Web Analytics Made Easy - Statcounter
Sunday, Jan 29, 2023 - 02:58:13
18 results - (0.001 seconds)

’helps our:

latest news at page 1:
1
    I’ve lived my entire life with the blessings of U.S. citizenship, but my ancestors grew up under Russian czars before emigrating. Whatever your ancestry, every American should tremble with gratitude for the liberty we enjoy here, although we don’t necessarily take time every day to contemplate those freedoms. Perhaps you will today if you read the piece linked below, written by a Stanford University student, Dasha Navalnaya, who happens to be the daughter of Russian resistance leader Alexei Navalny. Article continues after advertisement Dasha is completing a degree at Stanford, where she is relatively safe and comfortable compared to her beloved father. He is not only rotting in a Russian prison cell but is also suffering various forms of deprivation and torture designed to break his spirit, or at least serve as a warning to other Russians who might support his movement of resistance to Vladimir Putin’s tyranny. In this heart-breaking, brave letter of solidarity with her dad, Navalnaya wrote: “We all know that prison isn’t a place where you want to end up anywhere in the world, but, the...
    ALTHOUGH the kitchen is the heart of the home, it is also the place that gets the dirtiest the quickest. There are many tips for cleaning a kitchen once the mess is already there, but you’re better off trying to prevent the mess before you even start cooking. 3One woman said her family has a tradition that helps their kitchen run smoothlyCredit: Getty 3The cleaning hack has been a "family secret" for over 75 yearsCredit: Getty A woman named Shiraf Combiths said that her family has had a generational secret for over 75 years that has helped keep their kitchens clean. In her article for ApartmentTherapy.com, she revealed the rule: “Never, ever leave drawers open while cooking, eating or cleaning up.” It’s a pretty useful rule when you think about the added trouble that open drawers will cause when mixed with cleaning or cooking. “Consider this scenario: Your brother is getting out spoons for dessert and you’re wiping down the counter, which is covered in sourdough crumbs. READ MORE KITCHEN TIPSKITCH IDEA Five viral kitchen hacks you MUST try -...
    Instead of our memories decaying with time, forgetting is actually an active form of learning that helps our brain to access more important information. This is the conclusion of experts from Trinity College Dublin and the University of Toronto, who said that 'lost' memories are not really gone, just made inaccessible. Memories, they explained, are stored permanently in sets of neurons, with our brains deciding which ones we keep access to and which irrelevant ones are locked away. These choices, they said, are based on environmental feedback, theoretically allowing us flexibility in the face of change and better decision-making as a result. If correct, the findings could lead to new ways to understand and treat memory loss associated with disease — such as is seen, for example, in patients with Alzheimer's. Instead of our memories decaying with time, forgetting is actually an active form of learning that helps our brain to access more important information. Pictured: forgetfulness (stock) The study was undertaken by neuroscientists Tomás Ryan of Trinity College Dublin and Paul Frankland of the University of Toronto. 'Memories are stored...
    RUNNING on to the pitch, this football team looks like any other as the players take their places for kick-off. Yet there is a heartbreaking bond that unites them — they are all dads who have lost children. 6Angels United FC was set up by 14 fathers who met through a bereavement groupCredit: Andy Kelvin / Kelvin Media 6Olly and Katie with soccer shirt in memory of their daughtersCredit: Andy Kelvin / Kelvin Media This week marks a year since the club, Angels United FC, was set up by 14 fathers who met through a bereavement group. The squad support each other, both on and off the pitch, through a shared love of the game and the desire to remember their kids. Each player also proudly wears the name of his “lost angel” across the back of the team’s eye-catching pink and blue strip. It was seeing the names emblazoned on the kit that first brought Jake Pugh to a training session this summer. He and his partner Beth lost their three-year-old daughter Lily-Mai to a rare form of lung...
    If you’re not using an electric toothbrush you love, now is a great time to make the switch. Not only does it lead to a better clean, it also helps you focus on the parts of your matter. If you’re looking to upgrade your toothbrush, you’re in luck. One of our favorites is almost 40% off on Amazon right now. Philips Sonicare ProtectiveClean 6500 Electric ToothbrushShop at Amazon$Free Shipping | Free Returns Scouted Contributor Gideon Grudo reviewed the Philips Sonicare Electric Brush and loved it. Not only does it sync to your phone so you can follow the brushing around your mouth, you also earn points every time your brush. The Sonicare app helps adjust your technique so you get a squeaky clean, every single time. Scouted selects products independently and prices reflect what was available at the time of publish. Sign up for our newsletter for more recommendations and deals. Curious about a specific product or brand? Let us know! If you buy something from our posts, we may earn a small commission.
    JABS Army volunteers with hundreds of shifts under their belts have encouraged Sun readers to join them to help with the vaccinations blitz. These amazing stewards have been the backbone of our drive since it began in January. 5Mohammad Khatib, 34, of Romsey, Hants, has done 104 jab army shifts and also helps the vulnerable with shopping They marshal car parks, help to keep queues moving, wipe down chairs and provide a friendly face. Mohammad Khatib, 34, of Romsey, Hants, has done 104 shifts and also helps the vulnerable with shopping. He said: “I was born in Syria and had to run away. This country’s looked after me. I wanted to give back and show Muslim doesn’t mean terror.” Widower Barrie Church, 79, has completed 110 shifts. He said: “It helps others, makes you feel good and gives you a huge sense of purpose.” Trevor Henderson, 61, of Peterborough, has completed 114 shifts. He said: “Once we’re all double vaccinated we can go clubbing — which in my case means the golf course.” Most read in The US SunFAMILY...
    In a choice between death or penitentiary, an addict discovers recovery and parenthood Military-grade spyware found on journalists and activists phones: report Players and fans are describing in more detail the terrifying scene and chaos that followed a shooting outside of the third base gate at Nationals Park on Saturday night.  Three people were injured in the shooting, DC Police said after initially reporting four were shot. One was a fan who is expected to recover, police said via CNN. The game between the Washington Nationals and San Diego Padres was suspended and set to resume Sunday afternoon before the final game of the series.  Seconds after the final out of the top of the sixth inning, gun shots could be heard in the stadium and were partially audible on the telecast. The field remained clear while fans, unsure what had happened, could be seen fleeing out of the right-field gates.  No one knew details at first, creating a chaotic scene as concerned fans, players and journalists attempted to flee or scramble for cover.  Nationals packed fans 'like sardines'...
    More On: Alexa jewelry Cartier celebrates Love at 50 with a new necklace Van Cleef’s Sweet Clovers is luck in a bracelet The biggest red-carpet jewelry from the 2021 Oscars and Golden Globes Rainey Qualley picks her favorite bags and bling for spring Apart from running one of America’s top gem meccas, London Jewelers, Candy Udell has a pet project: helping pups stay alive, healthy and happy. “I rescue dogs from all over — the southern US, Puerto Rico and China’s meat markets, in partnership with Jeffrey Beri and No Dogs Left Behind. So far, I’ve saved more than 10,000,” says Udell, referring to her impressive rescue-networking efforts, which match imperiled pooches with forever homes. In 2011, she combined her passions for furry friends and fabulous bling, launching Our Cause for Paws, a jewelry line benefiting the Rescue Paw Foundation, which funds no-kill shelters and humane education around the country. The baubles — each sporting a signature paw print — include necklaces, earrings, bracelets and charms, starting at $45. “These pieces are gifts that really do give back,” says...
    Then Harvard John a. Paulson Engineering and Applied ScienceApril 6, 2021 Raindrops continue to fall on the outer planets One day, humanity may set foot on another habitable planet. This planet may seem very different from Earth, but one thing is for sure – rain. A recent study published in 2005 JGR PlanetsHarvard researchers have found that raindrops are very similar in different planetary environments, the planets being Earth and Thursdays. Understanding the behavior of raindrops on other planets is not the only way to find ancient climates on such planets Tuesday But identifying planets that can live outside our solar system. “The life cycle of clouds is very important when it comes to the viability of the planet,” said Keithlin Loftus, a graduate student in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science and the primary author of this article. “But clouds and rain are really complex and more complex to fully form. We are looking for simple ways to understand how clouds form. The first step is whether the clouds evaporate into the atmosphere or end up...
    If you're revising for a big test, it's better to grab a pen and paper than your laptop or tablet, according to a new study.   Taking notes on paper helps our brains to remember information better than on tablet or smartphone, the study has found.  Researchers from Japan asked 48 students to take down the details of a person's schedule using either pen and paper, a tablet or a smartphone. They found that those who wrote the information in a notebook were able to record all the details faster than those who used an electronic device. Recalling the details in a brain scanner later, those who took written notes exhibited more activity in regions of their brain related to memory, language and navigation. According to the team, writing with paper involves unique, complex spatial and tactile information that provides the brain with more information to trigger memory. Taking notes on paper leads to more brain activity when you recall the information an hour later than when recalling text typed into a device, a study has found (stock image) 'Paper is more...
    Loading the player... Ruth E. Carter is an American costume designer, an artist, and a trailblazer whose work has helped Hollywood highlight our history for more than three decades. Throughout her career, she has profoundly influenced how we see ourselves, capturing entire eras, immortalizing moments in time, and truly defining what we look like onscreen. This week, she made history again when it was announced that she would be the first costume designer ever to be honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  PASADENA, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 01: Ruth E. Carter attends the 51st NAACP Image Awards – Nominees Luncheon on February 01, 2020 in Pasadena, California. (Photo by Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images) Read More: Ruth E. Carter becomes the first Black woman to win Oscar for Best Costume Design Born April 10, 1960, in Springfield, Massachusetts, Ruth E. Carter graduated from Hampton University before working at the Santa Fe Opera, later moving to Los Angeles in 1986, where she worked at Los Angeles Theater Center. There, she met Spike Lee, who hired her to work on his second film,...
    (CNN)The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has just released a road map for bringing students back to in-person instruction. About 89% of children in the US, however, live in a county considered a "red" zone with high levels of Covid-19 transmission under that new guidance, according to a CNN analysis of federal data.That's more than 65.3 million children who live in "high-transmission" communities, defined by the CDC as a county where there were at least 100 new Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people or a test positivity rate of at least 10% during the past seven days.The CDC guidance stresses five ways to mitigate risk: requiring masks, physical distancing, handwashing, maintaining clean facilities and contact tracing. Many schools have already been teaching students in the classroom at least part time, if not full time, and more will likely resume a combination of in-person and online learning or full in-person learning. Binasa Musovic (left), an educational paraprofessional, and teacher Chris Frank (right), instruct blended learning students on the first day back to school, December 7, 2020, at Yung Wing School...
    Scientists have discovered a new type of brain cell that helps us remember where we've left our personal belongings.  It's already know that GPS-like brain cells store 'maps' of the places we've been, like a kitchen or the inside of an office.  However, the newly-discovered Vector Trace cells enable us to identify objects – such as car keys or a mobile phone – within these 'mental maps'.   The British researcher behind the study claim future research on Vector Trace cells could help explain why people who suffer from dementia experience memory loss.  A new kind of brain cell has been discovered which will help to understand how we remember where we left objects, such as car keys and mobile phones. Damage to these cells may help explain memory loss in certain kinds of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Brain implant that monitors neural activity can forecast... Brain implants successfully restore rudimentary vision in... Human genes are inserted into MONKEY BRAINS causing them to... Paperclip-size brain chip is deemed 'life-altering'...
    BAD language is good for our mental health — with women just as likely as men to turn the air blue, a study found. Having a potty mouth like telly chef Gordon Ramsay helps us handle pain and problems much better. 1Swearing like telly chef Gordon Ramsay helps us handle pain and problems much better, a study has foundCredit: Getty - Contributor More than a quarter of Brits say swearing has helped them stay motivated during lockdown. Two fifths (41 per cent) admit they have sworn at themselves to boost enthusiasm. Cursing is also used to help cope with stress by more than a third (36 per cent). And a quarter (27 per cent) say it helps them feel better when they are having a bad day. Language expert Dr Emma Byrne said: “Swearing engages both sides of your brain, the language centre in the left brain and the emotional centre in the right brain, and the positive impact of this is far-reaching. “Dependent on the situation, profanity can serve as a painkiller, mood-booster or even social bonding tool....
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- ABC 7, Chicago's No. 1 station for news, will present a virtual town hall, exploring how three Chicago organizations: Asian Americans Advancing Justice/Chicago, Council on American Islamic Relations Chicago (CAIR) and Hollaback!, are taking a stand against anti-Asian attacks with a unique training program.ABC 7 Weekend Anchor/Reporter Ravi Baichwal will moderate OUR CHICAGO: Voices of the Community, an hour-long event available on abc7chicago.com, Thursday, Dec. 3 at 2 p.m.During the pandemic, verbal and physical attacks on members of the Asian American community have intensified. Illinois is ranked fourth among states for the highest number of these incidents. With COVID-19 cases surging across the country, the Asian American community is bracing for more racist harassment and attacks. To tackle the problem head on, Asian Americans Advancing Justice, CAIR/Chicago and Hollaback! are joining forces. This town hall will examine their efforts to provide a virtual bystander intervention training program to help victims of harassment. Ravi will talk to these community leaders to learn more about this unique program and what attendees experience during training.Guest panelists confirmed to date: Andy...
    IT seems D is the magic letter. A new study says taking vitamin D supplements may reduce the risk of cancer by up to 38 per cent. The “sunshine supplement” is also thought to help fight Covid-19, with the Government ­planning to hand out free supplies to vulnerable people. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 7Follow our guide to beating disease and illness with the help of vitaminsCredit: Getty Images - Getty Here in our A-Z guide, we show the best and most useful vitamins, minerals and natural supplements along with easy ways to boost your intake. A What it does: Vital for the immune system, healthy skin, vision and to help our organs function properly. It can cause bone damage if you consume too much,though. How to get it: Meat, dairy, eggs and oily fish. Vegans need foods high in beta-carotene. B What it does: There are eight B vitamins, with functions including the breakdown, use and storage of energy from food, keeping the nervous system healthy and forming healthy red blood...
    Richard D. Wolff July 17, 2020 10:30AM (UTC) This article was produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute. In January 2020, the NASDAQ stock market's index stood just under 10,000. In the March crash, it fell to 7,000. As of July 10, 2020, it hit 10,600. The U.S. government's economic policies produced a "recovery" for the rich who own the vast bulk of stocks. Their holdings are worth more now than before COVID-19 hit us. The other major benchmarks for securities, the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the Standard and Poor 500, show similarly dramatic, slightly smaller recoveries. Massive government economic intervention—what most of its current beneficiaries have always denounced—subsidized those recoveries. The Federal Reserve pumped unprecedented amounts of new money into the U.S. economy after mid-March. That money poured into the stock market and fueled its rise. The U.S. Treasury provided unprecedented direct cash supports to much of corporate America. : Over the same time, government economic support for the working class was too little, too late, and totally inadequate to what could and...
    Miles Yu, who witnessed the devastation of Mao’s Cultural Revolution as a boy growing up in China, has now emerged as one of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s most influential advisers on U.S.-Sino relations. Below are excerpts of an interview Washington Times correspondent Bill Gertz recently conducted with Mr. Yu, now a senior member of the policy planning staff in Mr. Pompeo’s office.: TWT: Tell me about your background. Where were you born and what was it like growing up during the Cultural Revolution? Miles Yu: I was born in an obscure small place in eastern China’s Anhui province but grew up in the Chongqing area in southwestern China. My primary and middle school years were during the Cultural Revolution. Although I was too young to actively take part in the political madness, my childhood innocence was brutally upended by the communist revolution’s violence, absurdity, ideological shriek, destruction of social trust and public mores, and utter hatred for anything Western or “bourgeois”. These childhood experiences and memories have forged my elemental distaste for revolutionary radicalism and my deep disdain for...
1