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    The combination of intense interest in the 2020 presidential election with a deadly pandemic is spurring sky-high rates of early voting. That's going to have an impact on the way election night plays out this year, but it won't affect the outcome. So far, over 5 million voters have already cast their ballots, and many more intend to do so in the coming weeks. Some will vote by mail, while others will do so in person at early voting centers. (Check out ways of voting in your state here.) We've been asking voters in battleground states how they would prefer to vote this year. The chart below shows results across six competitive states we've polled over the past three weeks. In each state, a sizable segment of likely voters tell us they would prefer to vote by mail or in person — before Election Day, which falls on November 3. In states with strong track records of early voting — like Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas — large majorities prefer to vote by mail or early in person, ranging from...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Friday marks six months since the World Health Organization officially declared COVID-19 a pandemic. This comes as the global cases near 30 million and global deaths approach one-million.Chicago area doctors said there's still plenty to learning about the virus, as the fight to contain it continues.Masks, social distancing and Zoom are words that were not part of our everyday vocabulary a short time ago."Certainly we've learned a lot on how it spreads. We know this is primarily spread through droplets that come out of our nose and mouth when we cough sneeze or talk to one another," said Dr. Ben Singe, a Northwestern Hospital pulmonary critical care specialist.He says knowing how it spreads from person to person has taught the medical community about the importance of social distancing and, especially, wearing masks.RELATED: Dr. Anthony Fauci says it could be late 2021 before life is 'back to normal'"The most important reason to wear a mask is less to protect yourself, but to protect the people around," Singer added.While there was some mask confusion at the beginning, doctors say...
    By SCOTT BAUER, Associated Press MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Democrats, stung by President Donald Trump's narrow win four years ago, are confident the lessons they learned will ensure he doesn't do it again. But Republicans say civil unrest that followed a police shooting in Kenosha, and Trump's “law and order” message, will help him win over the crucial white suburban voters he needs to capture a second term. With less than two months to go until the election, the presidential race is focused on Wisconsin and other battleground states that will likely determine the winner. Republicans and Democrats in Wisconsin expect another close race, just like three of the past five presidential elections that were decided by less than a point in the swing state. “This is going to be a fistfight in the mud until the very end, scrapping for every vote,” said Republican strategist Brian Reisinger. Democrat Joe Biden has led Trump by 4 to 6 points in the past four Marquette University Law School polls of likely Wisconsin voters between May and September. Attitudes didn't change...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Democrats, stung by President Donald Trump’s narrow win four years ago, are confident the lessons they learned will ensure he doesn’t do it again. But Republicans say civil unrest that followed a police shooting in Kenosha, and Trump’s “law and order” message, will help him win over the crucial white suburban voters he needs to capture a second term. With less than two months to go until the election, the presidential race is focused on Wisconsin and other battleground states that will likely determine the winner. Republicans and Democrats in Wisconsin expect another close race, just like three of the past five presidential elections that were decided by less than a point in the swing state. “This is going to be a fistfight in the mud until the very end, scrapping for every vote,” said Republican strategist Brian Reisinger. Democrat Joe Biden has led Trump by 4 to 6 points in the past four Marquette University Law School polls of likely Wisconsin voters between May and September. Attitudes didn’t change this month even after both...
    MADISON, Wis. – Wisconsin Democrats, stung by President Donald Trump's narrow win four years ago, are confident the lessons they learned will ensure he doesn't do it again. But Republicans say civil unrest that followed a police shooting in Kenosha, and Trump's “law and order” message, will help him win over the crucial white suburban voters he needs to capture a second term. With less than two months to go until the election, the presidential race is focused on Wisconsin and other battleground states that will likely determine the winner. Republicans and Democrats in Wisconsin expect another close race, just like three of the past five presidential elections that were decided by less than a point in the swing state. “This is going to be a fistfight in the mud until the very end, scrapping for every vote,” said Republican strategist Brian Reisinger. Democrat Joe Biden has led Trump by 4 to 6 points in the past four Marquette University Law School polls of likely Wisconsin voters between May and September. Attitudes didn't change this month even after both Biden...
    (CNN)As I'm about to begin a new semester online at Middlebury College, I'm reminded of James A. Garfield's comment that "the ideal college is Mark Hopkins on one end of a log and a student on the other." Hopkins was a philosopher (and later president) at Williams College, and he was a legendary teacher. This has always been my mantra: a teacher, a student and a log. That's all you really need for education to happen. Jay Parini I've been a college teacher for 45 years and have sat on some expensive logs in my time. I work at a well-equipped campus, with "smart classrooms." The internet is omnipresent, pulling information into the classroom. I can do PowerPoints and show film clips on a screen. Every convenience for learning is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Across this country, in fact, the modern campus is a wonder. But is this overkill? Will the coronavirus pandemic teach us something about what we need, and what isn't really essential for learning to happen? The original campus was Plato's...
    (CNN)It has now been almost six months since Covid-19 was declared a pandemic in the United States. For all researchers have learned, there's still so much more to understand.The key to moving forward is understanding where Covid-19 has spread around the country and what the science tells us about what to do next. What lessons can be applied in schools and universities? What can cities and counties learn from what others have already endured? Where are we in the search for treatments and a possible vaccine?Here's what's clear so far about who is impacted by the virus, how the virus has been controlled, and where the global race for treatments and vaccines stands.Who has been impactedThe human toll of the virus has grown by measures many could not imagine. When the pandemic first began little was known about who would be impacted and what factors might make people vulnerable. Those answers have shifted over time.Read MoreWhere things stand: As of Monday, at least 183,000 people have died in the United States and more than 6 million have been infected, according...
    LONG BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- It was January 4 when the World Health Organization tweeted about a cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan, Hubei Province in China. #China has reported to WHO a cluster of #pneumonia cases —with no deaths— in Wuhan, Hubei Province ???????? . Investigations are underway to identify the cause of this illness.— World Health Organization (WHO) (@WHO) January 4, 2020While health officials agree that much is still unknown about what we now call COVID-19, we do have much more information today than we did seven months ago.Here are seven things we have learned about coronavirus so far.1. Scientists say you can get reinfected with COVID-19Can you get coronavirus twice? Researchers in Hong Kong claim to have the first evidence of someone being reinfected with the virus.Hong Kong man 'first case' documented of getting coronavirus twice, researchers say.Dr. Anthony Cardillo, CEO of Mend Urgent Care and ER physician, said that one could "100%" get reinoculated with COVID-19."You could have been infected back in March, April, May or June, you go back to normal life and someone sneezes...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. On April 6, St. Therese of New Hope became one of the first long-term care facilities in Minnesota to have a positive COVID-19 case in our resident population. The following weeks were the most trying and devastating in our 52-year history as our dedicated staff worked as quickly as possible to protect more than 100 residents from the ravages of this disease. While many residents who  contracted COVID-19 did recover, tragically, this unpredictable virus moved rapidly, and we did lose some of our residents. Once at the front end of the COVID-19 outbreak curve, St. Therese is now leading on the back end of the curve. We are encouraged to see the infection and mortality rates of long-term care residents declining significantly across Minnesota. There have been zero new cases of COVID-19 at St. Therese since the end of May. Recent studies and analysis by Harvard University, Brown University and the...
    (CNN)For the past four years, tech giants including Facebook (FB), Google (GOOGL) and Twitter (TWTR) have invested massively in beefing up their election security efforts — creating new rules for political advertisers, hiring thousands of content moderators and building ties with law enforcement. The aim has been to avoid a repeat of the 2016 campaign, which was marred by foreign meddling and highlighted how woefully unprepared social media companies were for an attack on US democracy leveraging their platforms. Now, as they gear up for the most consequential presidential race of the decade, the internet's largest platforms are eager to show they are ready. On Wednesday, the companies met with federal officials to discuss how they're monitoring their platforms for foreign interference and preparing for the Republican and Democratic national conventions. And on Thursday, Facebook, Google and Twitter all announced new or forthcoming efforts to promote voter registration and participation. Facebook told reporters on a conference call Thursday that it has engaged in tests and exercises to try to anticipate certain election night scenarios.But for all their efforts to hunt...
    LOS ANGELES -- When the coronavirus swept the world earlier this year, becoming a pandemic and major health crisis, it caught many off guard. Similarly, the HIV/AIDS pandemic that seemingly appeared out of nowhere in the early 1980s also caught the world by surprise, none more so than the LGBTQ community who seemed to be hit hardest first.However, unlike HIV and AIDS, which was largely ignored for years in the United States by the government and population at large, COVID-19 got people's attention immediately."Within sixty days there was a lockdown, then a quarantine and the country stopped," Dr. Chris Donaghue said about COVID-19.When AIDS was discovered, the opposite reaction happened. The disease was dismissed - often being referred to as the "gay plague"."It wasn't spoken about, information wasn't shared. Gay men died alone and isolated due to fear," Donaghue added.However, despite the difference in virus, there are some similarities."Coronavirus also owes a debt to the HIV or AIDS activist community which pushed the government to fund the science that opened an entirely new field of viral studies that has lead...
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