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    CHICAGO (CBS) — One local mayor is so fed up with the bad mail service in his area, he went to the post office to demand action. CBS 2’s Jeremy Ross went along to find out what could be done. There are boxes in piles. Stacks of mail sacks behind the Mount Greenwood Post Office and Alsip Mayor John Ryan wants the postal service to get it in gear and get delivering. He tried calling earlier and no one answered. So he paid the post office a personal visit for answers. “I had a resident call me up in tears she couldn’t get her medication,” said Ryan Neighbor Tim Gholston believes his mom’s missing package is somewhere in that pile. It was supposed to be delivered November 9. “They were saying that they didn’t know where the packages were at,” Gholston said. “It’s very frustrating.” Alderman Matt O’Shea (19th) said the problem has grown exponentially worse lately. The U.S. Postal Service said the workload has been greatly impacted by the pandemic and the holiday season is especially challenging for...
    (CNN)Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has announced the city's first director of LGBTQ Affairs, her office said Friday. Lifelong Atlanta resident and LGBTQ advocate Malik Brown will take on the newly-created position, in which he'll advise Mayor Bottoms, city officials and city departments on policies affecting the LGBTQ community, among other duties."Since taking office, our Administration has prioritized the well-being and advancement of Atlanta's large and diverse LGBTQ community and municipal LGBTQ affairs," Mayor Bottoms said in a statement. A record number of transgender and gender nonconforming people in the US have been killed in 2020"By creating a Director-level LGBTQ Affairs position in the Mayor's Office and continuing the work of the Mayor's LGBTQ Advisory Board, we are creating institutional support for LGBTQ Atlantans," Bottoms said.The mayor's office said the full-time, director-level role would place Atlanta "among only a handful of cities in the country" to have such a position.Read MoreIn a tweet, Brown said he was "honored to have been chosen to serve in this role."Brown previously served as Atlanta's LGBTQ affairs coordinator. He's also a member of the...
    New York City's official financial watchdog is suing Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration for allegedly refusing to turn over documents related to their handling of the coronavirus pandemic.   Comptroller Scott Stringer filed a lawsuit at the New York Supreme Court on Wednesday, six months after launching an investigation into the city's preparation and response to the outbreak in March.  Stringer, who recently announced he is running for mayor, has accused the city of failing to comply with the probe, claiming it has 'continually delayed' handing over documents since his initial request in May.  Comptroller Scott Stringer, who is running to replace Bill De Blasio as NYC mayor, filed a lawsuit against the city on Wednesday, accusing officials of failing to comply with his investigation into their response to the pandemic At the time, Stringer said New Yorkers deserved 'an objective assessment' on the city's handling of the health crisis and was determined to 'examine what we knew, when we knew it, and what we did about it.'    His lawsuit claims he had sought information pertaining to the city's finances,...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – Today is Columbus Day, which is a federal holiday, and in Philadelphia all city buildings and services are closed. A lot of people are wondering why the city still observes the holiday, especially since over the summer they boxed up the Christopher Columbus statue in South Philly. It turns out, all city holidays are tied to the collective bargaining agreements made between the mayor’s office and the city’s four municipal unions. All of the unions and the mayor’s office would have to agree to a change. The current contract expires in June, so it is possible this could be the last Columbus Day in Philadelphia.
    Despite dramatic threats to cut essential city services if a referendum to repeal Nashville’s 34 percent property tax increase prevails, necessary budget cuts likely will not be made as Mayor John Cooper has laid out. Cooper has called the referendum a “ poison pill” and said repealing the city’s property tax hike would be a “ self-inflicted crisis” that would “gut essential city services.” Metro Nashville Public Schools Director Adrienne Battle has said potential cuts could “render the school district unrecognizable.” Cooper issued a news release last month that outlined what an across-the-board 35 percent budget cut would look like, spread evenly across Metro operations. Trash collection could be cut to twice monthly and recycling collection eliminated, Cooper said. Parks, recreation facilities and libraries would be partially to completely closed. More than 500 positions would be eliminated from the Nashville Fire Department, Cooper said. Four of Metro Nashville Police Department’s eight precincts could be closed, and the police force could be reduced by one-third, causing “dramatic increases in response time and delays.” The mayor repeatedly has...
    Leaked emails show Nashville’s Metro Health Department and the mayor’s office attempted to withhold information from the public that strongly suggested COVID-19 wasn’t spreading through the city’s bars and restaurants. “They are fabricating information," said city councilmember Steve Glover. "They’ve blown their entire credibility.” “I don’t trust a thing they say going forward ... nothing," he added. The emails between the mayor’s office and the health department discuss the low number of COVID-19 cases coming out of the city’s bars and restaurants and how to keep that information from going public. “This isn’t going to be publicly released, right? Just info for Mayor’s Office?” asked Leslie Waller, an official from the health department, in one email. “Correct, not for public consumption,” the mayor’s senior adviser, Benjamin Eagles, wrote back. Contract tracing in late June showed that construction sites and nursing homes were seeing the worst virus spread in the Kentucky city, with more than 1,000 cases linked to each industry. Bars and restaurants, however, accounted for just 22 cases. A month later, reporter Nate Rau...
    The attack, which was supposed to take place on September 15, was made known to the authorities through a call that was received on September 13. MEXICO – The Attorney General’s Office of Mexico City (FGJCDMX) investigates an anonymous complaint about a threat against the mayor of the capital, Claudia Sheinbaum. The attack, which was supposed to take place on September 15, was made known to the authorities through a call received on September 13. A woman pointed to a man, identified as “Neri”, as the alleged attacker. “The corresponding investigations are already being carried out to identify, where appropriate, the origin of the message and who may have spread it,” said the Prosecutor’s Office. According to the anonymous complaint, “Neri” would have in his possession different firearms, among which are an AK-47, an R15, a Colt 45, a Pietro Beretta nine millimeters, a .357 Magnum and 2.23 bullets, “they explained. The authorities. “Neri has a vehicle with the letterhead of the Private Security Intelligence company; which has address in Durango number 243, fourth floor...
    In the past eight months, St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter’s administration has generally favored external candidates over city employees for director-level positions. Here’s a look at six recent hires, how much they’ll be paid and who else applied for their jobs. While the names of city job applicants are private data, names of finalists — meaning those selected to move forward to interviews — are public. PLANNING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR After little more than 18 months with the city, Planning and Economic Development Director Bruce Corrie resigned his position in July 2019 to return to Concordia University as an economist and administrator. For the past year, the department has been led by Deputy Director Kristin Guild. Several internal candidates expressed interest in the role, but the mayor’s office chose instead to hire a search firm to conduct a national search, and then do it again. In total, 67 applicants applied for the position of PED director. An advisory committee interviewed six candidates. St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter and a second committee then screened two finalists: Terri Thao, a program...
    Frida, a female Chihuahua, was mayor of San Francisco for a day in 2014. Stephen Lam / Reuters American politics is a dog-eat-dog world — and sometimes that means an actual dog is in office. Small towns in California, Minnesota, Colorado, and Kentucky have all had dog mayors, and San Francisco had one for one day. Here are the some of the country's politicians with the loudest bark. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. There are dogged leaders, and then there are actual dog leaders. Across the US, we've found nine dogs who have been elected mayor. Small towns in California, Minnesota, Colorado, Kentucky, as well as San Francisco have all had dog mayors. Mostly, the dogs are figureheads. Their elections are used to raise money for animal shelters, or for the towns. Elected dogs also tend to last a long time in office, in dog-years anyway. While they're not as controversial as some of their peers, at least one dog leader sparked international headlines and was condemned by China as a sign of failing democracy. Continue...
    Seattle police officers have agreed to only enter the Capitol Hill Organized Protest, or the CHOP, to respond to “significant life-safety issues,” according to the mayor’s office. “The Seattle Police Department’s definition of life-safety issues may include an active shooter incident, an assault, a structure fire, significant medical emergency (i.e. heart attack, stroke, trauma) and other incidents that threaten a person’s life safety,” the office of Mayor Jenny Durkan said on Tuesday. City officials and organizers occupying the area previously called the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone, or the CHAZ, reached an agreement to remove temporary roadblocks set in place by protesters and replace them with concrete barriers, reducing the size of the zone from about seven city blocks to just three. SEATTLE REACHES DEAL WITH 'CHOP' TO REMOVE TEMPORARY ROADBLOCKS, REPLACE WITH CONCRETE BARRIERS “While there have been inaccurate and misleading depictions of the CHOP from the President and some national media, the City believes first amendment activities can continue while also maintaining public safety and allowing access for residents and businesses who operate in the area,” the...
    The six-block area in Seattle surrounding the East Precinct known as the “Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone” now reportedly has an armed community patrol. As Kim Kelly, the labor columnist at Teen Vogue, writes at The Daily Beast, “Comparisons have predictably been drawn between CHAZ and the Occupy movement, but in the place also known as Free Capitol Hill, there is one crucial distance: this time, some of the protesters are armed.” Kelly notes that members of the Puget Sound John Brown Gun Club (PSJBGC), a leftist organization, “have been a constant presence.” Among members of the Puget Sound John Brown Gun Club in 2019, according to police, was 69-year-old Willem van Spronsen, who allegedly attacked an ICE center before he was fatally shot by police after he allegedly pointed a rifle at authorities. Spronsen “allegedly approached the center around 4 a.m. Saturday, manipulating what looked like an AR-15-style rifle and setting fire to a building owned by the detention center. Police said surveillance video shows he placed flares strategically — including underneath a 500-gallon propane tank — ignited his own...
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