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that washed ashore:

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    At the time of its death, the female humpback whale was by all accounts healthy. It was about average at 49 feet in length, with ample amounts of blubber and fat reserves, and likely was spending its summer off California to feed before heading south in winter toward the Baja California coast for mating season. But sometime this summer, a ship struck the endangered whale, leading to its death, marine experts said. Beachgoers first spotted the whale on Sunday, as tides carried its bloated carcass ashore on Half Moon Bay’s Manhattan Beach. California 21,000 fish die in ‘catastrophic failure’ at UC Davis facility studying threatened species The fish, which died of chlorine exposure, included green and white sturgeon and chinook salmon that were being studied at the facility. A team from the Marine Mammal Center, based in Marin County, was dispatched to conduct a necropsy on the humpback whale. Experts noted that the whale had a massive contusion over its right chest, and its skull and upper vertebrae were dislocated from its spine. “These findings,...
    A sick bottlenose dolphin that washed ashore in Texas died after beachgoers attempted to ride it - and now those involved are facing a possible harassment investigation, according to the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network.  The group of people, who have not been identified, found the beached dolphin at Quintana Beach County Park on Sunday evening and tried to push it back into the water, where some tried to ride the animal, the agency told the Houston Chronicle. The ailing dolphin soon became stranded on the shore again, and died before rescuers could arrive to the Gulf of Mexico beach town about 60 miles south of Houston.  Pictures of the incident, posted to the animal rights group's Facebook page, showed the beached dolphin surrounded by the group before playing with the sick marine animal in the shallow water. Pictures of the incident show the beached dolphin, pictured, at the Quintana Beach County Park on Sunday evening A group of beachgoers can be seen playing with the sick marine animal along the shallow water, with several trying to ride the dolphin prior to its...
    Confronted with a jet-black globular fish with razor-sharp teeth, prickly skin and a strange stalk protruding from its head, lifeguards at Swami’s Beach in Encinitas immediately knew they had something extraordinary on their hands. A surfer found the ghoulish-looking, nearly 13-inch dead fish washed ashore Friday and alerted lifeguards, who in turn notified scientists, said David Huff, a marine safety sergeant with the city of Encinitas. What had emerged from the depths was a Pacific footballfish, an exceedingly rare species of anglerfish that inhabits deep waters beyond the sun’s reach, said Ben Frable, collection manager of marine vertebrates at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where the fish was sent. Frable is preserving the 5-pound fish for the institution’s archive, “so researchers all over the world can utilize it for the years to come,” he said. Rare find‼️ A Pacific #footballfish, one of the largest species of #anglerfish, washed ashore near Encinitas last Friday. Lifeguards notified scientists about the unique #deepsea creature, and Scripps scientist Ben @Frable was able to collect it for research and preservation. pic.twitter.com/nP76zzwBa4— Scripps...
    A four-foot-long, cannibalistic lancetfish washed up on the shore along California and although dead, the fish was found intact with its long silver body, ridged black fins and piercing blue eyes. The vicious creature was found on San Diego’s La Jolla Shores, but typically lives between the ocean’s surface and about 6,000 feet below. It is unclear how the lancetfish came ashore, but there is a chunk missing from its neck that expert say are tears from seagulls chomping on the dead fish. The carcass is now in the hands of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the team was able to study its stomach contents, showing the fish consumes large amounts of microplastics. Scroll down for video  A four-foot-long, cannibalistic lancetfish washed up on the shore along California and although dead, the fish was found intact with its long silver body, ridged black fins and piercing blue eyes Beachgoers spotted the long, skinny fish on the beach last Tuesday – Scripps just made the announcement of the find on Friday. The lancetfish is not a particularly rare site, but...
    BROWARD (CBSMiami) – An unusual discovery in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea early Sunday morning. According to the Broward Sheriff’s Office, a deputy on patrol saw a military explosive device that had apparently washed up onshore. READ MORE: 1 Wounded, 3 On The Run After Security Guard Shoots At Thieves Targeting Pricey Cars At Miami Beach Home Deputies secured the area around the item, calling in the BSO bomb squad as well as the US Air Force. READ MORE: Miami PD Continues Search For Missing California Tourist Angela Morrisey The mine being removed from the beach. (CBS4) Crews were able to safely remove the mine from the beach. MORE NEWS: Miami International Airport Expects 98,000 Passengers To Pass Through On Easter Sunday Officials are now investigating.
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    Scientists have identified a new species of whale—and they say it’s already endangered. LiveScience reports that in January 2019, the body of a whale washed ashore in the Florida Everglades. Scientists initially thought the whale was a subspecies of the Bryde’s whale called Rice’s whale. Bryde’s—pronounced “broodus”—is a baleen whale species in the same category as the humpback whale and blue whale. But new research has led scientists to conclude that the Rice’s whale is its own species. The journal Marine Mammal Science recently published their findings. Two of the paper’s authors, NOAA Fisheries scientists Patricia Rosel and Lynsey Wilcox, completed the first genetic tests on Rice’s whales in 2008. But they began the research that would lead them to confirm the new species in the 1990s, collaborating with co-author Dr. Keith Mullin (Tadusa K. Yamada was also an author on the paper). When the whale washed ashore in Florida, Rosel examined the skull, which revealed that the Rice’s whale skull differs significantly from that of the Bryde’s whale. According to LiveScience, the scientists also determined that Rice’s whales...
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    'Washed Ashore' At Florida Aquarium I’ve been spending a lot of time at the Florida Aquarium (long story short: I don’t have a babysitter until about 10:30 a.m., and the place is relatively empty when it opens at 9:30 a.m.). Thanks to the air-conditioning and sea critters, the venue is perfect for my nine-month-old and me. But one aspect of each visit—the art made from plastic that’s been collected from the shores of beaches—is both beautiful in its aesthetics and absolutely soul-crushing in its message (long story short: we’re pretty much selfish fucks who can’t be bothered to utilize reusables or even secure our trash). The sculptures in “Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea” include a parrot fish, white shark, whale skeletons and more, but they’re all made of lighters, toilet brushes, flip-flops, bleach bottles and other garbage. Go punish yourself by going to see it (viewing has been extended through October), and then walk out committed to trying to make sure an exhibit just like it can’t ever be made again. flaquarium.org —Ray Roa See all winners...
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