Monday, Dec 05, 2022 - 07:08:13
92 results - (0.005 seconds)

plan to spend:

latest news at page 1:
12
    Childcare shortages are not a factor in keeping parents from returning to the pandemic-crippled economy, according to a new study by one of President Barack Obama's top economic advisers. The findings suggest President Joe Biden's proposals to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on childcare will make little difference to easing the country's staffing crisis as businesses complain they cannot fill jobs. And conservatives immediately said it was evidence of a president sneaking through a radical agenda under cover of COVID-19 recovery efforts. In fact, the study led by Jason Furman, a Harvard academic and chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers under Obama, found that employment rates of parents with young children declined by less (4.5%) than people without children (5.2%). Jason Furman served under President Obama from 2013 to 2017. He said his analysis other factors than childcare - such as generous unemployment benefits - might be to blame for keeping people from taking up jobs Analysis by Jason Furman, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under Obama, found that parents with young...
    More On: infrastructure McConnell optimistic about bipartisan infrastructure deal GOP leaders draw ‘red line’ on tax hikes after first Biden meeting Biden to host McCarthy, McConnell at White House in push for $4T in spending ​White House chief of staff insists ‘infrastructure’ bill should be bipartisan President Biden on Thursday met with six Senate Republicans to discuss possible compromise on his proposed $2.3 trillion infrastructure bill. Biden hosted the top Republicans on relevant committees a day after he hosted Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) for the first time. “I’m prepared to compromise,” said Biden, who was joined by Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo. “We’ll see if we can work out some — on a compromise on infrastructure. And I know they’re sincere about it, so am I. And what we’re going to try to do is figure out what we can — what constitutes infrastructure from… our perspectives and then see whether or not we’re in a position that — how, how much we want to...
    The White House announced Thursday that it is providing $7.4 billion of funding from the pandemic relief measure passed earlier this year to hire and train public health workers to respond to COVID-19 and future crises. The funding includes $3.4 billion for “overstretched public health departments” in states and localities to hire additional staff who can work on vaccination outreach, testing, contact tracing and other tasks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and AmeriCorps will team up to launch a Public Health AmeriCorps, with $400 million in funding “to recruit and build a new workforce ready to respond to the public health needs of the nation,” the White House said. At least $500 million will go toward hiring school nurses who can help in the COVID-19 vaccination effort for younger people. The CDC on Wednesday cleared the way for adolescents aged 12-15 to get vaccinated, and approval for younger children could come down the line. A final $3 billion will focus on longer-term funding to “modernize the public health workforce” with a new grant program focused on helping...
    California Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled a plan Tuesday to spend $12 billion on homelessness in his state as part of his $100 billion “California Comeback Plan,” promising to solve the problem of “family homelessness” within five years. .@CAgovernor @GavinNewsom is cleaning up trash near Downtown Los Angeles. He’s highlighting new funding efforts to beautify the state in addition to funds to combat homelessness & other issues. pic.twitter.com/506HZo40CJ — Elex Michaelson (@Elex_Michaelson) May 11, 2021 Newsom’s approach will build on the state’s temporary strategy during the coronavirus pandemic, which involved spending money to house homeless people in hotel rooms — and, eventually, purchasing some hotel and apartment buildings for them. He did not explain how California would prevent such a program from enticing more homeless people to move to the state, nor how the state would confront the mental health and substance abuse challenges from which many homeless people suffer. In a statement, Newsom’s office said: Governor Newsom’s $12 billion plan to tackle the issue of homelessness will be the largest investment of its kind in California history. This investment will provide 65,000...
    U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen speaks as she joins White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki for the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. May 7, 2021.Jonathan Ernst | Reuters States and local governments will have significant leeway in deciding how to spend the $350 billion in Covid-19 relief funds authorized by President Joe Biden's American Rescue Plan. The Treasury Department said Monday that governments will be compelled to spend the cash infusion "to meet pandemic response needs and rebuild a strong, more equitable economy." But importantly, Treasury officials said that states and territories are not allowed to use the funding to offset lost revenue as the result of a tax cut or make a deposit to a pension fund. Senior administration officials said on Monday that approved uses for the funds are intentionally broad and flexible. "Every state and city are different," Deputy Treasury Secretary Adewale "Wally" Adeyemo told reporters Monday. "In the coming days and weeks, Treasury's Office of Recovery Programs will work hand-in-hand with governors, mayors, members of Congress and other local officials...
    More On: kevin mccarthy Steve Scalise won’t back Liz Cheney staying in GOP leadership post CNN’s Jake Tapper floats idea of banning some Republicans from his show Rep. Kevin McCarthy takes aim at Liz Cheney amid leadership feud The polls are coming from inside the house! McCarthy confirms he’s living with prominent pollster Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader in the House, blasted President Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure plan as out-of-control spending on Democratic priorities that would hit most Americans in the wallet. McCarthy, of California, told host John Catsimatidis on his radio show on WABC 970 AM that there’s no “need to spend these trillions of dollars” on the package. “The real challenge is in these great big bills there’s just waste, fraud, abuse, but more importantly corruption,” McCarthy said in the interview that aired Sunday. Along with traditional infrastructure projects like repairing roads and bridges, Biden’s two-part package would include funding to expand broadband, revamp water lines, invest in electric vehicles and boost care for children and the elderly. The president plans to raise the corporate tax...
    ARSENAL owner Stan Kroenke’s offer to pay their Uefa fine from his own pocket could leave the club with LESS money to spend this summer. Kroenke, along with his fellow American owners at Liverpool and Manchester United, promised to meet the initial £1.44million European Super League fine - plus five per cent of the club’s next season of European cash earnings - from his personal funds. 3Stan Kroenke promised to meet the fin personally - but it could have an impact on the Gunners' transfer kittyCredit: Getty But finance specialists warned such payments would be deemed as “owner funding” in Financial Fair Play calculations. One expert explained: “If Kroenke pays from his own funds, that is deemed an owner expense. “It means Arsenal’s next income will be reduced and will have an impact on the amount they are allowed to spend on players. “While the Arsenal fans may be welcoming his decision now, they might not be so impressed if they discover they will have less to spend on players as a direct result.” ⚽️ ⚽️ ARSENAL TRANSFER NEWS ⚽️...
    Investments in roads, bridges and broadband access. Expanded child care options and workforce training. More affordable housing and good-paying jobs in manufacturing and clean energy. That's how Maine Gov. Janet Mills anticipates spending more than $1 billion in federal pandemic relief money that's headed for the state as part of the latest stimulus package. Mills said about $540 million of her Maine Jobs & Recovery proposal, which was submitted to the Legislature on Tuesday, will be dedicated to fixing roads and bridges and expanding internet access. Another $300 million would go to long-term projects such as workforce retraining. The plan would also divert $260 million to reducing health care costs for businesses and rebuilding the unemployment trust fund. The massive influx of federal dollars is an "unprecedented opportunity to address the longstanding challenges that have constrained our state’s ability to thrive over the years," Mills said. "By encouraging innovative small business growth, investing in our workforce, and building essential infrastructure, like housing, child care and broadband, we can accelerate our recovery from the pandemic and build...
    U.S. President Joe Biden speaks as he announces executive actions on gun violence prevention in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, April 8, 2021.Kevin Lamarque | Reuters Americans broadly back the big-ticket spending proposals that have defined President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, a variety of recent polls show. Surveys show many more Americans approve than disapprove of the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill Biden signed into law in March — by far his most significant legislative victory to date. Polls also find Biden's $2 trillion infrastructure plan is already popular with majorities or pluralities of respondents. As he turns the page on his first 100 days on Thursday, Biden is now gearing up to unveil yet another massive spending package, this one aimed at addressing family-related issues. The White House has shared few details about that plan — but at least one poll shows a sizable majority of Americans already support it. Since taking over from former President Donald Trump in the midst of the pandemic, Biden has vowed to pursue swift and ambitious...
    President Biden wants to give the IRS an extra $80 billion to target mega-rich tax evaders to help fund his “American Families Plan” legislation, according to a report Tuesday. The proposed cash would come with new powers to aggressively crack down on wealthy people hiding money from the government, including new disclosure requirements, two sources told the New York Times. The $80 billion would be a two-thirds increase over the agency’s entire funding levels for the past decade — but is hoped to raise at least $700 billion on net over 10 years, the report said. As with his plan to raise the capital gains tax, Biden will portray it as leveling the playing field between typical Americans and the small number of very high earners who minimize or avoid paying taxes, the report said. It will be used to help pay for his “American Families Plan,” which he will detail before addressing a joint session of Congress on Wednesday. IRS headquarters, located in the Federal Triangle section of Washington, DC.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images That plan is expected to cost at least...
    PRESIDENT Joe Biden's climate plan to cut greenhouse emissions by 50 to 52 percent by 2030 could come with significant changes to Americans' daily routines. Biden announced his ambitious plan at the start of a two-day climate summit that started on Earth Day on Thursday. 4Biden announced his climate plan on Earth Day on ThursdayCredit: AFP 4Americans could also see a tax hike of upwards of $3,500 for the country's highest earnersCredit: Getty In it, Biden promised to slash emissions by over half in a little less than a decade when compared to 2005 numbers, vowing to set the US forward to become a zero-emissions economy by 2050. Although this plan calls for creating jobs as the country switches to greener energy, the plan might all affect how Americans eat, work, and heat their homes. "The signs are unmistakable. The science is undeniable. The cost of inaction is mounting," Biden said on Thursday. "This is a moral imperative, an economic imperative." "Time is short, but I believe we can do this," he continued. "And I believe that we will do....
    President Joe Biden's ambitious plan to slash greenhouse emissions by 50 to 52 percent over the next decade could prompt sweeping changes that could affect how Americans eat, drive and heat their homes.  Biden announced the goal to cut emissions by 2030, compared with 2005 levels, at the start of a two-day climate summit on Thursday.  He vowed the plan, which would set the US on a path of a zero emissions economy by no later than 2050, would create jobs and boost economies.  But he is yet to release any firm details on exactly how such a plan will affect the daily lives of ordinary Americans.  He also hasn't set out the price for reducing emissions.   The plan immediately sparked criticism from Republicans and industry experts who argue it isn't sustainable in the long run, will put jobs at risk and cause tax hikes for Americans.    While Biden hasn't released details on what life could look like for Americans, experts and recent studies have laid out what would need to change by 2030 to reach the goal.  Here's how...
    Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka, R-East Gull Lake, and Sen. Zach Duckworth, R-Lakeville, on Friday announced a package aiming to spend billions of federal dollars on hard-hit industries, filling the unemployment fund, and infrastructure plans. “These one-time funds provide us with the chance to set Minnesotans on a path for long-lasting growth. By targeting our spending for maximum impact, we are setting Minnesotans up to rebuild their community connections, invest in their families, and help our businesses recover and grow.” Duckworth said in a statement. “Most importantly, these investments are being made without increasing taxes on Minnesotans who have already sacrificed so much in the last year.” The bill language, expected to be released next week, seeks to direct $2.5 billion of the American Rescue Plan to Minnesotans hardest hit by the pandemic and promote economic growth, according to a press release. “The legislature has a constitutional duty to Minnesotans to oversee all state spending, even when it comes in the form of federal grants,” Gazelka said in a statement. “Gov. Walz should not be the sole decider in how...
                      by Scott McClallen  Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka, R-East Gull Lake, and Sen. Zach Duckworth, R-Lakeville, on Friday announced a package aiming to spend billions of federal dollars on hard-hit industries, filling the unemployment fund, and infrastructure plans. “These one-time funds provide us with the chance to set Minnesotans on a path for long-lasting growth. By targeting our spending for maximum impact, we are setting Minnesotans up to rebuild their community connections, invest in their families, and help our businesses recover and grow.” Duckworth said in a statement. “Most importantly, these investments are being made without increasing taxes on Minnesotans who have already sacrificed so much in the last year.” The bill language, expected to be released next week, seeks to direct $2.5 billion of the American Rescue Plan to Minnesotans hardest hit by the pandemic and promote economic growth, according to a press release. “The legislature has a constitutional duty to Minnesotans to oversee all state spending, even when it comes in the form of federal grants,” Gazelka said...
    The City University of New York is about to plunk down $3 million to hire consulting powerhouse McKinsey & Co. to draft a reopening plan for the fall. The board of the public university system is set to vote Monday on the $2,974,800 agreement for McKinsey to work with its colleges to come up with blueprints to bring students back. CUNY has been mostly on remote instruction since the coronavirus pandemic began in March 2020. But the system’s schools had already formulated reopening plans in anticipation of returning last fall, according to CUNY’s web site. “CUNY campuses have individual reopening and operating plans to cover a range of scenarios that reflect engagement with campus stakeholders, administrators, faculty, staff, students, unions, alumni and community-based groups,” a notice posted in September 2020 read. It’s unclear how the new $3 million plans would differ. CUNY has largely used remote instruction since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images The proposed hiring agreement noted McKinsey was providing a 33 percent discount for the project. CUNY was in such...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The problems with U.S. broadband networks have been obvious for years. Service costs more than in many other rich nations, it still doesn’t reach tens of millions of Americans and the companies that provide it don’t face much competition. Now the Biden administration is promising to do something about all of those issues as part of its proposed $2.3 trillion infrastructure package. The plan, which would devote $100 billion to get all Americans connected, is more idea than policy and lacks a lot of important detail. READ MORE: VIDEO: Oakland Homeless Encampment Fire Sparks Massive 2-Alarm Blaze At Recycling Company But it sketches out a striking new vision of activist government measures intended to improve high-speed internet service, following decades in which the government has largely left the job to private companies. WHAT IS BIDEN’S PROPOSAL? It would spend $100 billion to “future-proof” broadband as part of an eight-year infrastructure plan, calling high-speed connections “the new electricity” that’s now a necessity for all Americans. (For history buffs, that’s a reference to the Rural Electrification Act —...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden’s $2.3 trillion plan to transform America’s infrastructure includes $16 billion to plug old oil and gas wells and clean up abandoned mines, a longtime priority for Western and rural lawmakers from both parties. Hundreds of thousands of “orphaned” oil and gas wells and abandoned coal and hardrock mines pose serious safety hazards, while causing ongoing environmental damage. The administration sees the longstanding problem as an opportunity to create jobs and remediate pollution, including greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Biden said last week he wants to put pipefitters and miners to work capping the wells “at the same price that they would charge to dig those wells.” Many of the old wells and mines are located in rural communities that have been hard-hit by the pandemic. Biden’s plan would not only create jobs, but help reduce methane and brine leaks that pollute the air and groundwater. Methane is a powerful contributor to global warming. The Interior Department has long led efforts to cap orphaned wells — so named because no owner can be...
    President Joe Biden urged Americans to rally behind his dramatic $2.5 trillion economic plan on Wednesday. “Put simply, these are investments we have to make, we can afford to make them,” he said. “Put another way, we can’t afford not to.” Biden detailed his plan Wednesday afternoon during a speech in Pittsburgh and said the multi-trillion plan was only the first part of his proposed spending initiative to “build back better.” The president’s plan spends roughly $639 billion on traditional infrastructure but more than a trillion on proposals that have less to do with infrastructure and more to do with climate change and clean energy goals, expanding health care, and affordable housing. Biden promised to raise taxes to help pay for his proposed plan. He emphasized the need to raise the corporate tax from 21 percent to 28 percent. “No one should be able to complain about that,” he said. He vowed to end various loopholes to keep companies like Amazon and other top 500 corporations from paying zero taxes. “I don’t want to punish them but that’s just wrong,”...
    President Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan may include $4 trillion in spending and $3 trillion in increased taxes, according to a report released Monday. The Washington Post reported that Biden’s infrastructure plan might include $4 trillion in new spending and $3 trillion in tax increases. Members of the White House Economic Council reportedly remain worried about the increase in spending. “The officials worried that the large gap between spending and revenue would widen the deficit by such a large degree that it could risk triggering a spike in interest rates, which could in turn cause federal debt payments to skyrocket, said the people familiar with the matter,” the Post’s Jeff Stein wrote. The infrastructure plan follows as Biden recently signed the Democrats’ partisan $1.9 trillion coronavirus package. The reported Biden proposal would serve as one of the largest tax hikes in generations. This runs in contrast to President Donald Trump’s administration, which cut taxes with the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Democrats also reportedly disagree over if they should focus on physical infrastructure such as roads and bridges compared to social welfare spending...
    More On: taxes Here’s how to track the status of your third stimulus check NY legislature proposes nearly $7B in new taxes on wealthy Stimulus potholes aplenty thanks to infrastructure red ink from Democrats Who qualifies for the $3,600 child tax credit in new stimulus bill? As we predicted the other day, the Legislature is looking to take advantage of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s weakness to push tax hikes that New York can’t afford. Three days after OKing a full impeachment inquiry, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie announced a mind-numbing $208.3 billion spending plan, a whopping 22.6 percent jump over last year’s $177 billion, plus nearly $7 billion in tax hikes. This comes as New York’s getting a huge $100 billion federal bailout, including $12.7 billion straight to state government. Indeed, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer crowed last week that the new law just erased the state’s budget deficit and negated any need to raise taxes. But the Legislature’s addiction to spending is strong; the bailout just gives it reason to get greedier. Heastie’s plan adds all manner of gifts...
    The Senate on Friday will begin a massive vote-a-rama on amendments to President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan as Republicans look to delay a final vote on the legislation. Republican senators are expected to offer multiple amendments to the bill, which Democrats claim is necessary to help the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. The GOP protests the bill's cost and claim it's filled with progressive priorities. As part of their objections they are using the legislative process to delay a final vote as long as possible. On Thursday, Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin demanded clerks read the entire 628 page bill aloud.  The process  - in which three clerks took turns reading the text aloud in a monotone that threatened to put lawmakers to sleep - took 10 hours and 44 minutes. It began at 3:20 p.m. on Thursday and ended at 2:04 a.m. in the early hours of Friday morning. Now senators can proceed to debating the legislation, which includes the vote-a-rama, a series of votes on blocks of amendments that could last well into Friday...
    Ferrovial’s Martian plan to spend European funds: flying taxis
    CDC reports 618 variant cases across 33 states; Johnson & Johnson applies for FDA authorization; 455K US deaths. Latest COVID-19 updates. U.K. Vaccine Plan With CureVac; Russia-China Talks: Virus Update 44% of Americans Expect Their Finances to Improve in 2021 How has your life changed since February 2020? © Money; Getty Images Money-Poll-Americans-Finance It’s no secret that the nation has been financially devastated by the coronavirus pandemic over the past year. But despite the widespread suffering, many Americans feel their finances are in good shape and will get better over the course of this year. In a new survey from Money and Morning Consult, 63% of people say their current financial situation is the same or better now than it was a year ago. Another 44% say they expect their financial position to improve in 2021. Conducted between Jan. 26 and Jan. 28, the poll of 2,200 reveals a sharp divide in how the coronavirus crisis has impacted Americans’ wallets over the past 12 months. While some held steady or prospered, others floundered financially. And the difference between the...
    A woman who found her grandma's 1949 yearbook was left in hysterics after one of her 'iconic' classmates left a rather amusing note.   Deb Duncan, from Chicago, took to Twitter and shared an old photograph of a woman from the yearbook and penned: 'Pat was...built differently.' While many of Pat's classmates wrote about wanting to spend their future making their husbands happy, Pat had a rather different future goal and penned: 'If I only knew where I was to die, I'd never go near the place.'  And it wasn't long before social media users took to the comments section to praise Pat for her very witty remark,  'They're like "I wanna be a homemaker", which I mean, valid. But my girl Pat is like "I WISH TO PURSUE IMMORTALITY" and I love that for her,' wrote one, while a second penned: 'Pat is ready to challenge death to a duel and i respect that.' Deb Duncan, from the US, took to Twitter and shared an old photograph of her grandma's yearbook from 1949. Pictured, Pat The...
    The Tua Tagovailoa vs. Justin Herbert draft debate needs to slow down "Bridgerton" Was Partially Filmed in the Mansion Next to Prince Charless Home You Cant Even Begin to Plan for Retirement Without This Number One of the hardest truths of retirement planning is that you're never going to get it right. Just like today's retirees never could've foreseen the pandemic and recession we're currently living through, there will be surprises that come up for you in your senior years, some of which may cost you a lot of money you hadn't budgeted for. © Provided by The Motley Fool You Can't Even Begin to Plan for Retirement Without This Number The key to successful retirement planning is not to get things exactly right, but to get as close as you can based on educated guesswork and to err on the side of estimating too high rather than too low. If you're still not sure how much you need for retirement, you can follow the steps below. © Getty Images Pensive woman holding pen and notebook Estimate the length...
    Many Americans will look to save money this holiday season by cutting back on how much they spend on gifts, with about 40% saying they plan to spend less this year, according to a survey from CNBC. The financial network asked 800 Americans in its CNBC All-America Economic Survey whether they plan on spending more or spending less during the holidays this year. 39% will spend less. 11% will spend more. CNBC notes that in 2017, 25% of Americans said they planned to cut back spending during the holidays, while 18% said they would spend more than usual. When the 2020 respondents were asked why they were spending less: 29% cited loss of wages or income. 19% cited the coronavirus. 17% cited the economy. 16% cited a need to save money. CNBC also notes that while people from all income levels reported cutting back on spending, “the wealthiest Americans could be holding back the most” this year. “It does seem like those Americans earning over $100,000 are holding back a little bit more than they did...
    Shoppers hold hands at the Willow Grove Park Mall in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, November 14, 2020.Mark Makela | Reuters Almost 40% of Americans plan to spend less on gifts this holiday season than they did last year, the largest such percentage since 2013, according to the CNBC All-America Economic Survey. Just 11% plan to spend more, as Americans continue to cope with surging Covid-19 cases and widespread unemployment. The average American plans to spend just $886, down 10% from their planned spending last year, according to the survey. Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwards Of the 800 Americans surveyed, 29% said they plan to spend less due to lost wages or income, 19% cited the coronavirus, and 17% cited the poor economy. The poll carries a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5%. All income groups reported planning to spend less this year compared with a year ago. And when it comes to actual dollars they plan to spend, the wealthiest Americans could be holding back the most. "It does seem like those Americans earning over $100,000 are holding back a...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — No matter where you shop this holiday season, a new poll says half of Americans are putting their pets on their gift lists. The new National Confidence poll by SunTrust Bank says people are planning to spend an average of $137 on their furry friends. Dogs are expected to get more under the tree than cats though. New treats and toys are the most popular gifts. MORE ON CBSPHILLY.COM Pennsylvania State Senator Gets Positive COVID-19 Test At President Donald Trump Meeting: AP Source Delaware National Guard Corporal, Maryland Man Identified As Two Killed In I-95 Multi-Vehicle Crash President-Elect Joe Biden Fractures Foot While Playing With His Dog Major, To Wear A Boot
    THE BACHELORETTE’S Clare Crawley and Dale Moss are paying no attention to rumours that Dale was recently seen with other women, as a source close to the couple denies there was any wrongdoing. The couple are ignoring claims Dale kissed another woman while in New York last week, and are preparing to spend Thanksgiving together in San Diego. 8Dale and Clare are preparing to spend the holidays togetherCredit: Instagram Fans of the couple were distraught to hear that former football player turned model Dale, 32, had been seen getting close to two female models in NYC.  However, it appears that The Bachelorette stars have dismissed the speculation regarding their relationship, with a source telling TMZ they'll be spending their first Thanksgiving together on the West Coast. TMZ reported that Dale flew to Sacramento to meet Clare, 39, and they'll be heading down to San Diego to spend time with family and friends on both sides. The source revealed there is no truth in the rumours swirling around Dale being sighted with two women, explaining: “They got drinks afterward, and...
    The Missouri House Budget Committee Monday poured through Gov. Mike Parson’s proposed plan to spend $1.27 billion in federal pandemic assistance during the third day of a special session to amend the state’s $35 billion Fiscal Year 2021 budget. During afternoon hearings before the panel, chaired by Rep. Cody Smith, R-Carthage, state department and agency chiefs testified about their most urgent needs after suffering significant slashes in allocations since the pandemic skewered their budgets. The 163-member House, which includes at least 46 lame duck lawmakers who will not serve in the 2021 Legislature, convened Thursday and is scheduled to mull Parson’s supplemental budget request through Tuesday. The 34-member Senate will convene its special session to review Parson’s budget request Nov. 19-20. In Parson’s request outlining his proposed allocation for the remaining $1.2 billion from the $3 billion in CARES Act money the state received in March, the Governor’s Office is seeking more than $764 million in state and federal funds for pandemic relief, mostly for child support aid, job training grants and school nutrition services. ...
    A screen shows Alibaba's sales volume exceeding 100 billion yuan after one hour during 2019 Alibaba 11.11 Global Shopping Festival on November 11, 2019 in Hangzhou, China.VCG | Visual China Group | Getty Images The e-commerce giant Alibaba's annual Singles Day shopping event could be a boon for Chinese brands, according to a new survey. Sixty-six percent of Chinese consumers say they'll be shopping for domestic brands over foreign labels during the shopping event, which is held on Nov. 11 each year. This is global consulting firm AlixPartners' third survey tied to the event. It polled 2,029 adult Chinese consumers from Sept. 30 to Oct. 6. The majority surveyed, or 62%, cited "patriotism" as their reason for buying local. A year ago, 51% of those polled had a similar answer. Spending overall is expected to eclipse previous records, as Chinese consumers rebound from the shutdowns put in place during the coronavirus pandemic. Singles Day 2019 drew more than $38 billion in sales. Thirty-nine percent of Chinese consumers plan to spend more on Singles Day this year compared with last, the...
    CHARLOTTE, North Carolina – Nearly three out of four parents plan to spend more money on Halloween in 2020 to make up for a year filled with missed opportunities during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a Lending Tree Survey. Can money buy happiness? No, but that will not stop most parents from trying. In a new survey conducted by Lending Tree, one of the country’s largest lending marketplaces, most parents surveyed with children under 18 say they plan to spend more on Halloween because they have already missed out on other celebrations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The company said parents have faced challenges this year transitioning children to remote learning models and dealing with events and activities being canceled through the year so far. “Parents, in particular, have faced huge challenges. Many schools remain closed. Social distancing has been factored into play dates, if they happen at all,” the company said in a statement. “Birthday parties, Little League games and school graduations have been affected. That, and more has made 2020 a downright difficult year for both parents and their...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Americans are expected to spend less this holiday season than in the past. The National Retail Federation released its annual survey. They asked nearly 80,000 consumers about their holiday shopping plans. They found that on average that people planned to spend about $1,000 dollars on gifts, food and other necessities for the holidays. That’s $50 less than last year. MORE FROM CBS PHILLY: Stimulus Package Update: What Happens To The Economy Without A Second Stimulus? Biden Details ‘Science-Backed’ COVID-19 Plan, Accuses Trump Of Failing American People Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules Ballots Can’t Be Tossed Out Over Voter Signature   
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Since there’s now snow on the ground, we may as well talk about holiday shopping. The annual Deloitte Holiday survey asked 4,000 customers about their habits. Shoppers are expected to spend $1,387 per household this year, which is down 7% year over year. Just over half of all shoppers feel anxious about shopping in store. Sixty-five percent say they prefer shopping online to avoid crowds, and 43% prefer to shop their neighborhood businesses instead of huge chains. Click here for more information.
    The Republican National Committee will spend $25 million on television ads in a battleground state advertising blitz beginning Tuesday and running for the final two weeks before Election Day, Fox News has learned. The RNC on Tuesday will launch television ads in a number of key states, including Arizona, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina and Wisconsin. TRUMP PREDICTS ELECTION DAY VICTORY  The buy comes on the heels of the RNC committing to spend $60 million on digital efforts to get out the vote in the final stretch of the campaign. An RNC official told Fox News that roughly $14 million of the $25 million total will be spent on advertising targeted to seniors, with a focus on protecting Medicare. “Joe Biden’s health care plan would be an inevitable step toward single-payer health care, leading to higher taxes, less quality of care, and a complete upheaval of our health care system,” RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel told Fox News. Video“As part of the RNC’s multi-pronged effort to target and turn out voters, we will be telling the truth about Biden’s socialized health care...
    PRAGUE (Reuters) - The Czech Defence Ministry will start talks with the Israeli government to buy a short and medium range air defence system made by Israeli state-owned supplier Rafael, the ministry said on Friday. The government has been raising defence spending to modernise its armed forces, but has admitted it would fall short of its pledge, as a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, to spend 2% of gross domestic product on defence by 2024. The ministry said it expected a government-to-government contract to be signed in early 2021 and supplies from 2023 and had picked Rafael's SPYDER Short Range Air Defence/Medium Range Surface to Air Missile (SHORAD/MRSAM) from nine systems offered by seven producers. It plans to spend 10 billion crowns ($430 million) on four batteries, each including its own radar, command and control unit. The SPYDER will replace an over 40-year-old Soviet-made 2K12 KUB air defence system. (Reporting by Jan Lopatka; editing by Barbara Lewis) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    President Trump mocked billionaire Mike Bloomberg for the former New York City mayor's plan to spend at least $100 million in Florida to help Joe Biden defeat Trump and other Republicans. The president joked that he thought Bloomberg would be done dumping money into Democratic politics after putting $1 billion into a failed presidential bid in the 2020 cycle. "I thought Mini Mike was through with Democrat politics after spending almost 2 Billion Dollars, and then giving the worst and most inept Debate Performance in the history of Presidential Politics. Pocahontas ended his political career on first question, OVER! Save NYC instead," Trump tweeted Sunday morning. "In the highly competitive world of high tech, how come nobody has ever challenged Mini Mike Bloomberg and his very average, & supposedly outdated, 'stuff' that he sells to so many? Did he use his position as Mayor of New York to create what is now a monopoly? Just askin’?" Trump added in a separate tweet, jabbing Bloomberg. I thought Mini Mike was through with Democrat politics after spending almost...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A long weekend is on the horizon, but it turns out many Americans plan to labor this Labor Day. According to vacation rental engine HomeToGo, 46% of people surveyed are planning an overnight getaway for the weekend. But 74% of them plan to work remotely or attend online classes for at least part of their vacation.
    Despite warnings from fiscal analysts and Republicans that the COVID-19 pandemic is stretching financial resources, Gov. Roy Cooper's fiscal 2021 amended budget proposal includes $2,000 in bonuses for teachers and principals as well as bonuses for school support staff and higher education employees. About $85 million of that $360 million in bonus payments would be taken directly from the state's private school voucher fund, which provides scholarships to lower-income students to attend private schools. "The budget I propose takes on the challenges of today while building for the promise of tomorrow," Cooper said. "We have to rise to the occasion of this pandemic response now and focus on ways to emerge from this crisis stronger than before." The plan immediately received backlash from Senate Republicans, who have been at odds with Cooper over state spending. Sen. Deanna Ballard, R-Watauga, who co-chairs the Senate Education Committee, said Cooper's plan to appropriate unused funds from the private school voucher program reduces the chances for lower-income children to receive a better education. "Under the governor's 'equity' plan, only...
    Brussels has proposed this Wednesday use 46% of the total economic Recovery Fund already in 2021, of which 211,000 million would be direct transfers and 133,000 million through loans to be repaid. The conditions are not yet agreed and a new meeting of the prime ministers of 27 has been set for July 17 to close the agreement. In addition, the European Commission has presented its draft for next year’s Community budget, which would amount to 166.7 billion euros and to which should be added the part corresponding to the reconstruction plan. These are still proposals that depend on the final agreement reached by the heads of state and government of the EU and the European Parliament, both with respect to the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2021-2027 and for the recovery fund itself. In addition to the funds already distributed in 2021, the Brussels proposal also plans to use some 42.4 billion in 2021 from the extraordinary allocation for Cohesion Policy (called React-EU) and almost 8 billion from the fund to support climate transition in the regions. more dependent...
    Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.Billionaire entrepreneur and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban told "Hannity" Thursday that the issuing of pre-loaded, federally funded, "use it or lose it" debit cards is the best way to spur consumer demand and boost the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. "I'm not saying we don't reopen but the question is -- and I will even put the hit on the Democrats -- when the [Paycheck Protection Program] was initiated, [it was a] great plan, but the key to make it work was getting the money in the hands of businesses immediately," Cuban told host Sean Hannity. Cuban explained that delays in passing and enacting the CARES Act in March that allowed Democrats to secure funding for "museums" and other entities meant that companies who may have needed to "protect paychecks" no longer had a payroll to protect. "Once small businesses laid people off, that really defeated the purpose of the payroll protection program," Cuban said. "That now leaves small businesses in a state of suspended animation." The "Shark Tank" star claimed that more than two-thirds of laid-off workers...
12