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    Three in four Americans say they are hoping to avoid political conversations at the Thanksgiving dinner table this year, according to a new poll.  Research from Axios found that 77 percent of Americans do not want to talk about the controversial topic this year, while just one in four, 23 percent, look forward to political discussions.  This comes as a Quinnipiac poll found that half of all Americans said they expect political divisions to worsen over the coming year.  40 percent said they don't expect the climate to change while just seven percent believe that divisions will ease between now and next year.  Less than one-fourth of Americans said they are looking forward to discussing the results of the midterm elections at Thanksgiving  President Joe Biden recently pardoned several turkeys ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday  Former President Donald Trump during a turkey pardoning held during his term The poll results come after a tumultuous midterm election where Democrats maintained control of the Senate but Republicans took back the House.  Quinnipiac also found that 59 percent of Americans think Americans are not...
    Eric Trump has concluded that there’s no possible way his family colluded with Russia because they were too dumb to do so. “We weren’t smart enough to collude with Russia,” Trump said on the latest addition of Uncut With Jay Cutler podcast. “We didn’t know what a delegate was.” The former president’s son went on to trumpet another example of his ignorance — in an effort to further establish his intellectual inability to collude. “I remember walking up to a caucus in Iowa, I looked at this little young staffer and said, ‘Hey can you tell me what a caucus is? Because I have no idea what the hell I’m supposed to be doing here.'” Trump said after the “young staffer” explained to him what a caucus is, he reiterated how uninformed he is. “I go, ‘You understand they actually know something about politics right? What the hell do I know about the world? What the hell do I know about immigration?'” Trump then doubled down about how his families lack of knowledge inhibited them from colluding. “We weren’t smart...
    US Coronavirus: The country reported more than 2,100 deaths in a single day. Things are projected to get worse Trump tweets string of falsehoods about Wisconsin absentee voters 5 golden rules if you end up talking politics with your family this Thanksgiving THE MONEYIST © MarketWatch illustration Some American thanksgivings might be particularly fraught this year. If it’s a virtual occasion? When dealing with perceived slights, actual insults, and ill-gotten gains, between friends, frenemies, in-laws or relatives, resist telling that person exactly what you think of them or their political affiliation via text. Also, don’t email. Don’t send Facebook messages. Don’t Slack for the love of God, please don’t tweet  your views. ‘Thanksgiving dinner will already have a turkey, it doesn’t need two headless chickens fighting over the soul of the nation.’ — Thanksgiving dinner typically allows you to dish out your views face to face. What you say cannot be produced as evidence against you. It cannot be forwarded to others as an example as what your father-in-law or sibling has had to put up with over the...
    Here are Tuesday’s top personal finance stories:Personal Finance Janet Yellen is poised to become Treasury secretary in a Biden cabinet — and here’s what that means for cash-strapped American families ‘We are in for very, very rough economic times,’ one analyst tells MarketWatch.Older people, Black and Latinx Americans say they would be hesitant about getting a coronavirus vaccine Many Americans say they're hesitant to get a vaccine, even if one was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. 5 golden rules if you end up talking politics with your family this Thanksgiving ‘Thanksgiving dinner doesn’t need two headless chickens fighting over the soul of the nation’Pope Francis takes aim at anti-mask protestors: ‘They are incapable of moving outside of their own little world’ In his new book, the pontiff asks, ‘What matters more — to take care of people or keep the financial system going?’Artists want to turn the Sunday after Thanksgiving into Black Friday for art Thousands of artists and organizations across the country are coming together to encourage people to shop art Nov. 29Lucky, stressed, and ready to...
    The Duchess of Sussex has been criticized for speaking about the US election. Chris Jackson/Getty Images, Karwai Tang/WireImage/Getty Images Meghan Markle has abandoned the royal family's ban on speaking about politics since stepping back in January. Royal experts told Insider that while the duchess would have been able to vote in the US election if she hadn't resigned, she would have likely been forbidden from speaking about it publicly.  "The palace would not under any circumstances have allowed her to take a public stance on the US elections," royal author Nigel Cawthorne told Insider. A source close to Markle told Insider that she chose to speak on the subject to encourage women specifically to make sure "their voice is heard by casting their ballot." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. One unexpected development from Meghan Markle's post-royal life has been her involvement in US politics. The Duchess of Sussex made history by voting in the US election, something royals don't typically participate in as they are supposed to remain politically neutral. Markle and Prince Harry encouraged Americans to...
    Healthcare workers, high-risk people will get priority for COVID-19 vaccine in New York: governor The most delicious burger and fries in your state Meghan Markle Might Stop Talking About Politics to Help Prince Harrys Relationship with the Royal Family Everything to Know About Harry and Meghan’s Royal Exit Marie Claire See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Nearly 30% of office workers will take less time off this summer Veuer How to pop a pimple yourself, according to Dr. Pimple Poppers tips INSIDER How to explain a coronavirus-related layoff on your resume Buzz60 Run out of things to do? Try one of these very specific hobbies. The Washington Post Singles now displaying COVID antibody test results in dating apps! Buzz60 Ways to ask a stranger for help landing a job Veuer 5 surprising sports to enjoy during the pandemic GOBankingRates Advice for dealing with the grief of losing someone during the pandemic Veuer Makeup industry looking...
    'Uncomfortable' Prince Harry seemed 'regretful' and 'tense' when he spoke about the US election with Meghan Markle in a new video, a body language expert has revealed. The Duke, 36, and Duchess of Sussex, 39, caused a stir when they appeared in a video for Time 100 yesterday and urged American citizens to register to vote in what Meghan called 'the most important election of our lifetime.' Speaking from their $14 million mansion in Santa Barbara, Prince Harry told voters to 'reject hate speech' and admitted he was not eligible to vote - adding that he had never voted in the UK either where convention dictates that royals keep well clear of politics. Analysing footage of the discussion for FEMAIL, body language expert Judi James noted Prince Harry looked 'uncomfortable' and 'tense' because he would be 'well aware of the potential fall-out from his comments in the UK and in the royal family'. Judi explained that the Duke used 'distraction rituals' throughout which reflected his 'level of discomfort' and built up throughout the video to the point where he did a...
    It's no secret that the coronavirus pandemic has completely upended American life - both at home and at work.   Specific changes weathered over the course of this year were examined in detail by the 2020 American Family Survey released on Tuesday by researchers from The Deseret News and Brigham Young University.   Among the most compelling findings were that couples in the US are having less sex, talking more and feel that the pandemic has brought their families closer - even as more than a quarter of households have experienced economic hardships as a result.   In addition to coronavirus-related factors, the survey also looked at how America's turbulent summer of protests against racial inequality and the upcoming presidential election have affected family and romantic relationships.  It found that people are talking more about politics in general, with 73 percent of people discussing the Black Lives Matter movement and police brutality with their loved ones.    The 2020 American Family Survey released on Tuesday examined how current events have shaped life in the US over the past year (file photo) Respondents...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY MARIA Editor’s note: The author’s last name has been withheld. She is affiliated with the New York Immigration Coalition, which provided this op-ed. Sixteen years ago, I came to New York City to meet my husband and start our life together. We built a home here and are raising our two children in a community that we feel deeply connected to through our church, school, friends, and neighbors. We thought we had done everything the government wanted immigrants like us to do, including paying taxes, but when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the government turned its back on us. Like so many other New Yorkers, my husband and I both lost our jobs. Before the outbreak, I worked at a cleaning service but once the pandemic hit our clients canceled. At first, the cleaning service claimed that when the self-isolation orders ended, I would return to work. As the weeks turned into months, the cleaning service’s revenues dried up and then...
    Living in my car? Fall semester online means college students are scrambling for housing, Wi-Fi The FDA Just Released This New COVID Food Safety Checklist Steph & Ayesha Curry Have Endearing Chat About Politics With Daughters Riley & Ryan During 2020 DNC © DNC The Currys are endorsing Joe Biden. Steph and Ayesha Curry, along with their daughters -- Riley, 8, and Ryan, 5 -- made a sweet appearance during night four of the Democratic National Convention to have an endearing chat about politics. “We want to ensure that our kids live in a nation that is safe, happy, healthy and fair. And so this election...” Ayesha began, "We're voting for Joe Biden," the NBA star finished. In the prerecorded segment, the parents then had a candid and cute conversation with their two girls, asking them where the president of the United States lives and if they knew what his job was. "To tell what happened to the world," Ryan replied, with Riley adding, "Keep the environment safe." Ayesha then asked, if they could create the ideal person to lead this country,...
    Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex said she will note in the next US general election. Max Mumby/ Indigo/ Getty Images. Meghan Markle spoke about politics for the first time since becoming a member of the royal family, saying that she plans to vote in the next US general election.  Writing in Marie Claire's August 2020 digital issue, the duchess said she knows what it feels like to "voiceless," possibly referencing her time as a working royal when she didn't openly discuss politics. The duchess previously spoke about her disdain for Donald Trump before marrying Prince Harry. During a TV interview in 2016, she called Trump "misogynistic" and said she would move to Canada should he be elected. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Duchess of Sussex said she will be voting in the next US general election, despite the royal family's strict rule against getting involved with politics. Meghan Markle opened up about why she plans to vote in Marie Claire's August 2020 digital issue. The duchess said she knows what it's like to feel "voiceless" —...
    ELON Musk has a "strained relationship" with his 'mother-in-law' after they clashed on Twitter over politics, a family insider has told The Sun. The Tesla chief exec, who welcomed a son, bizarrely named X Æ A-12, with singer Grimes in May, angered her mom Sandy Garossino when he encouraged followers to "take the red pill", a phrase used by the far right to signify a political awakening. 5 SpaceX founder Elon Musk clashes with his 'mother-in-law' over his political viewsCredit: Reuters 5 Elon is at logger-heads with his 'mother-in-law' Sandy after she called him out on TwitterCredit: Twitter Now, a close source says she has never seen eye-to-eye with her daughter's billionaire baby daddy, and it's caused friction between the two families. "Sandy went to LA to welcome her grandson into the world, but it wasn't a long trip and she flew back to Canada," they told The Sun. "There was already tension between her and Elon before he was born, they don't share the same political views and Sandy is not his biggest fan. "Claire [Grimes' real name] gave...
    Fox News host Tucker Carlson said the New York Times will put his family in danger by publishing his address in a forthcoming story. Carlson said during his Monday show that the decision to include his address is politically motivated and claimed the New York Times "hates [his] politics." "They hate my politics," he said. "They want this show off the air. If one of my children gets hurt because of a story they wrote, they won't consider it collateral damage. They know it's the whole point of the exercise to inflict pain on our family, to terrorize us, to control what we say. That's the kind of people they are." This post is breaking and will be updated. News Tucker Carlson New York Times
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