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    CHICAGO -- When Angelica Varela thinks of childhood, she's surrounded by lush plants in her Mexican grandmother's home. If Varela had a bad day, her grandmother would set a plant before her and tell her to describe its every detail. By shifting her focus to plants, Varela felt a boost in her mental health. Though her grandmother wouldn't call it "mental health," Varela unknowingly learned plant-medicine techniques that eased her anxiety and depression. "Growing up, especially in a Latino household, there's no such thing as depression or anxiety. My family has really gone through the ups and the downs, and they just dealt with it," Varela recounted. So when the pandemic hit and Varela found her mental health in flux, she went back to her roots."I've always had plants, but I was always working. And I think that once I got laid off, I was able to focus on my plants," Varela recalled. "Once I started collecting a little bit more, it took me back to our motherland. I started getting more in-tune with my culture (and) that kind of...
    (CBSDFW.COM) – When the summer heat sets in most of us hunker down and keep the garden tasks to watering, weeding and surviving. This despite the fact of so many North Texas landscapes STILL full of blank spots from the historic arctic cold blast of last winter. Last summer I had a 14-foot long, 7-foot high trellis completely covered in passion vine. This summer I’m looking at an empty wood frame as my newly planted clematis slowly take their place. READ MORE: 24-Year-Old Killed In Shooting In Dallas, Police Say I’m betting it’ll take three to four years for the two climbing flower vines to cover what my passion vine did in two. There are some edible options to plant in summer. Melons are one of my favorites. To be honest, I don’t really plant them for the fruit, it seems the rodents get to them before I do anyway. I plant them because they quickly sprawl out and cover an empty bed, producing a carpet of large green leaves. READ MORE: Texas Amber Alert: Mansfield Police Find Missing 13-Year-Old...
    Strawberries make people happy. They do it when they are fresh and juicy, warm from the sun. They do it when they are freeze-dried and reconstituted in oatmeal. They work in pies, cakes (so much so that they have a cake all their own: Strawberry Shortcake), and homemade ice cream. They’ll spruce up an otherwise plain bowl of cereal. They’ll make a salad, with a little balsamic vinaigrette and some walnuts in the mix, something to talk about later. They are just delicious in so many ways. Knowing this, it’s no surprise that the prospect of growing some strawberries right at home might be of interest to many of us, and the good news about that is that they are super easy to deal with, can produce a lot throughout the year and are perennial plants, meaning they don’t need to be bought again or replanted each year. In fact, they are prolific growers and will provide food for half a decade before tiring out. But, not to worry, they are also very easy to reproduce. Stick around. It’ll...
    Potatoes have the reputation of being fairly easy to grow, and for the most part, they are. Heck, leave a potato in the pantry long enough, and you’ll see that it starts to grow right there and then, no planting necessary. In fact, while not recommended, oftentimes those organic potatoes we bring home from the supermarket can be planted in the garden to produce more potatoes. All that said, there are some issues with growing potatoes at home. For one, to produce a sizeable quantity requires a large amount of space, and ultimately producing those potatoes—if we buy proper seed potatoes to do it—will cost about as much as buying them from the supermarket, even organic. Because of this, it makes sense to grow other vegetables if space is limited. And, that’s why growing gourmet potatoes can be a lot of fun. They’ll add some pizzazz to the potato dishes we’ve come to love, and they’ll be something a bit more notable than the standard russet we can get in such abundance for so cheap. In other words, go...
    With spring springing into the air, many of us are turning our thoughts to the garden. It’s an exciting time. A winter of less-than-fresh veggies and preserves is giving way to what could be another great year of (or a first annual) bountiful harvest from the home garden. At least, that’s the way we all like to imagine it, so why wouldn’t we? Small-scale gardens can be pleasant, relaxing things, not too labor-intensive, not too stressful if we allow them to be. We can set our gardens up to be low-maintenance. We can plant wisely to give our crops the best shot at being productive. And, we can do this without doling out loads of money. Instead, we can take from what we have, use our waste to make our gardens bloom with food, and spend as much time enjoying the natural beauty and flavor as we do toiling over its success. It’ll only take a few tips to get us going and growing. 1. Plant Early and Plant Often. When planting from seed, it makes sense to start...
    Even though we’re blessed in California with being able to grow vegetable and flower gardens the year round, there are some seasonal rules. Fortunately, Mother Nature can be as forgiving as she is harsh, but here are some guidelines for growing in each season. Spring March, April, May Spring is the season of renewal and hope. Our gardens and planter boxes, even those pots crowded onto postage-stamp size patios and balconies, seem to come to life all on their own. But they can use a little help and guidance. Any plants you’ve been nurturing through the winter could use a shot of fertilizer and the start of regular watering. You might be tempted to start planting your vegetable garden, but the soil temperature, even in containers, still is too cold for many plants. Gardening is 99 percent patience. In late April and early May, you can start planting beets, broccoli, corn, cucumbers, lettuces, onions, peas, potatoes, radishes and squashes. It’s also safe to prune your spring-blooming shrubs, if they’ve stopped blooming. In late May, you can plant tomato seedlings and...
    If you walk briskly, you could traverse the winding path that runs through the Manhattan Beach Botanical Garden in a very short time. Yet the fact that the garden is small makes each plant that much more precious to behold. Unlike most botanical gardens, where one day is never enough to appreciate everything there is to see, it’s different here. You can take long looks at each specimen on display and not feel you might be missing out on something if you linger more than a few moments over any particular plant. What follows are descriptions of some of the beauties to be found at the Manhattan Beach Botanical Garden (MBBG) whose plant collection consists almost entirely of California natives except for a few notable exceptions. The garden is located in Polliwog Park at 1237 North Peck Avenue. It is open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week. Admission is free. Volunteer workdays are Fridays from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and drop-in volunteers over age 16 are always welcome. Bladderpod (Isomeris arborea) is a wonderful plant...
    Amidst this constantly developing and changing world, there are areas that remain neglected and forgotten about over time. Beautiful but crumbling locations that were left to ruin by their human inhabitants, but have astonishingly been reclaimed by nature.  From abandoned silos to derelict chimneys, these deteriorating relics have become home to impressive sprawling swathes of vegetation. In an online gallery, collated by Bored Panda, social media users from around the world shared awe-inspiring snaps of placed conquered by plant-life.  You shall not pass! The suspension bridge (pictured) across the Manawatu River at Opiki in New Zealand, was constructed in 1917. It was known for many years as the Opiki Toll Bridge before closing in 1969 when a newer bridge was built nearby One social media user said they found this 'beautiful tree growing inside an abandoned silo' while they were exploring. The location of the building is unknown Neglected train tracks are completely covered in greenery in a forest in Taiwan. Clothed in vines and leaves, the former track is a sight to behold RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Why didn't I...
    When it comes to the list of things we do for love, be sure to add paying up to $5 a pop for artichokes at the grocery store. Worth it, you say? Maybe — until you figure that on a scale of 1 to 10, the difficulty of growing your own artichokes is about a 2, says Contra Costa master gardener Janet Miller. “There’s not much to growing them,” Miller says. “Cut the leaves back, mulch. Beyond that, they do their own thing.” So now you’re wondering how to jump onto the artichoke bandwagon. Would we leave you hanging? Here’s the how-to. When to plant You can start your artichokes by planting seeds indoors. The seed starts will need a lot of heat to germinate — the soil needs to be about 70 degrees — so you’ll need a heat mat. It may be easier to simply buy seedlings at your favorite nursery or gardener plant sale later this spring. It’s still too early to plant your artichokes outside. Miller says you need to wait four weeks from the last...
    Lizzo ended the 2020 Grammys wearing a custom sheer Versace dress. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images More celebrities are going vegan and sharing their tips on maintaining a plant-based lifestyle.  Notable figures like Lizzo, Jenna Dewan, and Ariana Grande all post accessible content about their vegan meals for their millions of followers to see.  Here is a list of eight vegan celebrities and what they eat.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Veganism is a dairy-free, meat-free diet and lifestyle fast growing in popularity in the US. That includes a growing number of celebrities, including Mike Tyson, Billie Eilish, and Peter Dinklage, whether it's for health reasons, sustainability, or animal rights. It can be a tricky diet to follow. It's one thing to cut out meat, milk, and eggs, but then there are animal-based products like chicken stock or certain oils and candy. Cakes and pastries are usually cooked with dairy, as is restaurant-cooked fish, basted in butter. Vegans typically struggle to keep up their B12 levels without proper nutritional guidance.  All in all, there's a lot of...
    Food and gardening just naturally go hand-in-hand. We need healthy, hopefully, delicious food to eat since all of us Green Monsters are out there looking for plant-based nourishment. One of the easiest solutions to this (for both our budget and our health) is to simply grow our own however possible for ultimate sustainable food production. The problem here is that many of us have no experience with growing our own food, so we have no idea on earth about how to go about doing it. Luckily, that can change in 750 words or less – at least with two foods. Today we are going to learn to grow two of the world’s most notable spices, known as much for medicinal qualities as for instantly recognizable flavors: garlic and ginger. Like producing your own pineapples or mushrooms, growing your own garlic and ginger only requires normal planting pots and soil, the typical weekly trip to the supermarket, and a bit of interest and patience. Plus, it provides so much more than just food: a sense of accomplishment, a touch of knowledge, and...
    New York (CNN Business)Becoming a vegan didn't stop Pinky Cole's cravings for fast food. When she got sick of not being able to find the vegan options she wanted, she decided to solve the problem herself. So in 2018 she opened Slutty Vegan, an Atlanta-based restaurant designed to upend expectations with plant-based burgers that could taste good and be a little fun too. Other fast-food chains might have the Whopper or the Big Mac — Slutty Vegan has the One Night Stand, loaded with vegan cheese, vegan bacon, caramelized onions, lettuce and tomato, and the Super Slut, with guacamole, jalapeño and vegan cheese. Since it opened, Slutty Vegan has gained attention from celebrities like Snoop Dogg, Tiffany Haddish and Usher. People caught wind of the trendy new spot, and lines spilled out the door. A visit to Slutty Vegan is designed to feel like going to a party: First-time customers are called "virgins" and cheered. A visit to Slutty Vegan should feel like going to a party. "We have amazing vegan restaurants in Atlanta, Georgia but I tagged on...
    Like everything else about gardening, an herb garden isn’t a one-size-fits-all deal. We’re most concerned with the best part, of course: The actual growing and use of the herbs. But there are a number of things to take into account from soil and climate to water, pruning and propagation.  That’s where books and videos can be so helpful. Here’s a list of recommended publications, websites and how-to videos to help. “Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs” Written by Claire Kowlachik and William H. Hylton, this encyclopedic book (Rodale Press, $27) includes color photographs of more than 140 herbs, as well as black-and-white sketches of individual plants. The volume delves into the history, cultivation and uses of herbs in cooking, healing, cosmetics and as dyes, with recipes for food and drinks, perfumes, poultices and medicinal syrups. “Healing with Medicinal Plants of the West” This book by Cecilia Garcia, James Adams, Michelle Wong and Enrique Villasenor, now in its fourth edition (Abedus Press, $20), explores the cultural and scientific basis behind medicinal herbs and their uses. There are photographs of each plant, along...
    Colorado marijuana regulators have adopted new waste management rules intended to reduce the industry's growing carbon footprint. According to the state Department of Public Health and Environment, 3,650 tons (7.3 million pounds) of marijuana plant waste was produced by the state's pot industry in 2019, and that number would be increased to 7,300 tons by a requirement that unused plant matter and product be mixed with waste such as sawdust, mature compost, bleach, coffee grounds, sand, glass or shredded paper — as long as the marijuana-to-waste ratio is 50/50. Although the state Marijuana Enforcement Division didn't remove or alter the 50/50 requirement as had been discussed at previous meetings, the MED did open up several paths around it in the department's latest round of extensive rule updates, adding new exemptions for biomass recycling and composting methods. According to CDPHE marijuana environmental impact researcher and small business consultant Kaitlin Urso, the new waste removal rules take effect at the start of 2021.Related Stories Colorado Explores More Eco-Friendly Marijuana Regulations The Dankest Weed Could Also Be the Most Polluting Earth Day Highlights the...
    Cooking with hemp might not be as alluring as making weed edibles, but it's much more healthy and sustainable in the long term. And as government restrictions loosen and public knowledge of hemp grows, so does the plant's nutritious legend. Rich in protein, fiber and good fats, hemp is quickly becoming a regular part of plant-based dishes and diets, and has even gained the annoying "superfood" moniker. But how are we supposed to eat it? Shadi Ramey found herself wondering the same thing five years ago. Already a chef for a decade by 2015, she knew how to infuse food with cannabis (she still teaches private cannabis cooking classes), but incorporating hemp into a healthy diet was entirely different. After immersing herself in hemp cooking and even growing the plant for herself, the Boulder-based Ramey has developed a full set of recipes featuring hemp seeds, hearts, oil and protein, among other hemp-based ingredients. Her favorite meals at the moment? Hemp heart tabbouleh, hemp-mushroom chili and hemp-crusted mushroom tacos. You'll soon be able to cook Ramey's favorites and more hemp eats...
    Beyond Meat said on Tuesday its burger patties will be available at more than 2,400 Walmart stores from next week, as it triples distribution with the retailer to tap into the growing demand for its plant-based meat products during the pandemic. Demand for fully cooked plant-based alternatives jumped 25 percent in the four weeks to Aug. 22, data from Nielsen showed, as consumers grow increasingly health conscious and concerned about the environmental impact of industrial animal farming. The company said the wider distribution of its Beyond Burger patties – made from peas, mung bean and rice to mimic the taste of a beef burger – from 8,000 Walmart stores to over 2,400 comes after the successful launch of its value offerings this summer, at a time traditional ground beef prices were spiking due to COVID-19-related supply chain disruptions at beef plants. It also comes at a time the company, which derives about half of its global sales from restaurants such as Dunkin and KFC, is trying to reroute its products to retailers to keep sales humming as restaurants continue to...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) — I consider myself a novice gardener, my efforts have largely centered on edible landscapes. I only started putting in ornamentals in my backyard two years ago, after I visited an organic winery in California that used “pollinator oases” to reduce pesticide use by increasing beneficial insect populations. I put in a pollinator garden I bought in a box from Texas A&M AgriLife and it was a huge success. Just yesterday I watched a couple of hummingbirds dart in and out of it several times to get at the Turk’s cap and Lantana. Now I’m suddenly willing to surrender more space to add some color, looking for perennials that give that color as much of the year as possible. I found two ways to best search out plants that I want. I walk around my neighborhood and if I see someone growing something I like, I’ll ask them about the plant. As I’ve found, every plant has its own particulars: how much light, how much water, when do you prune it, what do you feed it, etc....
    Lyft calls for building bus, bike lanes in cities This Food Company Was Just Shut Down By the FDA Your Complete Guide to Growing Ground Cherries If you aren't already growing ground cherries in your home garden, then now's the time to start. "Ground cherries are in the nightshade family that also includes eggplant, tomatoes, and potatoes," says Christopher Landercasper, director of farming operations for Sonoma's Best Hospitality Group. "The most commonly consumed plant people think about when they are talking about ground cherries is the tomatillo." While tomatillos differ from ground cherries, according to the University of Minnesota, they stem from the same genus, making them a not too distant cousin of the fruit. © Provided by Martha Stewart Living Getty / Kesu01 © Getty / Kesu01 From the best place to plant them to harvesting tips, gardeners share their advice for growing and caring for the plants. Commonly used to make preserves, jams, sauces, and pies, garden expert Melinda Meyers says the sweet, somewhat tart flavored fruit is a great plant for beginning gardeners to grow. "It...
    Man arrested for Zoombombing a university class lecture with a bomb threat Virtual Kitchen, founded by ex-Uber execs to help restaurants with delivery, raises $20 million Savvy Americans do this to earn an extra $1,394 per month in retirement Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/8 SLIDES © PopSugar I Have 15 Plants in My Apartment, and Here's How I Keep Them Healthy and Growing Few things bring me as much calm as taking care of plants. I never thought I'd be about that life, but 15 plants later, it's become a treasured pastime. It frees up mental space so I can fully be in the present, and there's something so rewarding about watching them grow. No, you don't need a green thumb to keep plants alive, but you do need to apply yourself. With the different types we have, including monsteras, philodendrons, a snake plant, a majestic palm, and a fig tree, my husband and I spend at least two hours...
    Nicole Karlis September 7, 2020 11:30PM (UTC) Sweet, drippy, and a tad crunchy, a bite of a watermelon evokes nostalgic feelings of balmy beach days and summer barbecues. But for a subset of amateur farmers across the country, watermelons are much more than a beloved juicy snack. They're also the center of a competitive and passionate hobby: growing giant watermelons. Hobbyist Todd Dawson discovered what would soon become his passion when he visited the North Carolina State Fair in 2009. He was amazed by the State Fair Weigh-Off competition, where farmers show off their giant pumpkins and watermelons. : "We were there and I saw the giant watermelons, and I jokingly said to my wife, 'I'm gonna grow one of those next year, and I'm going to win the blue ribbon,'" Dawson tells Salon. "The next year I grew one, and you would have thought it was the biggest watermelon in the world — I mean I was just tickled to death with this melon." A first-place winner receives $6 for each pound of watermelon, plus a $2,500 bonus if the world record is...
    A green-thumbed dad has broken the record for growing the United Kingdom’s biggest tomato – with the help of a pair of sheer tights. Douglas Smith, 42, spent more than two months carefully growing the giant tomato, which weighs a whopping 6.6 lbs. and is actually six regular beefsteak tomatoes fused into one. The huge fruit, which had to be suspended using a pair of tights so it did not fall off the stem, weighed in at a whopping 6.85 lbs., and measured 27.5 inches in circumference. It was grown from a seed from a variety known as Big Zac. Smith’s monster has edged ahead of the previous U.K. record-holder, Peter Glazebrook, whose record-winning tomato last year weighed 6.4 lbs. “This has been an ambition of mine for a couple of years, now,” Smith, from Stanstead Abbotts, England, said. “Giant tomatoes have been my main focus in terms of competitive vegetable growing.” He’s made two previous attempts, but he was bested by Peter Glazebook. “And my attempts have been just shy of his each time, he said. “But this...
    Didn’t think 2020 could get any worse? Think again! While you’re doing your best to maintain social distancing, you might be tempted to turn to nature, taking a nice walk on a trail, or even do some gardening. As it turns out, those things are now a bit riskier than before, and not because of the ongoing pandemic. Poison ivy, the plant known to cause seriously painful rashes when oils on the plant’s leaves come in contact with skin, is growing faster than ever, according to Dr. Jacqueline Mohan, a professor at the University of Georgia. In an interview with WVLT, Mohan explains that increases in yearly CO2 levels are contributing to the rapid spread of poison ivy, and putting people in danger as a result. The plant isn’t mutating or doing anything out of the ordinary itself, but it is growing faster and potentially becoming more potent due to increases in CO2 levels. Plants love CO2, and poison ivy is no different. The more CO2 that is present in the air around us, the more can be used...
    FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – Growing up in the south, okra joined the summer garden right alongside tomatoes, beans and squash. To be honest I’ve never been a fan of okra when used in soups and the classic gumbo dishes. When I started to pan fry it in just a little olive oil however, I became a big fan. When I get in conversations with people who want to start a garden I almost always recommend okra. It is very easy to grow, does great in the Texas heat and isn’t super thirsty. There are many variates to choose from. I’ve settled on one called “Stewart Zeebest” because it doesn’t get too woody when I accidentally miss cutting it in time. Okra grows its seed pods quickly and they are same color as the stems, it is easy to let one get too long. I try to cut mine when the pods get about 3”-5” in length. The conversation I had with Dr. Joe Masabni with Texas A&M AgriLife is going to change how I grow it next year. Growing okra...
    By Kat Webb, The Herald Journal LOGAN, Utah (AP) — Ninety years ago, hemp researchers at Utah State University grew cannabis for rope and had no way to test the THC content in crops other than smoking it and monitoring the effects. Research halted in 1970 when then-President Richard Nixon signed the Controlled Substances Act. Now that it’s legal to grow once more USU researchers are back at it — only this time, they’re using technology and testing to determine the optimal ways to grow the plant for high yield and cannabinoid content, and what that means for Utah growers. “We do a lot of trying to nurture these plants as best we can,” said Mitch Westmoreland, the Ph.D. student running the lab at USU’s greenhouse. “But then we also go on the other side of things and see how much we can torture these plants without them dying. … One of the big questions that a lot of people have, especially in Utah, is how drought stress affects cannabinoid concentration.” There are at least 66 different cannabinoids in cannabis...
    Q. We planted radishes from seed this spring. The plants grew well but most of the radishes in the ground failed to develop into the round shape, leaving a plump root. We are wondering if there was something that we can do next time to promote full, round radish roots? — Brad, Danville A. As I don’t know what you did or didn’t do, here’s a quick primer on successfully growing radishes. The first step is in preparing the soil. Do not prep the bed with fresh manure or fertilizers high in nitrogen. Radishes don’t want soil that is overly rich, since it will produce lots of nice leafy tops but not much underground. Radish seeds are fairly tiny, making it difficult to plant just one seed per hole. So do the best you can and when the seedlings are about 2 inches tall, thin them out. The seedlings need room to bulb up in the ground, or you’ll end up with shriveled, inedible radishes. They should be about 3 inches apart. Once the radishes are up and growing, you can...
    EU Regulators Raise the Bar on Data Transfers After Court Ruling Tested: Volvo V-8 Wagons Photos When and How to Harvest the Potatoes Growing in Your Own Backyard Easy to grow and a pantry staple, potatoes are a functional addition to any vegetable garden. "Container gardening is an easy way to grow potatoes if you have a small space, and makes enough potatoes to feed a family," says Samantha "Foxx" Winship, founder of Mother's Finest Family Urban Farms. However, if you don't know when and how to harvest potatoes correctly, cultivating them can be tricky. "With most plants you can watch the fruit develop above ground," explains Christopher Landercasper, director of farming operations for Sonoma's Best Hospitality Group. "With a potato, I really don't know how they are doing until I dig them up." © Getty / johnnyscriv From digging tips to storage suggestions, two experts share their top methods for cultivating the popular vegetable. Fortunately, with the right timing and tools, harvesting potatoes at home can be a breeze. "Harvesting is as simple as grabbing a shovel, or...
    Opinion: S&P 500 stocks post their biggest gains when company earnings make this move Mike Finnegan’s Blasphemi, a 1955 Chevy Gasser That’s Not Just Made-for-TV How to Grow and Care for Creeping Avens Creeping avens, also known as Geum reptans, can make a cheery addition to any home garden. The yellow blooms grow as a natural groundcover but can be contained to smaller areas with regular maintenance. Follow this advice from two professional gardeners and get the most from these herbaceous perennials this growing season. © Federica Grassi / Getty Images Your garden needs these happy yellow blooms. Related: Great Ideas for Your Garden Start with Plants While there are plenty of different flowers you can grow from seeds, our experts suggest starting your creeping avens from a plant for the best results. "If you're growing it as a groundcover, you will probably be happier buying a starter plant from your local garden center so it can get established and start growing right away," explains Justin Hancock, a Monrovia horticultural craftsman. He says another benefit is that you'll...
    Q. I have a couple of questions regarding growing veggies in pots. I live in an apartment. I have done this for several years, but this year things did not go well. I grew cucumber for the first time, and the plant is huge after five weeks. I got male flowers 10 times more than female flowers, but I have no bees or other insects coming to my balcony to do the pollination. I manually pollinated the female with a Q-tip.  A day later, I noticed the pollinated female was dying. After that, many male flowers shriveled and dropped. I only found two female flowers; one died after I did the pollination, the other is shriveling. What is happening here? I also planted a cayenne pepper, which after six weeks stopped growing, but there are some peppers. Do I need fertilizers? I am trying to learn gardening, and would appreciate your help. Hailen, Bay Area A. You don’t need a backyard to have a vegetable garden. Many vegetables can be grown in pots. But it seems to be bad year...
    Dow trades 300 points lower but Nasdaq rebounds as investors seek safety in tech Street Freaks From Syracuse A Guide to Planting, Growing, and Caring for Crocosmia Plants Known for their colorful blooms and sword-shaped leaves, crocosmia plants, also known as coppertips, are beloved by gardeners for their flashy, fragrant flowers. "crocosmias are members of the iris family; blooms start in May and can continue all summer," explains Dr. Gladys Mbofung-Curtis, a plant scientist at Spectrum Brands Home & Garden. "Their blooms have a subtle saffron scent that intensifies when the flowers are dry, and their bright tubular flowers can attract hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, and other pollinators." © Getty / Suna Viro / EyeEm From the best soil for planting to watering tips, two gardening experts share their advice. However, for as rewarding as having crocosmias in your garden may be, growing them can be tricky. "If they aren't planted in well-drained soil, the roots of crocosmia plants can rot," explains Samantha "Foxx" Winship, founder of Mother's Finest Family Urban Farms. "Handle the bulbs carefully when planting and make...
    Lizzo ended the 2020 Grammys wearing a custom sheer Versace dress. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images More celebrities are going vegan and sharing their tips on maintaining a plant-based lifestyle.  Notable figures like Lizzo, Jenna Dewan, and Russel Simons all post accessible content about their vegan meals for their millions of followers to see.  Here is a list of six vegan celebrities and what they eat.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Veganism is a dairy-free, meat-free diet and lifestyle fast growing in popularity in the US. That includes a growing number of celebrities, including Mike Tyson, Billie Eilish, and Peter Dinklage, whether it's for health reasons, sustainability, or animal rights. It can be a tricky diet to follow. It's one thing to cut out meat, milk, and eggs, but then there are animal-based products like chicken stock or certain oils and candy. Cakes and pastries are usually cooked with dairy, as is restaurant-cooked fish, basted in butter. Vegans typically struggle to keep up their B12 levels without proper nutritional guidance.  All in all, there's a lot of...
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