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    Half of Americans say runaway inflation and high living costs are taking a toll on their health, as millions turn to drink, junk food, and smoking more as worries mount over electricity and gas bills this winter. Research at Toluna, a consumer insights firm, found that 50 percent of those surveyed were feeling their health suffer as a result of the cost-of-living crisis, with inflation currently running above 8 percent according to the consumer price index. Among them, 37 percent said they were feeling more stressed, 21 percent said they were eating less healthily, 16 percent said they were smoking more, and 13 percent were boozing more often. The survey of 1,000 people comes as inflation, crime and immigration are at the front of voters' minds ahead of the November 8 midterm elections, which will decide whether Republicans or Democrats control Congress. Cigarettes, alcohol and junk food are among the bad habits Americans are turning too as they worry about inflation and rising energy prices this winter  A projection by Bloomberg this week said the US economy was 100...
    In this article TREEFollow your favorite stocksCREATE FREE ACCOUNTwatch nowVIDEO3:5703:575 tips to afford anything you want in lifeConsumer & Retail Digital Original VideoWith prices rising nearly across the board, it's getting harder to pay for basic necessities, causing some Americans to fall behind. To that point, 32% of adults have paid a bill late in the past six months, according to a recent report by LendingTree — and 61% of them said it's because they didn't have the money on hand to cover the cost. About 40% said they are less able to afford their bills compared to one year ago, the report found. Most said they fell behind on a utility bill, credit card payment or cable or internet bill.   More from Personal Finance:Consumers prioritize Netflix, Amazon Prime over groceries, gasNearly half of Americans make this mistake with credit cardsThese steps can help you tackle stressful credit card debt "Life is getting more expensive by the day, and it's shrinking Americans' already tiny financial margin for error down to zero," said Matt Schulz, LendingTree's chief credit analyst. "Unless they've...
    Nearly two thirds of U.S. adults say their incomes are falling behind the cost of living, and grocery bills have surpassed mortgage repayments for some, as the economy remains a key issue for voters in the upcoming midterm elections. Recent polling by NBC News found that 63 percent of voters say they could not make ends meet because their incomes were not keeping up with higher living costs, while 58 percent disapproved of the Biden administration’s economic policies. Still, the survey of 1,000 adults found that President Joe Biden’s approval rating had risen to 45 percent, and his Democratic Party was making gains against rival Republicans, driven by voter anger over women’s restricted access to abortions. The survey comes as Americans faced another month of economic hardship. While average gas prices have dipped to $3.67 per gallon, the pain is being increasingly felt at grocery store checkouts. U.S. consumer prices unexpectedly rose in August, with an 8.3 percent increase against the previous year, and underlying inflation accelerated amid rising costs for rents, healthcare and food. Grocery prices are up 13.5 percent...
    Prostock-studio | Istock | Getty Images Social Security recipients could see the largest increase to their checks in decades next year. Even so, for many retirees, the bump in their annual cost-of-living adjustment won't be enough to shield them from the pain of sharply rising prices, experts say. "Unfortunately, the formula used to calculate the adjustment doesn't reflect the specific expenses that seniors face, especially rising medical costs," said Nancy Altman, president of Social Security Works. "Moreover, the underlying benefits are inadequate." More from Personal Finance:Tax return backlog still 'crushing the IRS' as pileup exceeds 21 millionTax pros 'very skeptical' about expanded IRS voice bots for paymentsLawmaker urges feds to remove 'red tape' for Series I bondsHow much money Social Security recipients could getMonthly benefits for retirees could rise 10.5% in 2023, according to a recent analysis by The Senior Citizens League, a nonpartisan senior group. That would amount to a $175.10 increase to the average payment of $1,668. Meanwhile, the nonprofit Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget reports the benefit bump for seniors could actually be as high...
    In this article PRIImages By Tang Ming Tung | Stone | Getty ImagesThe reality of inflation and the specter of a recession appear to be weighing heavily on middle-class households. Among those whose income falls in the $30,000-to-$100,000 range, 75% say their earnings are falling behind the cost of living, and 77% think the U.S. will be in a recession by the end of 2022, according to a recent survey from Primerica. There's also been a general uptick in financial worries in the last six months, with 39% of those surveyed expecting to be worse off financially in a year, up from 32% in March and 28% in December 2021. In December 2020, that share was 17%. More from Personal Finance:Workers could see average raises of 4.1% in 2023Focus on ‘personal economy,' not possible recessionHere's why inflation is less likely to hurt some retirees "There's a higher level of concern financially among middle-income families than there was even at [the height] of the pandemic," said Glenn Williams, CEO of Primerica. The June survey of nearly 1,400 adults was done as...
    What if we held a recession and no one lost their job? The Department of Labor on Friday will deliver its report on its two monthly surveys meant to capture the health of the nation’s labor market. The first is known as the household survey and is derived from a survey of around 60,000 households conducted by the Census Bureau. Its main product is the unemployment rate as well as the various breakdowns along demographic lines and reasons for unemployment. The other is the establishment survey of businesses and government agencies from which we get data on the size of nonfarm payrolls, hourly and weekly earnings, the labor force participation rate, and average hours worked. It is based on the payroll period that included the twelfth of each month, which means it does not necessarily reflect any late-breaking changes in the economy. The data gets seasonally adjusted and adjusted for the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ estimates of payroll changes caused by the closings and openings of businesses during the month. One way to think about what a soft-landing would look...
    The White House was faced with another dire poll Tuesday that found that 54 percent of Americans believe the middle class hasn't benefited 'at all' from President Joe Biden's policies.  On top of that, the new Monmouth University Poll found that 88 percent of Americans surveyed said the country was headed in the wrong direction - with just 10 percent saying it's headed the right way - a record low.  Nearly half those surveyed said inflation and gas were the biggest concerns currently facing their families, with 33 percent saying inflation and 15 percent pointing to fuel costs.  And inflation and gas prices were rated the top two family concerns by a variety of demographic groups - crossing income, race and political party, pollsters found.   The White House was faced with another dire poll Tuesday that found that 54 percent of Americans believe the middle class hasn't benefited 'at all' from President Joe Biden's policies President Joe Biden's job approval continues to sink. Currently, he stands at 36 percent approval, while 58 percent disapprove Biden's overall job rating continues to...
    Americans continue to register bleak assessments of the state of the U.S. economy, with a majority stating pessimistic views of their own situation as well as the overall national picture. A combined 83 per cent of Americans now say the state of the economy is either poor or not so good, according to a new Wall Street Journal-NORC poll released Monday. That is more than three times the number who say it is excellent or good.  It all comes at a time of record inflation – but also near record low unemployment, while President Joe Biden is calling inflation his highest priority while his party faces a reckoning on Election Day this fall. More than a third of the country, 35 per cent, are not satisfied with their own financial situation – a record going back 50 years. Thirty-eight per cent of Americans in a new survey said their financial situation had gotten worse in the past few years, as President Joe Biden calls tackling inflation his top priority Thirty-eight per cent said their financial situation had gotten worse in...
    Voters say that economic issues are their top priority heading into the 2022 midterm elections as only 37 percent say they approve of how President Joe Biden is handling economic recovery – and even less approve of gas prices and inflation. A whopping 83 percent of Americans say that the economy is either an extremely or very important issue in determining how they will vote, according to an ABC News/Ipsos poll published on Sunday. But Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg assured ABC News in a Sunday morning interview that inflation is Biden's 'top economic priority,' despite record-setting hikes and record-low approval. 'I'm sure additional ideas will be welcomed,' Buttigieg said on the continued effort to improve the economy. When it comes to inflation, only 28 percent of Americans approve of Biden's handling of the issue compared to the 71 percent who disapprove. A new ABC News/Ipsos poll shows that 83 percent of Americans say that the economy is either an extremely or very important issue in determining how they will vote in the 2022 midterms – and a vast majority disapprove of...
    Moyo Studio | E+ | Getty Images The latest inflation read from the government, the core personal consumption expenditures price index, showed on Friday morning that prices may be starting to ease from record levels, but financial stress among workers amid the steepest inflation in four decades remains as high as ever. Two-thirds of American workers say their salaries are not keeping pace with inflation, and the percentage of employees considering quitting a job is at a four-year high, according to a new CNBC|Momentive Workforce Survey. Sixty-six percent of workers say inflation has outpaced any salary gains they've made in the past 12 months, while 19% say increases in their salary have about matched inflation and 13% say their salary has increased more than inflation.  As more American workers at multiple income levels give voice to a frustration that the economic data has been signaling throughout this year — that price gains continue to outpace wage gains — the squeeze is particularly high among middle-income workers. Those with incomes between $50,000 to $150,000 are more likely than high-income and...
    Dayton, Ohio (CNN)After casting their early Ohio primary ballots last weekend, voter after voter -- those who grabbed Democratic ballots and Republican ballots -- identified the same issue as the most important to them: inflation. "It's food on the table, gas in your car, retirement. How are you going to deal with all these things when you don't get any additional income?" said Roland Winburn, a 75-year-old former Democratic state lawmaker. Montgomery County, the home of Dayton, in recent elections has served as a gauge of the nation's shifting political tides. It's the only county in Ohio to vote for the winner of the last four presidential elections -- one of just 25 counties in the United States to vote for former President Barack Obama twice, pivot to former President Donald Trump in 2016 and boomerang to President Joe Biden in 2020. The concerns of voters here could offer an early window into what will drive this year's midterm elections. Undecided voters could make for an unpredictable Ohio primary outcome Peter Slavey, 26, a machinist in Dayton who said he...
    A string of senior Democratic Party voices is warning that the rise of the Squad and a lurch towards more progressive policies is alienating voters who care more about pocket issues than 'defund the police.' The concerns emerged this week after months of polls showing Democrats lagging far behind Republicans in congressional polling, triggering fears of a midterm bloodbath. Taken together, they suggest a push to defund the police, tear down down statues and rename schools is getting in the way of Democrats holding the House and the Senate.  'It's what we've been screaming about for a year,' Matt Bennett, co-founder of center-left Third Way, told the Axios news website.  'It's a huge problem.' The latest sign of a backlash, according to the report, was the recall this week of three San Francisco school board members. They faced criticism from parents that they were more focused on renaming public schools that honored Abraham Lincoln and George Washington than getting children back into classes during the pandemic.       It's just the latest example of the public face of the party being out...
    Half of Democrats said inflation is impacting the way they budget, an iCitizen poll released on Tuesday found. When asked, “is the current rate of inflation affecting your family budget?” 50.3 percent of Democrats answered “yes.” Nearly 90 percent of Republicans and 77.8 percent of independents agreed. The survey, which was conducted on Dec. 15-17 with 1,762 respondents, found that 70.8 percent of those polled said inflation is impacting the way they budget. A little over 29 percent disagreed.  Broken down by race, 73.9 percent of white respondents, 68.8 percent of black respondents, and 68.1 percent of Hispanics answered “yes.” By gender, both male and female responses were “virtually identical,” with 74.5 percent of men and 74.6 percent of women said inflation is becoming a real problem.  Eighty-two percent of people with less than a bachelor’s degree and 70.7 percent of people with a bachelor’s degree or higher also said inflation is impacting their family budget. Every age category reported being impacted by inflation, the “yes” response rate being highest among 35 to 49-year-olds at 81.2 percent. Fifty to 64-year-olds...
    More than twice as many Americans believe President Joe Biden's actions are hurting inflation rather than helping, according to a new poll, which comes even as Biden as increased his public attention to the record-breaking price hikes.  A large plurality of 47 percent said Biden's actions on getting inflation under control were actually hurting, according to a new Fox Business poll. That is compared to 22 per cent who said it was helping, and 28 per cent who said it wasn't making a difference. This comes as an increasing number of Americans identify inflation as a leading problem that is impacting their lives.  More than a third of those surveyed, 36 per cent, called inflation the biggest issue facing the economy, while 16 per cent rated government spending and the deficit as the biggest issue. Twice as many believe Biden's actions are hurting on inflation than helping in a new Fox Business poll The reviews come after Biden and congressional Democrats were able to muscle through a $1.3 trillion American Rescue Plan and a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure law –...
    A Bloomberg article has been mercilessly mocked for advising people to 'spend their pay checks immediately' and 'borrow lots of money' to cope with inflation. The piece takes advice from Argentinians on how they deal with soaring inflation - the country is ravaged by 50 percent rises in a typical year.  'In a high-inflation economy, money that sits in the bank is losing value. Each day, those $100 on deposit buy a little bit less,'  the article says.  'As a result, many Argentines spend their paychecks as soon as they receive them, carting away weeks' worth of groceries in a single shopping trip, even if some of it ... will sit in the freezer for months.' Among the handy tips, it advises Americans to 'negotiate a pay rise - or two' and to 'buy homes and cars.' The article has been savaged by commentators who claim it is hopelessly out of touch with Americans who are facing the highest rate of inflation rate in 40 years.   Empty shelves at a supermarket in Washington DC amid supply chain woes and surging prices...
    More than three-fourths of Americans are worried inflation will affect their winter, with 51 per cent concerned they 'won't be able to afford what they need during the holidays,' a new poll reveals. A Yahoo/YouGov survey taken the week before Thanksgiving shows 77 per cent of Americans feel inflation is affecting their lives – and 57 per cent blame it on President Joe Biden. Among Democratic voters, 25 per cent say Biden is not doing enough to address inflation and another 39 per cent say they aren't sure. This means that 64 per cent of the president's own party don't have much confidence in his response to the inflation crisis. Inflation is hitting three-decade highs in the midst of a supply chain issue exacerbated by worker shortages. From October 2020 until now, prices overall in the U.S. have soared by 6.2 per cent. Republicans say they feel the effects of inflation at a higher rate than Democrats. A new poll shows 77 per cent of American voters feel the affects of inflation going into the holiday season Prices at the...
    Seventy-seven percent of Americans believe inflation is impacting their holiday season, according to Tuesday’s Yahoo News/YouGov poll. While a majority of Americans blame President Joe Biden for the inflation stifling their holiday season, only 18 percent believe “Biden is doing enough to address it.” The poll also shows overall eight in ten Americans are impacted by the price increase of everyday goods. Thirty-seven percent say its hurting them “a great deal” and 40 percent say  “some.” More specifically, six in ten Americans believe they are suffering from “shortages of goods and services.” Seventeen percent say the shortages are impacting them “a great deal” and 44 percent say “some.” The poll additionally found a majority or 51 percent of Americans are “worried” they “won’t be able to afford what they need during the holidays due to inflation.” Another 45 percent are “worried” they “won’t be able to get what they need” because of food shortages. In the era of Bidenflation, it is getting much more expensive for working class Americans to buy a car, drive a car, repair a car, or insure a car....
    New York Times contributor Sarah Jeong raised eyebrows on Twitter for comments dismissing growing inflation concerns.  "All the stuff you see about inflation in the news is driven by rich people flipping their shit because their parasitic assets aren’t doing as well as they’d like and they’re scared that unemployment benefits + stimmy checks + 15 minimum wage + labor shortage is why ~[just my thoughts]~"  CNN REPORT CONTRADICTS BRIAN STELTER'S WIDELY MOCKED TWEET DISMISSING SUPPLY CHAIN ISSUES Jeong, a former Times editorial board member whose LinkedIn profile says she is currently an "editorial writer' for the paper, insisted it was "not me starting s--- on purpose with the inflation hysterics." Critics blasted the liberal journalist, many claiming she's out of touch with how most Americans are impacted by the current economy.  "This Tweet is a failure to comprehend basic economics," Outkick founder Clay Travis reacted. "Rich people are far less impacted by inflation than poor people because rich people spend a comparatively smaller amount of their income on products. Inflation is a massive default tax on the poor." "You...
    Many Americans are still feeling the financial strain the COVID pandemic. Last week, the U.S. Department of Labor reported that the Consumer Price Index rose by 6.2 percent, the largest increase the United States has seen in three decades. Almost immediately after the increase was reported, Republican lawmakers quickly attempted to point the finger at President Joe Biden and the Democratic Party. In fact, the Republican National Committee (RNC) tweeted, "Bidenflation is hurting working Americans all over the country." As prices continue to rise across the country putting an extra added strain on Americans' pockets, Republicans are using inflation as a key issue to argue for next year's midterm elections. However, The New Yorker's John Cassidy explains how inflation is being distorted by Republican lawmakers. Although Republicans are conveniently placing blame on Biden, Cassidy notes that many of the issues at the core of the world's pandemic-related inflation problem are actually "beyond the immediate control of any President." READ: 'You're his lawyer': CNN host stumps Bannon lawyer by asking if client had 'foreknowledge' of Capitol riot "If the Biden...
    But Manchin said that he did not back Califf's nomination in 2016 and he will not do so now. "Dr. Califf's nomination makes no sense as the opioid epidemic continues to wreak havoc on families across this country with no end in sight," Manchin said. "2020 was the deadliest year on record for drug related overdose deaths with 1,386 West Virginians and nearly 95,000 Americans dying from a drug related overdose. "I have made it abundantly clear that correcting the culture at the FDA is critical to changing the tide of the opioid epidemic. Instead, Dr. Califf's nomination and his significant ties to the pharmaceutical industry take us backwards not forward. His nomination is an insult to the many families and individuals who have had their lives changed forever as a result of addiction. I could not support Dr. Califf's nomination in 2016 and I cannot support it now," the senator said in the statement. My statement on the nomination of Dr. Robert Califf to serve as Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner:pic.twitter.com/vuhcx3Kcs7 — Senator Joe Manchin (@Senator Joe...
    Gas prices over $4.00 a gallon are displayed at a Speedway Express station on October 12, 2021 in San Francisco, California.Justin Sullivan | Getty Images By most economic metrics, American businesses are staging a remarkable rebound from the Covid-19 recession. But ask the people themselves, and Americans tell you they aren't feeling so peachy. Employers added more than half a million jobs in October, the unemployment rate is under 5% and spending across the economy is returned to its pre-coronavirus trend. The average hourly wage in the U.S. is up nearly 5% from a year ago, and the S&P 500 is up 39% since President Joe Biden's election in 2020. But for all the good news, Americans still feel like the economy is going downhill. That is a problem for Democrats, who are trying to hold on to razor-thin majorities in both the House and the Senate. That's in addition to the usual uphill climb faced by a president's party heading into a midterm election cycle, when the incumbent's side often loses seats. In a recent NBC News poll,...
    Joe Biden has been hit by a damaging poll claiming 33 per cent of Americans think the economy is in 'poor condition' - with 79 per cent blaming his administration's policies for the inflation spike The Fox News survey found that a further 38 per cent of people questioned said the economy was in 'only fair' shape, with just 29 per cent of respondents categorizing it as 'good' or 'excellent.' Inflation - a rise in the cost of living - is an increasing worry among Americans. A massive 86 per cent of people polled said they were fearful of it growing. The direct impact of inflation was also highlighted by the poll. Seventy per cent said rising grocery prices had caused them financial hardship, with 67 per cent saying the same of gas prices.  Any hopes of the Biden Administration being given a pass because of COVID were also dashed by the survey. COVID was blamed as a key driver of inflation - with 86 per cent of those polled said it had caused price rises, amid huge increases in...
    The US economy is roaring back to life after stalling out during the pandemic, but there are warning signs flashing that could hit consumers right in the pocketbook.  Measures of inflation - or the prices of goods and services that we all pay - are rising much more quickly than experts like to see. If those price increases get out of control, then the economic boom is likely to come to a screeching halt. And many signs of inflation are already here - with the prices of groceries, household items, gas and electricity, for example, all surging over the last year. It might seem like a complicated concept, but it plays out in real life: The average price of coffee is now up nearly 8 percent compared to last year, while the price of bread is up 11 percent, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Gasoline is up a whopping 22 percent.  Those things have all gone up in price while paychecks, generally, haven't. The price increases show up in the the personal consumption expenditures index, or PCE, one of...
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