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    Ruh-Roh. Warner Bros. altered the new popular video game Scooby Doo ‘MultiVersus’ after user feedback branded Velma a 'Karen' because of her tendency to call the police when a crime was successfully solved.  Velma, the bookish brunette member of the crime-solving gang, was designed in the new game to be able to flash a 'wanted' poster and signal for the cops to come once enough evidence had been gathered against a suspect. But that move did not fly with some of the 20 million users who have played the free game that features characters from across the Warner Bros. Discovery catalogue since its July release.  Without announcing a reason, Warner Bros. changed the game last week. Velma now calls her Mystery Squad pals to cart off adversaries Members of the original Scooby Gang (from left to right: Daphne, Fred & Velma) work to solve crimes in Warner Bros.' new 'MultiVersus' video game The game was met with generally positive reviews and has become popular with online users but dissatisfaction with white woman Velma's special ability to call the cops on...
    Leonia residents and merchants are invited to assess the borough's police department as part of a process known as accreditation. Members of the department and borough employees also are encouraged to call during the scheduled phone-in period from 10-11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 19. THE NUMBER: (201) 592-5759 Telephone comments will be fielded by an assessment team from the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police, whose members will examine “all aspects of the Leonia Police Department’s policies and procedures, management, operations, and support services,” Police Chief Scott Tamagny said. Comments are limited to 5 minutes and “must address the agency’s ability to comply with the accreditation standards,” Tamagny said. You could also email kseminerio@leonianj.gov or write to the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police, Law Enforcement Accreditation Commission at 11,000 Lincoln Drive West, Suite 12, Marlton, NJ 08053. Verification by the team that the department meets the commission’s "best practice" standards is "part of a voluntary process to achieve accreditation, a highly prized recognition of law enforcement professional excellence,” Tamagny said. Accreditation results in greater...
    (CNN)As details about failures of the police response to the school massacre in Uvalde, Texas, have trickled out through leaks and incomplete official reviews, it's still not clear more than two months later to what extent any of the agencies involved are investigating individual and systemic mistakes in the response to the most deadly US campus shooting in nearly a decade. Residents, policing experts, other law enforcement officials, state leaders and lawmakers all have criticized police from more than 20 agencies on scene that day for the delay in confronting a spree shooter who was in classrooms at Robb Elementary for more than an hour with 21 people he fatally shot and 17 others injured.What we know about the victims at Robb Elementary SchoolOfficials representing agencies involved in the immediate response largely have avoided talking about their internal investigations -- if acknowledging them at all -- including whether their goals include discipline for officers or others, or a focus on how similar incidents could be handled better, or both. Also not entirely clear are steps they may be taking to...
    Four people were charged during a detail targeting alcohol and drug impaired drivers on Long Island. Officers from the Suffolk County Police Highway Patrol Bureau targeted multiple roadways leading in and out of Patchogue Village for offenses that involved driving a motor vehicle while ability impaired by alcohol, drugs, or a combination of both, according to police.  The special saturation patrol operation involved the use of several Drug Recognition Experts (DRE), officers who are specially trained at identifying drug impaired drivers, said police.  The detail  was part of ongoing Memorial Day holiday crackdown operations targeting alcohol and drug impaired driving. Christopher Miller, age 26, of Mastic Beach, and Jake Delloiacono, age 27, of Medford, were charged with driving while intoxicated, police announced. Michael Morlock, age 29, of Miller Place, was charged with driving while ability impaired by combined alcohol and drugs, said police. Victor Lituma Vicuna, age 27, of East Hampton, was charged with driving while ability impaired by drugs, according to police. All were held overnight at the Sixth Precinct and were scheduled to be arraigned at First...
    The Capitol Police's chief admits that the organization struggles to get staffed. While the Capitol Police have experienced several reforms since the events of Jan. 6, the organization is still struggling to acquire enough staff to accommodate Congress's needs. "We are now really about 400 officers short of where we need to be," Chief J. Thomas Manger told Trace Gallagher on Fox News Sunday. FIVE MAJOR ISSUES THE MILITARY FACES IN 2022 Manger noted that the Capitol Police have lost more than 130 officers through retirements or resignations since the Jan. 6 riots. Manger also noted that the National Federal Law Enforcement Training Academy suspended classes in 2020, making the acquisition of new officers harder. This understaffing occurs concurrently with an increased number of threats to Congress, Manger said. "We've had to really shift the focus of just doing the typical job that we would do normally and put more resources toward investigating those complaints," Manger said. "Ensuring that members of Congress are safe not only when they are at the Capitol, but...
    During an interview released on Friday’s “Megyn Kelly Show,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) reacted to Democrats responding to crime increases by pushing for more gun control by stating, “First, they take the police away from me, then they take the ability for me to protect myself away.” McCarthy said, “I had this person talk to me the other day, and he has his own small business…and he goes, you know, it’s getting very scary now because of defunding the police. The crime is rising. And I’ve never felt that I needed to protect myself or carry a weapon because I thought the police were there. Now, they’re not. I need to get a concealed weapon. But now the Democrats are making it more difficult for me to even protect myself. First, they take the police away from me, then they take the ability for me to protect myself away.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
    The Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that police cannot "categorically" justify a warrantless entry into a misdemeanor suspect's home. In a mostly unanimous decision, the court found that the Fourth Amendment generally protects people from impromptu police searches. The case is one of several Fourth Amendment disputes the high court has heard in the past year. Justice Elena Kagan wrote the court's majority opinion. A number of justices also filed concurrences. SUPREME COURT TO DECIDE IF POLICE CAN ENTER MISDEMEANOR SUSPECTS' HOMES WITHOUT A WARRANT The case came out of a traffic stop in California. A patrolman spotted the suspect, Arthur Lange, playing loud music and honking his horn while driving on the highway. He believed Lange was drunk and followed him home. At Lange's house, the patrolman entered Lange's garage and charged him with drunk driving after smelling alcohol on his breath. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit ruled against Lange, finding that the police officer had a “hot pursuit” carve-out from Fourth Amendment protections. Kagan wrote that while there are some exceptions for police...
    Residents of cities where crime has spiraled amid deep police cuts are being denied their right to defend themselves just when they need it more than ever, say gun rights supporters. The nation's strictest gun laws have long been in the urban centers of blue states. With many of those cities moving to defund their own police departments, violent crime is leaving an unarmed citizenry at the mercy of outlaws, one Second Amendment backer said. "If you’re primarily disarming the most law-abiding good citizens who obey the law, you make it easier for criminals to go and commit crimes," John Lott, a former Trump administration adviser and the author of More Guns, Less Crime, told the Washington Examiner. The gun debate is not new, but the crime wave that followed last summer's movement to slash municipal police forces has given it a new urgency. In Minneapolis, where George Floyd's murder at the hands of a police officer spawned the "defund the police" movement, total violent crimes are up nearly 15% year-to-date, with the homicide rate twice...
    A landmark Supreme Court decision Thursday expanded the ability of people to sue police for excessive force — with justices saying that cops don’t have to physically seize a plaintiff to violate their Fourth Amendment rights. The nation’s top court ruled in favor of a New Mexico woman who filed a civil rights lawsuit after she was shot by cops who she thought were criminals trying to steal her car. In a 5-3 decision, justices ruled that Roxanne Torres could continue suing New Mexico State Police for violating the Constitution’s illegal search and seizure ban, even though she had not been seized in the incident. In 2014, four cops approached Torres with guns drawn while she sat in her car at an Albuquerque apartment complex. Torres drove off, mistaking the officers as car jackers. Police fired 13 shots, hitting her twice as she fled the scene. Torres was arrested at a hospital and convicted of fleeing from a law enforcement officer. “We hold that the application of physical force to the body of a person with intent to restrain...
    GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ENGLAND – OOCTOBER 10: Amidst the houses and the car parks sits GCHQ the Government Communications Headquarters in this aerial photo taken on October 10, 2005. (Photo by David Goddard/Getty Images) – Getty Images Police officers, intelligence agents and legal experts are going to work together in a new Counter Terrorism Operations Centre, in an attempt to better thwart terror attacks. Details of the new unit, which is already dubbed ‘CTOC’ in law enforcement circles, will be announced as Boris Johnson unveils his 10-year vision for foreign policy. The centre is an attempt to avoid weaknesses in counter-terrorism operations revealed in 2017, when Britain suffered five terror incidents in a single year. Counter-terrorism officers, agents from MI5, MI6 and GCHQ, and judicial experts are all expected to be seconded to CTOC, improving cross-agency working. The centre will both plan how to avoid future potential terror attacks and act as an operational hub if such an incident occurs. It will be based at an as-yet undisclosed London location and go live later this year, gradually scaling up to full capacity....
    A police officer in Maricopa, Ariz. was given a 20-hour suspension after the death of his K9 partner Ike. The nine-year-old Dutch Shepherd was left inside Officer Craig Curry's patrol vehicle last summer for an hour and 40 minutes during a meeting at the Maricopa Police headquarters. Maricopa Police policy advises officers to check on their K9 partners at least once every 30 minutes, according to KNXV, the ABC affiliated TV station in Phoenix. K9 SHOT THREE TIMES IN TENNESSEE, UNDERGOES EMERGENCY SURGERY In an internal investigation of the June 26, 2020 incident, Curry said he had left the car with the engine running, the air conditioning on the third fan speed and the coldest temperature setting, and the windows rolled up and doors locked.  Upon his return, the officer found that the engine had shut down and Ike -- stuck in the built-in K9 kennel near the trunk -- had suffered heatstroke. The high temperature for that day was around 107 degrees, according to the department's report.  Curry attempted to restart the car multiple times, but it would not comply. He then ran back inside the building to...
    (CNN)More than 30 House members sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Thursday requesting more flexibility for using their congressional allowances toward helping their personal safety by hiring local law enforcement or other security personnel for their home district offices."While the U.S. Capitol is protected by the United States Capitol Police with the support of strong security measures, including vehicle barriers and metal detectors, most Members spend the majority of their time in their Congressional Districts where security is often sparse," they wrote in the letter. "Protecting Members in their District is much harder because local law enforcement agencies are stretched and limited, and often don't have sufficient staffing or money to provide regular protection to Members. Except for Leadership, Members do not have security details protecting them."Thursday's letter took issue with existing rules regarding the rules governing member allowance use, describing the protocols as "constrictive and anachronistic, set in a time before the current"CBS News first reported the letter.The request is the latest development in a string of reactions to the...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A policing commission said Baltimore city police lacks the ability to detect and punish officer misconduct. The Commission To Restore Public Trust In Policing was created to get to the bottom the corruption in the Gun Trace Task Force and how it went unchecked for so long. Several members of the GTTF, an elite city police unit, were convicted of corruption. Its effects of mistrust and civil lawsuits are still being felt. A 184-page document released on Dec. 2 lays out what went wrong and how to better prevent future corruption at the city police department. “What was the agency doing to detect this? What was the agency doing to deter this?” said Sean Malone, a commission member. Malone said Baltimore Police Department’s current leadership is on the right track. But, internal affairs complaints against the corrupt GTTF members piled up. Two of the officers had twenty or more internal affairs complaints. “Why were these officers even allowed into a unit with such freedom when many of them had complaints in the double digits from citizens?” asked...
    Time and again we have seen bills pushed to control the ability of women of color to make our own reproductive health decisions, from when to become pregnant and raise children to creating more obstacles to abortion access. We heard the horrific news that immigrant women were being forced to have hysterectomies — and over the past year, bans on abortion have swept the nation. Let’s be clear: This is all part of a political agenda to deny autonomy to women of color. We are told when we can and can’t have kids, and what kind of health care we are allowed to get. This is all while people ignore the very real plight that Black women are facing when we seek to try to have healthy pregnancies. Black women are dying in childbirth at the same time I hear lawmakers talk about how much they value life. Where is the care for the lives of Black women when it comes to Breonna Taylor, who was gunned down by police, or Deidre Johnson, a 35-year-old woman in Colorado...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- Sitting in the dining room of her home in Oakland, Elna Hall is on a Zoom call with her youngest son. "Did you have a great day at school?" she asks with a big smile on her face.Elna's son attends a school out of state that specializes in working with young people on the autism spectrum."I love you, Mom," he says as they end the call."He's just a great kid. He's sweet and he's kind and even though his language is very limited, he's very emotionally expressive. He loves to build, loves to draw, loves to sing and listen to music."Elna is obviously very protective of her son, so when they moved to a new neighborhood a few years ago in a different city, she made it a point to take him to the police station and introduce them to her youngest son. "The fear was that, number one, he wouldn't be assumed to be a resident of the community. That, number two, he'd be seen as a threat, as a stranger, as someone who could...
    Ocean City, Maryland, officials are claiming that how it handled a pop-up car rally over the weekend, that saw hundreds arrested and clashes with police, was successful. Mayor Rick Meehan said the city’s response to the unofficial H20i rally was a “success in the fact that we made a statement; we had a plan in place. We adopted that plan successfully.” Meehan was joined Monday by Ocean City police Chief Ross Buzzuro as they provided an update on what happened over the past week and weekend. “I would say that success may not be the appropriate word,” Buzzuro said. “I would say that the measures that we introduced through legislation, exhibition driving and heightened fines, and the ability to tow vehicles that were deemed unsafe, those measures assisted us greatly.” Buzzuro said that tens of thousands descended into the city, rivaling Fourth of July weekend numbers. “So with that number of people and the measures we were able to introduce, (that) gave us an ability to maintain control virtually throughout the four to five days of this event. So in...
    He might be riding high in the polls, but Joe Biden’s mental acuity increasingly is an issue in the election campaign, and growling at reporters who ask about it is no way to alleviate voter concerns. Asked during an event with the National Associations of Black and Hispanic Journalists if he had “taken a cognitive test,” Biden snapped. “No, I haven’t taken a test! Why the hell would I take a test? C’mon, man!” Frowning and irritated, he paused before ripping into the reporter, Errol Barnett of CBS News. “That’s like saying you, before you got on this program, if you take a test where you’re taking cocaine or not, what do you think? Huh? Are you a junkie?” said Biden in an interview to be streamed Thursday. Ouch. Barnett had hit a nerve, and Biden’s flash of anger was a reminder of his interview with black man in May, radio host Charlamagne tha God, when Biden blurted out the ruinous line that if you vote for Trump, “you ain’t black.” This time, Biden’s startling go-to defense was to accuse...
    An organization representing 1,200 Montgomery County, Maryland, police officers called legislation restricting use of force “extremely flawed” and said the council bill would make it “difficult to protect the health and safety of law enforcement,” as well as the public. In a statement on the organization’s website, Lee Holland, corporate vice president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 35, called for a veto of the legislation and complained the council engaged in a “closed-door process.” The statement said that members’ voices were “muzzled” by the legislative process, although Holland testified before the council’s Public Safety Committee on July 9. Holland said three letters submitted to Council President Sidney Katz were not included in the legislative packet on the bill. The bill passed by the county council prohibits or limits police from using “carotid restraints,” known commonly as chokeholds, bars police from striking a restrained person and shooting at or from a moving vehicle. The bill also restricts the use of no-knock warrants. The FOP argues the bill limits an officer’s ability to investigate crimes and creates different standards for...
    Seattle’s police chief issued a memo over the weekend, warning the city’s residents and business owners that police officers would not be able to “safely intercede” in the event that homes and businesses were targeted during expected protests after the city’s council passed a measure barring cops from using non-lethal crowd control methods. The new measure, passed as a way of preventing members of the police force from using excessive force, “bans Seattle Police officers the use of less-lethal tools, including pepper spray that is commonly used to disperse crowds that have turned violent,” according to Chief Carmen Best’s letter. “Please know that the Seattle Police Department is committed to addressing life safety incidents and calls for service, and responding to ongoing demonstrations and unrest in the city,” the chief’s memo reads. “Please also know that the City Council Ordinance 119805 Crowd Control Tool goes into effect this weekend on Sunday, July 26, 2020. This ordinance bans Seattle Police officers the use of less-lethal tools, including pepper spray that is commonly used to disperse crowds that have turned violent. Simply...
    The police chief in Seattle wrote a letter to business owners and residents reminding them officers will not be able to use nonlethal weapons when attempting to disperse large gatherings starting this weekend, citing a newly-passed city ordinance. "Please know that the Seattle Police Department is committed to addressing life safety incidents and calls for service, and responding to ongoing demonstrations and unrest in the city," said Chief Carmen Best in a letter dated July 24. "Please also know that the City Council Ordinance 119805 Crowd Control Tool goes into effect this weekend on Sunday, July 26, 2020. This ordinance bans Seattle Police officers the use of less lethal tools, including pepper spray that is commonly used to disperse crowds that have turned violent. Simply put, the legislation gives officers no ability to safely intercede to preserve property in the midst of a large, violent crowd." Best said she separately sent the city a letter ensuring leaders that she has "done my due diligence of informing them numerous times of the foreseeable impact of this ordinance on...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — As George Floyd repeatedly pleaded “I can’t breathe” to police officers holding him down on a Minneapolis street corner, some of the officers responded by pointing out he was able to speak. One told Floyd it takes “a lot of oxygen” to talk, while another told angry bystanders that Floyd was “talking, so he can breathe.” That reaction — seen in police restraint deaths around the country — is dangerously wrong, medical experts say. While it would be right to believe a person who can’t talk also cannot breathe, the reverse is not true – speaking does not imply that someone is getting enough air to survive. “The ability to speak does not mean the patient is without danger,” said Dr. Mariell Jessup, chief science and medical officer of the American Heart Association. “To speak, you only have to move air through the upper airways and the vocal cords, a very small amount,” and that does not mean that enough air is getting down into the lungs where it can supply the rest of the body with...
              Ohio House Democrats introduced a bill Thursday that would restrain state law enforcement’s ability to secure military grade-equipment. House Bill (HB) 721, which was introduced by state Representatives Casey Weinstein (D-Hudson) and Erica Crawley (D-Columbus), wants to reform Ohio’s participation in the federal program 1033. This program provides law enforcement agencies with military equipment from the Defense Logistics Agency at discounted rates or no cost. If HB 721 did become law, it would prevent the transfer of “drones, aircraft, grenades, grenade launchers and weaponized armored vehicles from the Defense Logistics Agency to local law enforcement agencies,” according to Crawley’s press release. “This type of military-grade equipment was largely intended to be used in counter-terrorism activity by trained military personnel. Deploying this equipment in the field is counterproductive and proves to be escalatory,” said Rep. Weinstein. “In the exceedingly rare event where the use of military-grade equipment might become necessary, it should be properly trained members of the military responding, not law enforcement.” Crawley said that Ohio must address how the militarization of law...
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