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    (CNN)Nurse Katie Sefton never thought Covid-19 could get this bad -- and certainly not this late in the pandemic. "I was really hoping that we'd (all) get vaccinated and things would be back to normal," said Sefton, an assistant manager at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, Michigan.But this week Michigan had more patients hospitalized for Covid-19 than ever before. Covid-19 hospitalizations jumped 88% in the past month, according to the Michigan Health & Hospital Association."We have more patients than we've ever had at any point, and we're seeing more people die at a rate we've never seen die before," said Jim Dover, president and CEO of Sparrow Health System. Katie Sefton said she's now seeing younger patients die from Covid-19. "Since January, we've had about 289 deaths; 75% are unvaccinated people," Dover said. "And the very few (vaccinated people) who passed away all were more than 6 months out from their shot. So we've not had a single person who has had a booster shot die from Covid." Read MoreAmong the new Covid-19 victims, Sefton said she's noticed a disturbing trend."We're...
    People with Down's syndrome, sickle cell disease and kidney transplant patients are most at risk of dying from the coronavirus after having two vaccines, experts have found. Findings from a tool developed by UK researchers concluded that those with certain conditions are up to 12 times more likely to be hospitalised or die from the virus after being jabbed, compared to healthy people.  And the likelihood of hospitalisation and dying from Covid also increased as people got older, while men and those of Indian and Pakistani origin were at higher risk. A person's overall risk from severe health outcomes after being double-jabbed is still very small, with the vaccines having already tens of thousands of lives. But the study confirms that those who were already at-risk before being vaccinated are still more likely to be hospitalised or die if they catch it, compared to healthy double-jabbed people. Researchers said the calculator can help the Government make policy decisions, such as who should be given additional Covid vaccines. And medics can use it to make clinical decisions, such as which patients...
    Jakarta (CNN)Taufiq Hidayat enters the homes of the dead to claim bodies no one will touch.He leads a dozen volunteer undertakers who take calls from grieving families in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta, the center of one of the world's largest Covid-19 outbreaks."It's really tough and hot for us because we are always in full hazmat suit while trying to navigate small alleys and high floors with a body in tow," said Taufiq.The number of calls has eased since the peak of Indonesia's second wave in mid-July, but there are still reports of people dying at home, despite new capacity in the country's hospitals and isolation centers, where thousands of beds are sitting empty.So far this month, almost 50 people have died at home from Covid-19, according to LaporCovid-19, an online citizen reporting platform that receives information from families and local officials.Taufiq Hidayat's team collects the bodies of people who have died at home from Covid-19 in Jakarta, Indonesia.Read MoreThe number surged during July to around 2,400 -- a sixfold increase from June, according to Fariz Iban, the site's data analyst,...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) — The coronavirus delta variant is raging across the nation with cases and hospitalizations spiking, especially in Florida, which leads the nation in new COVID-19 hospitalizations. Florida is the only state in the country with 25 percent or more of its hospital beds occupied by COVID patients. Nearly 13 thousand COVID patients are hospitalized in Florida, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. READ MORE: Fourth Stimulus Check: Could There Be Another Relief Payment? That has left hospitals coping with overflow and expanding their workspaces. Memorial West Hospital in Pembroke Pines has set up a makeshift area in the cafeteria and a conference room to help patients who do not have the coronavirus. Doctors and nurses are challenged by what they are seeing. Bryan James is a physician’s assistant at Memorial Regional Hospital. “What we are seeing is that they are coming back stronger and they are coming in younger and sicker. Unfortunately, they are dying quicker I hate to say. But we are dealing with that but that is why we are so frustrated,”...
    A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool claims to calculate a patient's risk of dying from COVID-19 and associated variants by scanning for heightened blood vessel inflammation.  Scientists at the University of Oxford trained an algorithm to spot a COVID-19 signature in chest CT scans. The technology detects abnormalities in fat surrounding blood vessels in order to measure the level of inflammation caused by cytokines in infected patients. Those with heightened blood vessel inflammation were up to eight times more likely to die in the hospital due to the virus, but were also found to respond well to an anti-inflammatory drug that had a six-fold reduction in risk of dying. The team believes the innovation could personalize treatment and allow specialists to administer anti-inflammatory drugs faster to save the person's life.   Severe cases of COVID-19 have been associated with a cytokine storm, which is caused by the immune system flooding the bloodstream with specific proteins called cytokines that cause inflammation as a response to the virus.  Scroll down for video  Using this information, scientists at the University of Oxford trained...
    No one in India is safe. This infection has seeped so deeply into the community that it is impossible to avoid the virus with its new, seemingly more infectious mutations, spreading through entire families like wildfire. Yesterday, India recorded a record coronavirus death toll for the third day running. Since Wednesday, there have been more than one million infections in what has now been described as the most deadly outbreak in the world. The worst affected areas, including New Delhi, Mumbai and the state of Maharashtra, have run out of hospital beds and oxygen, the lifesaver that Covid sufferers most desperately need. And patients are suffocating to death because of the shortage – 21 in a single hospital, it was reported yesterday. The government is now deploying military planes and trains to rush oxygen to the capital while the High Court has ruled anyone found obstructing supplies will face the death penalty. The first wave, which struck six months ago, proved to be manageable. Younger people were hardly affected. Now, the under-40s are sick too. Two-month-old babies are becoming infected....
    Dr Joseph Alpert (pictured), a professor of medicine at the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center, wrote that, last year, one-third of non-COVID patients were being consulted about hospice care compared to the usual one patient A doctor is warning that Americans with serious illnesses are dying due to fear of contracting COVID-19. Dr Joseph Alpert, a professor of medicine at the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center, says that during the course of the pandemic there are still millions of hospitalized patients suffering from conditions such as heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, by the time they get to the hospital, they are usually very sick because they have delayed seeking the life-saving medical care they need. In an op-ed in the American Journal of Medicine, Alpert, who is the Editor-in-Chief, writes that 'a massive education effort' is needed to assuage the fears of patients with potentially deadly conditions and to convince them that hospitals are safe.  During the coronavirus wave in Arizona last year, Alpert was not working with COVID-19 patients, instead attending in the Internal Medicine and...
    New York : One of the most devastating elements of the coronavirus pandemic has been the inability to personally care for loved ones who have become ill. Time and again, grieving family members have recounted how more devastating their loved one’s death was because they were unable to hold their hand to provide a comforting, familiar presence in their final days and hours. Some had to say your last goodbye through a mobile phone screen held by a healthcare worker. Others resorted to the use of walkie-talkies or to greet family members through the windows. How can you overcome the overwhelming pain and guilt that comes when you think of a loved one dying alone? I don’t have an answer to this question. But the work of a hospice doctor named Christopher Kerr, with whom I wrote the book “Death Is But a Dream: Finding Hope and Meaning at Life’s End “ (“Death is but a dream: finding hope and meaning at the end of life”), could offer some comfort. Unexpected visitors Early in his career, Dr. Kerr was...
    A HEALTH worker who has been on the Covid frontline in Brazil has spoken of Covid patients left dying in chairs as the country's healthcare system buckled under a devastating second wave. It comes as the country as seen the emergence of the new, more contagious, mutant P1 strain in the second wave as he urged the UK - and all nations - not to make the same mistakes as seen in Brazil. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 12Hospitals in Brazil are at breaking pointCredit: AFP or licensors 12Fabio Bolchini is on the Covid frontline in Manaus 12The country has seen its record amount of Covid deaths twice this weekCredit: AFP or licensors Fabio Biolchini, field coordinator for Doctors Without Borders in Manaus, the Brazilian city where the virus is believed to have originated, was on the scene during the height of the second wave. Brazil's health system has been pushed to the brink of collapse by the pandemic with critical shortages of supplies. Mass graves have been dug, hospitals have run out...
    An ICU nurse in Southern California took to TikTok last week to express heartfelt concerns about the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and its impact on hospital capacity. That video’s gone viral as COVID-19 hospitalizations in the U.S. have reached record numbers and are poised to further increase. Featured Video Hide
    Male coronavirus patients are at greater risk of being admitted to intensive care units and dying compared to female patients, a new study suggests. Researchers found no differences between the percentages of men and women diagnosed with COVID-19. However, men with the disease were nearly three times more likely to need intensive care treatment and had higher odds of death. The team, from University College London and the University of Cape Town, says the findings offer some clues in the differences between the sexes and provide evidence that men and women may need separate types of treatments.   In a new study from University College London and the University of Cape Town, male coronavirus patients were 2.84 times more likely to be admitted to ICUs and 1.39 times more likely to die. Pictured: Nurse Daniel Corral works with a COVID-19 patient at the El Paso Long Term Acute Care Hospital, in El Paso, Texas, November 6 For the meta-analysis, published in the journal Nature, the team looked at 92 studies from around the world between January 1 and June 1...
    When the number of people being sent to the hospital with COVID-19 began to creep up in Los Angeles County early this summer, officials warned that a major increase in deaths was inevitable. A record-breaking number of cases could result in a record-breaking number of deaths, they predicted. But nearly two months later, that has not materialized. The coronavirus continues to kill hundreds of people every week in L.A. County, but the death toll has remained lower than expected. The trend is due in part to younger people falling sick, as well as better control over the disease’s spread in high-risk settings, such as nursing homes. But doctors say there’s another factor pushing up survival rates: better treatments. “It was so grim in the beginning,” said Dr. Armand Dorian, an ER physician and chief medical officer for Verdugo Hills Hospital at USC. “Now we actually have regimens of treatments that do help. ... Since the beginning, say, February to now, we’ve learned a lot.” The trends are not limited to L.A. County. In California, 3.6% of people diagnosed with...
    Giving hospitalised Covid-19 patients statins could cut their risk of dying or needing to be hooked up to a ventilator, a study has suggested. Chinese researchers found severely-ill patients given the cholesterol-busting drugs – which can cost just pennies – were up to 45 per cent less likely to die. And data showed statins cut the risk of patients needing mechanical ventilation, being admitted to intensive care or suffering a deadly complication. Doctors are desperate for more weapons in their arsenal to treat Covid-19, which has killed almost 500,000 people worldwide in just six months. Only one drug – £5 steroid dexamethasone – has so far been proven to boost survival odds for coronavirus patients who are admitted to hospital. Dozens of other medicines are being tested in Britain and around the world, in the hope of saving lives and safely ease the world back into normal life. Scientists behind the statins study at Wuhan University – based in the Chinese city where the pandemic began in December – called for more trials to prove the link. Chinese researchers...
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