain that ripped through his country like wildfire. Chris Bateman watched on in horror as the virus saw patients flood into “jam packed” wards and pushed hospitals “to their limits”. A medic attends to a Covid patient at a special ward in Arwyp Medical Centre, South Africa The former editor of the South African Medical Journal says he feels 'lucky' to have passed Covid during the first wave as the new variant is 50% more infectious than the original. Explaining how the new mutation that was first detected in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa, last October, has affected his country, he says that apart from the healthcare system the country's economy has also taken a serious hit. And despite the country's easing of the measures and opening up parks and beaches, he says the impact of the new variation is still noticeable. He told Mirror: "The UK is right to be wary of it. "ICUs are still mostly full, our healthcare workers, many of...
    A NASAL spray that can prevent the coronavirus infection for up to two days could be available in high street chemists by the summer. The spray is made from ingredients already approved for medical use, meaning it does not need any further approval for use, and will help to ease lockdown restrictions. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 2The spray could help keep schools open say researchers Credit: Alamy Scientists at the University of Birmingham have been working on spray since April last year. They are currently in discussions with shops and pharmaceutical giants on the next steps to mass produce the spray, the Sunday Telegraph reports. The researchers believe using the spray four times a day would be enough for general protection from Covid. It’s also safe enough to be applied every 20 minutes if in a high-risk, densely populated environment such as schools. “We think it will help in schools, as one of the good things about the formulation of the nasal spray is that it would not need to be reformulated for...
    Experts blame COVID-19 for excess U.S. deaths in 2020 Malaysia Extends Restrictions; Biden Unveils Plan: Virus Update Mayim Bialik says pandemic parenting can be exhausting and frustrating: It’s just me, it’s always been just me “We’re all bored,” Mayim Bialik says of lockdown life, but the truth is that the former child star has a lot on her plate right now. There’s her leading role in the brand-new Fox sitcom Call Me Kat, her mental health podcast, Mayim Bialik’s Breakdown, which draws on her experience as a neuroscientist and — oh yeah — the responsibilities and challenges of parenting during a pandemic. “There’s definitely a level of frustration and exhaustion, especially when I’m anxious — when the news is scary, or when I’ve been looking at the news too much, or when numbers are spiking, or people that we know are positive,” the actress tells Yahoo’s Kylie Mar of being a “divorced parent in quarantine.” Bialik and ex-husband Michael Stone divorced in 2012 after nine years of marriage, and co-parent two sons, 15-year-old Miles and 12-year-old Fred. “They just want...
    Tommy John Jr., the famed baseball player and elbow surgery pioneer, has contracted COVID-19. But even as he receives oxygen while battling a case of the deadly disease, the Hall of Fame candidate and his chiropractor son are spouting anti-vaxxer views. From his hospital bed near his home in Indio, California, the 77-year-old former Yankees pitcher told The Daily Beast he was experiencing no symptoms at all after being diagnosed during a hospitalization for a recent fall. “I’d leave right now if they’d let me walk out,” he said on Tuesday. Later, asked if the diagnosis made him nervous about his health, he responded: “You gotta be shitting me.” "You’re either going to live or you’re going to die,” he added. It was perhaps a predictable response from the curveball king, who returned to pitch for 14 seasons after receiving a then-nascent ligament replacement surgery in 1974. But it was also, according to his longtime girlfriend Cheryl Zeldin, not the whole story. As Zeldin tells it, she and John were on a trip to Nashville in early December when...
    While millions around the world celebrated the New Year from the comfort of their own sofas in lockdown, thousands of revellers in Wuhan were partying together with no social distancing in sight.   In what is sure to spark envy in many countries still subject to strict measures, party-goers were seen crowding into a live music event in the former Covid epicentre. Many opted to go mask-free inside the venue where people danced just inches from each other. Thousands of revellers in Wuhan celebrated the New Year together with no social distancing in sight Party-goers were seen crowding into a live music event with dancers on stage in the former Covid epicentre Many opted to go mask-free inside the venue where people danced just inches from each other The festivities come 12 months after the virus was first discovered in the Chinese city Balloons were released into the sky in an incredible display in Wuhan. Huge crowds gathered in the city which was the Covid-19 epicentre less than a year ago Amazed locals took...
    By Aislinn Laing SANTIAGO (Reuters) - The idea to sign up for the trial of a COVID-19 vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson came to me after interviewing the company's Latin American vice president for medical affairs in September. Josue Bacaltchuk told me that volunteering for trials meant being part of the solution to a global problem, and the media could play a critical role in scrutinizing vaccine development and building confidence among people who might receive them. All of us, these past nine months, will have felt at times overwhelmed by the sadness generated by this pandemic. To this day, my heart contracts when I see signs telling people: "Keep your distance" and "Stay apart" - it seems so contrary to human nature. As a family, we have always trusted medical science and so far that trust has been rewarded. Our three little boys' vaccine schedules are up to date and they are hale and hearty. My husband successfully beat back testicular cancer after chemotherapy and great medical care. My mother and my mother-in-law are both at high risk...
    London (CNN Business)A 90-year-old British grandmother became the first person in the West to receive an approved Covid-19 vaccine on Tuesday. It was a seminal moment in the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed more than 1.5 million lives and forced the shutdown of large swaths of the global economy.The distribution of vaccines throughout the next year is expected to trigger an economic boom, allowing businesses that were closed to slow the spread of the virus to reopen, while unleashing a wave of pent-up demand.But economists are already warning that the rebound may not play out as dramatically as some expect. "The recovery will be strong by historical standards, for many it won't feel that way and there may be bumps and volatility ahead," Ben May, director of global macro research at Oxford Economics, said in a research note published this week.May expects global GDP growth next year to be the strongest since the late 1970s — a big enough upswing to return output to pre-crisis levels by the summer. But given that the surge would just restore the status quo,...
    SAN ANTONIO - – Excitement is mounting as coronavirus vaccines are getting ready for distribution after they’re approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. However, people also have some concerns about what the vaccine contains, its side effects and when they’ll be able to get get it. Local infectious disease expert Dr. Ruth Berggren, with UT Health San Antonio, said learning about the vaccine may quell any fears of the unknown. The current coronavirus vaccines, including those made by Pfizer and Moderna, were created in record time by utilizing a method never done before. “I think people are hung up on that and really scared of it, but the technology has been around since at least 1990. Don’t be afraid. It’s ideal because this technology allows us to ramp up vaccine production very, very quickly in massive quantities. The more traditional approaches to making vaccines are more cumbersome and slower,” Berggren said. The current coronavirus vaccine focuses on mRNA, or messenger RNA, which is found in your body. It does not inject the live virus into your body. “So...
    U.S. doctors are worried that their patients won't return to get a second dose of coronavirus vaccine if the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) doesn't give them a clear, upfront warning that none of the shots will be a 'walk in the park.' 'As a practicing physician, I have got to be sure my patients will come back for the second dose,' said Dr Sandra Fryhofer of Emory University during a Monday meeting with officials, attended by CNBC.  'We really have got to make patients aware that this is not going to be a walk in the park.'  Participants in trials for vaccines made by Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Moderna have described the side effects of the shots as similar to the symptoms of COVID-19 itself.  On the other hand, convincing Americans - especially some who are high-risk, including black and Latinx people in the U.S. - that COVID-19 vaccines are safe to take has been a challenge to begin with.  Ultimately, it will be up to states to decide how to distribute vaccines to their populations, and who...
    Weddings with more than 50 attendees put guests and staff at risk. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Samantha Lee/Insider Some engaged couples have held weddings with more than 50 guests despite the continued threat of the coronavirus pandemic. Couples who host weddings right now need to be aware of the danger they're putting guests and staff in, and think about how they would feel if someone contracted COVID-19 at their event. People who have attended big weddings recently told Insider they regret going. One guest told Insider she saw a groomsman passing around a bottle of alcohol for the bridal party to drink communally, while neither the bride nor the groom wore masks. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Mary was dreading Cassie's wedding.  She knew there would be a risk of contracting the coronavirus if she attended, but she didn't feel like she could miss it. She knew the couple had been planning their wedding for years. She and her partner decided to go, despite these fears. But they soon proved prescient. Between 50...
    The hottest decorations this Halloween may turn out to be PVC pipe covered in orange duct tape or painted a garish, spooky purple. From Chicago to Washington state, people are rigging up “candy chutes” to send Twix and Milky Ways into the waiting buckets of trick-or-treaters from a safe distance during the pandemic. They range from simple slides all the way to elaborate feats of puppetry — and they’ll be called into action tomorrow. Sarah Millar installs a candy chute for trick-or-treaters outside her home in the Edgewater neighborhood Sunday in Chicago. The chute allows children to collect candy from neighbors while social distancing during Halloween. pic.twitter.com/BAnxOZ0g42 — armando l sanchez (@mandophotos) October 25, 2020 “People have certainly gotten creative, and as bizarre as it may look, some of those things are built-in distancing to avoid close contact and direct contact,” says Colleen Nash, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Rush University Medical Center. “If people are going to trick or treat, it gives some of those creative ways to distribute candy and not have 100 hands in...
    The novel coronavirus may be able to block pain and mask the illness in its early stages as it spreads throughout the body, a new study suggests. In research conducted in mice, scientists found that the spike protein the virus uses to enter cells attaches to a receptor and completely reverses the pain signaling pathway of neurons. What's more, pain relief could occur within 30 minutes of being infected and lasts for several hours, if not days.   The team, from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, says the findings may explain why nearly half of all patients with COVID-19 experience no symptoms. Researchers discovered the spike protein on the outside of the coronavirus binds to a receptor called neuropilin-1 but, instead of causing pain, it blocks the pain pathway A new study, from the University of Arizona Health Sciences , found when the spike protein bound to the receptor neuropilin in mice, pain was blocked within 30 minutes. Pictured: A paramedic moves an elderly patient from the Olympia Convalescent Hospital into an ambulance in Los Angeles, July 19 Corresponding...
    Former First Lady Michelle Obama pulled no punches in a new “closing argument” speech in which she pressed a sustained attack on President Donald Trump’s “failure” on the coronavirus and “racist” fearmongering, and told Americans to “vote for Joe Biden like your lives depend on it.” In the opening seconds of a 24-minute video released Tuesday morning, Mrs. Obama began a barrage at Trump by saying “Right now, our country is in chaos because of a president who isn’t up to the job.” “If you’re a parent like me, you’re feeling the consequences of this president’s failure to take this pandemic seriously… from his constant downplaying of the importance of masks and social distancing… to his relentless pressure on schools to open without offering a clear plan or meaningful support to keep students and teachers safe,” Mrs. Obama said. The former first lady went on to conclude the pandemic portion of the speech with a brutal summation that included references to Trump exposing his supporters to the virus: A man who had every resource at his disposal, the finest...
    By TOM MURPHY, AP Health Writer INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Larry Brown had been on a ventilator for 37 days. Nurses periodically turned the 45-year-old former Indiana State football player onto his stomach to help him breathe. Though sedated, he had tried to pull off the equipment keeping him alive, so his arms were strapped down. But Brown’s lungs were filling with fluid, and doctors didn’t expect him to last much longer. As visitors weren’t allowed in the intensive care unit, a nurse placed a phone next to his ear. “Thank you for fighting so hard, Larry,” his sister-in-law, Ellie Brown, told him. She was careful not to say goodbye. If he could hear her, that might scare him. Like millions of COVID-19 cases, Brown’s had started with minor symptoms — fatigue, loss of appetite. When he fell ill in mid-March, people in the United States were becoming familiar with the novel coronavirus. Mask use wasn’t widespread outside hospitals. Around Brown’s hometown, Indianapolis, fewer than 10 new cases were reported each day, on average. Businesses were just starting to shutter around...
    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Larry Brown had been on a ventilator for 37 days. Nurses periodically turned the 45-year-old former Indiana State football player onto his stomach to help him breathe. Though sedated, he had tried to pull off the equipment keeping him alive, so his arms were strapped down. But Brown’s lungs were filling with fluid, and doctors didn’t expect him to last much longer. As visitors weren’t allowed in the intensive care unit, a nurse placed a phone next to his ear. “Thank you for fighting so hard, Larry,” his sister-in-law, Ellie Brown, told him. She was careful not to say goodbye. If he could hear her, that might scare him. Like millions of COVID-19 cases, Brown’s had started with minor symptoms — fatigue, loss of appetite. When he fell ill in mid-March, people in the United States were becoming familiar with the novel coronavirus. Mask use wasn’t widespread outside hospitals. Around Brown’s hometown, Indianapolis, fewer than 10 new cases were reported each day, on average. Businesses were just starting to shutter around him in response to...
12