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Myanmar’s Foreign:

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    Reuters February 2, 2021 0 Comments The U.S. State Department will conduct a review of its foreign assistance to Myanmar after determining that the military takeover in the Asian country this week constituted a coup, officials said on Tuesday. President Joe Biden has threatened new sanctions against the generals who seized power in Myanmar and detained elected leaders including Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi early on Monday. Washington has not been in direct contact with the coup leaders in Myanmar or the deposed civilian government leaders.  At the request of the White House, the top U.S. military officer, Army General Mark Milley, attempted to call Myanmar’s military following the coup, but he was unable to connect, a U.S. official said on Tuesday. Under U.S. law, the assessment that a coup has taken place automatically puts restrictions on U.S. assistance. The coup is a significant blow for the Biden administration and its effort to forge a robust Asia-Pacific policy to stand up to China. Many of Biden’s Asia policy team are veterans of the Obama administration, which on leaving...
    Washington (CNN)The Biden administration has formally determined that the military takeover in Myanmar constitutes a coup d'état, a designation that requires the US to cut its foreign assistance to the country."After careful review of the facts and circumstances, we have assessed that Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of Burma's ruling party, and Win Myint, the duly elected head of government, were deposed in a military coup on February 1," a State Department official said Tuesday. "We continue to call on the Burmese military leadership to release them and all other detained civil society and political leaders immediately and unconditionally.""In addition, we will undertake a broader review of our assistance programs to ensure they align with recent events," the official said. "At the same time, we will continue programs that benefit the people of Burma directly, including humanitarian assistance and democracy support programs that benefit civil society. A democratic civilian led government has always been Burma's best opportunity to address the problems the country faces." Anger and anxiety over whats to come following Myanmars coup"As President Biden has said, we...
    More On: myanmar Burma’s junta strikes again Viral video appears to show woman doing aerobics amid Myanmar coup Biden White House warns Myanmar military after coup Biden briefed on Myanmar situation, US ‘alarmed,’ White House says A military coup underway in Myanmar presents an early foreign policy test regarding China for President Biden, who campaigned on reasserting US leadership abroad. Myanmar, also called Burma, reportedly had a military takeover this week, ending a democratic transition that began when Biden was vice president. If Myanmar returns to its longtime military rulers, it’s expected to fall more heavily under the sway of China in the face of US sanctions. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi met last month with US-sanctioned Army chief Min Aung Hlaing and reportedly praised the country’s infamous military for its “national revitalization.” The White House said Monday it was “alarmed” at the coup and threatened sanctions. Secretary of State Tony Blinken requested the release of arrested officials and “respect [for] the will of the people of Burma as expressed in democratic elections on Nov. 8.” Former President Barack...
    MANILA (Reuters) - The Philippines foreign ministry said on Tuesday it is following the situation in Myanmar "with deep concern" especially over the safety of ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Its statement was stronger than remarks a day earlier by President Rodrigo Duterte's spokesman, who said events in Myanmar were "an internal matter that we will not meddle with". (Reporting by Neil Jerome Morales; Editing by Martin Petty) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Myanmar, Asia, Philippines
    President Joe Biden threatened to reimpose sanctions on Myanmar on Monday as his administration debates on whether to call a military takeover a 'coup.' Insiders familiar with the back-and-forth described the discussions as 'chaos' as officials fear that the White House calling the military takeover a coup could anger China and force the United States to withdraw foreign aid, Politico reported. Myanmar's army took power of the country early on Monday and declared a state of emergency after detaining de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi along with members of her party. Myanmar's army has taken control of the country and detained members of its pro-democracy party President Joe Biden has condemned the takeover but has so far refrained from calling it a coup The military, known as the Tatmadaw, has had escalating tensions with the country's civilian government over alleged election irregularities in November when Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy party won in a landslide against the party backed by the military. Min Aung Hlaing, the country's commander-in-chief, has been appointed as acting president...
    By MATTHEW LEE, AP Diplomatic Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — A military coup in Myanmar and a mass crackdown on dissidents in Russia are presenting early tests for the Biden administration as it tries to reestablish American primacy as a worldwide pro-democracy leader. Having taken office with a pledge to restore ironclad U.S. support for human rights, freedom of speech and political openness, President Joe Biden is being confronted with two serious challenges in two disparate parts of the world that had either been neglected or the subject of inconsistent messaging during the Trump era. After investing decades of time, energy and money into promoting democracy in both Myanmar and Russia, the U.S. now faces challenges in each that could affect the global balance of power, with the Myanmar turmoil potentially strengthening China's hand. And, while neither situation can be directly tied to domestic political uncertainty in the United States, experts believe foreign governments might be taking cues from the vestiges of America's perceived rudderlessness in the final months of President Donald Trump's term. “It is not always about us,” said...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A military coup in Myanmar and a mass crackdown on dissidents in Russia are presenting early tests for the Biden administration as it tries to reestablish American primacy as a worldwide pro-democracy leader. Having taken office with a pledge to restore ironclad U.S. support for human rights, freedom of speech and political openness, President Joe Biden is being confronted with two serious challenges in two disparate parts of the world that had either been neglected or the subject of inconsistent messaging during the Trump era. After investing decades of time, energy and money into promoting democracy in both Myanmar and Russia, the U.S. now faces challenges in each that could affect the global balance of power, with the Myanmar turmoil potentially strengthening China’s hand. And, while neither situation can be directly tied to domestic political uncertainty in the United States, experts believe foreign governments might be taking cues from the vestiges of America’s perceived rudderlessness in the final months of President Donald Trump’s term. “It is not always about us,” said Dan Fried, a former senior U.S....
    Ocasio-Cortez talks Capitol attack, past sexual assault Biden meets Republicans on virus aid, but no quick deal In early going, Biden floods the zone with decrees Myanmar, Russia pose early tests for Biden’s foreign policy GOP’s McConnell blasts ‘loony lies’ by Ga. Rep. Greene Biden and GOP senators offer competing COVID-19 relief plans Trump lawyer: Impeachment case ‘undemocratic,’ ill-advised US won’t make immigration arrests at virus vaccination sites Harris speaks with Trudeau in first foreign leader call Biden threatens sanctions on Myanmar after military coup Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Callaway Apex, Apex Pro hybrids (2021) Alcohol brands owned by celebs Big Tech’s Foreign Problems Come Home While reporting on Facebook’s operations in Myanmar in 2018, I wrote about mobs hunting down people in the streets, violent animosity toward a beleaguered minority group, and the targeting of journalists (some of whom were branded as terrorists)—all of which could be traced back to hate-filled misinformation that had rippled across social media unimpeded. At the time, a Facebook employee, an American diplomat, and several others who had spent time in Myanmar (also known as Burma) told me they worried that similar trends were under way in the United States. © Getty / The Atlantic In the U.S. itself, however, that concern was rarely replicated. The link between online lies and real-world violence was present not just in Myanmar, but in India, Sri Lanka, and elsewhere—places where American technology platforms, particularly Facebook, were used to spread dangerous conspiracy theories and barrage users with propaganda. In those countries, civil-society members, activists, and concerned citizens repeatedly rang alarm bells. Load Error Yet these...
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