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    Russia's parliament officials warned that nations that are arming Ukraine with more powerful weapons risk their own destruction, which would lead to 'a global catastrophe'.  The message followed Ukraine's supporters pledging billions in military aid to the country on Friday, including armoured vehicles, air defence systems and other equipment.  This did not include the battle tanks Kyiv had previously requested.  State Duma chairman Vyacheslav Volodin said: 'Supplies of offensive weapons to the Kyiv regime would lead to a global catastrophe.'  Russian officials have warned that nations arming Ukraine with more powerful weapons risk their own destruction State Duma chairman Vyacheslav Volodin said: 'Supplies of offensive weapons to the Kyiv regime would lead to a global catastrophe' RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Boris Johnson signs his name on Ukrainian anti-armour weapon... Will Putin send another 500,000 conscripts to Ukraine?... Share this article Share 'If Washington and Nato supply weapons that would be used for striking peaceful cities and making attempts to seize our territory as they threaten to do, it would trigger a...
    On October 7, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that the United States’ unemployment rate had fallen to 3.5 percent. The U.S., during the Biden era, has experienced some of its lowest unemployment rates in over half a century; that’s the good news. But the bad news is that the U.S. has also been experiencing its worst inflation since the early 1980s. Even Dollar Tree raised most of its prices by 25 percent. Republican candidates, in the 2022 midterms, have been blaming President Joe Biden for inflation —although, truth be told, inflation is a global problem that has been aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic. GOP strategists are hoping that voters, angry over inflation, will also blame Biden and take out their frustration on Democratic candidates.Washington Post opinion writer Catherine Rampell, in her October 18 column, poses the question: How will Republicans handle the economy if they achieve a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives and/or the U.S. Senate in the midterms? Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has expressed confidence that Republicans will likely “flip” the House, but...
    HUMILIATED Vladimir Putin admitted failures in Ukraine today - but also threatened a "global catastrophe" as his allies warned the West not to "push him into a corner". Russia is said to be running low on missiles and is desperate to return to the negotiating table now his troops are on the run in Ukraine. 6Vladimir Putin warned of a 'global catastrophe' at a summit today in KazakhstanCredit: Reuters 6Ukraine officials reckon Russia has used up two-thirds of its long-range precision missilesCredit: Twitter/@oleksiireznikov 6Putin fired 100 missiles at cities across Ukraine this weekCredit: Reuters Mad Vlad launched a blitz of more than 100 missiles on Ukrainian cities this week in revenge for the Crimea bridge bombing. Western officials today condemned the "further barbaric assaults on the civilian population" - but analysts believe Putin cannot keep it up. One official said: "Russia is rapidly exhausting its supply of long range precision munitions - in particular its air-launched cruise missiles. "So this is not a campaign it will be able to sustain indefinitely." read more on russiaSTRIKE FORCE Putin deploys 11 nuclear bombers...
    Vladimir Putin said today that a direct clash between NATO troops and those from Russia would lead to a 'global catastrophe', adding that he saw no need for massive strikes on Ukraine... for now. The Russian strongman also said his military mobilisation for the war is coming to an end, and he has no plans for further conscriptions once it has finished. Putin was speaking in Astana during a meeting of The Commonwealth of Independent States Summit (CIS), where he sat down with allies - most of them leaders of post-Soviet states.  Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the plenary session of the Commonwealth of the Independent States (CIS) Summit, October 14, 2022 in Astana, Kazakhstan Speaking at a press conference in the Kazakh capital, Putin said that the 'partial mobilisation' he announced last month, which the defence minister said aimed to recruit 300,000 soldiers, was finishing and would be over within two weeks. 'I hope that those who are saying this are smart enough not to take such steps,' he said of a possible conflict between Russia and the western alliance. He...
    The worldwide supply of electricity from clean energy sources must be doubled by the end of the decade to limit global temperature rise—or else there is an increased risk that worsening extreme weather disasters turbocharged by the fossil fuel-driven climate crisis will further diminish energy security and even imperil renewable power generation. That's according to the annual World Meteorological Organization (WMO) State of Climate Services report, published Tuesday, which includes input from 26 partners and focuses on energy this year because it "holds the key" to international agreements on sustainable development and climate action, with urgent and far-reaching changes needed to improve public and planetary health. "The energy sector is the source of around three-quarters of global greenhouse gas emissions," WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said in a statement. "Switching to clean forms of energy generation, such as solar, wind, and hydropower—and improving energy efficiency—is vital if we are to thrive in the 21st century." "Net-zero by 2050 is the aim," said Taalas. "But we will only get there if we double the supply of low-emissions electricity within the next eight...
    by Duggan Flanakin   Maybe Vladimir Putin SHOULD get the Nobel Peace Prize after all. To be sure, Putin’s bloody invasion of Ukraine is an affront to humanity, given his targeting of civilians. Russia even fired upon medical and humanitarian aid convoys and is using a nuclear power plant as a shield for his military operations. But Putin’s invasion may be saving Europe – and other nations – from their blind devotion to the “climate catastrophe” movement and the worldwide push to “Net Zero by 2050.” Even before Putin’s war disrupted European energy supplies vastly increased energy costs, Europeans were suffering from senseless “green” energy policies imposed in the name of “saving the planet.” The radical Net Zero plan, crafted by the United Nations and endorsed by such entities as the World Economic Forum, would press nations to abdicate reliance on fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and even hydroelectric dams in favor of so-called “green energy” that is not that green and does not generate and transmit reliable, affordable energy. Chief architects UN chairman Antonio Guterres and UN climate chief...
    The eruption of war between China and Taiwan would be a global catastrophe on a scale far greater than the Ukraine crisis. Yet again Chinese military jets invaded Taiwanese airspace this week, this time following American politician Nancy Pelosi’s provocative visit to the sovereign island off the Communist mainland. Beijing staged live-fire exercises close to Taiwan, effectively blocking those regions to traffic. Meanwhile, the secretary general of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, warned that the world was ‘just one miscalculation away from nuclear annihilation’. Charles Parton OBE is a senior associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute, who spent 22 years as a senior diplomat in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan No one is more aware of the dangers of that miscalculation than the Chinese leadership. President Xi Jinping knows that if he takes a gamble and loses, the repercussions could destroy China’s economy or might even bring down the Communist Party that has ruled since 1949. We should not doubt the level of Chinese anger at the actions of Mrs Pelosi, speaker of the US House of Representatives...
    The world faces the prospect of a mass starvation “catastrophe” driven by unprecedented food shortages, U.N. chief Antonio Guterres warned Friday. Guterres pointed to the conflict in Ukraine as exacerbating disruptions caused by “climate change, the coronavirus pandemic and inequality” to produce an “unprecedented global hunger crisis” already affecting hundreds of millions of people. “There is a real risk that multiple famines will be declared in 2022,” he said in a video message to officials from dozens of countries gathered in Berlin. “And 2023 could be even worse.” Guterres noted harvests across Asia, Africa and the Americas will dive as farmers struggle to cope with rising fertilizer and energy prices, AP reports. As Breitbart London reported, one indirect obstacle already posed by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is the strain that is putting on Romania as it seeks to help export its neighbour’s wheat crop to a waiting world. Romanian Route for Exporting Ukrainian Grain Struggles With Sheer Volume Movinghttps://t.co/4bdO3hQNSI — Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) June 24, 2022 The Black Sea port of Constanta has emerged as a main conduit for the...
    BERLIN (AP) — The head of the United Nations warned Friday that the world faces “catastrophe” because of the growing shortage of food around the globe. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the war in Ukraine has added to the disruptions caused by climate change, the coronavirus pandemic and inequality to produce an “unprecedented global hunger crisis” already affecting hundreds of millions of people. “There is a real risk that multiple famines will be declared in 2022,” he said in a video message to officials from dozens of rich and developing countries gathered in Berlin. “And 2023 could be even worse.” Guterres noted that harvests across Asia, Africa and the Americas will take a hit as farmers around the world struggle to cope with rising fertilizer and energy prices. “This year’s food access issues could become next year’s global food shortage,” he said. “No country will be immune to the social and economic repercussions of such a catastrophe.” Guterres said U.N. negotiators were working on a deal that would enable Ukraine to export food, including via the Black Sea, and...
    The world was warned last night that it is facing a ‘human catastrophe’ as Vladimir Putin stokes a global famine. World Bank president David Malpass said the record rises in food costs triggered by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could push hundreds of millions of people into malnutrition and poverty. His warning came as Ireland accused Putin of using military tactics to engineer a worldwide food crisis on top of a massive wave of refugees and soaring energy costs. World Bank president David Malpass (pictured at COP26) said Putin could start global famine The war between Russia and Ukraine, which together export more than a quarter of the world’s wheat, has sent prices soaring. The US-based World Bank, which provides loans and grants to low and middle-income countries for capital projects, calculates there will be a staggering 37 per cent rise in food costs. It said the effect will be ‘magnified for the poor’ who will have to ‘eat less’ and will be left with little money for anything else. African countries who rely heavily on Russian and Ukrainian grain exports...
    UN Secretary General António Guterres photographed at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland on Nov. 11, 2021.Jeff J Mitchell | Getty Images News | Getty Images The U.N. Secretary General issued a stark warning Monday, saying the planet had emerged from last year's COP26 summit in Glasgow with "a certain naïve optimism" and was "sleepwalking to climate catastrophe." In remarks delivered to The Economist's Sustainability Week via video link, Antonio Guterres sketched out a picture of where he felt the world stood when it came to tackling global warming. He noted that while COP26 had seen positive developments related to issues such as cutting methane emissions, tackling deforestation and mobilizing private finance, significant challenges remained. "Keeping 1.5 alive requires a 45% reduction in global emissions by 2030 and carbon neutrality by mid-century," he said. "That problem was not solved in Glasgow. In fact, the problem is getting worse." Guterres' reference to 1.5 relates to the Paris Agreement's target of limiting global warming "to well below 2, preferably to 1.5 degrees Celsius, compared to pre-industrial levels."VIDEO9:4109:41COP26 had big ambitions —...
    Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC markets, told CNN Business that the “tipping point” occurred when the United States and United Kingdom announced they would be withdrawing staff from their Ukrainian embassies. Hewson continued to say that this diplomatic withdrawal gave the “European markets a nudge lower” despite the U.S. State Department claiming it was done out of an “abundance of caution.” While people may feel uncomfortable at the prospect of their diminishing returns, CNBC’s Jim Cramer instructed U.S. investors not to panic as he urged people to “do some buying.” And, as the Omicron variant continues to spread during the winter months, more and more people continue to miss work. Further disruptions in supply chains can also be attributed to the perpetually mutating virus. However, an abundance of mild Omicron cases now means there is potential for widespread immunity in the near future. Investors in cryptocurrency may be hemorrhaging money as the global marketplace reacts to a potential war, but they may find solace in the fact that their volatile investments often recover and...
    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (L) and UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres prepare to receive attendees during day two of COP26 at SECC on November 1, 2021 in Glasgow, Scotland.Christopher Furlong | Getty Images News | Getty Images GLASGOW, Scotland — U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday will warn world leaders at the COP26 climate summit that it is now "one minute to midnight" in the race to prevent global heating from surpassing a critical threshold. The U.K. is hosting U.N.-brokered climate talks in Glasgow, Scotland in what has been described as humanity's last and best chance to secure a livable future. It is for this reason that the long-awaited summit is seen as one of the important diplomatic meetings in history. "Humanity has long since run down the clock on climate change," Johnson is expected to say at Monday's World Leaders Summit Opening Ceremony. "It's one minute to midnight and we need to act now." The COP26 summit, which formally opened on Sunday and runs through to Nov. 12, comes six years after the landmark Paris Agreement was signed...
    Tubbataha Reef, Philippines.Alexis Rosenfeld/Getty This story was originally published by Yale E360 and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. When ecological genomicist Christian Voolstra started work on corals in Saudi Arabia in 2009, one of the biggest bonuses to his job was scuba diving on the gorgeous reefs. Things have changed. “I was just back in September and I was shocked,” says Voolstra, now at the University of Konstanz in Germany. “There’s a lot of rubble. The fish are missing. The colors are missing.” It’s a sad but now familiar story. Earlier this month, the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network released the first-ever report collating global statistics on corals, documenting the status of reefs across 12,000 sites in 73 countries over 40 years. Overall, they report, the world has lost 14 percent of its corals from 2009 to 2018—that’s about 11,700 square kilometers of coral wiped out. “If this had happened to the Amazon, if overnight it had turned white or black, it would be in the news everywhere,” says Voolstra. “Because it’s underwater, no one notices.”...
    (CNN)The COP26 international climate talks in Glasgow this November couldn't come at a more crucial time.A state-of-the-science report published by the UN in August showed that the world is warming faster than scientists previously thought, and that slashing greenhouse gas emissions by at least half this decade is crucial to staving off the more catastrophic impacts of the climate crisis. This past year of deadly wildfires and floods in many parts of the world has left little doubt that climate change is here now, and is touching all corners of the Earth.Here's everything you need to know about the pivotal UN climate conference in November, and what world leaders hope to achieve.What is COP26?Read MoreCOP is short for the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention on Climate Change, which is an event that takes place annually, though it was postponed last year because of the pandemic. World leaders do attend, but a lot of the discussions take place among ministers and other high-level officials working on climate issues. The 26 signifies that this is the group's 26th meeting....
    With less than one week until President Biden and other world leaders will meet in Glasgow for the Climate Change Conference, a UN report released Tuesday asserted that current goals to lower greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 will not be enough.  The latest Emissions Gap Report by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) found that the current "vague" goals put forward by 49 nations and the European Union by 2030 will stave off 7.5% of emissions by 2030.  RECONCILIATION BILL: MANCHIN TALKS 'NICE VISIT' WITH BIDEN, BUT HAS INFLATION CONCERNS: LIVE UPDATES But UN scientists have said the world will need to cut emissions by 55% to meet the Paris Climate Agreement and "limit global warming" by 1.5 degrees Celsius – a figure comparable to "pre-industrial levels." "Less than one week before COP26 in Glasgow, we are still on track for climate catastrophe," UN Secretary-General António Guterres said during a press conference Tuesday. "As the title of this year’s report puts it: ‘The heat is on.’ And as the contents of the report show — the leadership we need is off. Far off," he...
    Environmental activists rally for accountability for fossil fuel companies outside of New York Supreme Court.Drew Angerer/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The vast majority of fossil fuel reserves owned today by countries and companies must remain in the ground if the climate crisis is to be ended, an analysis has found. The research found 90 percent of coal and 60 percent of oil and gas reserves could not be extracted if there was to be even a 50 percent chance of keeping global heating below 1.5 C, the temperature beyond which the worst climate impacts hit. The scientific study is the first such assessment and lays bare the huge disconnect between the Paris agreement’s climate goals and the expansion plans of the fossil fuel industry. The researchers described the situation as “absolutely desperate”. “We are nowhere near the Paris target in terms of the fossil fuels people are planning to produce.”...
    PRINCE Charles has warned "time is running out" for humanity to stave off a "climate catastrophe". In an emotional appeal, he urged Britain's business leaders to help or Earth is “done for”. 6Prince Charles is calling on big business to act now with their trillions to save the world from global warmingCredit: Getty - Pool 6World on fire... a massive wildfire in Greece creeps nearer to the capital AthensCredit: AFP Writing for the Daily Mail, the Prince of Wales declares business "with its trillions of dollars" has an "absolutely critical" role to play.  Wildfires devastating Greece — the land of his dad Prince Philip — were "terrifying" and "the stuff of nightmares".  He said: "We have been in the 'last chance saloon' for too long already, so if we do not confront the monumental challenge head-on — and fast — we and the world as we know it will be done for. If we do not confront the monumental challenge head-on — and fast — we and the world as we know it will be done forPrince Charles "We now...
    8 hours ago Image released, EPA It has warned that countries vulnerable to climate change are “on the brink of extinction” if they do not take action to avoid it. A group of developing nations has warned that global warming could make parts of the world uninhabitable, a United Nations report has said. World leaders, including British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, have described the report as “a warning to the world.” But some strong reactions to his findings have come from severely affected countries. “We give our lives for someone else’s carbon,” said Mohammed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, who represents about 50 countries that could be affected by the effects of climate change. Maldives is the lowest country in the world. Nasheed said the United Nations’ international government’s predictions on climate change would “wreak havoc” on the country, which is “on the brink of extinction.” According to a recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, heat waves, heavy rainfall and droughts are becoming more common and severe. The UN Secretary-General described it as a “red...
    Failure to act now on climate change will result in “catastrophic” consequences for the world, the leader of the United Nation’s next climate talks has warned. “I don’t think there’s any other word for it,” Alok Sharma, the British minister in charge of the 26th UN Climate Change Conference (COP26), told British newspaper The Observer, warning that the annual talks, which will take place in Glasgow, Scotland in November, would be among the last chances to limit global heating and save lives. “This is going to be the starkest warning yet that human behavior is alarmingly accelerating global warming and this is why COP26 has to be the moment we get this right. We can’t afford to wait two years, five years, 10 years — this is the moment,” he said. Sharma’s comments came one day before the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is due to release its latest assessment, which has been years in the making and will likely provide the most conclusive look yet at the extent of human-made climate change. The IPCC — the global scientific...
    A study by the University of Cambridge warns that size and destruction capacity is not the most important factor when a volcano causes a global economic catastrophe Researchers have identified seven “pinch points” where weak eruptions could cause millions of dollars in losses. In volcanoes the location matters much more than the destruction capacity, according to the researchers No one knew its name when it erupted in 2010. No one knows it today because it was unpronounceable, but Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajokull stopped air traffic across Europe for weeks at a cost of $ 5 billion to the world economy. It is an example of what a relatively small, active volcano can do to the world economy. Now Cambridge scientists have warned about the risk of catastrophic global consequences for the domino effect that they unleash small volcanic eruptions in vital regions for the humanity. Researchers led by the Center for the Study of Existential Risk (CSER) from the University of Cambridge have identified seven “pinch points” where groups of volcanoes relatively small but active sit alongside vital infrastructure...
    New Delhi (CNN Business)A terrifying and record-breaking wave of Covid-19 in India threatens to stall the country's economic recovery and send shockwaves through several important global industries.Asia's third largest economy has been struggling for weeks to control the devastating surge. Hundreds of thousands of new cases are reported every day, and economists are rethinking their forecasts for double-digit growth this year — a troubling sign for a country that plunged into recession last year for the first time in nearly a quarter of a century after the government imposed a nationwide lockdown.Fauci joins calls for nationwide lockdown to contain Indias Covid crisisPrime Minister Narendra Modi has so far resisted calls to impose another total lockdown on the country, even as many regions have announced their own heavy restrictions. But several global industries that rely on India are looking on anxiously. Should the crisis deepen, everything from clothing and pharmaceuticals to financial services and global shipping could feel the pain. Supply chains About 80% of world goods trade by volume is carried on ships, according to the United Nations World Conference...
    VIDEO2:5802:58Dr. Ashish Jha: We don't have to get into herd immunity to get our lives backThe News with Shepard Smith The Covid outbreak in India is putting the rest of the world at risk and is leaving a "humanitarian catastrophe" in its wake, the dean of Brown University's School of Public Health warned Monday. "India is a big country, and if there are large outbreaks there, of course we're going to worry about more variants, which will be bad for Indians, and ... it will spread around the world," said Dr. Ashish Jha. "So part of keeping America safe is vaccinating the whole world." The White House pledged to send more than $100 million worth of medical supplies to India as the country breaks global infection records on a near-daily basis. The country recorded more than 300,000 new cases for 12 straight days, but experts fear the real numbers could be much higher. Data shows that only about 2% of India's population is fully vaccinated against Covid.  Jha told CNBC's "The News with Shepard Smith" that because the U.S. is now...
    (Bloomberg) – Even in the 64 countries where carbon dioxide pollution is declining, it would have to fall 10 times faster to avoid potentially catastrophic and irreversible climate change, according to a new scientific analysis on global CO₂ emissions since signing. of the Paris Agreement five years ago. The Global Carbon Project (GCP), an international scientific collaboration, published these findings today in the journal Nature Climate Change. Among the 64 countries with decreasing emissions, carbon dioxide reduction amounted to 160 million metric tons per year from 2016 to 2019 compared to the average from 2011 to 2015. During the same time period, another 150 countries saw an increase of CO₂ by an average of 370 million tons per year. The unmatched drop in emissions from the pandemic makes 2020 difficult to compare with longer-term trends. GCP scientists found that fossil fuel CO₂ emissions fell 7% last year globally to 34 billion tonnes, in line with the International Energy Agency estimate published yesterday of a nearly 6% drop in the CO₂. The GCP analysis also follows a report last week from...
    Are you the one who is into futuristic action-packed shows? Then Netflix’s upcoming series titled as Tribes of Europa should be on your must-watch list. As the streaming platform dropped the trailer of the show and it looks spectacular. From the producers of Dark, this one is set in the year 2074 and will take you on a hell of a ride like never before. Tribes Of Europa is a Netflix original series and will have a total of six episodes. Malcolm & Marie Trailer: John David Washington and Zendaya’s Love Goes Through Fire and Ice In This Black-n-White Netflix Flick (Watch Video). Check Out The Trailer:  Must say there are few scenes in the trailer which give you goosebumps. So, how did you f ind the trailer? Tell us your view in the comment section below. Helmed by Philip Koch and Florian Baxmeyer, Tribes of Europa  is all set to release on Netflix on February 19, 2021. (The above story first appeared on News Brig on Feb 03, 2021 05:12 PM IST. For more news and updates on...
    Doomsday scenarios are usually the subject of Hollywood blockbusters. But experts believe they are more scientific fact than science fiction – with Earth overdue a mass extinction event for more than 30million years. They have worked out that catastrophic global incidents come roughly every 27million years. And with the last mass extinction 66million years ago – when dinosaurs were wiped out by an asteroid or comet – they reckon Earth could be on borrowed time. Experts believe doomsday scenarios are more scientific fact than science fiction – with Earth overdue a mass extinction event for more than 30million years. Picture: Stock Catastrophic events such as meteor strikes and eruptions can follow a cycle. With new statistical analysis, US researchers concluded extinction comet showers occur every 26 to 30million years when they pass through the galaxy. If they hit Earth, the cataclysmic impacts could create widespread dark and cold, wildfires, acid rain and ozone depletion. These would potentially kill off land and marine life. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Woman, 32, is fatally shot in...
    The emission reduction targets or nationally determined contributions (NDCs) global governments agreed to under the Paris Accord are “woefully inadequate,” according to the UN. It says governments need to commit to targets that are at least three times as ambitious to limit the global temperature increase to 2-degrees Celsius.  If there’s any silver lining to the report, it’s that the UN says the 2-degree target is still attainable if governments around the world commit to a “green recovery” coming out of the pandemic. Policy initiatives like the Green New Deal could reduce predicted emissions in 2030 by as much as 25 percent. By investing in zero-emission technologies, cutting back on fossil fuel subsidies, building no new coal plants and launching ambitious reforestation projects, there’s even the possibility we could course-correct toward the 1.5-degree target, provided governments move fast enough.  Individuals, particularly those who live in the developed world, will also need to do their part. Emissions generated by the wealthiest one percent — those who earn more than $109,000 per year — of the world’s population accounts for more than...
    Should scientists artificially cool the planet to stave off climate catastrophe? Here’s everything you need to know: What is geoengineering?Some climate scientists are coming to believe it’s humanity’s only hope for slowing or stopping disastrous changes in the climate. As runaway carbon dioxide emissions contribute to melting ice caps, widespread flooding, prolonged heat waves and droughts, apocalyptic wildfires, and devastating hurricanes, researchers are exploring planetary-scale interventions in Earth’s natural systems as a way of counteracting climate change. Geoengineering has been debated since the 1960s, when U.S. scientists suggested floating billions of white, golf ball–like objects in the oceans to reflect sunlight. Interfering in natural processes was widely considered naïve and dangerous until recently, but as the window to curb global warming shrinks, proposals to reflect sunlight, shade Earth’s surface, accelerate carbon absorption in the oceans, and remove CO2 from the air are being taken more seriously. In October, SilverLining, a nonprofit, gave $3 million toward climate-engineering research. “I liken geoengineering to chemotherapy,” said Michael Gerrard, a professor of environmental and climate law at Columbia University. “If all else is failing,...
    A top official at the World Health Organization is urging world leaders to stop "using lockdowns as your primary control method" against the coronavirus. What's the background?When COVID-19 struck the world, most countries responded by enacting strict nationwide lockdowns. The decision plunged the world economy into an immediate recession, the consequences of which are still being felt even months after most countries have lifted their strict lockdown measures. In fact, experts estimate the pandemic, and the ensuing lockdowns, plunged around 100 million additional people into "extreme poverty." From the Wall Street Journal:The coronavirus pandemic has thrown between 88 million and 114 million people into extreme poverty, according to the World Bank's biennial estimates of global poverty. The reversal is by far the largest increase in extreme poverty going back to 1990 when the data begin, and marks an end to a streak of more than two decades of declines in the number of the extremely impoverished, which the World Bank defines as living on less than $1.90 a day, or about $700 a year.What did the WHO official say?Dr. David...
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