Sunday, Dec 04, 2022 - 04:30:00
38 results - (0.003 seconds)

to celebrate Thanksgiving:

latest news at page 1:
1
    An Illinois grandma and grandpa were killed in a plane crash Saturday on their way to celebrate Thanksgiving with their son and grandchildren.  Joseph Kreher, 64, and Patty Kreher, 66, were killed when their plane, a Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, crashed in North Carolina, just minutes away from the runway at the Smith Reynolds Airport in Winston-Salem.  According to KSDK, the Krehers had departed from the St. Louis Downtown Airport in Cahokia, Illinois, and made a stop in London, Kentucky, before their plane ultimately crashed around 11.15am.    The grandparents had reportedly been circling the runway before the 'airplane lost control' and hit the ground.  The plane, which crashed just outside the Smith-Reynolds Airport in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, appeared mangled as officials investigated the crash Patty Kreher, 66, and Joseph Kreher, 64, were killed in a plane crash Saturday Pete Wentz with the National Transportation Safety Board provided an update on the crash Saturday afternoon and said that the Krehers approached from the west, ready to land on runway 3-3 before they began a circle of the airport.  'The pilot communicated saying...
    Ousted CNN boss Jeff Zucker's ex-wife Caryn appears to be dating private equity billionaire David Rubenstein, sources tell DailyMail.com.  Caryn, 57, and Rubenstein, 73, have been getting close and this summer posed together for a photo at a charity gala in the Hamptons.  A source tells DailyMail.com, 'David has developed a really close friendship with Caryn Zucker. It's been the talk of the Upper East Side, Hamptons and Palm Beach since the summer.' Now all eyes are on the pair's holiday plans - as The Bidens are spending Thanksgiving at Rubenstein's $20million Nantucket estate.  'This should be a great Thanksgiving for them both,' the source added. 'Everyone is wondering if they will turn up for Thanksgiving dinner with the President and First Family.' Jeff Zucker's ex-wife Caryn, 57, is reportedly seeing private equity billionaire David Rubenstein, 73. This summer they posed together for a photo at a charity gala in the Hamptons President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden arrive in Nantucket Tuesday night for their Thanksgiving holiday. Sources tell DailyMail.com that it's possible Caryn will be spending the Thanksgiving...
    Members of Native American tribes from around New England are gathering in the seaside town where the Pilgrims settled — not to give thanks, but to mourn Indigenous people worldwide who’ve suffered centuries of racism and mistreatment. Thursday’s solemn National Day of Mourning observance in downtown Plymouth, Massachusetts, will recall the disease and oppression they say European settlers brought to North America. "We Native people have no reason to celebrate the arrival of the Pilgrims," said Kisha James, a member of the Aquinnah Wampanoag and Oglala Lakota tribes and the granddaughter of Wamsutta Frank James, the event’s founder. Supporters of Native Americans pause following a prayer during the 38th National Day of Mourning at Coles Hill in Plymouth, Mass., on Nov. 22, 2007. Denouncing centuries of racism and mistreatment of Indigenous people, members of Native American tribes from around New England will gather on Thanksgiving 2021 for a solemn National Day of Mourning observance. ((AP Photo/Lisa Poole, File)) THANKSGIVING TURKEY: WHAT THE CDC SAYS NOT TO DO BEFORE COOKING A BIRD "We want to educate people so that they...
    PLYMOUTH (CBS) – Members of Native American tribes from around New England gathered in the seaside town where the Pilgrims settled — not to give thanks, but to mourn Indigenous people worldwide who’ve suffered centuries of racism and mistreatment. Thursday’s solemn National Day of Mourning observance in downtown Plymouth recalled the disease and oppression that European settlers brought to North America. READ MORE: Massachusetts Thanksgiving High School Football Scoreboard“We Native people have no reason to celebrate the arrival of the Pilgrims,” said Kisha James, a member of the Aquinnah Wampanoag and Oglala Lakota tribes and the granddaughter of Wamsutta Frank James, the event’s founder. “We want to educate people so that they understand the stories we all learned in school about the first Thanksgiving are nothing but lies. Wampanoag and other Indigenous people have certainly not lived happily ever after since the arrival of the Pilgrims,” James said. “To us, Thanksgiving is a day of mourning, because we remember the millions of our ancestors who were murdered by uninvited European colonists such as the Pilgrims. Today, we and many Indigenous...
    Members of Native American tribes in New England are gathering where the Pilgrims originally settled to mourn Indigenous people “who’ve suffered centuries of racism and mistreatment,” the Associated Press (AP) reported Thursday. The National Day of Mourning in Plymouth, Massachusetts, is supposed to bring attention to the “disease and oppression” European settlers brought with them, the article read. National Day of Mourning11.25.21 Plymouth MA #NDOM21 pic.twitter.com/yZSKRZK4oy — UAINE (ndnviewpoint) (@mahtowin1) October 21, 2021 “We Native people have no reason to celebrate the arrival of the Pilgrims,” Kisha James, who is a member of the Aquinnah Wampanoag and Oglala Lakota tribes, stated. The outlet continued: “We want to educate people so that they understand the stories we all learned in school about the first Thanksgiving are nothing but lies. Wampanoag and other Indigenous people have certainly not lived happily ever after since the arrival of the Pilgrims,” James said. “To us, Thanksgiving is a day of mourning, because we remember the millions of our ancestors who were murdered by uninvited European colonists such as the Pilgrims. Today, we and many Indigenous...
    Members of Native American tribes from around New England are gathering in the seaside town where the Pilgrims settled — not to give thanks, but to mourn Indigenous people worldwide who’ve suffered centuries of racism and mistreatment. Thursday’s solemn National Day of Mourning observance in downtown Plymouth, Massachusetts, will recall the disease and oppression that European settlers brought to North America. “We Native people have no reason to celebrate the arrival of the Pilgrims,” said Kisha James, a member of the Aquinnah Wampanoag and Oglala Lakota tribes and the granddaughter of Wamsutta Frank James, the event’s founder. “We want to educate people so that they understand the stories we all learned in school about the first Thanksgiving are nothing but lies. Wampanoag and other Indigenous people have certainly not lived happily ever after since the arrival of the Pilgrims,” James said. “To us, Thanksgiving is a day of mourning, because we remember the millions of our ancestors who were murdered by uninvited European colonists such as the Pilgrims. Today, we and many Indigenous people around the country say, ‘No Thanks,...
    Thanksgiving, more than any other holiday, is associated with huge family get-togethers. Whether it’s relatives from near and far coming together for a big, festive reunion, sharing all the blessings for which they are grateful or a day filled with the stress of annoying, overbearing relatives, it is still considered a family holiday set against the backdrop of tons of delicious food. But for some people, there may not be a bunch of relatives to get together with. It may be by choice – some people would rather avoid the family stress and squabbles – or it may be due to distance or loss. Either way, spending a holiday alone, especially one that is constantly being discussed in terms of big family crowds, can be hard. My husband and I, for example, have no family to spend the holidays with. For the past few years, it has literally been just the two of us. And while that can be sad and lonely, we still figure out ways to celebrate because we know we have much to be thankful for. So...
    President BidenJoe BidenUS bishops to weigh whether Biden should receive communion Congress barrels toward end-of-year pileup Biden taps former New Orleans mayor Landrieu to spearhead infrastructure MORE will celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday on Nantucket, resuming a longtime family tradition for the first family, the Boston Globe reported. The Biden family has been staying on Nantucket, an island in Massachusetts, for Thanksgiving since 1975, according to the Globe. The president is slated to pardon the National Thanksgiving Turkey in a ceremony at the White House on Friday and it’s unclear when he would leave for Nantucket. This year marks the 74th anniversary of the National Thanksgiving Turkey presentation. The 2021 National Thanksgiving Turkey and its alternate were raised near Jasper, Ind., according to the White House. Biden in 2020, as president-elect, spent Thanksgiving at his home in Rehoboth, Del., with First Lady Jill BidenJill BidenBiden marks Veterans Day at Arlington National Cemetery Graham says friendship with Biden at breaking point over Afghanistan withdrawal The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP dealt 2022 blow, stares down Trump-era troubles MORE, their daughter...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more It’s time for the most anticipated, thought-out and well-planned meal of the year. Yes, the Thanksgiving dinner that is talked about, written about and strategized for months but probably only takes less than an hour to eat. This is the time to pull out all the stops and fill the table with delicious dishes everyone will be thankful for. Don’t worry about not having a turkey on the table for your guests. When you set out a feast of amazing food, everyone will be so busy eating, they will forget all about the turkey. For those interested in eating more plant-based, we highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App  – with over 15,000 delicious recipes it is the largest meatless, vegan, plant-based and allergy-friendly recipe resource to help you get healthy! Also, don’t forget to check out our ultimate guide to plant-based recipes for Thanksgiving! Here are some ideas for how to make your Thanksgiving dinner festive, fabulous and flesh-free: 1. The Centerpiece Source: Gluten-Free Vegan Turkey When...
    MANY Americans carved their Thanksgiving turkeys solo last year — and over half plan to do it again this holiday season. A survey of 2,000 Americans looked at how respondents’ traditions and feelings about the holidays changed during the pandemic – and the results found that 72 percent of those who celebrated alone last year thought the festivities were more stressful than in past years. 3A new study has revealed that many are spending Thanksgiving alone againCredit: Getty 3Traditions have changed for manyCredit: Getty The pandemic caused 60 percent of respondents to reevaluate the holidays, with 68 percent saying the way they celebrate has changed forever. When it comes to holiday foods, 44 percent of respondents said they cooked a holiday meal by themselves for the first time last year, and 58 percent plan to do it again this year. However, more than half (54 percent) said they ate different holiday foods than what they were used to last year. Those foods included pizza (30 percent), steak (29 percent), pasta (28%), and fast food (26 percent). Commissioned by The Little Potato...
    It’s that time of year when people are making plans for the holidays, and much has changed since last November when health officials urged everyone to limit social activities as COVID-19 cases spread like wildfire. So is it safe to gather at grandma’s again for your Thanksgiving feast? California saw its worst outbreaks of the pandemic after Turkey Day in 2020. The vaccines that arrived too late to save last holiday season were supposed to give everyone something to celebrate this time around. But then came the super-contagious delta variant, breakthrough infections and another awful summer of COVID-19. For now, public health officials and medical experts are holding off on “official” holiday guidance, anxiously eyeing case rates for signs that the virus’s current retreat might reverse like it did last fall. They say people should assess their own risk tolerance and follow health guidance to celebrate as safely as possible. “I think the stage we’re at in the pandemic is that hunkering down forever is not a viable strategy,” said Dr. Bob Wachter, chair of the medical department at UC...
    A New Jersey school board has scrapped the names of all holidays from its calender to avoid 'hurt feelings' after backlash over renaming Columbus Day as Indigenous Peoples Day. Randolph Board of Education members unanimously voted to remove all holiday names off of the school calendar, including religious holidays such as Yom Kippur and Christmas, at a meeting that drew over 100 people on Thursday.   Instead, all holidays will be designated as simply 'days off,' in schools across the Morris County township, which is about an hour west of New York City, according to a Fox5 NY report. 'If we don't have anything on the calendar, we don't have to have anyone be hurt feelings or anything like that,' board member Dorene Roche said of the controversial change. At a Randolph Board of Education meeting on Thursday, board members voted to remove all holiday names off of the school calendar amidst backlash from the community 'If we don't have anything on the calendar, we don't have to have anyone be hurt feelings or anything like that,' board member...
    CHICAGO — People should celebrate Christmas and other holidays online due to the coronavirus pandemic, the state’s top doctor said Wednesday. Illinois is still in the midst of a COVID-19 surge that’s killing hundreds and infecting thousands of people per week. Dr. Ngozi Ezike, head of the Illinois Department of Public Health, and other officials have said they’re worried there could be another surge on top of that if people gather for the winter holidays. Ezike is urging people to stay home, only spending time with members of their household, and to celebrate virtually so the virus’s spread slows and more people don’t lose their lives. “The safest way to enjoy the upcoming holidays would still be to be virtual,” Ezike said at a Wednesday news conference. The doctor suggested people find ways to honor traditions without gathering in person. That could mean bringing presents to a loved one’s home and leaving them outside or donating to a charitable organization as a gift to someone, she said. “I want you to call or video chat, as many of you did...
    A shot. A wait. Another shot: Two-dose coronavirus vaccine regimens will make it harder to inoculate America 10 Things on Amazon That Are Cheaper Than Ever Before Thanks to Black Friday Courteney Cox channeled Monica Gellers iconic turkey dance from Friends to celebrate Thanksgiving © Provided by INSIDER Courteney Cox recreated one of her "Friends" character's iconic scenes. Courteney Cox/Instagram; NBC "Friends" star Courteney Cox (Monica Geller) recreated the famous scene from season five in which her character danced with a raw turkey on her head.  "I'm feeling so thankful, and also, if I get one more goddamn GIF with that turkey on my head dancing like a f---ing fool, I'm just gonna snap," the actress said in a video posted on Instagram on Thanksgiving. "Since I'm the symbol of Thanksgiving, here you go. Hope it makes you happy," Cox said as the video cut to her dancing with a turkey on top of her own head.   Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. "Friends" star Courteney Cox celebrated Thanksgiving by recreating Monica Geller's iconic turkey dance from...
    Courteney Cox recreated one of her "Friends" character's iconic scenes. Courteney Cox/Instagram; NBC "Friends" star Courteney Cox (Monica Geller) recreated the famous scene from season five in which her character danced with a raw turkey on her head.  "I'm feeling so thankful, and also, if I get one more goddamn GIF with that turkey on my head dancing like a f---ing fool, I'm just gonna snap," the actress said in a video posted on Instagram on Thanksgiving. "Since I'm the symbol of Thanksgiving, here you go. Hope it makes you happy," Cox said as the video cut to her dancing with a turkey on top of her own head.   Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. "Friends" star Courteney Cox celebrated Thanksgiving by recreating Monica Geller's iconic turkey dance from the hit sitcom. "Happy Thanksgiving everyone, I hope you're having a great day," the 56-year-old actress said in a video posted on Instagram on Thursday. "I'm feeling so thankful, and also, if I get one more goddamn GIF with that turkey on my head dancing like a f---ing...
    The 24-year-old's holiday snaps left little to the imagination. Sommer Ray gave fans a big Thanksgiving treat this week when she posed in a thong and corset to celebrate the holiday. In a new upload posted to Instagram on November 26, the model sat with her legs apart as she flaunted her flawless body. The first snap showed the 24-year-old leaning against a shiny black piano as she flashed plenty of skin. She sizzled in a white corset with pearl detailing across the edges and down her torso, pairing it with matching thong panties that left little to the imagination. She pulled the strings up past her hips to show off her jaw dropping curves. The star had her highlighted hair down in beachy waves that cascaded over her right shoulder as she gave the camera a sultry look with her lips slightly apart. Sommer accessorized with a three string pearl necklace, dangling pear-shaped drop pearl earrings, a gold bracelet, and several rings. In the second snap, she gave a look at her booty in the barely-there bottoms. Sommer again...
    MONROE TOWNSHIP, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Whether celebrating with loved ones in-person or virtually, families are finding meaningful ways to come together and give thanks on a Thanksgiving like no other. For the Gambuto family in Monroe Township, it was important to be together for Thanksgiving, so they gathered under one roof, but separated into pods. “What we’re going to be doing is what we’re calling a pod-together, instead of a get-together. So my sister, her kids and her husband will be at the kitchen table. My mom, her husband and my grandmother will be at the dining room table. And I will be at the kitchen island,” said Julio Vincent Gambuto. Gambuto directed a new film called “Team Marco” about a friendship between generations, so he thought it was important to bring four generations of his family together to give thanks at the end of a tough year. RELATED STORY — Siblings Honor Mother Who Died From COVID-19 By Helping To Feed Those In Need On Thanksgiving “We just keep telling the kids that this is temporary and that this...
    (Photo: Adobe Stock) To celebrate Thanksgiving Day is to celebrate the butchering of Native Americans, and as a Black man living in America that is something that I will never be able to celebrate. This is a holiday that white people have established and have created a narrative around as something that is delightful for American families to commemorate, but it actually has a history rooted in the killing of Native people who were on this land before it became the United States of America we know today. As a graduate of Morehouse College, I have been conditioned early on to look beyond the information that is presented to me about the history of America and do further research outside of the lens of a Eurocentric perspective. Read More: Americans risk traveling over Thanksgiving despite warnings (Photo: Adobe Stock) America is a country that has been designed to uphold the white male patriarchy. Case in point: John Winthrop, an English Puritan lawyer and a leading figure in colonizing the Massachusetts Bay Colony instituted Thanksgiving Day. But...
    The mayor of Denver has been branded a 'hypocrite' for jetting out of the city for Thanksgiving, just 30 minutes after he posted a message urging residents to stay home for the holiday.  A spokesperson for Democrat Mayor Michael Hancock admitted Wednesday that the politician was flying to Mississippi to celebrate Thanksgiving at his daughter's house.  'As he has shared, the Mayor is not hosting his traditional large family dinner this year, but instead traveling alone to join his wife and daughter where the three of them will celebrate Thanksgiving at her residence instead of having them travel back to Denver,' Hancock's deputy communications director told ABC 7 in a statement. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has been branded a 'hypocrite' for jetting out of the city for Thanksgiving, just hours after he posted a message urging residents to avoid travelling for the holiday 'Upon return, he will follow all necessary health and safety guidance and quarantine.'  The admission came a short time after Hancock posted a message to Twitter, pleading with constituents to avoid travel as COVID-19 cases spike across the...
    To view past editions of The Hill's 12:30 Report, click here: http://bit.ly/1M1mIfw  To receive The Hill's 12:30 Report in your inbox, please sign up here: http://bit.ly/1Tt4hqN --> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.* *Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically.   The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Meghan MarkleMeghan MarkleMeghan Markle lawsuit against newspaper to be delayed until fall 2021 Prince Harry on unconscious bias: 'Ignorance is no longer an excuse' Meghan Markle: You realize 'your voice matters' even more 'when you're not able to exercise it' MORE writes NYT op-ed | Describes recent miscarriage | Trump allows Biden to receive intel briefings | Chinese president congratulates Biden | Progressives support Cabinet picks so far | Trump plans to pardon Flynn | Governors take heat for violating their own COVID-19 restrictions | Best online Black Friday deals   LATEST WITH THE CORONAVIRUS Yes, governors. We are looking at you.:     Via The Hill’s Reid Wilson, “Several top Democrats have come under criticism in recent days for violating the coronavirus restrictions they imposed on their own states and cities in hopes...
    Lev Radin/Pacific Press/Zuma Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.How are your Thanksgiving plans different this year? You may have heeded the urgent advice to put travel plans on ice, but you’re still trying your best to feel the holiday spirit, somehow? As the latest coronavirus surge continues unabated, and as various kinds of restrictions swing into effect across the country, the Mother Jones Podcast team is bringing you two chats with top infectious-disease experts on how to stop the spread and keep you and your family safe during a holiday season unlike any other. Science communication expert Jessica Malaty Rivera, a microbiologist, has a few tips for you, and a couple for the incoming president, too. Rivera spoke to our senior editor Kiera Butler about Thanksgiving strategies—”a negative COVID-19 test is not an immunity passport,” she warns—as well as her work to document up-to-the-minute coronavirus data and trends at the COVID Tracking Project. “Nobody here is saying we should cancel Thanksgiving,”...
    CHICAGO — Please don’t celebrate Thanksgiving with people outside your household, officials said in a last-minute plea to all Chicagoans Wednesday. Dr. Allison Arwady, head of the Chicago Department of Public Health, and Mayor Lori Lightfoot warned Chicago — and the rest of the United States — could see a deadly surge in cases if people don’t practice social distancing over the holiday. The city is already in the grips of a second wave of the disease, which is killing about 100 Chicagoans per week. “It’s better to have a Zoom Thanksgiving than an ICU Christmas,” Arwady said at a Wednesday news conference. “It’s true. And I want you to think about that as you’re making your decisions not just for Thanksgiving, but for Black Friday” and afterward. The city’s leaders and state officials, like Gov. JB Pritzker Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, have made similar pleas for weeks. They fear Thanksgiving dinners could turn into superspreader events that will result in many more people becoming sick and dying. About 40 percent of people...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Stepping up warnings about the continuing surge in COVID-19 cases, Los Angeles County's public health director said residents should celebrate Thanksgiving only with members of their own household, even if they plan to hold their holiday dinner outdoors.The county, based on previous guidance regarding public gatherings, had earlier stated that residents could celebrate the holiday with members of up to two other households, as long as the dinner was held outdoors with physical distancing and face coverings.But Barbara Ferrer clamped down on that Monday, saying the current surge of virus cases in the county and across the country makes it much safer to restrict holiday get-togethers to one household.RELATED: Travelers arriving in LA required to sign COVID-19 form acknowledging state quarantineEMBED More News Videos Mayor Eric Garcetti warned if the current pace of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations continues, there will not be enough hospital beds by Christmastime. "As cases continue to increase rapidly across the United States and here in our county, the safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving is to celebrate at home with the people...
    Whether you plan to attend a gathering or not, a new study says Massachusetts is one of the safest states in the country in which to celebrate Thanksgiving. Massachusetts was among the top 10 safest states to spend Thanksgiving during the COVID-19 pandemic - ranked No. 7 overall. The safest place in the U.S. to enjoy Thanksgiving is Vermont. The study was done by WalletHub, an online financial service provider, and compares all 50 states on metrics that include the state’s response to COVID-19, virus incident rates, deaths-related to COVID-19 per capita, crime rate, and fatal November driving-under-the-influence motor vehicle accidents. While Massachusetts may be one of the safer states in which to have Thanksgiving, government officials are encouraging people to celebrate in their own homes or at very small, well-ventilated gatherings. Small gatherings have been blamed over the past few weeks for helping to drive up COVID-19 rates in Massachusetts and neighboring states. Still, New England is a pretty good place to spend Thanksgiving this year. The region placed well in the ranking with Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire...
    There’s no place like home for the holidays – so when’s it acceptable to start decorating? A new study from YouGov has revealed the most popular times to start decking the halls, but the findings won’t surprise anyone ready to celebrate the most wonderful time of the year. In a report shared with Fox News on Thursday, the U.K. market research firm shared findings from a November survey of 3,017 adults in the U.S. on holiday décor. Of participants polled, 2,748 celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah or Kwanza. Among the bunch, 70% spruce up the interior of their home for the holidays, while 42% go the extra mile to make the exterior of their residence sparkle and shine. The findings from the YouGov report probably won’t surprise anyone ready to celebrate the most wonderful time of the year. (iStock) 'THE BACHELOR' MANSION HITS AIRBNB, AND IT IS NOT CHEAP   Keeping with tradition, 69% who spruce up their surroundings for the winter holidays wait until after Thanksgiving, but from there, opinion was mixed regarding the best time to do so. According...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Miami-Dade County has released an ad encouraging families to celebrate Thanksgiving with only those in their immediate household. The ad states those eating together should do so outdoors because of COVID. “Even better, share a virtual dinner with family and friends. Deliver meals to loved ones without contact,” the ad continued. With COVID infection rates rising, Dr. Olveen Carrasquillo, with University of Miami Health, agrees the typical Thanksgiving is off the table. “It’s not the news I want to hear. It’s certainly not the news my family wants to hear. But unfortunately that’s what we need to follow,” said Dr. Carrasquillo. The CDC is recommending you keep the car parked and avoid hopping on plane. “We just can’t put people at risk. I mean, we’ve gotten over two bad humps. This is the third hump. We don’t want people to take unnecessary risks” Carrasquillo said. In Miami-Dade, the two-week average positivity rate of new cases is 8.15%. In Broward County, it’s 7.51%. Doctors say that means too much of the virus in the community. “We see...
    (CNN)As Covid-19 cases rise across the country, leading U.S. medical and health organizations called on the American public to celebrate safely this holiday season.The American Medical Association (AMA), American Hospital Association (AHA), and the American Nurses Association (ANA) issued an open letter Thursday urging Americans to scale back on traditional gatherings to stop the spread of Covid-19."With Thanksgiving and the holiday season fast approaching and a deadly Covid-19 pandemic surging, we -- the physicians, nurses, hospital and health system leaders and public health professionals on the front lines of this pandemic -- strongly urge everyone throughout our country to celebrate responsibly, in a scaled-back fashion that limits the virus's spread, to help reduce the risk of infecting friends, family and others you love," read the letter.The groups fear that the surge of cases expected around the holiday season will overwhelm the health care system.Heres everything you need to know about social distancing"The record-shattering surge underway is resulting in uncontrolled community spread and infection that has already overburdened health systems in some areas and will ultimately consume capacity of our health...
    Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar spoke Wednesday about the coronavirus pandemic, talking up the very encouraging news about vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna while warning Americans they can’t let their guard down in the time being. The CDC recently sent out guidelines about how people should safely celebrate Thanksgiving, which Azar made a point of noting today: “The safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is at home with the people you live with and through virtual celebrations. Gathering indoors with people who aren’t members of your household is a higher risk activity for spreading the virus.” HHS Sec. Alex Azar on Covid-19: “The safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is at home with the people you live with and through virtual celebrations.” pic.twitter.com/pDGbXzVydF — Cheddar???? (@cheddar) November 18, 2020 “Please know that there is light at the end of the tunnel,” he added. “Because of the sacrifices Americans have made, and the hard work so many have done, we will have the chance to celebrate the holidays much more safely with family and...
    The Week People infected with COVID-19 at Thanksgiving could enter ‘the morgue around Christmas’ The sharp rise in U.S. COVID-19 infections — a million new cases in just six days, a seven-day average of 1,120 new deaths a day — prompted the governors of Michigan and Washington to announce new restrictions Sunday.In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) enacted a three-week ban on in-person classes at high schools and colleges, closed indoor dining at restaurants, suspended organized sports, and limited private gatherings. “The situation has never been more dire,” she said, adding that Michigan is “at the precipice” and could soon see 1,000 COVID-19 deaths per week. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) limited capacity at retail stores and grocers, and closed gyms and indoor restaurant service for a month. And it isn’t just Democrats implementing new restrictions. In North Dakota, Gov. Doug Burgum (R) ordered a statewide mask mandate over the weekend, joining 35 other states, and imposed restrictions on businesses.The new guidelines also limit indoor gatherings through November, as public health officials urge Americans to rethink their Thanksgiving travel plans....
    Apparently, it's quite hard to say no to Thanksgiving dinner. For almost all of 2020, traditional holiday celebrations have been altered (or even canceled) due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. While many hoped to be able to return to somewhat normal Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations, recent spikes in COVID-19 cases have officials warning against large gatherings. Based on a recent study, however, it seems that about 40% of Americans may still plan on attending these sorts of events. Based on a recent study, however, it seems that about 40% of Americans may still plan on attending these sorts of events. (iStock) A FATHER'S LAST CHRISTMAS DISPLAY IS LIT 24 HOURS AFTER HE DIED Researchers from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a national survey about how Americans plan to spend the holidays. In a press release, they say they found that, while a majority plan on taking precautions due to the pandemic, a significant number may be putting themselves at risk. According to the results, about two-in-five Americans (38%) still plan on attending gatherings with more than 10 people. And about...
    TEXAS – The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) updated its guide to celebrating Thanksgiving due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Through the website, the CDC indicates that the meetings for this season are fun but can also increase the risk of contagion for COVID-19 or influenza. Recommendations include celebrating with people who only live under the same roof. If you plan to celebrate with guests, then the following is recommended: Wear a mask Always keep your distance: at least 6 feet from other people who don’t live with you Wash your hands frequently If you plan to go to a party then try to bring your own food, plates, glasses and / or utensils Each of the above recommendations has been presented in detail on the CDC website. You can press here for more details.
    The Thanksgiving table at Dr. Anthony Fauci’s home is going to feel a lot emptier this year, with his three adult children skipping the trip to Washington D.C. for the holiday. For UCSF’s Dr. Peter Chin-Hong, it will be a Zoom holiday, with extended family dining together while apart. Dr. George Rutherford, also of UCSF, is inviting the kids to make brief “cameo appearances” — and plans to order food online for delivery, dodging germs in the cranberry aisle. Welcome to The Great Thanksgiving Opt-Out. Enlisting strategies unimaginable to the Pilgrims, the nation’s public health experts are reinventing the quintessential American holiday. “What we don’t want is five generations of people at some big table, with everybody bumping elbows and passing food to each other,” said Rutherford, a UCSF epidemiologist. “If somebody’s sick, they could spread it around to Grandma and Grandpa and whoever else is there.” Here are five things to know about the holiday: People are forgoing travel Flight searches for the week of Thanksgiving are down nearly 60%, according to Kayak, an online travel search company. Flight...
    Megyn Kelly joined in on excoriating California Governor Gavin Newsom on Sunday for his extremely restricting Thanksgiving guidelines, which includes 'strongly discouraging' singing at the festivities this year in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. In a tweet posted Sunday morning, the former Fox News and NBC News host listed some of Newsom's 'Thanksgiving insanity.' 'CA Gov's Thxgiving insanity: -Must be held *OUTSIDE*; -Guests may use bathrm inside if sanitized; -Masks on while not eating; -Singing 'strongly discouraged;' -Max of two hours together; -6 feet *mandated* in all directions b/twn all at table & otherwise.' Kelly posted along with an article from Newsweek posted last week detailing the rules. As Thanksgiving approaches next month, Newsom and the California Department of Public Health released safety guidelines they say must be observed for all private gatherings. Former Fox News and NBC News host Megyn Kelly excoriated California Governor Gavin Newsom for his 'Thanksgiving insanity' by imposing extremely strict rules on private gatherings She noted some of the stringent guidelines, including mandating holding the event outside and only allowing people inside...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Many families are wondering what to do about Thanksgiving this year because of the risks associated with Covid-19. Many doctors say a large family gathering is a recipe for inviting the virus in. So what are you going to do, during the holiday of family and food? “I get that question every day,” said Dr. Shira Doron of Tufts Medical Center. “I can’t make that decision, because risk is a very personal consideration.” Dr. Doron explained there is no such thing as a large family celebration with zero risk. Even if precautions aren’t taken. READ: CDC Guidelines For Thanksgiving For the Maier family in the South Shore, they discussed whether or not to bring their daughter home from college down south. “What kind of risks was it going to entail for our family, and then what are the safeguards can you put in place,” said Paul Maier. The family decided to bring her home. “It comes to using common sense,” Maier said. “Playing by the rules and you know, realizing you’re in a different environment than you...
1