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    SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Starbucks founder and new interim CEO Howard Schultz announced Monday that the coffee chain was suspending its share repurchase program to “invest more profit into our people and our stores.” The pivot in strategy comes just three weeks after Starbucks announced that Schultz, who bought the company in 1987 and led it for more than three decades, would be taking over the company’s top role until it found a permanent CEO. Since that announcement, analysts and experts have speculated that Schultz was being brought back to help the company fight a rising worker rights campaign that has seen six of its stores voting to unionize since December, with at least 140 more in 27 states filing petitions for union elections. Two weeks ago, baristas and other employees at a Seattle Starbucks voted to unionize, the first such vote in the city where Starbucks originated. Starbucks has 9,000 company-owned stores in the U.S. Schultz’s blog post on Monday was filled with references to “partners” — what the company calls its employees. “My first work...
    New York (CNN Business)Howard Schultz's first act on his return as Starbucks CEO is to pause the company's share buyback program. "Starting immediately, we are suspending our share repurchasing program," Schultz wrote in an open letter to Starbucks employees, customers and others which was published early Monday. "This decision will allow us to invest more into our people and our stores — the only way to create long-term value for all stakeholders."Monday marks Schultz's first day as interim CEO, and his third stint as chief executive of the company. Starbucks said it will find a permanent CEO by the fall. In the meantime, Schultz is helping run the company and aiding in the search for a successor. Howard Schultz returns to Starbucks as interim CEO on Monday, April 4. He's also trying to dissuade employees from unionizing. Since December, a number of Starbucks (SBUX) stores have unionized against the company's wishes, and several more are considering the option. Read MoreSchultz was trying to build support for the company even before he rejoined as interim CEO. In November, he spoke...
    Her first workday after handing out union cards at the Starbucks where she works, Laila Dalton found herself in a meeting with two managers. The managers had brought a list of complaints against Dalton, typed up the previous day. The managers said Dalton, 19, had “failed to fully meet performance expectations” of her job as a shift supervisor. Dalton offered a different account: she was the leading voice of a union effort at her Phoenix, Arizona, store. She is just one of multiple Starbucks workers across the country accusing the coffee chain of harassing its pro-union employees. “They’re just trying to make me quit at this point,” Dalton alleged to The Daily Beast. Spurred by pandemic-era working conditions, Starbucks employees across the country have moved to unionize their stores. They’re asking for better workplace safety, more transparency around pay and scheduling, more negotiating power in dealings with the coffee corporation. But some of those workers accuse Starbucks of retaliating against them, leading to a wave of firings, disciplinary write-ups, and work-hour reductions. Starbucks denies the allegations, while pro-union workers...
    Associated Press SEATTLE — Baristas and other employees at a Seattle Starbucks have voted to unionize, the first such vote in the city where Starbucks originated and the latest in a nationwide push to organize the coffee shop chain. The unanimous vote announced Tuesday by the National Labor Relations Board is also an especially symbolic win as Howard Schultz returns as interim chief executive officer, The Seattle Times reported. The store in the Capitol Hill neighborhood will become the seventh in the country where employees have voted in favor of unionizing with Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union. At least 140 more stores in 27 states have filed petitions for union elections. Starbucks announced March 16 that CEO Kevin Johnson was retiring. The company picked former longtime CEO Schultz as interim leader until it finds a permanent replacement by this fall. In his previous time with the company, the 68-year-old Schultz successfully fought attempts to unionize Starbucks’ U.S. stores and roasting plants. In a November letter to employees, posted just before the first unionization votes at...
    New York (CNN Business)Workers at a Starbucks store in its Seattle hometown voted unanimously to be represented by a union, giving the organizing effort by some company employees their most one-sided victory to date.The store is a small one, with 13 employees eligible to vote, and only nine had their votes counted. The victory gives the Starbucks Workers United union one of its highest-profile wins in the organizing effort that has been growing rapidly since early December, when the first store in Buffalo, New York, voted in favor of the union. Before Tuesday, five stores in and near Buffalo, New York, and one in Mesa, Arizona, voted to join the union. One in Buffalo voted no. The union said there are 149 other stores spread across 27 states where workers have signed cards in support of the union requesting an election.Workers at the Seattle store who spoke to the media after the vote said they believe their win will make a difference at some of those upcoming union votes."It's really cool to see. We were able to make a statement,"...
    DENVER (CBS4)– Employees at another Starbucks Denver location could be looking to unionize. Those who work at the Leetsdale Drive location in Denver have asked the National Labor Relations Board to hold elections for union representation. (credit: CBS) Earlier this month, employees at the Starbucks location at East Colfax and Milwaukee in Denver walked off the job and took to the picket line in front of the store. At that location, according to the union that is representing them, workers have seen retaliation. They say the cafe has given 2 workers final disciplinary warnings. (credit: CBS) Those employees said they are striking to protest alleged unfair labor practices by the Seattle-based coffee chain. (credit: CBS)
    SANTA CRUZ – An instance of harassment that turned into a store lockdown nearly two weeks ago emphasized why Starbucks employees in Santa Cruz wish to unionize. Over the weekend of March 5-6, Starbucks employees on Ocean Street in Santa Cruz experienced multiple altercations with a troublesome customer, according to local union leader Joseph Thompson. The customer had previous instances of harassment with workers and customers and Starbucks officially banned the customer from the store on March 5. The customer entered the store at around 6:30 a.m. on March 5. At that time, Thompson served the customer a letter informing them of their banishment from the establishment. It took the customer a few minutes to read and comprehend the letter before anger set in. The customer refused to leave the premises, forcing Thompson to call Santa Cruz Police. Police arrived shortly after and Thompson signed the trespass order, barring the customer from legally entering the property. That was when the customer decided to harass employees and other customers from the public sidewalk, according to Thompson. “Basically, he just waited outside...
    DENVER (CBS4)– Some Starbucks employees walked out early Friday morning to picket in front of the coffee shop. They were carrying signs, some of them read “Union Strong.” The location the employees walked out of is at 2975 E. Colfax Ave. in Denver. Copter4 flew over the location where about a dozen employees were picketing and carrying signs.
    New York (CNN Business)Union organizers overwhelmingly won a vote Friday to represent workers at a Starbucks in Mesa, Arizona, giving them their third win in an effort to organize the sector.The vote was 25 in favor of the union and only 3 opposed. There were a total of 43 workers eligible to vote.The union, Starbucks Workers United, had already won the right to represent workers at two stores in Buffalo, New York, but lost the vote at a third store there, although it is challenging that election result. The union has also filed to hold additional elections at more than 100 Starbucks stores across 26 states.Even if the union wins all those stores, it will be a fraction of the Starbucks stores nationwide. Company filings show Starbucks (SBUX) had 235,000 employees at nearly 9,000 company-operated stores in the United States as of October 2021. The company is throwing significant resources, including visits by top executives to stores holding votes, to convince employees not to unionize.Read MoreBut this third win, by such a large margin, could give a lift to the...
    Employees at many Apple stores across the United States are working to unionize and are using rival Android phones to organize and prevent their bosses from finding out about the efforts.  The move comes against the backdrop of unionization efforts gaining momentum at large U.S. corporations, including Amazon and Starbucks. Employee groups based at at least two Apple retail stores are backed by major national unions and are preparing to file paperwork with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in the near future, according to a report by the Washington Post. It details how at least six more locations are at less advanced stages in the unionization process. Apple has more than 65,000 retail workers at its nearly 300 stores around the country. The average Apple retail sales associate makes about $30,472 a year - which is 24 percent below the national average.  To avoid having their unionization plans detected by those in management, workers have been setting up secret meetings by using encrypted messaging on the operating system made by Apple's main competitor, according to the Post. Employees at...
    Apple employees at several stores across the country are secretly plotting to unionize as their salaries stagnate below inflation and after the success of workers at other retail giants, like Starbucks, forming unions.   Workers at two Apple stores, which have not been identified by location, are already close to unionizing and are being supported by two major unions as they prepare to file paperwork with the National Labor Relations Board, an anonymous source the Washington Post.   Meanwhile, at least a half dozen other Apple stores are also in the beginning stages of unionizing.   'I have a lot of co-workers and friends who I genuinely love and they do not make enough to get by,' said one labor organizer who works at an Apple retail store.  'They're struggling and they're hurting and we work for a company that has the resources to make sure that they're taken care of.' The tech giant, which has over 500 retail locations worldwide and more than 270 in the US alone, employs upwards of 65,000 retail employees, according to its website. Workers at two Apple...
    New York (CNN Business)The effort to unionize Starbucks workers is one of the country's most closely-watched labor organizing drives in years. And on Wednesday it takes another important, though admittedly small, next step.Votes by up to 43 workers at a Starbucks in Mesa, Arizona will be counted Wednesday afternoon. The employees were sent ballots by the National Labor Relations Board after the Starbucks Workers United union filed signed cards requesting to organize. It will become the fourth location nationwide to hold such a vote.In December votes were counted at three Starbucks in Buffalo, New York. One became the first location to have workers, known as "partners" in the company's parlance, vote in favor of the union. Another store voted against unionizing, and the union is challenging that vote. The third location's vote was initially left undecided as both the union and the company challenged ballots, which were eventually decided in the union's favor. The two unionized stores in Buffalo have about 30 employees each.It's possible that challenged ballots may once again stop a clear winner from being declared in Mesa...
    People march during a protest in support of Amazon and Starbucks workers in New York City on Nov. 26, 2021. by Allison Torres Burtka This article was originally published at Prism Union organizing at Starbucks stores across the country has gained steam, with at least 55 stores in 19 states petitioning to unionize. In New York, two Buffalo-area stores recently voted to unionize, and a third store voted against it. Concerns about worker safety amid the COVID-19 pandemic have been a primary reason behind the push to unionize. Stores have been understaffed as workers—called “partners” in the company since they technically hold Starbucks stock—have tested positive for COVID-19 or have been exposed and needed to quarantine. Starbucks employees say they have lacked support in dealing with understaffing, don’t receive adequate paid time off, and are forced to work in unsafe conditions without proper masks and other safety precautions.   “I think a lot of people still feel unsafe,” said Liz Alanna, a shift supervisor in a Mesa, Arizona, store that filed to unionize in November. “If we are...
      An effort to unionize by Starbucks employees in Buffalo, New York, is moving west, having worked its way into Cleveland, Ohio and Chicago, Illinois, and now to the Twin Cities. “Early Friday morning, the hourly workers at two Twin Cities Starbucks locations, demanded union recognition from CEO Kevin Johnson and local management,” the letter said. The stores are working in conjunction with Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), in their efforts. That group said that a majority of the employees at both stores – one in Minneapolis and the other in St. Paul – signed off on a letter to Johnson demanding unionization. The stores are the first in Minnesota to make such a demand. “We as workers at Starbucks invest our time, well-being and safety into a company that has shown repeated apathy towards its employees,” the letter from the St. Paul store, emailed to Johnson, said. “We work in the midst of an ongoing global crisis, and see little to no support … We want to see Starbucks become a healthier and...
    New York-area Starbucks workers are planning to form a union amid the company firing seven employees who tried to form a union, The New York Times reported.  Employees from company locations in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Long Island on Thursday filed a petition to form their union with the National Labor Relations Board and organized by Workers United. In a letter, the NY-area employees told Starbucks president CEO Kevin Johnson about the struggles to make a living during the COVID-19 pandemic, work conditions, years of deteriorating trust between the corporation and employees and expressed how a union will help them shape their workplace into a better place, according to the Times.  “We realize, like our fellow partners across the nation, a union is the way to build back that trust and create a true partnership,” a letter signed by the Brooklyn-based employees said. “ We want transparency and accountability, and unionizing gives us the power to make sure our presence is felt.” The three locations have joined 60 other company restaurants to form their own unions in the past months as...
    Starbucks fired seven workers at a Memphis, Tennessee, branch who tried to form a union and gave interviews with the media last month without authorization. The former employees were attempting to unionize the 20 store workers in mid-January and held an interview with WMCA News 5 inside the shop, after business hours, which Starbucks says broke company safety and security policies.  The seven employees were fired on Tuesday, but they were joined by the Memphis Restaurant Workers United labor group to protest outside the coffee shop.   Beto Sanchez, a former shift supervisor who was fired, told ABC 24 that he and his coworkers were out of a job as retaliation for attempting to unionize. 'They felt that it was much more necessary to get rid of a third of the store at this point than to allow us to have our organized union, and they thought apparently they’re taking care of us better than we are,' he said.    Seven Starbucks employees were fired on Tuesday after they attempted to unionize and held an interview with WMCA News 5 last month Beto Sanchez,...
    Starbucks on Tuesday fired seven workers looking to unionize their Memphis branch of the company, according to The New York Times. A spokesman for the company said that these workers violated safety and security policies before being let go. However, the union planning to organize the store is accusing Starbucks of firing the employees because of their involvement in the unionization. Starbucks spokesman Reggie Borges told the Times that the employees were investigated and ultimately fired after an incident in the store where some were found to be unmasked. The employees interviewed with media representatives after hours at the store, in response to which Borges said, “That is a clear policy violation, not to mention the lack of masks.” Borges said that the workers violated protocol when they opened a locked door at the store, stayed at the store without authorization after closing, allowed other unauthorized individuals into the store after closing and allowed unauthorized individuals into store areas where access is usually restricted to store employees. An employee also opened a safe in the store without authorization and was...
    By Allison Morrow | CNN Starbucks fired seven workers who were involved in unionizing in Memphis, Tennessee, fueling accusations that the company is retaliating against a growing labor movement at its locations across the United States. Starbucks denied that the firings were linked to the employees’ organizing efforts. A company spokesman, Reggie Borges, said the workers were fired for serious security violations. The firings stem from an incident last month in which the employees allowed members of the media into the store as part of the public launch of their unionization effort. Borges told CNN Business that Starbucks employees are allowed to speak freely with media if they choose, but that the members of the press and some of the staff did not have authorization to be in the store after the close of business. The employees allowed the media into the private back-of-house area while leaving an unlocked door unattended, Borges said. Another staffer opened a safe when they weren’t authorized to do so. “These egregious actions and blatant violations cannot be ignored,” Borges said in an email. “As...
    New York (CNN Business)Starbucks fired seven workers who were involved in unionizing in Memphis, Tennessee, fueling accusations that the company is retaliating against a growing labor movement at its locations across the United States.Starbucks (SBUX) denied that the firings were linked to the employees' organizing efforts. A company spokesman, Reggie Borges, said the workers were fired for serious security violations.The firings stem from an incident last month in which the employees allowed members of the media into the store as part of the public launch of their unionization effort.Starbucks workers at Buffalo store vote to unionizeBorges told CNN Business that Starbucks employees are allowed to speak freely with media if they choose, but that the members of the press and some of the staff did not have authorization to be in the store after the close of business. The employees allowed the media into the private back-of-house area while leaving an unlocked door unattended, Borges said. Another staffer opened a safe when they weren't authorized to do so. "These egregious actions and blatant violations cannot be ignored," Borges said in...
    Starbucks has fired seven employees who were leading an effort to unionize a Memphis, Tennessee, store. The Seattle coffee giant said Tuesday that the employees violated company policy by reopening a store after closing time and inviting non-employees to come inside and move throughout the store, including behind the counter and in back rooms. The employees used the store to do an interview with a local television station about their unionizing effort. But the employees who were fired say Starbucks was retaliating against them for their unionization efforts. They say they plan to file a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board. “Most of these partners had never had a write-up or anything,” said Beto Sanchez, 25, one of the workers who was fired. The dispute comes as a growing number of Starbucks stores across the country seek to unionize. Since December, when a store in Buffalo, New York, became the first Starbucks location to form a union in decades, 66 stores in 20 states have filed petitions with the labor board to hold union elections, according to Workers United,...
    NEW YORK — Employees at an REI store in Manhattan filed for a union election Friday, making the outdoor equipment and apparel retailer the latest prominent service-industry employer whose workers have sought to unionize. Amazon employees in Bessemer, Alabama, rejected a union in an election last year, though the National Labor Relations Board later threw out the result, citing improprieties on the part of the company, and ordered a new election to begin next month. In December, workers at two Starbucks stores in Buffalo, New York, voted to unionize, making them the only company-owned Starbucks locations in the country with a union. Employees at about 20 other Starbucks have since filed for union elections. The filing at the REI store in SoHo asked the labor board for an election involving about 115 employees, who are seeking to be represented by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, the same union that has overseen the union campaign at the Amazon warehouse in Alabama. In addition to filing for the election, the REI employees have asked for voluntary recognition of their union,...
    (AP) — Starbucks is no longer requiring its U.S. workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, reversing a plan it announced earlier this month. In a memo sent Tuesday to employees, the Seattle coffee giant said it was responding to last week’s ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. In a 6-3 vote, the court rejected the Biden administration’s plan to require vaccines or regular COVID testing at companies with more than 100 workers. READ MORE: 2 Workers Hurt In Explosion At US Steel Plant In Ecorse“We respect the court’s ruling and will comply,” Starbucks Chief Operating Officer John Culver wrote in the memo. Starbucks’ reversal is among the most high-profile corporate actions in response to the Supreme Court ruling. The company employs 228,000 people in the U.S. Boston-based General Electric Co. also suspended its vaccine mandate last week, according to IUE-CWA Local 201, a union that represents machinists, electricians and other GE employees. GE, which employs 56,000 people in the U.S., had initially called for employees to get fully vaccinated no later than Feb. 11. But other companies have kept their...
              by Ted O’Neil   Seattle-based Starbucks announced this week that is dropping its policy requiring employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The coffee giant’s move comes in response to last week’s United State Supreme Court ruling to block the Biden Administration from requiring businesses in the private sector to put vaccine mandates in place. Justices voted 6-3 against the Biden administration, saying only Congress has the authority to give the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the authority to implement such a rule. Starbucks on Jan. 3 announced it would require all employees to be vaccinated by Feb. 9 or face weekly testing. The company also required employees to report their vaccination status by Jan. 10. Some 90% had done so and the company said a majority were fully vaccinated by that time. According to ABC News, a memo sent Tuesday to employees by Chief Operating Officer John Culver said, “We respect the court’s ruling and will comply.” Culver’s memo also said the company continues to strongly encourage employees to be fully vaccinated and receive booster shots. “I want to emphasize...
    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court blocked the Biden administration from forcing large employers to mandate vaccination or testing for employees, an irrational and deadly decision that will likely prove ruinous for American workers. But not only did the justices rob millions of people of the right to a safe workplace, they provided cover for CEOs to relax worker health and safety rules. On Tuesday, the largest coffee company on the planet gave us a grim preview of what could prove a deadly race to the bottom powered by fear and political consequences. After the Court’s ruling, it was predictable that many companies that had taken steps to comply with the federal rule would stop requiring vaccination of employees. As was widely reported Wednesday, Starbucks was among the first out of the gate. Chief Operating Officer John Culver sent a sterile memo to all employees announcing the move. He didn’t use these words, but effectively made it clear that baristas and other employees now have to go to work in crowded cafés and take their chances with COVID-19. Meanwhile, we...
    New York (CNN Business)Starbucks is no longer requiring employees to get vaccinated or submit to weekly testing, following the US Supreme Court's rejection last week of President Joe Biden's vaccine and testing requirement for large businesses. In a letter published on January 4, the coffee company recommended that its workers get vaccinated by February 9, in accordance with guidance from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Those who remained unvaccinated past that deadline would have had to submit to weekly testing, according to that early January note.But after the SCOTUS decision, Starbucks told employees that it would adjust its requirements. "We respect the Court's ruling and will comply," John Culver, chief operating officer and group president for North America at Starbucks, said in a Tuesday message to employees.In practical terms, that means workers no longer have to be vaccinated by the company's February 9 deadline, and they won't have to be tested weekly. A Starbucks employee hands a customer an order from a drive-thru window in April 2020. Read MoreIn his note, Culver added that Starbucks (SBUX) will follow local...
    Starbucks announced that it will no longer require its employees in the United States to get vaccinated against COVID-19. ABC News reported that the coffee shop chain made the announcement in a memo to employees on Tuesday, Jan. 18. The company reportedly said it made the decision in light of the Supreme Court's ruling, which rejected the Biden administration's effort to require companies with more than 100 employees to mandate vaccines or regular testing. Starbucks previously had announced it would require employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19 by Sunday, Feb. 9 or require that they get tested each week, ABC News reported. Read the full ABC News report here.
    At the time, Culver said company leadership was responsible for doing "whatever we can to help keep you safe and create the safest work environment possible." President Joe Biden had ordered that employers with more than 100 employees be required to have their workers vaccinated or regularly tested for the virus. But on Jan. 13, the Supreme Court blocked the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's temporary emergency standards imposing the federal vaccine mandate from taking effect. In a 6-3 decision, the court majority said OSHA lacked the authority to impose such requirements. But the Biden administration continues to urge employers to comply with their proposed requirements anyway. Some large companies have already done so. The Washington Post reported that the apparel company Carhartt will continue to make vaccines mandatory for employees. Citigroup will also move forward with its vaccine mandate, but General Electric said last week it will not, according to the Wall Street Journal. Starbucks will reportedly continue to strongly encourage employees to get vaccinations and booster shots. The company is also asking workers...
    Starbucks is scrapping its vaccine-or-test mandate after the Supreme Court found President Joe Biden’s workplace COVID-19 mandate unconstitutional. The coffee giant sent a memo to employees informing them of the change in policy and noting that it was a result of the Supreme Court’s 6-3 decision on the matter earlier this month. Starbucks had previously announced that it would require all its workers to be vaccinated by Feb. 9 or be subject to weekly coronavirus testing. “We respect the court’s ruling and will comply,” said the Seattle-based company’s Chief Operating Officer John Culver in the memo. GE ENDS VACCINE AND TESTING REQUIREMENTS AFTER SUPREME COURT STRIKES DOWN BIDEN MANDATE Last year, Biden announced that businesses with more than 100 employees must institute a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, although they had the option to provide weekly testing results in lieu of vaccination. The mandate carried financial penalties for employers who failed to enforce the requirement on staff. That edict failed in the high court, although the justices did rule 5-4 to keep requirements for healthcare workers in place....
                 A Democrat U.S. Senate hopeful from Ohio declared his support for a Cleveland Starbucks store, which aims to become the retail giant’s first unionized coffee shop in the state. “Something big is brewing in Cleveland. Congratulations and solidarity to the workers taking this critical step to get the fair treatment and respect you deserve,” Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH-17). Something big is brewing in Cleveland. Congratulations and solidarity to the workers taking this critical step to get the fair treatment and respect you deserve ✊ https://t.co/0tltND8P0n — Tim Ryan (@TimRyan) January 10, 2022 Ryan, a 19-year veteran of the U.S. Congress, ran an unsuccessful campaign for the Democrat nomination for president in 2020. He’s now vying for the Democrat nomination for U.S. Senate in Ohio in a bid to replace outgoing Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH). According to a compilation of recent polls, Ryan leads his fellow Democrat primary candidates by a wide margin. Ryan’s office did not return a Tuesday comment request from The Ohio Star. Starbucks Workers United has been mobilizing to create a union for the...
    Half a dozen recently unionized workers at a Starbucks near Buffalo walked off the job Wednesday after issuing a list of demands including hazard pay, N95 face coverings, free coronavirus testing kits and company policing of compulsory masks for all customers. Their departure prompted the temporary closure of the outlet as coronavirus cases surge across New York State, as Breitbart News reported. Starbucks defended the decision to shutter the Buffalo store rather than keep it open with staff from other locations once the workers walked out. Starbucks spokesperson Reggie Borges explained the decision was one of safety. “For the last two years we exceeded all safety standards to make sure our partners are safe,” Borges said. Starbucks employees at a store in Buffalo made a historic move this week when they voted 19 to eight in favor of unionizing. https://t.co/c1ZEIOmbVi — Breitbart News (@BreitbartNews) December 10, 2021 He added Starbucks provides sick pay as well as full pay for up to two self-isolation periods. This week the company also announced it will require all of its employees to either show proof of vaccination...
    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Employees of a Starbucks store in upstate New York who voted to unionize last month walked off the job Wednesday, saying they lacked the staff and resources to work safely amid surging COVID-19 cases. Six employees who had been scheduled to work formed a picket line outside the Buffalo store, leading Starbucks to close it for the day, the company said. Three other employees had remained inside. “Pressure to go to work is being put on many of us, when some of us already have other health issues. The company has again shown that they continue to put profits above people,” Starbucks Workers United said in a statement. All of the Buffalo-area stores have been operating as “grab-and-go” locations since Monday, Starbucks said. More than 15,000 people have tested positive in Erie County over the past week, the highest seven-day total to date. Starbucks spokesperson Reggie Borges said the company has met and exceeded CDC and expert guidelines and offered vaccine and isolation pay. “Over and above that, all leaders are empowered to make...
    New York (CNN Business)Six employees at a Buffalo Starbucks that recently voted to join a union walked out just before 9 am Wednesday citing health concerns, prompting the temporary closing of the store. Starbucks said it had closed that location and others in the city to in-store customer traffic Monday, restricting them to take-out only service due to a rising number of Covid cases in the area. Limiting stores to take out service also allows the locations to operate with fewer employees — referred to as "partners" at Starbucks — which is helpful given that many workers are unavailable due to the surge in Covid cases. Starbucks decided to close the Buffalo store rather than keep it open with staff from other locations once the workers walked out Wednesday, Starbucks spokesperson Reggie Borges said. "For the last two years we exceeded all safety standards to make sure our partners are safe," Borges said. He added that unlike many other food service companies and retailers, Starbucks provides sick pay as well as full pay for up to two self-isolation periods. This...
    (AP) — Starbucks says its U.S. workers must be fully vaccinated by Feb. 9 or face a weekly COVID testing requirement. The Seattle-based coffee giant said Monday it was acting in response to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which issued a vaccine-or-test requirement for companies with more than 100 employees in November. READ MORE: AT&T, Verizon Agree To Postpone 5G Rollout Near Airports By 2 WeeksThe requirement, which has faced numerous court challenges, was upheld last month by a three-judge panel with the U.S. Court of Appeals. The Supreme Court is scheduled to consider the requirement on Friday. Starbucks is requiring its 228,000 U.S. employees to disclose their vaccination status by Jan. 10. “I recognize that partners have a wide spectrum of views on vaccinations, much like the rest of the country,” Starbucks Chief Operating Officer John Culver said in a letter sent to employees in late December. “My responsibility, and that of every leader, is to do whatever we can to help keep you safe and create the safest work environment possible.” READ MORE: Caesars Windsor Temporarily Closes...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Starbucks employees must get the COVID-19 vaccine or face weekly testing. The company says its U.S. workers must be fully vaccinated by February 9. READ MORE: Miami-Dade Mayor Daniella Levine Cava Backs Annette Taddeo For GovernorThose who don’t get the shot will have to pay for their testing costs. READ MORE: COVID-19 Hospital Patients Near 7,000All 228,000 employees have to disclose their vaccine status by Monday. MORE NEWS: The Great Resignation: Labor Department Says 4.5 Million Americans Quit Their Jobs In NovemberStarbucks said the move is in response to new federal guidelines.
    Coffee empire Starbucks will soon be requiring workers to get vaccinated or submit a weekly negative coronavirus test. Starbucks made its announcement as the January 10 deadline for President Joe Biden’s vaccine mandate looms close ahead, requiring companies with 100 or more employees to enforce vaccination or weekly negative coronavirus tests. In a memo to employees on December 27, Starbucks Chief Operating Officer John Culver hailed the vaccine as “the best option” to combat the coronavirus. “My responsibility, and that of every leader, is to do whatever we can to help keep you safe and to create the safest work environment possible,” Culver wrote to his 220,000 U.S. employees. “The vaccine is the best option we have, by far, when it comes to staying safe and slowing the spread of COVID-19.” Biden Orders Vax Mandates: "This is Not About Freedom or Personal Choice" pic.twitter.com/HoDwTqLbyG — Breitbart News (@BreitbartNews) September 10, 2021 The mandate requires qualifying companies to collect their employees’ vaccination statuses by January 10 and enforce a vaccination-or-test policy by February 9. Though the policy has been blocked by...
    Starbucks says its U.S. workers must be fully vaccinated by Feb. 9 or face a weekly COVID testing requirement. The Seattle-based coffee giant said Monday it was acting in response to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which issued a vaccine-or-test requirement for companies with more than 100 employees in November. The requirement, which has faced numerous court challenges, was upheld last month by a three-judge panel with the U.S. Court of Appeals. The Supreme Court is scheduled to consider the requirement on Friday. Starbucks is requiring its 228,000 U.S. employees to disclose their vaccination status by Jan. 10. “I recognize that partners have a wide spectrum of views on vaccinations, much like the rest of the country,” Starbucks Chief Operating Officer John Culver said in a letter sent to employees in late December. “My responsibility, and that of every leader, is to do whatever we can to help keep you safe and create the safest work environment possible.” Starbucks said full vaccination means two shots of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine or one shot of the Johnson &...
    Starbucks Corp. employees in the United States will be required to get fully vaccinated for COVID-19 or submit to weekly testing, according to a Monday company announcement. The new requirements are products of President Joe Biden's federal mandates, according to a report. The date of Feb. 9 has been set as the deadline for "large employers" to implement the mandate, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court will hear arguments regarding President Joe Biden's COVID-19 vaccine-or-test measure on January 7. AT LEAST FIVE GIRLS RESCUED AND OVER A DOZEN SEX OFFENDERS ARRESTED IN LOUISIANA: U.S. MARSHALS A surge in the number of cases due to the omicron variant has forced many workers across the nation into isolation, delayed schools, disrupted airlines, and closed down restaurants, according to the report. Starbucks officials do not predict any wide closures due to the surge, the report noted. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER Roughly 220,000 people in the U.S. are employed by Starbucks, and each must...
    New York (CNN Business)To comply with the Biden administration's upcoming vaccine mandate, Starbucks is requiring its workers to be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 or undergo weekly testing, the company recently told employees.In a letter from Starbucks Chief Operating Officer John Culver, the coffee chain told its approximately 220,000 US employees they must disclose their vaccination status by January 10. Although Starbucks strongly recommended employees get vaccinated, workers can choose not to get vaccinated and instead get tested weekly. They will be responsible for acquiring their own federally approved tests and submitting results."This is an important step we can take to help more partners get vaccinated, limit the spread of Covid-19, and create choices that partners can own based on what's best for them," Culver wrote. "If vaccination rates rise and community spread slows, we will adapt accordingly. But if things get worse, we may have to consider additional measures. For now, my hope is that we will all do our part to protect one another."Starbucks sent the note to employees on December 27 and repeated the mandate details in a...
    In this article SBUXA Starbucks employee wears a facial covering while working in Dallas, Texas.Ronald Martinez | Getty ImagesStarbucks is readying its workforce to comply with the Biden administration's vaccine-or-testing Covid requirements for private businesses. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is mandating that private companies with at least 100 employees enforce weekly Covid testing and masking for unvaccinated workers as part of a broader plan to encourage vaccinations and slow viral spread. The mandate has faced court challenges from Republican-led states and business groups, and the Supreme Court is expected to hear oral arguments on the matter on Friday. Starbucks, meanwhile, is asking its U.S. employees to disclose their vaccination status by Jan. 10. If they aren't fully vaccinated by Feb. 9, when enforcement of the federal mandate is set to begin, workers will have to present a negative Covid-19 test no more than seven days before their next shift and once a week going forward. Unvaccinated workers will have to procure their own tests, and at-home tests will not be accepted. If the enforcement date changes as...
    Capping off what organizers and other labor rights advocates have dubbed "the year of the worker," employees at two more Starbucks stores are seeking to unionize. Workers at a pair of Starbucks locations in Broomfield, Colorado and Chicago, Illinois filed union petitions with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), a Twitter account associated with organizing efforts at the coffee giant announced Thursday. The filings follow the first-ever successful union vote for at least one Starbucks in Buffalo, New York earlier this month and ongoing efforts at locations across the country, which workers—known as "partners"—in Broomfield and Chicago noted in letters to president and CEO Kevin Johnson. "As our fellow partners in Buffalo, Boston, Knoxville, Seattle, Mesa, and more have demonstrated, we believe there is no true partnership without the sharing of power, influence, accountability, and success," the Colorado workers wrote. "We are forming a union to facilitate this belief, and to establish our voices and affect the change we need as true partners to this company," they added, detailing the benefits of an organized workforce for not only employees but...
    Much was made of the "death" of political comedy during the Trump years. Satire and parody, many argued, need foils of real-world respectability. And Donald Trump, the GOP's new lodestar, has pretty much dispensed with the conventions of political decorum. But while postured propriety may have lost its luster in the political realm, it remains alive and well in the private sector, making Corporate America's blunders all the more visible. 2021 saw endless gaffes and gaucheries from powerful American corporations. Some were caught red-handed in embarrassing and nefarious schemes never meant for the public eye. Others waged embarrassing public relations offensives that earned unintended blowback. To critical onlookers, all of the failed contrivances stand together as one big comedy of terrors. Here are the private sector's top ten fuck-ups of 2021: 10. Ozy Media's co-founder impersonates YouTube executive in meeting with Goldman Sachs In February, executives from Ozy, a digital media company whose financial practices have been widely scrutinized, were closing in on a $40 billion cash injection from Goldman Sachs when they held a videoconference to hammer out the...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks says it will negotiate in good faith with workers at the first store to unionize in the company’s 50-year history. In a letter sent to all U.S. employees Rossann Williams, an executive vice president, said Starbucks never favored unionization and still prefers to speak directly to employees, but respects the legal process and wants to work with those in Buffalo who voted in favor of union representation. “If we sometimes fall short, we want to continue to hear from you,” Williams wrote to employees. “That way we can work together to make the improvements necessary to provide you the very best partner experience we can.” Workers at a store in Buffalo, New York, voted to unionize two weeks ago, a first for any Starbucks location. A second store rejected unionization, but the union said it might challenge that result because it wasn’t confident all of the eligible votes had been counted. The results of a third store could not be determined because both sides challenged seven separate votes. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All...
    By Hilary Russ | Reuters NEW YORK – Starbucks Corp will be headed to the bargaining table at its first officially unionized corporate-owned U.S. location after the National Labor Relations Board on Friday certified the results of a vote to unionize. Employees at one Buffalo, New York area store on Elmwood Avenue voted last week to join Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union. Starbucks, which has not had unionized employees anywhere in the United States for years, did not object to the Elmwood results, the NLRB confirmed. “We remain committed to supporting our partners and are considering all options that will best protect the work flexibility, transferability and equitable benefits of all our partners,” a Starbucks spokesperson told Reuters. Baristas and shift supervisors at another location rejected the union, which has challenged those results. The outcome at a third location is still being determined as several ballots are under review. Starbucks repeatedly challenged aspects of the NLRB election along the way, including arguing unsuccessfully that the entire Buffalo market of about 20 cafes should all have...
    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The union vying to represent Starbucks employees has formally objected to the results of elections at two Buffalo-area stores, saying the coffee retailer waged a “shock and awe” campaign meant to dissuade workers from voting to unionize. Employees at another local store, in Buffalo, voted 19-8 in favor of a union last week, becoming the first at a Starbucks-owned store in the U.S. to do so. Workers United, in objections filed with the National Labor Relations Board late Thursday, said the company’s intimidation tactics affected the results of voting at two other stores where elections were being held, in suburban Hamburg and Cheektowaga. The 50-year-old company has actively fought unionization for decades, saying its more than 8,000 company-owned U.S. stores function best when it works directly with employees. Workers at the Hamburg location voted 12-8 against a union. The outcome of the Cheektowaga vote could not be determined because both sides challenged seven separate votes. In the objections, Workers United said Starbucks employees “were subjected to a massive campaign of overwhelming psychological force from the moment...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Starbucks workers in two Boston stores are pushing to unionize after workers saw a win in Buffalo. The stores are on Commonwealth Avenue and Harvard Street. Workers at a Buffalo, New York store successfully voted to start a union last week. If the Labor Board certifies the vote, it would become the first Starbucks to be represented by a union. READ MORE: Autopsy Reveals Former NFL, Patriots Player Phillip Adams Had Significant Brain Trauma Before He Killed 6 PeopleAccording to CNN, Starbucks has 235,000 employees across nearly 9,000 in the US. None so far have been part of a union. Employees have been working to organize Starbucks Workers United, which would be an independent affiliate of the Service Employees International Union. READ MORE: Woman Killed When 19-Year-Old Driver Runs Red Light At Brighton Intersection, Police SayStarbucks says it opposes unionization efforts and prefers to deal with workers directly.   MORE NEWS: Nurses Accuse Brigham And Women's Hospital Of Not Cutting Back On Elective Surgeries 
    Starbucks employees at a store in Buffalo made a historic move this week when they voted 19 to eight in favor of unionizing. The vote at the coffee giant’s Elmwood Village location centered on whether or not the store employees would join Workers United, a union affiliated with the Service Employees International Union, according to Fox Business. The vote followed another Buffalo location that moved to reject unionization 12 to eight while a third store’s vote still remains unknown due to “several challenged ballots.” Prior to the vote, Starbucks had appealed to the National Labor Relations Board asking that all 20 Buffalo locations would vote as one rather than store-by-store. The appeal was denied. Around 111 Starbucks employees were eligible to vote; 78 ballots were counted as of Thursday. Starbucks employees celebrate after the votes are counted, on December 9, 2021 in Buffalo, New York. Three Starbucks cafes in Buffalo have now created the first union at outlets owned by the retail coffee giant in the United States. (ELEONORE SENS/AFP via Getty Images) Alexis Rizzo, a shift supervisor at one of the...
    BUFFALO, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Starbucks workers at a store in upstate New York have voted to join a union. The National Labor Relations Board says that workers voted 19 to 8 in favor of a union at one of three stores in Buffalo. Starbucks has actively fought unionization at its United States stores for decades. Labor experts say this push by workers to organize could have a ripple effect. Retailers have drawn criticism for issues including low pay and unfair scheduling.
    A Starbucks store in Buffalo, N.Y., on Thursday became the first of the company's U.S. locations to vote to unionize, despite sentiments from the coffee chain that such a move was not necessary. “Victory at Elmwood, the first unionized Starbucks store in the United States — history made!!!” Starbucks Workers United, the Starbucks’ workers union, tweeted on Thursday. Victory at Elmwood, the first unionized Starbucks store in the United States—history made!!!— SBWorkersUnited (@SBWorkersUnited) December 9, 2021 At one of three Buffalo stores holding a vote over whether to unionize, workers voted 19-8 in favor of the move, according to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), the Associated Press reported. A second store voted against unionizing in a 12-8 vote and the results from a third store were not yet clear, according to the AP. Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBriahna Joy Gray discusses US's handling of COVID-19 testing Senate rejects attempt to block Biden's Saudi arms sale Overnight Defense & National Security — Lawmakers clinch deal on defense bill MORE (I-Vt.) celebrated following the vote in favor of unionization. “Congratulations to @SBWorkersUnited on the...
    By Hilary Russ | Reuters BUFFALO, N.Y. – Starbucks Corp on Thursday failed to fend off a labor organizing drive as employees in Buffalo, New York, voted to join a union in one of three stores. Employees at one Starbucks location in Buffalo voted to join Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union. The vote counting for two other stores in the upstate New York city was still continuing on Thursday. The Seattle-based coffee chain could still challenge the results of the election. But if the outcome holds, the company would gain its first unionized location in the United States in decades. About 15 Starbucks employees who support the union drive had gathered in a room in Buffalo to watch results. Many jumped, screamed and hugged when they realized they had enough votes to win the store on Elmwood Avenue. The vote was 19-8 in favor of joining the union. Starbucks had several unionized cafes and a roastery in the United States the 1980s, but all eventually decertified. It beat back organizing campaigns in Philadelphia and New...