Monday, Dec 05, 2022 - 06:34:21
12 results - (0.001 seconds)

Michigan charter schools:

latest news at page 1:
1
    by Bruce Walker   Election of Democratic majorities in the Michigan House and Senate is a warning shot for the state’s public charter schools. The incoming bicameral majorities and reelected Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer have already signaled antipathy toward public charter schools. Drawing much of the Democrats’ ire are for-profit education management organizations operating 42% of public charter schools in Detroit alone as of 2021. Holly Wetzel, director of public relations for the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, told The Center Square that Whitmer already has supported cutting state aid for public online charter schools and warned the governor could roll back the lift on enrollment caps that former Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, signed into law in 2011. “It is likely that charter schools will unfortunately continue to face proposed budget decreases, potential closures, and other attacks from Democratic lawmakers this upcoming session,” Wetzel said. “This would be a slap in the face to the nearly 10% of Michigan students who choose to attend charter schools. Charter schools across the state have historically outperformed their neighboring district schools, despite receiving...
    by Bruce Walker   Student enrollment for Michigan charter schools increased each year during the pandemic while traditional public-school enrollments dropped. Data compiled by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools tracked three years of enrollments during the pandemic and show Michigan’s charter schools had a 2.14% increase, or 3,147 students, between 2019 and 2022. NAPCS researchers relied on available public records for its study of 41 states, concluding charter school enrollment increased in 39 of the 41 states covered by the study during the three years of the pandemic. Only 41 states have public charter schools. The NAPCS study “Changing Course: Public School Enrollment Shifts During the Pandemic” also reports Michigan charter schools added 2,139 students, a 1.45% increase, during the first two years of the pandemic while traditional public-school enrollment in the state fell by 3.7% or 48,318 students. In third year impacted by the pandemic, Michigan’s charter schools added 1,008 students for an increase of 0.67% while traditional public-school enrollment in the state fell by 0.54%. Noting Michigan charter schools educate approximately 10% of the state’s total...
    by J.D. Davidson   A group of Ohio and Michigan charter schools sued the Biden administration today, claiming a new rule that requires charter schools to prove public schools are over-enrolled is illegal. The federal lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan, includes the Michigan Charter School Association and the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a nonprofit charter school authorizer that supervises 13 charter schools in Ohio. The new rule, which received a shortened 35-day comment period and 26,000 unique comments, took effect Aug. 5. “This new rule will profoundly harm children who need the educational opportunities that charter schools provide,” said Dan Quisenberry, president of Michigan’s Charter School Association. “Charter schools shouldn’t be punished just because traditional public schools – and the current administration – don’t like them.” Congress expanded the federal Charter Schools Program in 2015, appropriating hundreds of millions of dollars. It also established instructions and criteria for distributing the money. The new rule requires charter schools must prove traditional public schools are both failing and over-enrolled. Charters must also seek...
    The updated requirement includes an "invitational priority to encourage collaborations between charter and traditional public schools or districts that benefit students and families across schools." Kruckenberg points out that this rule is contradictory to the purpose of the charter school system. He states that charters "work as an alternative to schools that aren't doing what they're supposed to." The final problematic criterion, Kruckenberg noted, is the "racial balancing component to the new rule." The DOE requires that the charter school must demonstrate that it will "increase the availability of high-quality public school options for underserved students, promote racial and socio-economic diversity in such community or have an educational mission to serve primarily underserved students, and not increase racial or socio-economic segregation or isolation in the school districts from which students would be drawn to attend the charter school." Kruckenberg explained that this last requirement means "the new charter school project can't racially isolate or segregate students either in the charter school or in the public schools that they're getting their students from." The complaint filed by the charter school...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The president of Michigan’s Hillsdale College was riding high earlier this year when he announced plans to launch 50 charter schools in Tennessee after Gov. Bill Lee originally asked for 100. Six months later, that relationship has cooled after Hillsdale’s Larry Arnn made disparaging comments about educators, telling an audience including Lee that teachers “are trained in the dumbest parts of the dumbest colleges.” The comments inspired outrage among lawmakers, teachers and other public school advocates already skeptical of the plans. Now the Republican governor — long known as a charter school and voucher advocate — has distanced himself from Arnn, leaving the fate of charters connected to the small, conservative college in doubt. Since Arnn’s comments, three Hillsdale-affiliated charter school applications in Tennessee have been rejected by school boards in Jackson-Madison, Clarksville-Montgomery and Rutherford counties. A spokesperson for Hillsdale College declined to comment on the rejected applications and did not respond to a request to interview Arnn. It’s unknown when or if the additional 47 charter schools promised will ever materialize. No new legislation...
    The Michigan Republican Party is releasing an ad outlining several ways Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) “failed” the students of her state and fought to close down schools. The ad, titled “Whitmer Failed Our Students,” provided to Breitbart News in advance of its release, features headlines and newscasters detailing the dismal state of Michigan’s public schools. “Michigan is shaping up to be the latest battleground for education after the state Democrat party dismissed parents and what their kids learn inside of the classroom,” one of the newscasters says, referring to a Facebook post in which the state Democrat Party dismissed parents entirely, arguing that they are not “the client of the public school.” “Not sure where this ‘parents-should-control-what-is-taught-in-schools-because-they-are-our-kids’ is originating, but parents do have the option to choose to send their kids to a hand-selected private school at their own expense if that is what they want,” the now-deleted post began [emphasis in original]. “The purpose of a public education in a public school is not to teach kids only what parents want them to be taught. It is to...
    Three new public charter schools are opening their doors for Michigan students this fall, including the state’s first charter school in the Keweenaw Peninsula. The three new schools are Copper Island Academy in Calumet; Bridge Academy of Southwest Michigan in Benton Harbor; and New Dawn Academy in Sterling Heights. “At a time when Michigan parents seeking education options more than ever it would be good to see more of these opportunities,” Mackinac Center for Public Policy Education Director Ben DeGrow told The Center Square. “I hope to see more of these options in the future.” There are now 294 public charter schools in Michigan, a number that takes into account the three new schools and the closing of another, ACE Academy, a Strict Discipline Academy located in Highland Park. Serving grades K-8, Copper Island Academy’s curriculum is modeled on the traditional Finnish method of classical education. “The staff and administration at Copper Island Academy is a team of experienced and qualified educators with deep ties to the area,” Michigan Association of Public School Academies Vice...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The Michigan Senate voted unanimously Tuesday to allocate nearly $4.4 billion in federal COVID-19 aid to K-12 schools after Republican lawmakers and Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s administration reached an agreement. The supplemental budget bill would account for all but $362 million in unallotted school funding from U.S. rescue packages approved in March and December. The House is expected to send the measure to the governor as soon as Wednesday. READ MORE: Michigan Reports 182 New COVID-19 Cases, 26 Deaths The vote was a sign of progress weeks after Whitmer and GOP legislative leaders announced the framework of a deal to open budget talks after Republicans for months tried to curb her emergency pandemic powers. Negotiations continue over the 2021-22 budget and how to use billions in discretionary coronavirus aid. “I appreciate the movement and there is a lot more work to do,” state budget director Dave Massaron said. READ MORE: Will The Ford Maverick Be A Game-Changer In The Auto Industry? Under federal law, school districts and charter schools with higher numbers or portions of poor...
    Public charter schools say Freedom of Information requests from the State Board of Education. The SBE voted 6-2 to direct Michigan Department of Education staff to file what charter schools claim are ‘harassing’ FOIA seeking information the state already has. The vote came after Western Michigan University Professor Gary Miron last April told the Board charter schools aren’t transparent about how management companies running charter schools spend their money. Miron said separate companies don’t have to disclose salaries they pay charter school employees in much the same fashion traditional public schools aren't required to report what they pay vendors. This was the motion the state board approved: “The State Board’s Legislative Committee recommends that the full State Board of Education direct the Michigan Department of Education to research and prepare, prior to the end of summer, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests of a cross-section of public school academies (PSAs) and education management organizations (EMOs) to help ascertain the extent to which PSAs and EMOs hold – and are held – to the same standards of...
            by Bruce Walker  Remarks made by Michigan State Board of Education Vice President Pamela Pugh last month provoked fiery responses Tuesday from the state’s charter school community. In her controversial comments, made Nov. 23 before the Michigan Civil Rights Commission, Pugh advocated cutting state funds for Michigan’s charter schools by 25%. The recommended cut also is included in the MCRC’s “Education Equity in Michigan” report issued on Sept. 30. Pugh also repeated several inaccuracies contained within the MCRC report, including a claim that charter schools are not bound by the same rules and regulations as traditional public schools. She also incorrectly asserted charter schools only skim the best and brightest students from traditional public schools while rejecting students with special needs. “It’s not OK for a member of the State Board of Education to tell lies about charter schools, and it’s even more of an outrage that she’s now recommending that charter school students be treated like they’re only three-quarters of a person,” Dan Quisenberry, president of the Michigan Association of Public School Academies, told The Center Square....
            by Bruce Walker  A report recommending expanded government oversight of Michigan’s charter schools has prompted a rebuttal from the Mackinac Center for Public Policy (MCPP). “Improving Oversight of Michigan Charter Schools and Their Authorizers” was issued on Feb. 25 by the Levin Center at Wayne State University Law School, which had commissioned the study from the Citizens Research Council of Michigan (CRC), a Michigan-based think tank. The MCPP authors take issue with much of the methodology and conclusions presented by the CRC. The free-market MCPP historically has been an advocate of public charter schools. MCPP Director of Research Michael Van Beek and Director of Education Policy Ben DeGrow authored the policy brief, titled “Evidence Required: A Critical Review of ‘Improving Oversight of Michigan Charter Schools and Their Authorizers,’” released Thursday. “Over more than 50 pages, the [CRC] report provides many valuable insights into how charter schools operate, but it fails to justify the core assumptions upon which its arguments are based,” the MCPP writers said. The CRC did not respond to requests for comment. “It’s remarkable that after more than 25...
            by Scott McClallen  A former Democratic lawmaker disagrees with recommendations from the “Education Equity in Michigan,” report the Michigan Civil Rights Commission (MCRC) adopted Wednesday. The report was issued after the MCRC held statewide public hearings in 2018 and 2019. Buzz Thomas was the Democratic Leader of the Michigan House and the Democratic Floor Leader of the Michigan Senate in the late 1990s and the early 2000s and is the board chair of Michigan Association of Public School Academies (MAPSA), the state charter school association. Although most of the report contains positive recommendations, Thomas disagreed with “inaccurate and insulting” descriptions of charter schools and the advice to cut charter school funding. Thomas sent a letter Friday explaining his concerns to the MCRC and Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, neither of which responded to a request for comment by the time of publishing. The MCRC recommended Proposal A of the Michigan Constitution be amended, so charter school students only receive 75 percent of the state foundation grant that goes to other public school students. “Schools and students also would be helped by...
1