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    Americans are torn on apps like TikTok, a social media company that has faced scrutiny for alleged national security threats and concerns about links to the Chinese Communist Party, a new poll shows. Forty percent of Americans share the concerns of some lawmakers regarding such apps, specifically that they “pose a security risk to the U.S.,” and more than one third agree that China should be “dealt with firmly,” a survey from the research group Pipslay shows. Thirty-two percent of Americans polled think President Donald Trump’s assessment of TikTok as a national security threat is a baseless charge that “is more of a political gimmick.” Pipslay polled 30,499 Americans over the age of 18 nationwide between August 11 and 12 for the survey, which comes as Trump has expressed vocal support for American companies to buy TikTok from its parent company ByteDance. Trump has said that if Microsoft brokers a deal by the Sept. 15 deadline he wouldn’t ban the social media app that has come under fire for allegedly sharing user data to the CCP. (RELATED: Trump Signs Pair...
    Over the past few weeks, as relations between the US and China sank to even lower lows, the social media app TikTok has emerged as a new target for the Trump administration. Both secretary of state Mike Pompeo and White House adviser Peter Navarro warned on Fox News that the US was considering outlawing Chinese apps, of which TikTok is the most popular, over security concerns. Trump’s chief of staff Mark Meadows told reporters Wednesday that there are “a number of administration officials who are looking at the national security risk as it relates to TikTok and other apps,” adding that action may come within weeks, not months. Concerns about TikTok have also spilled over into the corporate world. Last Friday, Wells Fargo said it had banned its workforce from using TikTok on company devices, an announcement that came after Amazon walked back a similar notice it sent to employees the same day. Meanwhile, on Twitter, venture capitalists, tech journalists, and China watchers have been intensely debating whether or not TikTok—one of several apps created by the Chinese tech giant...
    The Republican chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee is leading the charge to declassify and make public what the intelligence community knows about “unidentified aerial phenomena." Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida is pushing legislation that would require the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which oversees the intelligence community’s 17 intelligence agencies, to work with the Pentagon and other relevant agencies to produce a detailed report outlining what the U.S. government knows about UFOs, including their origin, frequency, and potential threat to U.S. national security. Rubio’s efforts follow the April release by the Navy of three unclassified UFO videos that previously leaked online. “Look, here’s the interesting thing for me about all this and the reason why I think it’s an important topic, OK? We have things flying over our military bases and places where we’re conducting military exercises, and we don’t know what it is, and it isn’t ours. So, that’s a legitimate question to ask,” Rubio said in a Thursday interview with Jim DeFede of CBS4 News in Miami. “I would say that, frankly,...
    In a huge reversal, the United Kingdom announced its plans to ban the purchase of new Huawei equipment effective at the end of the year and to remove the giant Chinese telecom from its 5G network entirely by 2027 due to the security risk it poses. U.K. Secretary of State for Culture, Media, and Sport Oliver Dowden made the announcement before the House of Commons on Tuesday following a National Security Council meeting chaired by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Dowden said recent moves by the United States to blacklist Huawei and assessments by the U.K.’s National Cyber Security Centre led the Conservative Party government to conclude that allowing Huawei to operate even on the outskirts as the U.K. builds its fifth generation network would no longer be a safe nor feasible option. “The government agrees with the National Cyber Security Centre’s advice — the best way to secure our networks is for operators to stop using new effected Huawei equipment to build the U.K.’s future 5G networks,” Dowden declared. “So, to be clear, from the end of...
    The Australian Government is facing calls to ban TikTok amid concerns the social media platform poses a national security threat and users' data may be being shared with China. The popular video app, owned by Chinese company Bytedance, is used by more than 1.6 million Australians. A federal MP has revealed plans to put TikTok before the Foreign Interference through Social Media senate inquiry over fears it is collecting data and storing the information on Chinese servers.   The Australian Government is facing calls to have TikTok banned amid concerns it is a national security threat that could be sharing users' data with the Chinese government (stock image)  The MP said TikTok has flown under the radar in Australia and should be taken seriously as an effort by the Chinese Communist Party (the flag pictured) to collect data The unnamed MP said TikTok has flown under the radar in Australia and should be considered as an effort by the Chinese Communist Party to collect data. 'It might be dressed differently but it's the same beast,' the MP told the...
    Olivia Enos, a senior policy analyst in the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation, spoke with the Daily Caller’s Samantha Renck about China’s security law, what it means for Hong Kong and more. On Tuesday, China passed a new security law “to further tighten its control over Hong Kong amid rising tensions with the United States.” “This is pretty remarkable, as you mentioned,” Enos said. “It was a possibility it was going to happen — now it’s a reality. We’re looking at basically the one country, two systems framework that has governed Hong Kong since the handover from the British to China in 1997 basically crumbling before our very eyes.” Enos expressed concern over the security law because it “essentially makes very vague terms illegal. They make sedition illegal, talk of secession illegal, so-called foreign collusion and then terrorism illegal. But they don’t mean those words in the way that we mean them.” (RELATED: Man Arrested For Holding Hong Kong Independence Flag During Demonstration Against New Chinese Law) “All of the pro-democracy protests that we saw last year are...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHouse GOP leaders condemn candidate who said black people should be 'proud' of Confederate statues McConnell rejects push to 'airbrush the Capitol' of Confederate statues Seismic shifts on race leave Trump in the dust MORE (R-Calif.) blasted John BoltonJohn BoltonLincoln Project launches new ad hitting Trump over China policies Trump criticizes Bolton as memoir excerpts offer scathing account of White House Bolton book portrays 'stunningly uninformed' Trump MORE’s upcoming book on Thursday, claiming that the former Trump national security adviser sensationalized his accounts of his time serving in the administration for monetary gain. Excerpts of Bolton’s book — which has already shot to the top of best-seller lists ahead of its release —  include explosive allegations that President TrumpDonald John TrumpLincoln Project launches new ad hitting Trump over China policies Trump criticizes Bolton as memoir excerpts offer scathing account of White House Bolton book portrays 'stunningly uninformed' Trump MORE attempted to solicit help from Chinese President Xi Jinping to win reelection, floated attempting to jail members of the press and showed interest in invading...
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