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    When Hurricane Ian hit Florida, it was one of the United States’ most powerful hurricanes on record, and it followed a two-week string of massive, devastating storms around the world. A few days earlier in the Philippines, Typhoon Noru gave new meaning to rapid intensification when it blew up from a tropical storm with 50 mph winds to a Category 5 monster with 155 mph winds the next day. Hurricane Fiona flooded Puerto Rico, then became Canada’s most intense storm on record. Typhoon Merbok gained strength over a warm Pacific Ocean and tore up over 1,000 miles of the Alaska coast. Major storms hit from the Philippines in the western Pacific to the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic, to Japan and Florida in the middle latitudes and western Alaska and the Canadian Maritimes in the high latitudes. A lot of people are asking about the role rising global temperatures play in storms like these. It’s not always a simple answer. Record-setting cyclones in late September 2022. Mathew Barlow It is clear that climate change increases...
    CoastFest 2022, planned for Saturday, Oct. 1, in Brunswick, has been postponed due to the potential impacts of Hurricane Ian, the Coastal Resources Division (CRD) of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources announced today.  “We were hoping the storm’s path would change and allow us to host CoastFest this year, but the current trajectory does not appear to be in our favor,” said Tyler Jones, a public information officer for CRD and the CoastFest coordinator. “The logistics that go into putting the event together require several days of preparation, and the possible impacts from Hurricane Ian look like they will prevent that.” CRD is currently looking at potential make-up dates for CoastFest in the coming months, but no date has been set or decisions made, Jones added. “We know what an important event this is to the community, especially young people, and we are as disappointed as anyone,” Jones said. “We appreciate everyone’s understanding and encourage everyone who may potentially be impacted by the storm to prepare now.” The public...
    (CNN)Intense hurricanes and typhoons -- the most devastating storms on the planet -- could more than double by 2050 in nearly all regions of the world because of climate change, scientists reported Wednesday. The study, published in the journal Science Advances, defined intense storms as the equivalent of a category 3 hurricane or stronger. It noted that the probability of these storms will be higher in the coming decades, and more people will be impacted by intense storms in some of the world's most vulnerable regions.Researchers also found the wind speeds in these storms could increase by as much as 20%, as well as a tremendous increase in the frequency of category 4 and category 5 storms -- by more than 200% in some regions. "Our results also re-emphasize that regions that currently have a (very) low risk could start to be really impacted by tropical cyclones under climate change," Nadia Bloemendaal, a climate scientist at the University of Amsterdam and the lead author on the study, told CNN in an email. "We found it shocking to see the disproportionate...
    ARSENAL transfer target Noa Lang caused controversy as he stormed down the tunnel after being substituted for Club Brugge. The £33million-rated winger has allegedly been scouted by the Gunners for months. 2Noa Lang caused controversy in his last outing for Club BruggeCredit: Getty 2The Arsenal transfer target stormed down the tunnel after being subbed offCredit: AFP And multiple sources in Belgium and Lang’s native Netherlands have claimed Arsenal are ready to submit a bid for him. The 22-year-old has scored eight times and registered a further 12 assists so far this term. But despite his good form, his mood appears to be quite the opposite. Brugge were cruising to victory at Seraing and leading by three goals when his manager Alfred Schreuder decided to give him a rest in the 63rd-minute. Bas Dost was brought on to replace him - but Lang was absolutely furious and marched straight down the tunnel as he headed for the showers. He missed his team cap off an otherwise brilliant night by adding to more strikes to their tally to claim a 5-0 victory....
    Prince Charles has revealed told how his grandson Prince George is learning about climate change as he introduced a documentary ahead of Cop26. The Prince of Wales, 72, appeared in the new The Sky Kids Original documentary Cop26: In Your Hands, and explained his eldest grandson, eight, has been learning global warming is causing 'the big storms, and floods, the droughts, fires and food shortages' around the world. During the clip, Charles added: 'When I was his age, people had no idea about the damage they were doing, but by the time I was a teenager I started to see that if we didn't stop polluting our planet, we would face a very dangerous future indeed.' The royal's comments come after it was revealed Charles has written the foreword for a new children's book about global warming.  Prince Charles, 72, has revealed told how his grandson Prince George, eight, is learning about climate change as he introduced a documentary ahead of Cop26 In the documentary, Charles, shown holding a revolving earth in the footage, told viewers their 'future depends on...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a new extreme weather preparedness plan Monday, weeks after the remnants of Hurricane Ida devastated the region. It includes upgrading storm modeling, tracking and alert systems. It also involves identifying all basement and cellar residents, and taking measures to protect them. Lastly, it reimagines the city’s sewage and draining system. READ MORE: Democratic Mayoral Candidate Eric Adams Unveils Plan To Protect New Yorkers From Flooding, Climate Change Threats The mayor said one of the most important things is communication. READ MORE: Mattress Giveaway In Queens Highlights Depth Of Need That Remains 3 Weeks After Ida WATCH: Mayor De Blasio Unveils Extreme Weather Plan For NYC  “We’re going to have signage in new parts of New York City warning people in new ways of where to stay away when there’s heavy rain. We’re going to have evacuation preparation, going door to door,” he said. “We’re going to be talking about travel bans. Things we have rarely used in the past, we’re going to be using more often now.” MORE NEWS: Staten Island University Hospital...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- The New York City Council held a hearing Tuesday to discuss how to prevent a repeat of the deadly devastation left behind by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, which promoted the city's first ever Flash Flood Emergency and left 13 people dead.City leaders discussed how to be better prepared in the future."When the flooding is coming from above, not just from the river or the ocean, nowhere is safe," said NYC City Councilmember Mark Levine.The quest for answers came to City Council chambers, where one agency head after another admitted that the city's infrastructure simply is not built to withstand a deluge like the extraordinary rainstorm on September 1."Right now, this system is designed to handle about half of what we saw in Ida," New York City Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Vincent Sapienza said. "You know, from going from one and three quarter inches to three and a half inches in an hour."RELATED | Queens couple recalls night Ida flooding destroyed everythingEMBED More News Videos Jim Dolan has more with the couple who lost...
    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) on Friday suggested invoking travel bans ahead of future “extreme weather” in his city. De Blasio told CNN’s “New Day” that since “extreme weather is now tragically the norm” as a result of climate change, travel bans and evacuations are likely to be utilized to prevent flooding similar to what New York City has seen this week. “I think it’s a different ball game now, a different strategy,” de Blasio emphasized. “Instead of assuming, as we have in the past — for example, a travel ban was a very, very rare thing in the past. The few times I’ve used that when we were expecting massive blizzards. But now, seeing what happened on Wednesday, a travel ban is the kind of thing I want to introduce into the equation early in each storm as a possibility, and then pull the trigger if I have to and literally tell people, ‘Off the streets, out of the subways, clear the way.'” “Also, evacuation,” he added. “Evacuation, John, is something we only thought of in...
    (CNN)The weather on Earth can be strange, but it may be nothing compared to global dust storms or nighttime snowfall on Mars that scientists are just beginning to understand. Before we send humans to other destinations across the solar system, the ability to create accurate weather forecasts will be necessary, according to new research. And mapping Mars could help astronauts determine where to find critical resources, like melting ice.Luckily, there are some similarities between Earth and Mars and even Saturn's moon, Titan, that allow scientists to lay the groundwork for forecasting weather on other planets. "I believe the first accurate forecasts of perhaps a few Mars days may be only a decade away," said lead study author J. Michael Battalio, a postdoctoral researcher in Earth and planetary sciences in Yale University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, in a statement. "It is just a matter of combining better observational datasets with sufficiently refined numerical models," Battalio said. "But until then, we can rely upon connections between the climate and weather to help anticipate dust storms."Read MoreThe researchers examined an Earth phenomenon...
    A utility pole bends from winds caused by Hurricane Ida on a road leading to Batabano, in the Mayabeque province, Cuba on Friday. Ramon Espinosa/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.Hurricane Ida is projected to hit Louisiana on Sunday as a category-four storm, bringing winds as high as 140 miles an hour to the Gulf Coast 16 years to the day after Hurricane Katrina made landfall. Mandatory evacuation orders are in effect for some coastal parishes and parts of New Orleans (though evacuation is often an option that not all residents have), and the Saints have cancelled their Sunday game at the Superdome. And all of this is coming as the state’s hospitals are already overwhelmed by a fourth wave of COVID-19. Hurricanes are expected in hurricane season, but read the explanations of Ida and something else stands out: Ida is going to be a lot worse than it would have been, because the Gulf of Mexico is really warm right now. Per Reuters: “This storm has...
    Now hiring: U.S. seen adding 700,000 jobs in June 11 Ways Warren Buffett Lives Frugally © Provided by NBC Sports Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad Gareth Bale stormed off when asked if he would retire from Wales, as the captain of the Welsh national team was understandably emotional following their EURO 2020 exit. [ MORE: EURO 2020 hub ] Bale, 31, stood tall for Wales this summer but they were hammered 4-0 by Denmark in the last 16 clash in Amsterdam and many believe he will now call time on his international career for Wales. Some believe he may retire altogether this summer. Asked by the BBC after the game about his future and if that was his last game for Wales, Bale simply raised his hand and walked away from the interview. So, we don’t know anything about his future, but previously he said he knows what he wants to do and when he reveals his decision it will ’cause chaos’ this summer. Bale was asked about his overall thoughts on the game,...
    (CNN)When Hurricane Katrina struck Louisiana in 2005, it had been 40 years since New Orleans had seen a major hurricane. In the 15 years since then, our state has seen seven major weather disasters and even more unnamed storms -- every parish in the state has been under a federal flood declaration in recent memory. Liz Williams Russell Katrina would become one of the most devastating storms in the history of the United States. Now, as we pause in remembrance of the lives lost and forever changed as a result of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita, which hit just a month later, Louisiana has once again been ravaged by a major storm. Its impacts are compounded by the ongoing pandemic, which has already devastated our communities and upended so many of our lives. Hurricane Laura barreled towards our coastline early Thursday, packing winds of about 150 mph. Since 2005, we have seen storms intensify in shorter amounts of time, bringing more water more quickly than the thresholds around which our communities have been designed. It took Hurricane Laura...
    From the historic heat wave and wildfires in the West, to the massive derecho that tore through the middle of the nation, to the record-breaking pace of this year's hurricane season, the unprecedented and concurrent extreme conditions resemble the chaotic climate future scientists have been warning us about for decades — only it's happening right now.  While climate catastrophes are typically spaced out in time and geographic location, right now the U.S. is dealing with multiple disasters. The Midwest is cleaning up from a devastating derecho that caused nearly $4 billion in damage to homes and crops, as nearly a quarter-million people in the West are under evacuation orders or warnings from fires that have burned over 1 million acres, and at the same time residents along the Gulf Coast are bracing for back-to-back landfalls of a tropical storm and hurricane.   "This current stretch of natural catastrophe events in the United States are essentially a snapshot of what scientists and emergency managers have long feared," says meteorologist Steven Bowen, the head of Catastrophe Insight at AON, an international risk...
    DENVER (CBS4) – With 11 days left in July, it appears the metro area will have at least a small chance for late day thunderstorms each day through the end of the month. Some of the storms will likely be severe on some days. It’s very typical weather for late July which can be one of the stormiest times of the year. It’s also the warmest time of the year from climate standpoint. Temperatures will reach near 90 degrees again around Denver, Boulder, and Fort Collins on Monday and no significant temperature swings are expected before the end of the month. Highs should stay within 10 degrees of 90 for at least the next two weeks. (source: CBS) Thunderstorms will initialize in the mountains around midday on Monday and then gradually move east toward Interstate 25. The “best” chance for storms may end up being around Colorado Springs versus the Denver area. There is about a 30% chance for storms in the Denver metro area mainly after 4-5 p.m. Once the storms move east of the I-25 urban corridor in...
    Future tropical cyclones, or hurricanes, will feature more intense rain with more rain produced per hour than previous storms but fewer hurricanes will make landfall, according to predictions in a brand-new study. The researchers at the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University announced the findings on Monday, June 15. Published early online in Geophysical Research Letters, the study, which used global climate modeling, suggests that while rain intensity is likely to increase the number of storms that make landfall in the United States will decrease. “Essentially our work with climate and storm modeling provides evidence that hurricanes will produce more precipitation per hour of impact in the future,” said Kevin Reed, Ph.D., Associate Professor in SoMAS. “This finding is consistent and adds to our work using models of Hurricane Florence and tracking extreme amounts of rainfall,” he added, referring to a study published earlier this year in Science Advances and explained in this news release. The researchers used the global climate model that is called a variable-resolution version of the Community Atmospheric Model 5 (CAM5), a...
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