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    New York : In Thailand, a concert piano player performs a variety of classical compositions for a rather particular audience. Since 2011, British artist Paul Barton plays pieces by great composers like Beethoven, Chopin and Schumann for rescued elephants who live in an animal sanctuary. 10 years ago, Barton decided to take his piano outdoors and place it in the middle of nature at the Kanchanaburi Animal Retreat. There, the musician performs classical works for the elephants from the Elephants World institution, an NGO that rehabilitates them after being damaged by the unhealthy jobs they had to do in the timber industry, banned in 1989. Most of them tend to be old and some even went blind. The soloist’s most recent spectator was Mongkol, an old male elephant rescued from a life in captivity transporting trees for a lumber company. “We noticed that Mongkol was walking along the river. We brought the piano, he stopped and I played some classical pieces, ”Barton explained of his interaction with the creature. Over the years, Barton created a deep connection...
    FORGET the rocking-chair and slippers – today’s grandparents are more likely to be rocking out to Guns N’ Roses and going to the gym. A study of 2,000 grandparents found six in 10 remember the ‘Swinging 60s’, with 43 per cent admitting they try to live their life as they did then. 2Today’s grandparents are more likely to be rocking out to Guns N’ Roses and going to the gymCredit: Getty Images - Getty And for the ‘golden oldies’ weaned on rock throughout the 60s and 70s, age is definitely not mellowing their musical tastes. Heavy rock acts like Deep Purple, AC/DC and Guns N’ Roses trampled over easy listening and pop acts like Jess Glynne when it came to the most popular artists. It also emerged more than half believe they don’t follow any grandparent ‘stereotypes’, with 45 per cent claiming they have never felt as carefree as they do now. Verity Kick from Oak Tree Mobility, which commissioned the research, said: “Just because you’re older doesn’t mean you can’t do certain things, as the research clearly shows. 2Four...
    Legendary Indian classical musician and Padma Vibhushan awardee Ustad Ghulam Mustafa Khan who passed away at his Mumbai residence on Sunday afternoon has been laid to rest with full state honors on Sunday evening. The celebrated musician breathed his last breath at 12:37 pm today and has been laid to rest with full state honors. Ghulam Mustafa Khan No More: From AR Rahman to Salim Merchant, Celebs Pay Tribute to the Legendary Musician Khan was an Indian classical musician in the Hindustani classical music tradition, belonging to the Rampur-Sahaswan Gharana. The mortal remains of the noted musician were buried at Santacruz Kabrastan in the evening where his last rites were performed. Ustad Ghulam Mustafa Khan Dies At 89: Lata Mangeshkar Offers Condolences On The Legendary Musician’s Demise Born on March 3, 1931, in Badaun, Uttar Pradesh, Khan was the eldest son in a family of four brothers and three sisters. A receiver of several accolades including the Padma Shri in 1991, followed by Padma Bhushan in 2006 and Padma Vibhushan in 2018. Khan had earlier suffered from a brain stroke...
    That string-laden sweetness that sets the stage for some 19th century romancing in the first episode of “Bridgerton” — Netflix’s hot new period drama — isn’t Vivaldi. (That comes later in the season.) Instead, that familiar-sounding instrumental is a classical spin on “Thank U, Next,” Ariana Grande’s 2018 smash. It plays as courting season begins for heroine Daphne Bridgerton (Phoebe Dynevor) and other high-society debutantes, all trying to lock down a suitable suitor in Regency era London.  “It just seemed like a fun, cheeky way to score that scene,” said music supervisor Alexandra Patsavas, who has curated soundtracks for other Shonda Rhimes hit shows such as “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Scandal.”  “Of course, you hear the lyrics in your head. The lyrics are being whispered subliminally.” “Thank U, Next” isn’t the only modern pop song that gets DeLorean’d on “Bridgerton.” Maroon 5’s “Girls Like You,” Shawn Mendes’ “In My Blood” and Billie Eilish’s “Bad Guy” also get corseted up for your sonic pleasure. The versions you hear on-screen — which are also featured on the new EP “Bridgerton: Covers From the...
    More On: netflix Netflix hit ‘Bridgerton’ reveals that romance novels sparkle on-screen ‘Bridgerton’ spoon stirs fans into a sexy Instagram frenzy ‘Tiger King’ star’s dad reportedly dead from coronavirus Netflix’s ‘Surviving Death’ explores afterlife and near-death experiences That string-laden sweetness that sets the stage for some 19th century romancing in the first episode of “Bridgerton” — Netflix’s hot new period drama — isn’t Vivaldi. (That comes later in the season.) Instead, that familiar-sounding instrumental is a classical spin on “Thank U, Next,” Ariana Grande’s 2018 smash. It plays as courting season begins for heroine Daphne Bridgerton (Phoebe Dynevor) and other high-society debutantes, all trying to lock down a suitable suitor in Regency era London.  “It just seemed like a fun, cheeky way to score that scene,” said music supervisor Alexandra Patsavas, who has curated soundtracks for other Shonda Rhimes hit shows such as “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Scandal.”  “Of course, you hear the lyrics in your head. The lyrics are being whispered subliminally.” “Thank U, Next” isn’t the only modern pop song that gets DeLorean’d on “Bridgerton.” Maroon 5’s “Girls...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Claude Bolling, the French pianist, composer and arranger who attained a worldwide following through his melodic blend of jazz and classical influences and stayed on the Billboard classical charts for more than a decade with his 1975 album “Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano,” has died. Bolling's representatives announced on his website that he died Tuesday in Garches, France, at age 90. A cause of death was not provided. A lifelong admirer of Duke Ellington, the Cannes native was a professional musician by his teens and over the following decades would perform with everyone from Lionel Hampton to Yo-Yo Ma. He arranged music for Brigitte Bardot and Juliette Greco among others, wrote soundtracks for hundreds of French film and television productions and his compositions could be heard on such American releases as “The Holiday” and “Joker.” Bolling's three Grammy nominations included one for best chamber music for “Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano,” a collaboration with flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal which featured the playful “Baroque and Blue” and the more reflective “Irlandaise" and sold more than 1...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Claude Bolling, the French pianist, composer and arranger who attained a worldwide following through his melodic blend of jazz and classical influences and stayed on the Billboard classical charts for more than a decade with his 1975 album “Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano,” has died. Bolling’s representatives announced on his website that he died Tuesday in Garches, France, at age 90. A cause of death was not provided. A lifelong admirer of Duke Ellington, the Cannes native was a professional musician by his teens and over the following decades would perform with everyone from Lionel Hampton to Yo-Yo Ma. He arranged music for Brigitte Bardot and Juliette Greco among others, wrote soundtracks for hundreds of French film and television productions and his compositions could be heard on such American releases as “The Holiday” and “Joker.” Bolling’s three Grammy nominations included one for best chamber music for “Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano,” a collaboration with flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal which featured the playful “Baroque and Blue” and the more reflective “Irlandaise” and sold more...
    Daphne Bridgerton and Simon Basset on "Bridgerton." LIAM DANIEL/NETFLIX Netflix's "Bridgerton," a historical romance series set in Regency England, incorporates classical covers of modern day hits. Kris Bower, the series' composer, featured renditions of songs by Ariana Grande, Taylor Swift, Shawn Mendes, Maroon 5, Billie Eilish, and Celeste in the show's score.  Many fans were surprised by the covers and applauded the touch of modernity. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Netflix's "Bridgerton" takes place in early 19th century England, so viewers can expect plenty of the pianoforte, harp, and string quartets typical of period pieces set in the era.  However, there are several songs in the historical drama series that may sound familiar even to those who have never watched a single Jane Austen adaptation. The creators incorporated classical covers of modern-day pop music throughout the first season of the Shondaland production. For example, Ariana Grande's "Thank U, Next" plays at the first ball of the season in the premiere, and Taylor Swift's "Wildest Dreams" is in the background of Simon Basset (Regé-Jean Page) and Daphne...
    Gracias in Spanish means thank you. With the pandemic looming over this year's holiday season, the Gracias Choir has decided to bring Christmas to your home with the all-new Gracias Christmas Concert!The 2020 performance of the Christmas Cantata by the Gracias Choir can be seen on ABC7 on Sunday, Dec. 20th, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. For a list of the full television schedule from across the country, visit: christmascantata.usThe Christmas Cantata is a performance that combines opera, musical, and choral stages in a way that the entire family can enjoy. The Choir presents a special time where one can end the year by meditating on the true meaning of Christmas with loved ones while listening to beautiful carols. 13 different cities in the United States have even designated a "Christmas Cantata Day." The performance is receiving love and support from people all over the world.The Gracias Choir was founded in 2000 and has relentlessly pursued excellence in artistry of classical music, as well as emotional purification, education, and international fellowship through classical music. It was incorporated in 2013.Since then,...
    Music lovers have resigned themselves to a long wait for in-person performances this year. But virtual music needn’t be second best. Here are some streamed and recorded holiday events suitable for at-home enjoyment, gift-giving, and making the season bright. Shows to Stream Yo-Yo Ma — “Songs of Comfort and Hope”: Since October, Cal Performances has been streaming top-quality concerts, recitals, theater events and conversations. The parade of hits continues with superstar cellist Yo-Yo Ma, appearing with pianist Kathryn Stott in “Songs of Comfort and Hope.” Drawn from the duo’s upcoming Sony Classical release, the program includes Robert Schumann’s “Five Pieces in Folk Style” and traditional songs arranged by Benjamin Britten and Caroline Shaw. It’s available through Dec. 12. Also this month: “Cal Performances at Home” appearances by Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes, playing Mozart, Beethoven, and Janacek (Dec. 3), and the Dover Quartet, in a program of Haydn, Ligeti, and Dvorak (Dec. 10). Details: $5-$110; 510-642-9988, www.calperformances.org. S.F. Opera: You might want to get out your gowns and tuxes when San Francisco Opera presents “Celebrating the Voices of San Francisco...
    An 83-year-old man who was jailed in the UK for playing classical music too loudly has died behind bars, according to authorities. Ian Trainer was locked up in June for continuing to blare the Classic FM station at his home in Liverpool — and repeatedly breaking a restraining order barring him from blasting the tunes, according to the Liverpool Echo. He died in a hospital Monday last week while in custody, the UK’s Ministry of Justice confirmed to the local paper, without giving a cause of death. Trainer’s neighbor, Thomas Michael Thompson, told a judge that he suffered “noise pollution” that was “unbelievable at times,” complaining, “It’s not just one day of the week, it’s every day of the week.” The octogenarian said he couldn’t use headphones because of a medical condition that “irritated his ears” and told one arresting officer, “I like playing music at a level I enjoy.” Trainer was initially jailed in February — then thrown behind bars again four months later for violating the order upon release. He was banned from playing “any audio at a...
    By MESFIN FEKADU, AP Music Writer NEW YORK (AP) — The first batch of nominees for the 2021 Grammy Awards were revealed during a livestream held Tuesday by the Recording Academy's interim president and CEO Harvey Mason Jr. Mason Jr. kicked off the hourlong event announcing the nominees for non-classical best engineered album and non-classical producer of the year, which include Jack Antonoff, Dan Auerbach, Dave Cobb, Flying Lotus and Andrew Watt. Last year, Billie Eilish's brother Finneas, who produces her music and co-writes her songs with her, won the honor. Mason Jr. also announced nominees for best remixed recording, classical best engineered Album and classical producer of the year. The 2021 Grammy Awards, to be hosted by Emmy-winner Trevor Noah, will air live on Jan. 31. Artists are helping to announce the nominations in the 83 categories Tuesday, including pop singer Dua Lipa, English singer-songwriter Imogen Heap, country performer Mickey Guyton, Christian singer Lauren Daigle, Mexican singer-songwriter Pepe Aguilar, Nigerian Afropop singer Yemi Alade and classical violinist Nicola Benedetti. Gayle King and Sharon Osbourne will also announce nominees. Copyright...
    HYDE PARK — Four decades of Chicago’s contributions to classical music history, painstakingly recorded and archived by a Hyde Park husband and wife, will be preserved and catalogued by the Library of Congress. The Richard and Judith Mintel Archive of Recordings contains nearly 350 hours of classical music recorded from 1974-2014, of which samples are available online. The full digital archive contains nearly 250 gigabytes of data, while the physical archive consists of about 275 CDs. The collection arrived Nov. 6 at the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Culpeper, Virginia, and it will be processed and preserved in coming months. A copy of the archive was donated to Northwestern University in fall 2017, where CDs featuring the recordings can be listened to on-site or checked out at the Beinen School of Music Library. Another copy was made and donated to Chicago’s fine arts radio station WFMT in September 2019. Judith Mintel pitched her collection to archivists and engineers with the Library of Congress at a 2018 conference. A lawyer and organizer with the Hyde Park Refugee Project, Mintel has...
    With much of the classical music industry shuttered by the novel coronavirus pandemic, one of the leading management agencies has been acquired by an unusual buyer in an unconventional transaction. The San Francisco Conservatory of Music announced Tuesday that it had purchased Opus 3 Artists, which represents about 250 musicians and attractions, a group that includes conductors Daniel Barenboim, James Conlon, Christoph Eschenbach and cellist Yo-Yo Ma. David Stull, president of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, would not reveal the monetary details of purchasing the management agency. Opus 3 president David Foster said the coronavirus pandemic — which brought live performances to a halt in March — led the agency to evaluate the future. “As the COVID thing hit and we had to reduce our staff,” Foster said, “it became clear we were going to have much reduced income. So the question is then, what do you do?” Foster said he received inquiries about selling. "There were approaches from commercial entities and then David Stull called,” he said, “and the more I thought about it, the more interesting...
    By RONALD BLUM, Associated Press With much of the classical music industry shuttered by the novel coronavirus pandemic, one of the leading management agencies has been acquired by an unusual buyer in an unconventional transaction. The San Francisco Conservatory of Music announced Tuesday that it had purchased Opus 3 Artists, which represents about 250 musicians and attractions, a group that includes conductors Daniel Barenboim, James Conlon, Christoph Eschenbach and cellist Yo-Yo Ma. David Stull, president of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, would not reveal the monetary details of purchasing the management agency. Opus 3 president David Foster said the coronavirus pandemic — which brought live performances to a halt in March — led the agency to evaluate the future. “As the COVID thing hit and we had to reduce our staff,” Foster said, “it became clear we were going to have much reduced income. So the question is then, what do you do?” Foster said he received inquiries about selling. "There were approaches from commercial entities and then David Stull called,” he said, “and the more I thought about...
    BEIJING (AP) — China is holding its first classical music festival since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, featuring musicians from the former epicenter of Wuhan in an attempt to aid in the psychological and emotional healing process. Zou Ye, a composer from the central Chinese city where the virus was first detected late last year, said that Saturday night’s concert is part of an effort to work through frustration and helplessness on the way toward love and tolerance and, hopefully, some meaning to what he calls “nature’s tremendous revenge.” Musicians from the Wuhan Philharmonic Orchestra will present a choral symphony “To 2020” dedicated to the victims of COVID-19, co-written by Zou and two partners. More than 11 million people in Wuhan and its surrounding area underwent a draconian 76-day lockdown at the start of the pandemic. The city accounts for 3,869 of China's 4,634 deaths from the virus and the bulk of its more than 85,000 cases. The end of the lockdown on April 8 was seen as a key turning point in China's battle against the virus, which...
    BEIJING (AP) — China is holding its first classical music festival since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, featuring musicians from the former epicenter of Wuhan in an attempt to aid in the psychological and emotional healing process. Zou Ye, a composer from the central Chinese city where the virus was first detected late last year, said that Saturday night’s concert is part of an effort to work through frustration and helplessness on the way toward love and tolerance and, hopefully, some meaning to what he calls “nature’s tremendous revenge.” Musicians from the Wuhan Philharmonic Orchestra will present a choral symphony “To 2020” dedicated to the victims of COVID-19, co-written by Zou and two partners. More than 11 million people in Wuhan and its surrounding area underwent a draconian 76-day lockdown at the start of the pandemic. The city accounts for 3,869 of China’s 4,634 deaths from the virus and the bulk of its more than 85,000 cases. The end of the lockdown on April 8 was seen as a key turning point in China’s battle...
    BEIJING – China is holding its first classical music festival since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, featuring musicians from the former epicenter of Wuhan in an attempt to aid in the psychological and emotional healing process. Zou Ye, a composer from the central Chinese city where the virus was first detected late last year, said that Saturday night’s concert is part of an effort to work through frustration and helplessness on the way toward love and tolerance and, hopefully, some meaning to what he calls “nature’s tremendous revenge.” Musicians from the Wuhan Philharmonic Orchestra will present a choral symphony “To 2020” dedicated to the victims of COVID-19, co-written by Zou and two partners. More than 11 million people in Wuhan and its surrounding area underwent a draconian 76-day lockdown at the start of the pandemic. The city accounts for 3,869 of China's 4,634 deaths from the virus and the bulk of its more than 85,000 cases. The end of the lockdown on April 8 was seen as a key turning point in China's battle against...
              NASHVILLE, Tennessee – What happens when you take a person who was raised in a bluegrass family and give him a degree in jazz/classical guitar? Jordan Tice, a musician’s musician, is what you get. Tice grew up in Annapolis, Maryland where both of his parents played bluegrass. His mother played fiddle and his dad played banjo and they were involved with the local bluegrass scene. Tice picked up the guitar early on listening and playing, jazz, blues, and rock. He cites the Allman Brothers and Jimi Hendrix as two big influences. He confirmed, “Bluegrass was something my parents did. It was not ‘cool’ so I resisted it.” Eventually, Tice succumbed to the bluegrass bug-bite, and as he said, “I got way into it.” In college, he studied classical and jazz guitar along with classical composition. This is what makes Tice’s music a little unusual compared to the regular bluegrass you normally hear. After studying a very diverse variety of music, the musician moved to Boston and started playing bluegrass professionally where he met...
    (CNN)Iranians around the world flooded their social media accounts with tributes, songs and poetry dedicated to legendary Iranian singer and composer Mohammad-Reza Shajarian, who died from complications due to a long standing battle with kidney cancer on Thursday. "Our nightingale has flown to another tree," Iranian-American U.S. based musician Farid Shafinury said about Shajarian's passing in an Instagram post. Video posted to Twitter shows hundreds of fans gathered in front of Jam Hospital in Tehran where Shajarian was hospitalized earlier this week, defying a partial lockdown order imposed on Tehran after it was reported that Iran had recorded the highest daily coronavirus count since the start of the pandemic. Iranian women hold candles as they gather in front of the Jam hospital in central Tehran.Many held cellphones over their heads as the crowd sang Shajarian's songs. Shajarian's son Homayoun, also a classical singer, emerged from the hospital Thursday night and addressed fans, saying that his father will be buried next to revered 9th century Persian poet Ferdowsi. Read More"When they asked me where my father deserved to be buried...
    Last weekend was a big opening weekend for classical music in the Twin Cities. On Friday, the Minnesota Orchestra played their season premiere in Orchestra Hall. On Saturday, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra played theirs at the Ordway Concert Hall. On Sunday afternoon, the great tenor Lawrence Brownlee opened the Schubert Club’s International Artist Series, also at the Concert Hall, in recital with pianist Myra Huang. All the concerts were performed live at the venues where they were originally scheduled to take place. All the audiences stayed home, watching livestreams on what’s now blanket-termed our “devices”: computers, laptops, tablets, smart TVs. We did not dress up. We did not walk through the door to Orchestra Hall or the Ordway, make our way through a crowd, greet friends, maybe order drinks for intermission, show our tickets to ushers, find our seats, page through printed programs and look around to see who else was there. We did not share chair arms with strangers. We did not experience the proximity of a thousand other people, or two thousand, the excitement of the lights...
    Despite a smattering of live events returning in a limited capacity, those who once made a living in Denver's performing arts and music industries are still suffering, and Denver Arts & Venues is offering another round of support from federal funds in an attempt to help out. The city, which received $126.8 million in Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act funding, will be granting $700,000 of that CARES Act money to Denver's flailing independent performing arts and music venues, and around $300,000 to individual artists in a second round of distributions. “The COVID pandemic has had a devastating impact on our creative arts community and the venues and employees who support it,” notes Mayor Michael B. Hancock in a statement. “These phase two funds will help provide some relief until we are all able to once again safely enjoy the work of the talented artists who are the foundation of Denver’s rich, creative culture.”Related Stories This Is Not an Arts & Venues Obituary, but We're in Mourning Denver Arts & Venues Slashes Budget, Closes Venues and Furloughs Staff...
    With live, in-person performances still extremely limited, classical music lovers can be grateful for the wealth of streamed events and recordings coming our way. The virtual fall season goes into full swing this month, and here’s a look at some of the offerings you won’t want to miss. “At Home” delivery: Cal Performances launches its new At Home series Oct. 1 with top-quality streams from around the world. It’s a must-see lineup of concerts, recitals, talks and more; digital “watch parties” are included with each event. The series is set to run through Jan. 14, with additional programs still to be announced. Here’s what’s coming in October. Oct. 1: The series begins with violinist Tessa Clark, a Naumburg Award and Avery Fisher Career Grant winner, joined by pianist Andrew Armstrong in a live recital performance from New York’s Merkin Hall. The program features works by Bartók, Ysaÿe, Schubert, Grieg, and Ravel. Oct. 6: A live-streamed conversation with New Yorker critic Alex Ross, author of “The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century,” and composer John Adams, creator of operas...
    A musician discovered her kitten's love for her classical music after she started putting the cat in a bum bag while she practiced playing the violin.  Esther Abrami, a classical violinist from France, was having trouble playing music as her cat Rémila does not like being left alone on the floor.  But the classical musician found an ingenious way to stop her cat's interruptions - by putting the kitten in a bum bag while she plays.  The tiny kitten looks transfixed as Ms Abrami plays melodic classical music, footage taken by the cat lover shows. Esther Abrami, a classical violinist from France, started putting her rescue kitten Rémila in a bum bag while she practices her music to stop the cat from crying out In the video, Rémila falls fast asleep safely tucked inside the bag as Ms Abrami plays Apres Un Reve by Gabriel Faure on the violin. Rémila seems to have taken advice from the piece of music by the French composer - which is all about sleeping peacefully and dreaming. Rémila was abandoned but was rescued by cat shelter...
    Think some things are so beloved and essential to Western civilization they can’t be canceled? Think again. If there’s anything we should have learned from months of “mostly peaceful” Black Lives Matter street protests, statue toppling and online mobs seeking to silence anyone who dissents against leftist narratives about “racism,” it’s that no one, living or dead, is safe from the attentions of woke fascists. Even Ludwig van Beethoven. Beethoven’s work is not only at the core of the standard repertory of classical music; some of his most popular works have also become part of popular culture, their melodies recognizable even to those who’ve never heard an orchestral concert. For the last 200 years, Beethoven’s compositions have also been symbols of the struggle for freedom against tyranny. The “Ode to Joy” from the conclusion to his Ninth Symphony remains the definitive anthem of universal brotherhood. It is no coincidence that the opening notes of his Fifth Symphony — whose rhythmic pattern duplicates the Morse Code notation for the letter “V” as in “V for Victory” — were used by the...
    Devoid of an indoor chamber as venue amid the pandemic, the Brooklyn Chamber Orchestra has chosen the Brooklyn Heights Promenade as the outdoor space for public performances this fall. “All performing arts organizations are chomping at the bit to return to live audiences,” said Melody English, the general director of the Brooklyn Chamber Orchestra. Our ‘Unchambered’ series is a short-term way to share our love for classical music with the community in the interim.” The next performance takes place Sunday, September 20 at Fulton Ferry Landing.
    Has the 19th-century German composer Ludwig van Beethoven become a modern symbol of "exclusion and elitism" for rich, white men? In an article published by Vox on Tuesday that quoted New York Philharmonic clarinetist Anthony McGill, writers Nate Sloan and Charlie Harding argued that the work has been propped up by white, wealthy men, whose embrace of the musical composition stood as a symbol of "their superiority and importance." "For others — women, LGBTQ+ people, people of color — Beethoven’s symphony is predominantly a reminder of classical music’s history of exclusion and elitism," Sloan and Harding wrote. The writers suggested that because Beethoven was white and most other classical musicians are white, classical music has become a form of "exclusion, elitism, and gatekeeping" for black and brown people. “As you perpetuate the idea that the giants of the music all look the same, it conveys to the other that there’s not a stake in that music for them,” classical music critic James Bennett II told Vox. McGill struck a more measured tone, suggesting that an overemphasis on Beethoven's...
    VIDEO3:3603:36Lang Lang on concerns for current U.S. and China relationsThe CNBC Conversation The globally-acclaimed pianist Lang Lang has told CNBC that he's very worried about the current relationship between China and the U.S., and is planning a virtual concert in December to try and help bring the countries together. "I really worry about the U.S.-China relationship. I really hope that … they will go back to the normal speech and the normal way of communication. I really worry about the current situation," he said.  Lang, who was born in Shenyang, China, was speaking to CNBC from Bejing about the release of his new album, a recording of Bach's "Goldberg Variations," considered to be one of the most challenging pieces ever written for the piano. He recorded both a live and studio version of the piece in Germany just before the global lockdown.  His comments come as he plans a virtual concert which will include input from U.S. schools that he is working with as part of The Lang Lang International Music Foundation. He started the foundation in 2008 to champion...
    SAN ANTONIO – To celebrate the Mission San Jose Tricentennial, the 2020 World Heritage Festival and Agarita join forces to present a magical virtual experience of classical music. The performance will be livestreamed from the Mission San Jose Church on Sept. 11. The ensemble recorded the session Thursday. Copyright 2020 by KSAT - All rights reserved.
    There actually can be too much of a good thing. For many doughnut enthusiasts, there’s nothing better than a freshly glazed Krispy Kreme doughnut, hot out of the fryer. But what would happen if a doughnut was put through the glazer a few extra times? And what if a doughnut was put through the glazer 25 times? @jackpaul_jones I think a bite of this would kill you .. @jacobsherlin ##JustVisiting ##stepintolove ##LittleVoice ##donuts ##work ##food ##fyp ##friends ##krispykreme ♬ Classical Music - Classical Music Apparently, one Krispy Kreme worker decided to find out. Jack Jones posted a video to TikTok that shows an Orignal Glazed doughnut being glazed over and over again. He then followed up this video with another, in which he and his friends attempt to eat the resulting pile of frosting (with a small amount of doughnut underneath). KRISPY KREME LOCATION IN NORTH CAROLINA TO FEATURE 24-HOUR DOUGHNUT VENDING MACHINE In the first video, Jones explained that it was a slow day at work, so he and his coworkers decided to experiment. Apparently, the shift manager was skeptical,...
    OTT platforms have been keeping the audience bound in their homes due to COVID-19 highly entertained. While thrillers have taken centrestage with the likes of Undekhi, Raat Akeli Hai, Patal Lok and others, international content is also getting ravenously consumed. But Bandis Bandits, streaming on Amazon Prime Video, is definitely a refreshing change. It’s a series that uses Indian classical music as its premise while everything else is weaved around it. We don’t know when was the last time, we watched something that had classical music at the core. Many raved about the show and Amit Mistry is one who was showered with praises for his role. Bandish Bandits Season 1 Review: Ritwik Bhowmik, Shreya Chaudhry’s Musical Saga Gets Its Tune Right With Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s Brilliant Soundtrack and Amazing Supporting Cast Mistry plays Radhe’s uncle who blends pathos with humour so perfectly that it’s instantly likable. Mistry told us he is spending his lockdown days with Sangeet sadhana and waiting to go back on sets. He also speaks about how classical music should be taught in schools. You shot for...
    (CNN)Indian classical vocalist Pandit Jasraj died of cardiac arrest Monday in his New Jersey home, according to the Press Trust of India, which cited his daughter. CNN has also reached out to his family. He was 90.Pandit Jasraj's musical career spanned eight decades across continents. He received several prestigious awards, including the Padma Vibhushan, India's second-highest civilian honor, as well as Padma Bhushan and Padma Shri awards. He was in the United States when the coronavirus lockdown was enforced in India and decided to stay."With profound grief we inform that Sangeet Martand Pandit Jasraj ji breathed his last this morning at 5.15 EST due to a cardiac arrest at his home in New Jersey, USA," the news agency quoted a statement from his family."May Lord Krishna welcome him lovingly through the doors of heaven, where Pandit ji will now sing Om Namo Bhagwate Vasudevaya exclusively just for his beloved Lord. We pray that his soul rests in eternal musical peace. Thank you for your thoughts and prayers, Pandit Jasraj ji's family, and the students of Mewati Gharana," it added, referring...
    New Delhi, August 17: Indian classical music maestro Pandit Jasraj breathed his last on Monday in New York. He was 90 years old.  As soon as new of Pandit Jasraj’s demise surfaced, condolence messages started pouring in across the political divide. Cutting across the party lines, political leaders, including Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Rajasthan Chief Minister expressed grief over the demise of Pandit Jasraj. President Ram Nath Kovind also expressed his condolences. Pandit Jasraj, Indian Classical Vocalist, Dies in New York at 90. Pandit Jasraj’s career spanned over 80 years. He was a recipient of many prestigious awards, including Padma Shri, Padma Bhushan and Padma Vibhushan. The Indian classical vocalist was born on January 30, 1930, in Hisar district of Haryana. Atal Bihari Vajpayee Called Me Rasraj, Says Pandit Jasraj. Here Are Some Of The Political Reactions: President Ram Nath Kovind in a tweet said, “Music legend and unparalleled classical vocalist Pandit Jasraj’s passing makes me sad. Spanning a distinguished career of over 8 decades, Pandit Jasraj, a Padma Vibhushan recipient, enthralled people with soulful renditions. Condolence to his...
    New York, August 17: Indian classical vocalist Pandit Jasraj died on Monday in New York. He was 90 years old.  Pandit Jasraj’s career spanned over 80 years.  He belonged to Mewati Gharana. He was a recipient of many prestigious awards, including Padma Shri, Padma Bhushan and Padma Vibhushan. Atal Bihari Vajpayee Called Me Rasraj, Says Pandit Jasraj. The Indian music maestro was born on January 30, 1930, in Hisar district of Haryana. He was initiated into vocal music by his father, and later trained as a tabla accompanist under his elder brother. Tweet by ANI: Padma Vibhushan Pandit Jasraj passes away in New Jersey, US at the age of 90 pic.twitter.com/NlJFJzhF7W — ANI (@ANI) August 17, 2020 Pandit Jasraj began training as a vocalist at the age of 14. He had also worked to popularise semi-classical musical styles, such as Haveli Sangeet. (The above story first appeared on News Brig on Aug 17, 2020 06:46 PM IST. For more news and updates on politics, world, sports, entertainment and lifestyle, log on to our website...
    A friend notes that at his Long Island high school, where most of the top students were Jews, several of them applied to Harvard as teens. The ones with Jewish-sounding surnames did not get in. My friend, who is Jewish but whose last name is Smith (no relation to me), got in. So did several others with non-Jewish-sounding surnames. Talking about race is a bore and a chore because it’s cloaked in so much euphemism and misdirection, not to mention hair-trigger sensitivity and hysterical cries that “You’re racist,” but everyone knows Yale, Harvard and all of the other fancy private colleges discriminate heavily against Asians and Jews in favor of blacks and Latinos. They brag about it, via euphemisms. Non-Jewish whites are somewhere in the middle; working-class whites are all but shut out, but lots of white children of elites are admitted to these schools, and always have been. A Justice Department finding released this week merely restated the obvious, then did something not-so-obvious: It said this practice is wrong. It ordered Yale to stop discriminating on the basis of...
    LOS ANGELES -- Candlelight is a unique series of magical dining experiences! Surrounded by sounds of classical music under the stars, guests enjoy a special night out. Set in an intimate atmosphere at different venues around the world, Candlelight is a mini escape amid the on-going pandemic - where social distancing is practiced and guests are expected to follow strict safety guidelines - yet a wonderful, romantic night out is made possible with good food and music."You can just get lost for a second. That's what I hope people walk away with," said Benjamin Simon, project manager with Fever.The original idea was to make classical music more accessible. It's usually hosted in historic churches and grand venues, but since the onset of COVID-19, Candlelight shifted to outdoor, open-air venues where dinner is a focal point. Music is played, but it's not a concert."It was beautiful. The ambiance was everything. The music was wonderful," said Stacey Davis, a Los Angeles resident.For more information click HERE.
    Blending classical music with Bollywood film music was a common trend back in the day. It adds a flavour of distinct Indianness to every song as the nuances of Indian classical music are simply fascinating. But it is definitely heartwarming to see people taking to Bandish Bandits‘ music in a big way. A classical, modern-pop, traditional folk, and fusion album of BB has taken the internet by storm. While Shankar-Ehsaan Loy is getting a lot of thumbs up for the composition, Shivam Mahadevan is garnering acclaim for his vocals. A few of the songs are unlike anything you have listened to in recent times and that makes it such an unusual hear. Bandish Bandits Season 1 Review: Ritwik Bhowmik, Shreya Chaudhry’s Musical Saga Gets Its Tune Right With Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s Brilliant Soundtrack and Amazing Supporting Cast Many of the listeners have been bowled over by many of the songs. There are some who are wondering why is this album not becoming a famous one. But if they keep talking about the songs, this album will definitely get a lot of likes...
    A new show is up for the viewers to binge watch during lockdown. Amazon Prime has announced a new series titled as Bandish Bandits that revolves around the music, guru and a love story. The trailer of the same was released by the makers and it looks quite interesting. The story has two singers dedicated to their respective genres aka rock and classical and how their career and love life takes shape in the journey. Breathe Into the Shadows Review: Amit Sadh Steals the Show From Abhishek Bachchan in This Engaging but Uneven Thriller Series. The cast includes Naseeruddin Shah, Atul Kulkarni, Shreya Chaudhry, Ritwik Bhowmik, Amit Mistry, Sheeba Chaddha, Rajesh Tailang, Kunaal Roy Kapur, Rahul Kumar in the key roles. In the trailer, it is shown that a girl who specializes in Rock form falls in love with a shy guy who is dedicated to Indian classical form. However, things turn ugly when they decide to collaborate musically and the guy decides to go against the rules of his Guru who taught him classical music. There is also...
    For Bay Area music lovers, this is the time of year to make plans for summer festivals. In accordance with this year’s Covid restrictions, the usual formats have been abandoned. But the South Bay’s Music@Menlo and Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music are going forward, and both have announced attractive virtual seasons. Music@Menlo, the music festival and institute founded and directed by cellist David Finckel and pianist Wu Han, has been presenting top artists and emerging talent in a congenial atmosphere since 2003. The festival’s planned 2020 installment, titled “Haydn Connections,” has been postponed to 2021. In its place, Music@Menlo is taking the season into the digital domain with a new title and a new approach. “Intermezzo,” running July 17-August 8, is its aptly named moniker. Finckel and Wu Han say this year is a true intermezzo — the Italian term for music played between larger parts of a performance — and the idea is to create a virtual bridge between past seasons and what they hope will be next year’s full return. As such, “Intermezzo” will include live-streamed performances, new...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – For 28 years, the Mainly Mozart Festival, presented by the Miami Chamber Music Society, has been bringing first-rate classical music performances to South Florida audiences in Coral Gables. The festival was scheduled to start up again for their season in May. Artistic Director Marina Radiushina told CBS4’s Lisa Petrillo by mid-March they knew concerts weren’t going to happen because of COVID-19. “We were really fortunate to have a fantastic partner with the University Miami Libraries,” she said. “Together we came together and decided that basically we were going to create seven programs that were going to go live at the same time that the regular mainly Mozart concerts would have.” The concerts were live in May and June, with curated broadcasts now available online. The concerts feature a top notch lineup of artists in performance and conversation, sharing behind-the-scenes insights, excerpts from past performances and live musical moments. “We contacted musicians all around the world, first-rate musicians out there, and we’re very fortunate to secure a musicians for the seven programs and this is how the whole...
    TikTokers are going viral documenting themselves cleaning, building, and renovating around the house. One TikToker, @Squiglez22, picked up over 70 million views cleaning her Grandmother's pool. Fans of the videos are obsessed, Kacyee Stroh of the High School musical series even commented "I am committed to this series!" TikTokers behind the oddly satisfying videos are thrilled, but surprised their videos are getting so much attention.Evan Malone, a Professor of Art and Film Philosophy explained to Insider why people have become obsessed with watching the ordinary.Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Stuck in quarantine and without access to a gym, Eddy Deluca (@eddydeluca_) had nearly lost all motivation to work out. It wasn't until he stumbled across rusted workout equipment from a neighbor that Deluca realized all those nights he had spent watching DIY videos would finally pay off.  @eddydeluca_ I have always dreamt about having a home gym and I saw old rusty weights on the side of my neighbors house and bought them all for $70. ##project ##gym ♬ Classical Music - Classical Music
    RAVENNA – Conducting a joyful Mozart motet, Riccardo Muti sent a resounding message Sunday night, that live classical music has returned to the Italian stage after the coronavirus lockdown. A full summer festival program is planned in his adopted home of Ravenna, even as the musical outlook remains grim in the United States, where he also conducts the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. The 78-year-old renowned conductor said the coronavirus had ‘’destroyed music,’’ with shuttered venues depriving the world of ‘’spiritual food’’ as it faced a pandemic that still threatens uncalculated economic repercussions beyond the lives lost. Even during two world wars, Muti noted, theaters stayed open to provide cultural relief except during the worst of the bombings. ‘’In that sense, this virus was even more devastating than bombs,’’ Muti told The Associated Press before the inaugural concert for the Ravenna Festival’s 30th anniversary season, in which he conducted the Luigi Cherubini Youth Orchestra that he founded in 2004. The festival, founded by Muti's wife, salvaged its season by scheduling its nearly 50 events in outdoor venues with limited audiences,...
    Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Chris Thile, “Not Our First Goat Rodeo” (Sony Music Masterworks) The success of the first album from this string band in 2011 showed there’s a large potential audience for something different. Because this music is different. Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile, Edgar Meyer and Stuart Duncan debuted at No. 1 with their first album on Billboard’s classical, classical crossover and bluegrass charts — an improbable trio. On the follow-up “Not Our First Goat Rodeo,” the group again gleefully ignores genre to produce something that’s not merely classical, but unclassifiable. A goat rodeo is slang for a chaotic situation, and the album title is a nod to the collaborative chemistry necessary to pull off such a high-wire act. It helps that each performer is a virtuoso. Along with classical music and bluegrass, the set of 10 original tunes draws from the American folk, Celtic and jazz traditions, with strains of Stephen Foster, Béla Bartók and Bill Monroe, among others. Meter, tempo and key are all subject to sudden shifts via 20 strings of interplay,...
    Classical music’s virtual season continues with artists and organizations offering events from solo performances to full-scale festivals, beginning with Valley of the Moon’s celebration of the Beethoven year. Here is a rundown of what is available. Unless otherwise noted, all content is free, but donations are welcome. Beethoven lives: Lest we forget, this year marks the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth. Many planned tributes were cancelled, but the Sonoma-based Valley of the Moon festival is marking the milestone with “Virtual Beethoven 2020.” Under pianist Eric Zivian and cellist Tanya Tomkins, live-streamed events begin with Zivian performing the complete Beethoven piano sonatas; chamber works featuring Tomkins, violinist Francisco Fullana, pianist Audrey Vardanega, violist Liana Bérubé, and soprano Maya Kherani will follow. Details: Performances are 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Aug. 2; $10 suggested donation; valleyofthemoonmusicfestival.org. Spanning the centuries: The young artists of the San Francisco Girls Chorus haven’t been idle: the organization’s month-long Virtual Festival started with “Rightfully Ours,” a choral and dance work marking the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which granted women the right to vote. Also online...
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