Web Analytics Made Easy - Statcounter
Tuesday, Dec 06, 2022 - 18:44:26
122 results - (0.004 seconds)

online rules:

latest news at page 1:
123
    Independent contractors will be required to document online income that exceeds $600 in a single transaction starting next year, the Internal Revenue Service said Tuesday. New rules from the IRS dictate that income earned through online portals such as Uber, Etsy, DoorDash, and Airbnb that exceeds $600 in one transaction now have to be reported to the government on a 1099 form for tax purposes. AMERICANS MAY RECEIVE A SMALLER TAX REFUND IN 2023 — HERE'S WHY "The IRS cautions people ... who may be receiving a Form 1099 for the first time — especially 'early filers' who typically file a tax return during the month of January or early February — to be careful and make sure they have all of their key income documents before submitting a tax return," the IRS said. "A little extra caution could save people additional time and effort related to filing an amended tax return." Previously, independent contractors who completed more than 200 transactions through online portals or made more than $20,000 in a year through online platforms were...
    The controversial referee call led to a significant benefit for the Raiders who were able to avoid turning over possession of the ball to the Chiefs and went on to kick a field goal before halftime. Despite the call, the Raiders went on to narrowly miss an unlikely comeback against the Chiefs. The Chiefs won by a score of 29 to 30. Here's more about Aikman's comment: NFL Legend, Troy Aikman TRIGGERS Feminists HARD! | Louder With Crowder www.youtube.com
    Nobody will ever love me again. Those were the words I wrote under the heading ‘your greatest fear’, as part of an exercise at a divorce bootcamp three years ago.  I was more scared of being single than I was of ending up homeless or stuck in financial purgatory.  That said, I wasn’t exactly fearless about the prospect of finding someone to love me. Single friends had warned me about online dating. The self-confidence-crushing no-show dates, unwanted nude pictures, ghosting and love bombing and so-called ‘bread-crumbing’ (i.e leading you on by showing morsels of interest with no intention of actually going out — surprisingly common online).  It is daunting, especially when your confidence is at an all-time low post-divorce, but I learned it really doesn’t have to be dismal. You just need a strategy.  At the age of 45 Rosie Green's (pictured) marriage broke down and she found herself single. The UK-based journalist has complied her ultimate lists of DO's and DO NOT's for finding a man There are ways of gaming the system, tipping the scales in your favour...
    Getty Former Vanderpump Rules stars. Kristen Doute left fans confused with a recent Instagram post.  The 39-year-old former “Vanderpump Rules” star posted an unusual request while killing time at the dentist’s office in August 2022. Doute’s doomed relationships with Tom Sandoval, James Kennedy, and Brian Carter were featured on “Vanderpump Rules” before she was fired from the Bravo reality show in 2020. She went Instagram official with her most recent boyfriend, Alex Menache, in May 2020, according to People, and ultimately moved in with him in December 2021. Just six months later, Doute confirmed she broke up with Menache and hinted that it was his idea. When an Instagram follower wrote of Doute, “Awe…i wanted her to b with the ‘one,’” she replied, “Same, but it didn’t work out. Alex is a wonderful man who I love and respect very much.” But Doute’s latest IG request has fans wondering if she’s up to something now that she has split from Menache.Kristen Doute Asked Her Followers to Help Her Find a ‘Voice Changer’ GettyKristen Doute. In an August...
    LONDON (AP) — Britain’s governing Conservative Party said Wednesday that it has delayed sending out ballots for the party’s leadership election after a warning from the U.K. intelligence services about the risk of fraud. Ballots had been due to be mailed out early this week to about 180,000 party members, who are selecting a new leader for the party and the country. The party said it decided to “enhance security” on the advice of the National Cyber Security Centre, part of U.K. electronic spy agency GCHQ. The party had intended to allow members to vote online or by postal ballot, with an option to change the vote up until voting closes on Sept. 2. It now says each member will get a unique code that allows one, unchangeable vote, either online or by post. It said members should receive their ballot packs by Aug. 11. The National Cyber Security Centre said it had “provided advice to the Conservative Party on security considerations for online leadership voting,” but did not give details of the advice. The Daily Telegraph newspaper reported that...
    Visa may have facilitated child pornography from being distributed by providing payment services to Pornhub and other sites operated by parent company MindGeek, a judge has ruled.  Last week, US District Court Judge Cormac Carney in California denied Visa's request to be dismissed from a case where 34 women who said that Pornhub had hosted videos of them being sexually assaulted or abused as children without their consent. Carney found that the plaintiff had credibly alleged that 'Visa knew that MindGeek's websites were teeming with monetized child porn.'  'Visa lent to MindGeek a much-needed tool—its payment network—with the alleged knowledge that there was a wealth of monetized child porn on MindGeek's websites,' wrote Carney in his decision.  The lead plaintiff said that in 2014, when she was 13, her boyfriend uploaded a sexually explicit video of her to Pornhub without her knowledge or consent. The video was titled '13-Year Old Brunette Shows Off For the Camera' and garnered 400,000 views before the girl learned of it, according to court filings. On Tuesday, billionaire hedge funder Bill Ackman slammed Visa for...
    All Times Eastern NASCAR CUP SERIES FireKeepers Casino 400 Site: Brooklyn, Michigan Schedule: Saturday, practice, 12:35 p.m., and qualifying, 1:20 p.m.; Sunday, race, 3 p.m. (USA). Track: Michigan International Speedway Race distance: 200 laps, 400 miles. Last year: Ryan Blaney won after starting third. Last race: Tyler Reddick survived an intense overtime battle with Ross Chastain to win on the road course at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Fast facts: Reddick’s victory was his second this month, both on road courses, his second this season and the second of his career. … Chastain was later penalized for taking a shortcut through a turn on the course and finished 27th. … Reddick is the sixth multiple winner this season. He’s leaving Richard Childress Racing after the 2023 season to join Denny Hamlin and Michael Jordan at 23XI Racing. … Blaney and Martin Truex Jr. are the non-winners that would qualify for the playoffs now on points, with four more chances to ensure their spot. Kevin Harvick would be the first one out of the 16-driver playoffs field without a victory...
    LONDON (AP) — Big tech companies like Google and Facebook would have to comply with tough British rules under a new digital watchdog aimed at giving consumers more choice online — or face the threat of big fines. The U.K. government on Friday outlined the powers it’s planning for its Digital Markets Unit, a regulator set up last year to take on the dominance of tech giants. It didn’t specify when the rules would take effect, saying only that legislation would come “in due course.” Authorities in Britain and across Europe have been leading the global push to clamp down on tech companies amid rising concern about their outsize influence. The new watchdog would enforce rules that make it easier for people to switch between iPhones and Android devices or between social media accounts without losing their data and messages. The U.K. government’s digital department said smartphone users would get a wider choice of search engines and more control over how their data is used. Tech companies would have to warn small companies that do much...
    BEIJING (AP) — Beijing shifted more classes online Thursday in a further tightening of COVID-19 restrictions, as China’s capital seeks to prevent a wider outbreak. The city of 21 million has already ordered three rounds of mass testing this week for the virus, with the third due to take place on Friday, and closed down some communities where cases were found. On Thursday, it moved most students in the sprawling Chaoyang district to online learning, with exceptions for middle and high school students who are preparing to take crucial exams that could determine their academic futures. Beijing announced 50 new cases on Thursday, two of them asymptomatic, bringing its total in the latest wave of infections to around 150. Students make up more than 30% of total cases, with clusters linked to six schools and two kindergartens in Chaoyang. At least three other districts had already moved students online, and officials on Thursday announced rules requiring residents to remain inside two housing compounds in Chaoyang where cases have been detected. Beijing has moved more swiftly than...
    LONDON (AP) — A hands-off approach to moderating content at Elon Musk’s Twitter could clash with ambitious new laws in Europe meant to protect users from disinformation, hate speech and harassment. Musk, who describes himself as a “free speech absolutist,” pledged to buy Twitter for $44 billion this week, with European Union officials and digital campaigners quick to say that any focus on free speech to the detriment of online safety would not fly after the 27-nation bloc solidified its status as a global leader in the effort to rein in the power of tech giants. “If his approach will be ‘just stop moderating it,’ he will likely find himself in a lot of legal trouble in the EU,” said Jan Penfrat, senior policy adviser at digital rights group EDRi. Musk will soon be confronted with Europe’s Digital Services Act, which will require big tech companies like Twitter, Google and Facebook parent Meta to police their platforms more strictly or face billions in fines. Officials agreed just days ago on the landmark legislation, expected to take effect by 2024. It’s...
    LONDON (AP) — Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition and his plans for a more hands-off approach to moderating content could clash with ambitious new laws in Europe meant to protect users from disinformation, hate speech and other harmful material. Musk, who describes himself as a “free speech absolutist,” pledged to buy Twitter for $44 billion this week, with European Union officials and digital campaigners quick to say that any focus on free speech to the detriment of online safety would not fly after the 27-nation bloc solidified its status as a global leader in the effort to rein in the power of tech giants. “If his approach will be ‘just stop moderating it,’ he will likely find himself in a lot of legal trouble in the EU,” said Jan Penfrat, senior policy adviser at digital rights group EDRi. Musk will soon be confronted with Europe’s Digital Services Act, which will require big tech companies like Twitter, Google and Facebook parent Meta to police their platforms more strictly or face billions in fines. Officials agreed just days ago on...
    BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union reached a landmark deal early Saturday to take aim at hate speech, disinformation and other harmful content online that would force big tech companies to police themselves harder, make it easier for users to flag problems and empower regulators to punish noncompliance with billions in fines. EU officials finally clinched the agreement in principle in the early hours of Saturday over the final details of the Digital Services Act, which will overhaul the digital rulebook for 27 countries and cement Europe’s reputation as the global leader in reining in the power of social media companies and other digital platforms, such as Facebook, Google and Amazon. “With the DSA, the time of big online platforms behaving like they are ‘too big to care’ is coming to an end,” said EU Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton. EU Commission Vice President Margrethe Vestager added that “with today’s agreement we ensure that platforms are held accountable for the risks their services can pose to society and citizens.” The act is the EU’s third significant law targeting...
    European Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager.Anadolu Agency | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images The European Union agreed on new digital regulations Saturday that will force tech giants like Google and Meta to police illegal content on their platforms more aggressively, or else risk potential multibillion-dollar fines. The European Parliament and EU member states reached a deal on the Digital Services Act, a landmark piece of legislation that aims to address illegal and harmful content by getting platforms to rapidly take it down. A key part of the legislation would limit how digital giants target users with online ads. The DSA would effectively stop platforms from targeting users with algorithms using data based on their gender, race or religion. Targeting children with ads will also be prohibited. So-called dark patterns — deceptive tactics designed to push people toward certain products and service — will be banned as well. Tech companies will be required to implement new procedures designed to take down illegal material such as hate speech, incitement to terrorism and child sexual abuse. E-commerce marketplaces like Amazon must also prevent sales...
    LONDON (AP) — The European Union is nearing agreement on a set of new rules aimed at protecting internet users by forcing big tech companies like Google and Facebook to step up their efforts to curb the spread of illegal content, hate speech and disinformation. EU officials were negotiating Friday over the final details of the legislation, dubbed the Digital Services Act. It’s part of a sweeping overhaul of the 27-nation bloc’s digital rulebook, highlighting the EU’s position at the forefront of the global movement to rein in the power of online platforms and social media companies. While the rules still need to be approved by the European Parliament and European Council that represents the 27 member countries, the bloc is far ahead of the United States and other countries in drawing up regulations for tech giants to force them to protect people from harmful content that proliferates online. Negotiators from the EU’s executive Commission, member countries and France, which holds the rotating EU presidency, were working to hammer out a deal before the end of Friday, ahead of...
    A MAN'S girlfriend has been slammed as "controlling" after she revealed the list of rules she makes anyone she's dating follow. Some of these rules included not being allowed to follow or like the pictures of attractive women. 3A woman has revealed the rules she makes anyone she dates followCredit: TikTok 3People were not impressed and labeled her 'controlling'Credit: TikTok Natalia Reinoso revealed she has eight rules someone must follow if they want to date her and recited some of them in a video she shared online. "So number one: Block anybody you had a romantic interaction with. "Like obviously people you've slept with is a no-no but if I found out you held a b**ch's hand and you're still following her, you're done," Reinoso warned. "Number two: No following new women since the day we started dating. Period," she pressed. Read more in lifestyle HORROR SHOW Bridezilla shares brutal ‘bridesmaid rules’ including BANNING pregnancyFREE SPIRIT I’m moving to NYC without my husband – trolls say our marriage is doomed "Number three: No searching girls' names in the handlebar. "Like...
    INDIANAPOLIS -- The state appeals court has ruled that lawsuits filed by Indiana University and Purdue University students seeking tuition and fee refunds after both schools switched to online classes early in the COVID-19 pandemic can proceed to trial.A three-judge panel of the appellate court ruled unanimously Thursday there's a sufficient basis for the plaintiffs to pursue their claims that the schools failed to deliver on their contracted promises to provide an in-person learning experience.The suits seek prorated refunds of tuition and various fees as damages.SEE ALSO: Indiana, Florida, other states challenge CDC's face mask rule for public transitBoth IU and Purdue moved to online learning in March 2020 after Indiana's governor declared COVID-19 a statewide public health emergency.
    The European Union will clamp down on Big Tech companies such as Facebook and Google thanks to landmark digital rules agreement aimed at regulating online "gatekeepers" that was agreed to late Thursday. EU officials agreed on the final wording of the Digital Markets Act, a long-awaited overhaul of the region's digital regulations, that aims to stop the tech giants from unfairly dominating digital markets by threatening to impose large fines on them and even includes the possibility of breaking the companies up. The act, which continues to require other approvals before becoming law, would force the tech companies to have more stringent restrictions on how people's information is used for targeted online ads (a key source of revenue for companies such as Facebook and Google) while also requiring different platforms to work together to make users online experience more seamless. “What we have been deciding about yesterday will start a new era in tech regulation," European Union lawmaker Andreas Schwab said at a press conference Friday. INTERNET FRAGMENTS AS RUSSIAN INVASION PUSHES PLATFORMS TO CHOOSE SIDES The act would stop...
    A suspected Michigan school shooter aged 15 who is charged with killing four is set to receive a laptop and internet access to continue his education online.   Ethan Crumbley will receive the device and internet access to take online college courses offered by the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic after he turns 16 next month. He missed the deadline to enroll in a high school course after being incarcerated in the wake of the November 2021 shooting at Oxford High School.    The matter was discussed in court on Thursday, when Crumbley appeared before a judge via Zoom from Oakland County Jail in Michigan pursuant to the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, a law that requires his placement in an adult facility to be reviewed every 30 days.   For now, he will remain there to await trial for four counts of first-degree premeditated murder, seven counts of assault terrorism and 12 weapons offenses for the November 30 attack that left Hana St. Juliana, 14, Tate Myre, 16, Madisyn Baldwin, 17 and Justin Shilling, 17, dead.  Crumbley only spoke briefly...
    While a visit to a swanky restaurant or fancy cocktail bar may be the top choice for some singletons, Gen Z daters have a totally different idea when it comes to romance.  According to Badoo, young people are snubbing typical dating spots for crafting classes, gym sessions or even 'dawn dates' - where singletons meet up for coffee or breakfast before starting work.  Tina Wilson, who founded dating app Wingman, says a surge in online dating following the pandemic means Gen Z singletons are 'cutting to the chase', when it comes to meeting potential partners.  The London-based relationship expert has also noticed a spike in health-conscious users whittling down their pool of potential partners based on their drinking or smoking habits.  Dating guru James Preece also noted a rise in younger clients who are focused on their health - ditching wine bars and swanky restaurants for pottery classes or yoga sessions.   According to Badoo, young people are snubbing typical date spots for crafting classes, gym sessions or even 'dawn dates', where singletons meet up for coffee before work. Stock  'This is something...
    The logos of several different social media apps, including Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.Matt Cardy | Getty Images LONDON — The U.K. government has updated proposals to regulate online platforms with new criminal offences to tackle fraud and revenge porn. Britain's landmark Online Safety Bill seeks to combat the spread of harmful and illegal content on social media sites including Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Twitter and TikTok. Late last year, lawmakers wrapped up an inquiry into how online platforms deal with such material, concluding the government should add more offences to the scope of the law, such as self harm, racial abuse and scam advertising. The government said Friday that the bill will now include extra-priority provisions outlawing content that features revenge porn, drug and weapons dealing, suicide promotion and people smuggling, among other offences. It will also target individuals who send online abuse and threats, with criminal sentences ranging up to five years. The government said it is considering further recommendations, including specific offences such as sending unsolicited sexual images and trolling epilepsy sufferers, tackling paid-for scam advertising, and bringing forward...
    A further tightening of criminal restrictions on online speech is being looked at by the UK’s Conservative Party government. UK Conservatives within government are looking at the possibility of further tightening restrictions on online speech, with officials looking at criminalising posts that are “likely to cause harm” as part of a new Online Harms Bill. The UK’s hate speech rules already in place have previously been accused of allowing “trolls” and “conmen” to weaponize the police, while the UK Home Secretary Priti Patel has promised to take measures protecting free speech. According to a report by The Telegraph, the Tory government is reportedly considering the possibility of expanding criminal restrictions on online speech to include any message or post where the sender either intended to harm someone, or was “aware of” the fact that it would harm someone. Under the expansion, proposed by the UK’s Law Commission, no proof would be required regarding whether someone was actually harmed by the post. Other changes being considered include making sending or posting “knowingly false communications” an offence, along with inciting, encouraging, or participating in what The...
    Twitter took down an account that was spoiling the results for the online word game Wordle by automatically replying to their tweets with future answers, ruining the game for anyone who saw them. The account was deactivated last week because it violated Twitter's rules regarding sending a high volume of unsolicited replies, mentions, or direct messages. Note: if you like tweeting your wordIe scores, someone’s made a bot you should block as it auto-responds with tomorrows answer pic.twitter.com/u62kBaTivn— dan nguyen (@dancow) January 24, 2022 Twitter said in a statement that the spoiler bot account, @wordlinator, was "suspended for violating the Twitter rules and the automation rules around sending unsolicited @mentions." GOOGLE FAILS TO SHOW RESULTS FOR 'MADE IN AMERICA' SHOPPING SEARCHES Wordle is a popular online game in which users get six chances to guess a five-letter word. Many players share their scores from the game on Twitter using colored block emojis to show the letters they got right. The randomly generated five-letter word is the same for all users, and it refreshes every day. Players talk online about the...
    LONDON (AP) — Online companies would have to ramp up efforts to keep harmful content off their platforms and take other steps to protect users under rules that European Union lawmakers are set to vote on Thursday. The 27-nation bloc has gained a reputation as a trendsetter in the growing global push to rein in big tech companies as they face withering criticism over misinformation, hate speech and other harmful content on their platforms. Here’s a look at the proposed EU rules, known as the Digital Services Act, and why they would make an impact: WHAT IS THE DIGITAL SERVICES ACT? The legislation is part of a sweeping overhaul of the European Union’s digital rules aimed at ensuring online companies, including tech giants like Google and Facebook parent Meta, protect users on their platforms and treat rivals fairly. It’s an update of the EU’s two-decade-old e-commerce directive. “The Digital Services Act could now become the new gold standard for digital regulation, not just in Europe but around the world,” the lead EU lawmaker on the bill, Christel...
    E! Pictured: (l-r) EB Wright, Hana Giraldo, Austin Gunn, Myles O’Neal, Taylor Hasselhoff, Redmond Parker, Harry Thornton, Jasmin Lawrence The latest drama-filled reality show to hit TV is “Relatively Famous: Ranch Rules,” which premieres Wednesday, January 12 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on E!. If you don’t have cable, here are some different ways you can watch a live stream of “Relatively Famous: Ranch Rules” episodes online:Heavy may earn an affiliate commission if you sign up via a link on this pageFuboTVYou can watch a live stream of E! and 100-plus other TV channels on FuboTV, which comes with a seven-day free trial: FuboTV Free Trial Once signed up for FuboTV, you can watch “Relatively Famous: Ranch Rules” live on the FuboTV app, which is available on your Roku, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV or Fire Stick, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One or Series X/S, Samsung TV, LG TV, any device with Android TV (such as a Sony TV or Nvidia Shield), iPhone, Android phone, iPad or Android tablet. Or you can watch on your computer via the FuboTV...
    LONDON (AP) — The European Union’s ambitious plan to update its pioneering internet rules gained momentum Tuesday after a key committee passed measures requiring technology companies to better police content and lawmakers prepared to vote on regulations to rein in Big Tech. The 27-nation bloc has for the past year been drafting a sweeping overhaul of regulations for digital companies, aimed at making sure tech giants like Google and Facebook, now renamed Meta, treat rivals fairly and protect users on their platforms. The rules, which have been the subject of fierce lobbying from the tech industry, look set for approval from lawmakers, though they still face tough negotiations next year with EU bodies. The regulations, and similar ones in the United Kingdom to curb harmful online content, show Europe’s role as a pacesetter for regulating the tech industry as a global movement picks up pace following whistleblower Frances Haugen’s allegations that Facebook put profits ahead of safety. One set of EU rules, the Digital Services Act, aims to make tech companies more responsible for content on their platforms....
    Two teenagers watch a chat with friends on their smartphoneUte Grabowsky | Photothek | Getty Images LONDON — A group of British lawmakers said Tuesday that "major changes" need to be made to the U.K.'s upcoming Online Safety Bill. The draft bill is a proposed new piece of legislation that's designed to make the internet a safer place for people in the U.K. However, some lawmakers are concerned that the current proposals don't go far enough. In a report published Tuesday, the U.K. Parliament's joint committee on the draft bill said more offences should be brought within the scope of the proposed law. "We need to call time on the Wild West online," said Damian Collins, a lawmaker and chair of the committee, in a statement. "What's illegal offline should be regulated online." "For too long, Big Tech has gotten away with being the land of the lawless," he added. "A lack of regulation online has left too many people vulnerable to abuse, fraud, violence and in some cases even loss of life." The committee is calling for a plethora...
    LONDON (AP) — Proposed British rules aimed at cracking down on harmful online content should be beefed up with tougher measures like making it illegal to send unsolicited graphic images, requiring porn sites to ensure children can’t gain access and moving faster to hold tech executives criminally liable for failing to uphold the regulations, lawmakers said in a new report. The committee of lawmakers recommended a series of major changes to the U.K. government’s draft online safety bill early Tuesday that would make digital and social media companies more responsible for protecting users from child abuse, racist content and other harmful material found on their platforms. The proposals by Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government and similar rules that the European Union is working on underline how Europe is at the vanguard of the global movement to rein in the power of digital giants like Google and Facebook parent Meta Platforms. The committee of British lawmakers is scrutinizing the draft bill to offer recommendations on how the government can improve it before it’s presented to Parliament next year for...
    Stephanie Keith/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.On Tuesday, Twitter rolled out an update to its privacy policy that bans people from posting certain “images or videos of private individuals without their consent.” Many journalists and researchers immediately lambasted the new so-called “private information policy,” including activists who use the platform to spread documentation of far-right movements and their supporters. “This is absolutely intended to make it more difficult to show our work when calling out identified fascists, and it’s an invitation for Nazis to go back through antifascist accounts and retroactively report shit to get us banned,” tweeted independent extremism researcher Gwen Snyder.   Twitter’s lack of clarity is exploited by extremists. Within days, those concerns were vindicated. By Thursday morning, Snyder had been locked out of her own Twitter account, and met with a prompt asking her to delete, as she wrote in a Tweet explaining the lockout, a “May 2019 thread documenting a public Proud Boys rally attended by the GOP Philly mayoral candidate & Capitol riot defendant...
    Lawmakers weighing how to limit the spread of disinformation and control the power of Facebook and other social media giants are turning their attention to regulating the powerful artificial intelligence programs that drive them. Washington has made little progress in stepping up regulation of big tech and has been hamstrung by First Amendment protections on free speech. But Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen told senators this month that the best way to do it was to focus on the powerful machine-learning architecture that promotes certain content.  The implications were spelled out on Tuesday, when leaked documents revealed how Facebook spent three years making misinformation and clickbait more prominent in users' news feeds to keep them more engaged with its network. It offers an alternative strategy for lawmakers wary of banning types of speech entirely.  Targeting algorithms - automated actions that rank content or direct users to relevant adverts, for example - could ensure that harmful content is spread less widely. 'The algorithms driving powerful social media platforms are black boxes, making it difficult for the public and policy makers to conduct oversight and...
    Li Zhanguo’s two children, aged eight and four, don’t have their own smartphones, but like millions of other Chinese children, they are no strangers to online gaming. “If my children get their hands on our mobile phones or an iPad, and if we don’t closely monitor their screen time, they can play online games for as long as three to four hours each time,” he said. Not anymore. Like many other parents, Li is happy with new restrictions imposed on online game companies that took effect early this month. They limit children to just three hours weekly of online games time – an hour between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Friday, Saturday and Sunday most weeks. The restrictions are a tightening of rules set in 2019 that banned children from gaming overnight and limited them to 90 minutes game time most weekdays. The 90-minute restrictions, however, did not allay authorities’ concerns over addiction to online gaming. Experts say it’s unclear if such policies can help prevent addiction to online games, since children might just get engrossed...
    Animation game players take part in the 2021 ChinaJoy, July 30, 2021, in Shanghai, China.Costfoto | Barcroft Media | Getty Images Kids and teens under 18 years old in China will only be allowed up to three hours per week to play online video games, according to new rules published by China's National Press and Publication Administration Monday. The move is a fresh blow to the country's gaming giants from Tencent to NetEase which have dealt with an onslaught of regulation this year in areas from anti-monopoly to data protection. That has spooked investors and wiped billions of dollars of value off of Chinese tech stocks. According to a translated notice about the new rules, people under 18 in China will be allowed one hour a day between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Fridays through Sundays and on legal holidays to play video games. The agency billed the rules as a way to safeguard children's physical and mental health. The rules will apply to companies providing online game services to minors, limiting their ability to serve those users outside...
    The death of a Massachusetts woman while hiking a Phoenix mountain in July with a police officer she met online has been ruled accidental by the Maricopa County Medical Examiner’s Office. The brief report said 31-year-old Angela Tramonte’s July 30 death was due to 'environmental heat exposure.' Tramonte, who was from the Boston area, was in Arizona visiting Phoenix police officer Dario Didzar for the first time in person after spending two months communicating with him on Instagram. Despite foul play being ruled out in Tramonte's death by the police, questions have been raised about Didzar's decision to let her go down Camelback Mountain alone while he carried on with the hike.    Angela Tramonte, 31, died of accidental heat exposure on July 30 while on a first-date hike with Phoenix police officer Dario Didzar, a county medical examiner ruled  The Maricopa County Medical Examiner's Office issued this brief statement concerning Tramonte's death  Tramonte was found unresponsive after hiking alone halfway down Camelback Mountain in 104-degree heat without water  Authorities said as part of their first...
    DEVON and Cornwall have been slapped with extra Covid "rules" after a massive spike in cases. Cases in the holiday hotspot have soared in recent weeks - with infections so high that it would be "put on the red list" if it was a country on the UK's traffic light system. 1Cases have soared in the holiday hotspotCredit: Apex Devon and Cornwall will be given extra support amid the rocketing rate of cases due to concerns of growing pressure on the NHS. Cornwall's cases have doubled in a week, due to holidays with tourism, as well as the Boardmasters festival which has been linked to thousands of cases. It follows reports that Cornwall has six of the eight highest Covid areas in England. The top three in England are Newquay East, Newquay West and St Columb Minor & Porth - all in Cornwall. Most read in NewsLAMBS TO SLAUGHTER Trump savages Biden for handing the Taliban a 'kill list' of US alliesRevealedPRETTY DEADLY How deadliest ever female sniper 'Lady Death' killed 309 Nazis during WW2UNDER PRESSURE Weak’ Joe Biden ‘crumbles’...
    Tens of thousands of students are converging in concentrated locations from all over the state, nation and even the world. They are moving into tight dorm rooms and setting up apartments with new roommates. They’re sitting in classrooms, eating cafeteria-style, socializing and studying in the library. Many California college campuses appear to be havens of protection from the coronavirus, with strict safety practices that include mandatory vaccinations for students and staff, weekly testing and required masking for all indoor and some outdoor activities. Positive cases will prompt quarantines and contract tracing. But amid the surge of the highly contagious Delta variant, it’s unclear whether “almost back to normal” will last this fall, as students redefine the centerpiece of college life: togetherness. “It’s a pain to get tested every week and wear a mask, but we need to do these things to mitigate the spread,” said Dr. Sarah Van Orman, chief health officer for USC Student Health. “The tension we’re feeling is the tension everyone is feeling of how much do we get back to normal and how much do...
    DALLAS–Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., renewed her criticism of the liberal media and Big Tech Saturday as she slammed the two over their involvement in suppression of the lab-leak theory concerning the origin of the coronavirus. Speaking with Fox News during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), Blackburn ripped the media for downplaying the lab-leak theory when it was suggested by former President Donald Trump, expressed concern over Dr. Anthony Fauci's "coziness" with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg amid revelations from his published emails, and called for "one set of rules" in regulating the online ecosystem of Big Tech.  "It's so interesting because I've worked on the issue of online privacy, data security, censorship, all these issues since 2012 when I started pushing consumer privacy and reshaping the business model for Big Tech companies," Blackburn said when asked about the involvement of the media and Big Tech in attempting to squash the lab-leak theory prior to the release of Fauci's emails. "But what happened with the Fauci emails, and that coziness that he had with Mark Zuckerburg is people said, ‘Hey, wait...
    DONALD Trump has said the indictment against his company is like a "communist dictatorship" as he slammed prosecutors for "misconduct." The former president said on Saturday night: "It's reminiscent of a communist dictatorship targeting your political opponents. 1Trump on Saturday "Fabricating charges to try and silence them, abusing the justice system, and leaking out information on a daily basis in the press to engage in flagrant character assassination. "Radical Left New York City and state prosecutors who have allowed crime to skyrocket ... are now outrageously and shamefully continuing the greatest witch hunt. That's what they do. "They go and target me. "The people who talk about democracy are literally destroying it before our very eyes." Most read in NewsHACK ATTACKBiden branded as 'weak against Putin' as US companies get hit by cyberattackRACING RUINBiden says 'rules are rules' after US runner banned for smoking weedFATAL RAGETeen biker shot dead in road rage incident after HE pulled gun on Texas driverSICK ATTACKHomeless man beaten by 2 women on Venice Beach as tent city is removedLatest'DEVASTATING' HALTSearch for Miami victims stopped as...
    Delhi High Court judges have refused to issue a restraining order on new IT norms and rules laid down by the federal government to regulate digital media. Online media outlets such as the Foundation for Independent Journalism, The Wire, Quint Digital Media and Alt News have sought the Delhi High Court to ban the 2021 new IT norms and rules. Holiday court judges Hari Shankar and Subramaniam Prasad, who heard the case, said, “The matter is pending before the regular bench. They have not issued any restraining order in this regard. So these protocols and rules have come into force. In this case, no interim injunction can be sought for the time being. ” The court has been asked by the online media to take up the matter as soon as the leave period expires and the court resumes its proceedings. READ  NASA astronauts describe SpaceX's historic trip to the International Space Station
    The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday in favor of a former Pennsylvania high school student who was suspended from her school’s cheerleading team after she posted a series of Snapchats with expletives, finding she could not be punished by the school for cursing online. The case involved Brandi Levy, who in 2017 posted to Snapchat “f**k school, f**k softball, f**k cheer, f**k everything,” after she failed to make the varsity cheerleading squad at Mahanoy Area High School. Levy was later suspended from the squad for the upcoming year for her language. Levy’s parents sued the school, arguing Levy’s freedom of speech was violated. A district court granted an injunction ordering the school to reinstate Levy to the cheerleading team, using Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District to make their decision. (RELATED: Conservative Groups Rejoice Over ‘Substantial Win For Religious Freedom’ In Supreme Court Ruling On Catholic Abortion) The Supreme Court ruled in Tinker in 1969 students could wear black arm bands to protest the Vietnam War, with the court saying students don’t “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of...
    The government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is in a battle with U.S. tech firms over a new set of online speech rules that it has enacted for the nation of nearly 1.4 billion.   The rules require companies to restrict a range of topics on their services, comply with government takedown orders and identify the original source of information shared. If the companies fail to comply, tech firm employees can be held criminally liable.   The escalation of tensions between Modi’s government and tech firms, activists say, could result in the curtailment of Indians’ online speech.   “Absent a change in direction, the future of free speech in the world’s largest democracy is increasingly imperiled,” said Samir Jain, director of policy at the Center for Democracy & Technology, a digital rights advocacy group.  “Users will have less freedom of expression and less access to news and entertainment that is unapproved by the government. The rules will thereby undermine Indian democracy,” Jain told VOA.  At the center of the battle is Twitter, which asked for a three-month extension to comply with the new IT rules that went into effect May 25.   On May 24, New Delhi police attempted to deliver a notice to Twitter’s office, which was closed at the time, and then released a video of officers entering the building and searching the...
    Photo from: https://pixabay.com/photos/cards-play-deck-poker-game-casino-316501/ With increasing restrictions over the past few years at UK betting sites, casinos not on GamStop are becoming more popular. After a strict clampdown by the UK Gambling Commission, British punters have seen new rules emerge such as bet size limits, limited bonuses and funding restrictions. Casino sites in other jurisdictions can offer some freedom from these restrictions, but they can also be used as a loophole to escape the GamStop regulations. In this article we’ll discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using non-UK sites. How Does GamStop Work? The UK Gambling Commission has been tasked with regulating all gambling services in Great Britain and Northern Ireland since 2005. The group had a lighter tough regulatory approach in those earlier years, but the boom in online gambling due to new technology has seen them having to take a more hardline approach to the industry. Pressure from social groups and the government over the last few years has seen a strict approach to the sector and this is affecting the gambling experience of UK consumers. The rise of...
    MILLIONS of kids are exposed to harmful content online because social media bosses fail to enforce their rules. Youngsters must be at least 13 to use Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, TikTok and Snapchat — or 16 to join WhatsApp. 2Millions of kids are exposed to harmful content on social mediaCredit: Alamy But two in five under-age children already have their own accounts, according to research by Ofcom watchdogs. Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden has fired off a letter to tech firms asking them to tighten up their age verification process or face tough new sanctions. In the letter to the UK chiefs of Facebook, Google, Twitter, TikTok and Snapchat, he writes: “An age limit with no enforcement or checking mechanism is meaningless and risks putting young people at risk.  “I understand that verifying ages of children is more challenging than for adults, but we cannot turn a blind eye to this issue.” He wants them to share information with him about how they check ages — and how it is being enforced. 2Oliver Dowden has sent a warning to tech giantsCredit:...
    JAMES Kennedy has popped the question to his girlfriend Raquel Leviss in a Coachella-themed proposal. The couple first met in 2016 while at a New Year's Eve party where the DJ was performing. 1 James, 29, has officially proposed to Raquel, after five years of an off-and-on relationship. "James proposed at the iconic Empire Polo Fields of 'RACHELLA' Friday night..." the soon to be bride wrote on Instagram alongside a photo of the ring. "And I said YES! I'm over the Coachella moon." More to follow... For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. The Sun is your go to destination for the best celebrity news, football news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures and must-see video. Download our fantastic, new and improved free App for the best ever Sun Online experience. For iPhone click here, for Android click here.  Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheSunUS and follow us from our main Twitter account at @TheSunUS.
    The European Parliament has that will require platforms to take down terrorist content of European Union member states issuing a removal notice. If a platform doesn’t take down the content quickly enough, it’ll have to provide an explanation. The law will come into f orce 20 days after it’s published in the EU’s Official Journal, and it will start to be applied 12 months after that. It’ll be up to member states to determine penalties up to a maximum of four percent of a company’s global annual turnover if they repeatedly break the rules. Consideration will also be given to “the nature of the breach and the size of company responsible,” the parliament said. The regulations “target content such as texts, images, sound recordings or videos, including live transmissions, that incite, solicit or contribute to terrorist offences, provide instructions for such offences or solicit people to participate in a terrorist group.” There are protections for educational, research, artistic and journalistic work.  The rules don’t include a general obligation for platforms to monitor or filter content. Still, they’ll have to...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Plans for 3D-printed, self-assembled “ghost guns” can be posted online without U.S. State Department approval, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. A divided panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco reinstated a Trump administration order that permitted removal of the guns from the State Department’s Munitions List. READ MORE: COVID: San Mateo County To Resume Weekly Mass Vaccination Sites Listed weapons need State Department approval for export. In 2015, federal courts applied the requirement to weapons posted online and intended for production on 3D printers, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. However, three years later the State Department under then-President Donald Trump settled a lawsuit by a 3D gun company and ordered their removal. California, 21 other states and the District of Columbia sued and a federal judge in Seattle issued an injunction last year, saying that posting the designs without restrictions could put unregistered weapons into the hands of terrorists. READ MORE: Livermore City Official Under Fire For Ghetto Remark About Low-Income Housing Project In overturning the injunction, the appellate panel...
    Mozilla is leading calls for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to reinstate net neutrality rules that were gutted under the Trump administration. In a letter to FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel, the Firefox maker was joined by Reddit, Vimeo, Dropbox and Wikimedia in pushing for internet protections that prevent ISPs from blocking, throttling or prioritizing traffic for payment. “We believe that these fundamental safeguards are critical for preserving the internet as a free and open medium that promotes innovation and spurs economic growth,” the signees, including ADT and Eventbrite, wrote. The battle over net neutrality has been raging for over a decade and has seen telecommunications providers at loggerheads with tech firms over federal rules, which have been enacted and repealed on partisan lines. For its part, Mozilla has repeatedly pushed for the safeguards to be restored and even filed a lawsuit against the FCC to preserve the rules. Now, it’s arguing that the pandemic has made the need for net neutrality more apparent. “In a moment where classrooms and offices have moved online by necessity, it is critically...
    BEIJING (Reuters) - China's market regulator will launch new rules this year to clarify the responsibilities of platform companies involved in online transactions, the state-owned Xinhua News Agency said. Wei Li, an official of the State Administration of Market Regulation (SAMR), told Xinhua that the regulator will "adopt more powerful supervision methods this year and deploy a series of actions" to clear up "prominent problems in the online market". The regulator will also accelerate the construction of a system that will collect the online transaction information in real time allowing for better monitoring and coordination, Wei was quoted as saying on Monday which is Consumer Rights Day in China. The government has flagged it will be issuing new rules for the internet sector. Heightened scrutiny by Chinese regulators since December has included the announcement of a probe into e-commerce giant Alibaba,, penalising Alibaba-backed and Tencent-backed firms for not seeking anti-trust reviews for deals, while other firms have also been fined for irregular pricing. SAMR said it will also strengthen the legal system and issue detailed rules aimed at protecting the...
    By SHEIKH SAALIQ, Associated Press NEW DELHI (AP) — India on Thursday rolled out new regulations for social media companies and digital streaming websites to make them more accountable for the online content shared on their platforms, giving the government more power to police it. The Information Technology Ministry said the new regulations would require social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to swiftly erase content authorities deem unlawful. The regulations include a strict oversight mechanism that would allow the government to ban content affecting “the sovereignty and integrity of India.” The regulations would also require social media companies to assist investigations by India’s law enforcement agencies. They were announced as debate swirls over free speech and the suspension by Twitter of some Indian accounts linked to farmers’ protests after regulators ordered them to be blocked. Information Technology Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said the new regulations were a “soft touch progressive institutional mechanism” required for the “security and sovereignty of India, public order, and rape or any other sexually explicit material.” They will require social media companies to remove illegal...
    NEW DELHI (AP) — India on Thursday rolled out new regulations for social media companies and digital streaming websites to make them more accountable for the online content shared on their platforms, giving the government more power to police it. The Information Technology Ministry said the new regulations would require social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to swiftly erase content authorities deem unlawful. The regulations include a strict oversight mechanism that would allow the government to ban content affecting “the sovereignty and integrity of India.” The regulations would also require social media companies to assist investigations by India’s law enforcement agencies. They were announced as debate swirls over free speech and the suspension by Twitter of some Indian accounts linked to farmers’ protests after regulators ordered them to be blocked. Information Technology Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said the new regulations were a “soft touch progressive institutional mechanism” required for the “security and sovereignty of India, public order, and rape or any other sexually explicit material.” They will require social media companies to remove illegal content as quickly as...
    TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Ma Xiaolin frequently wrote about current affairs on one of China’s leading microblogging sites, where he has 2 million followers. But recently, he said in a post, the Weibo site called and asked him not to post original content on topics ranging from politics to economic and military issues. “As an international affairs researcher and a columnist, it looks like I can only go the route of entertainment, food and beverage now,” the international relations professor wrote on Jan. 31. Ma, who often posted on developments in the Mideast, is one of many popular influencers working within the constraints of China’s heavily censored web who is finding that their space to speak is shrinking even further with the latest policy changes and a clean-up campaign run by the country’s powerful censors. He declined an interview request. Beginning next week, the Cyberspace Administration of China will require bloggers and influencers to have a government-approved credential before they can publish on a wide range of subjects. Some fear that only state media and official propaganda accounts will get...
123