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    Associated Press LONDON — More than 700 Amazon warehouse workers in England staged a protest Thursday in a dispute over pay, in the latest sign of workplace friction stoked by Britain’s cost of living crisis and a growing discontent among employees over wage and working conditions. The GMB union said employees at the facility in Tilbury, Essex, east of London, stopped work after the ecommerce giant offered to raise salaries by 35 pence (42 cents) an hour. The union said workers want a raise of 2 pounds to better match the demands of their job and cope with soaring inflation. Amazon doesn’t recognize the union, which likely has one of the highest number of members at the Tilbury location out of its 28 U.K. facilities. “Amazon is one of the most profitable companies on the planet,” said Steve Garelick, the GMB union’s regional organizer for logistics and gig economy. “With household costs spiraling, the least they can do is offer decent pay.” Garelick shared videos on Twitter of workers sitting down at tables, which he said showed a “withdrawal of...
    An exam regulator in the United Kingdom advised employees to stop "hepeating," according to documents from the organization. Male employees of the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation were warned to stop the act of hepeating, or a portmanteau of the words "he" and "repeating" defined as men hijacking ideas suggested by their female colleagues, according to a 28-page internal employee handbook obtained by the Daily Mail. TEACHERS, ADVOCACY GROUPS CONCERNED AS STATE CONSIDERS MORE STANDARDIZED TESTING The word has been attributed to being created by the "friends" of Nicole Gugliucci, an assistant professor at Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire, according to the outlet. "My friends coined a word: hepeated," Gugliucci wrote in a 2017 tweet. "For when a woman suggests an idea and it's ignored, but then a guy says same thing and everyone loves it." "Usage: 'Ugh, I got hepeated in that meeting again.' Or, 'He totally hepeated me!'" Gugliucci said. My friends coined a word: hepeated. For when a woman suggests an idea and it's ignored, but then a guy...
    HACKERS are feared to have penetrated half of UK businesses due to staff working from home. And one in ten firms confirmed they were victims of a cyber attack last year, with IT systems thought to be more vulnerable, a study found. 1Hackers are feared to have penetrated half of UK businesses due to staff working from homeCredit: Getty Four out of five companies had no protections against cyber-criminals, the poll by the British Chambers of Commerce and IT firm Cisco found. Shevaun Haviland, Director General of the BCC, said: “The huge shift to home working, and the use of cloud computing, for tens of thousands of employees happened almost overnight. "So it is not surprising that many firms were caught out by the implications this had for their cyber-security arrangements.” He added that as companies shift to hybrid working it is “more vital than ever that firms have the right cyber-security protections in place.” Aine Rogers from Cisco added: “The lines between professional and personal are more blurred than ever. “Organisations are no longer just protecting an ‘office’ but...
    London (CNN Business)A British bank has adopted a four-day work week for all its employees without cutting pay, saying it's the largest UK company so far to make such a move. Atom Bank announced on Tuesday that it had also reduced the weekly hours of its 430 staff to 34 from 37.5 and expected most workers to take either Monday or Friday off. The change is voluntary and would mean staff working slightly longer days. The policy, which took effect on November 1, was introduced to support Atom's employees' "mental and physical wellbeing," and improve productivity, the company said. The majority of its workers have switched to the new work week. "A four-day week will provide our employees with more opportunities to pursue their passions, spend time with their families, and build a healthier work/life balance," Atom CEO Mark Mullen said in a statement.Mullen said that Atom's experience during the pandemic had "exploded many of the myths of the modern workplace," including the need to work in an office. Read MoreAtom launched in 2016 as a mobile bank. It offers...
    An Amazon warehouse in Leeds, England.Nathan Stirk | Getty Images LONDON — Labor shortages are forcing British businesses to hike wages to compete for workers, with Amazon offering joining bonuses of up to £3,000 ($4,140) in the run up to the festive period. The e-commerce giant is currently advertising a number of positions around the U.K. that come with hefty cash bonuses. One role, for a temporary warehouse worker in the English city of Exeter, is offering a £3,000 onboarding bonus, while a London-based job with the company offers a signing bonus of £2,000. Many other roles in Amazon's U.K. warehouses are offering welcome bonuses of £1,500. Basic hourly rates are £11.10 per hour in London, while overtime pay can reach as much as £22.20. The average pay for warehouse workers in the U.K. is £ 10.16 per hour, according to jobs site Indeed. Amazon's aggressive hiring drive is reflective of a labor problem spanning industries all over the U.K. Britain has an estimated shortage of 100,000 truck drivers, which has disrupted deliveries and led to empty store shelves, backlogs...
    Amazon founder Jeff Bezos may have been able to fly into space, but it seems the company's drone delivery system may never even get off the ground. The Amazon Prime Air initiative debuted in 2016 as a way to provide customers with their orders within half an hour. But five years later, the dream remains grounded as the tech giant shutters a  department in its pioneering British aviation team, as staff claim Prime Air is  'dysfunctional'. Speaking on the condition of anonymity to Wired, former employees of the UK team described a work environment in which managers were put in place to oversee the drone delivery project without any technological knowledge and people would drink at their desks due to a lack of motivation. Eventually, more than 100 employees at the Cambridge office lost their jobs and dozens of others were moved to other projects, Wired reports, just months after the company laid off dozens of employees working on the project in the United States.
    Many Americans and Britons will face practical vaccination warrants because a new poll shows that 56% of companies will have to vaccinate at least some employees against Covid 19, in many cases at risk of losing their jobs. The poll, conducted Thursday by Arizona State University, found that 40% of companies require all employees to be vaccinated against Covit-19, and at least 16% require some workers to be vaccinated. Overall, 88% of companies say their employees should be vaccinated or motivated, and 60% say they need some form of evidence to be vaccinated. The investigation, backed by the Rockefeller Foundation, paints a grim picture for those planning to endure the blows of Covid 19. The US and UK governments have avoided mandating vaccinations – and may face legal challenges – so the private sector can do it for them. Companies are already laying the groundwork for requiring a “vaccine passport”, and customers must show a vaccine or negative Govt test before accessing certain products, services and events. Even if many people choose not to travel internationally or go to...
    Uber drivers in the U.K. will receive the minimum wage, pensions and holiday pay, following a recent court ruling that said they should be classified as workers and entitled to such benefits. The ride hailing giant's announcement Tuesday comes after it lost an appeal last month at the U.K. Supreme Court following a yearslong court battle. The court's decision holds wider implications for the country's gig economy. Uber said it's extending the benefits immediately to its more than 70,000 drivers in the U.K. Drivers will earn at least the minimum wage, which currently stands at 8.72 pounds ($12.12), after accepting a trip request and expenses, and will still be able to earn more. Drivers will also get holiday pay equal to about 12% of their earnings, paid every two weeks. And they'll be enrolled in a pension plan that both they and the company will pay into. "This is an important day for drivers in the U.K.," Uber's regional general manager for Northern and Eastern Europe, Jamie Heywood, said in a filing to the Securities and Exchange Commission. He...
    Uber will classify around 70,000 drivers in the UK as workers and give them some benefits after losing an appeal at the Supreme Court level in February, following a years-long legal battle over their employment status. Drivers will still not be considered full-time employees, but they will receive a minimum wage, holiday time, and will be enrolled in a pension plan starting on March 17th. The decision in February was one of the biggest wins yet for drivers, and for gig workers writ large, in the UK. But that victory came just a few months after voters in California approved Prop 22, a ballot measure that reversed a previous decision to classify drivers as employees. And despite repeated claims that classifying drivers as employees would make things more expensive for customers, all the major gig economy companies have since raised prices anyway. Uber, which helped bankroll the effort to pass Prop 22, is now looking at making similar moves in the European Union. The case Uber lost in February began all the way back in 2016 when two drivers argued...
    BuzzFeed is reducing its HuffPost staff in the United Kingdom, a BuzzFeed spokeswoman confirmed Friday. The reductions come after layoffs at HuffPost in the United States were announced this week. “BuzzFeed has announced today that it’s begun a restructuring of HuffPost in order to break even this year and fast-track its path to profitability,” said Tess Atkinson, BuzzFeed’s chief of staff and head of international communications in an emailed statement. Staff were notified Tuesday about the plans, Atkinson said in an interview, and are currently talking with the company about other potential jobs at the company. The number of eliminated jobs will be under 20, she added, but it will not have a final number until the end of next week. The layoffs are needed, Atkinson said in the statement, because the company is reducing its coverage in the U.K. “As part of these changes, we have begun a consultation process in the UK to propose focusing on local coverage of politics, entertainment and LIFE (HuffPost’s lifestyle vertical) with a smaller team, while exploring new commercial partnerships in the market,”...
    Burger King UK deliberately stirred controversy by tweeting that “Women belong in the kitchen” — before pulling a woke bait-and-switch. “Women belong in the kitchen,” the fast-food chain posted on its official UK account, as if in imitation of a typical left-liberal caricature of an unreconstructed social conservative. “If they want to, of course. Yet only 20 per cent of chefs are women. We’re on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career,” they continued in a subsequent tweet, signed with the hashtag #IWD — for International Women’s Day, a communist holiday institutionalised by Bolshevik dictator Vladimir Lenin and popularised by the United Nations and woke corporations in the West. “We are proud to be launching a new scholarship programme which will help female Burger King employees pursue their culinary dreams!” BK concluded — but the message did not land for everybody. “[S]omebody working at Burger King really looked at this and thought it was a good idea,” tweeted one user. “To bring attention to...
    In honor of International Women’s Day, Burger King UK tweeted a controversial joke that was immediately grilled on Twitter. “Women belong in the kitchen,” the official UK Twitter account tweeted on Monday. They followed up with “If they want to, of course. Yet only 20% of chefs are women.” The follow-up tweet went on to say: “We’re on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career.” In a third tweet on the thread, Burger King UK then announced the company is launching a new scholarship program to “help female Burger King employees pursue their culinary dreams!” While the initial tweet has over 492,000 likes and growing, many readers did not find the company’s play on the offensive stereotype clever.  Women belong in the kitchen. — Burger King (@BurgerKingUK) March 8, 2021 “I won’t be eating at your store again thanks,” commented one offended former fan to the tune of over 28,000 likes. “Burger King belongs in a trashcan,” responded actress Chelsea Peretti, before...
    Savannah Rychcik March 8, 2021 0 Comments Burger King U.K.’s attempt to celebrate International Women’s Day backfired. The company tweeted on Monday, “Women belong in the kitchen.” It followed with another tweet providing an explanation. “If they want to, of course. Yet only 20% of chefs are women. We’re on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career,” the account added. The company went on to announce it is “launching a new scholarship programme which will help female Burger King employees pursue their culinary dreams!” If they want to, of course. Yet only 20% of chefs are women. Were on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career. #IWD— Burger King (@BurgerKingUK) March 8, 2021 We are proud to be launching a new scholarship programme which will help female Burger King employees pursue their culinary dreams!— Burger King (@BurgerKingUK) March 8, 2021 Several...
    More On: burger king Burger King, Wendy’s are the latest to enter chicken wars Burger King in France is giving away 2-pound bags of potatoes KFC set to revamp menu as battle with Popeyes heats up Whopper of a scam: Ex-Burger King employee accused of stealing $30K In honor of International Women’s Day, Burger King UK tweeted a controversial joke that was immediately grilled on Twitter. “Women belong in the kitchen,” the official UK Twitter account tweeted on Monday. They followed up with “If they want to, of course. Yet only 20% of chefs are women.” The follow-up tweet went on to say: “We’re on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career.” In a third tweet on the thread, Burger King UK then announced the company is launching a new scholarship program to “help female Burger King employees pursue their culinary dreams!” While the initial tweet has over 492,000 likes and growing, many readers did not find the company’s play on the offensive...
    This probably didn’t go the way they hoped it would. In honor of International Women’s Day, a number of companies and brands are using social media to share supportive messages or promote their own relevant initiatives for female employees. Burger King U.K. apparently tried to do the latter, but has since come under fire for its statements, which the fast-food chain appeared to present in a joking manner. On Monday, the Burger King U.K. account tweeted out a message simply reading "women belong in the kitchen." The brand followed it up with another tweet, clarifying that women only belong in the kitchen "if they want to, or course." "Yet only 20% of chefs are women. We're on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career," the second tweet clarified. The company concluded by announcing a scholarship program "which will help female Burger king employees pursue their culinary dreams!" NEW MCDONALD'S DRIVE-THRU IS USING AI TECHNOLOGY TO TAKE ORDERS, MAKE SUGGESTIONS The initial post, however, drew some harsh criticism from fans....
    JESSUP, MD. (WJZ) — An inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution-Jessup tested positive for the B.117 variant, also known as the U.K variant of COVID-19. The Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services was notified of the case on February 19. They said they have conducted “comprehensive contact tracing.” READ MORE: Watch Live: Baltimore Officials To Give Update On COVID Vaccination Plan They also giving all inmates and employees both rapid and diagnostic tests, as well as sequencing to detect any presence of any of the COVID-19 variants. The “special testing operation,” as they call it, will include around 900 inmates and employees. READ MORE: Registration Open For COVID Vaccination Appointments At M&T Bank Stadium MCI-Jessup is reporting 29 positive cases of COVID-19, which they said is 4.4% of its population. “All staff at the facility, as well as all inmates over 65, have been offered the vaccine, and the first dose has been administered to those who agreed to be vaccinated,” they said in a statement. MORE NEWS: Maryland Weather: Up To 3 Inches Of Snow, Wintry Mix Expected...
    Companies in Britain have been tasking law firms to craft “no jab, no job” contracts that would bar prospective employees from being hired unless they have been vaccinated against the Chinese coronavirus. While the government has publicly claimed that it has no intentions of requiring domestic vaccine passports, ministers have admitted that private businesses may take up the mantle of imposing it on the British public. Speaking to the Financial Times, law firms said that they have already been contacted by companies, including care homes and multinational corporations, which are looking to draw up contracts that would require employees to be inoculated against the virus. One unnamed attorney told the paper that such requirements could be risky as they might trigger discrimination claims from people who refuse to take the vaccine on religious grounds, pregnant women, or those who have health conditions, such as allergies, which prevent them from taking the jab. The lawyer did note that in sectors in which employees are surrounded by at-risk people, such as in care homes, so-called “no jab, no job” contracts may ultimately...
    Bill Russell: Career retrospective 8 Amazing Side Effects Of Eating Avocados Every Day The 30 highest-rated US and UK CEOs during the coronavirus pandemic, according to employees © Mark Neuling/CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images Boston Scientific CEO Michael Mahoney Mark Neuling/CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images The coronavirus pandemic has been a test for corporate leaders. People, especially employees, are watching how CEOs respond to troubling times and judging them based on it. To find out which CEOs are viewed most favorably by their employees during the pandemic, jobs site  Glassdoor analyzed anonymous employee reviews posted on its website between March and July. Leaders from Zoom, DocuSign, Box, and Boston Scientific made the list. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The coronavirus pandemic has been, and continues to be, a major test for corporate leaders. Load Error The public is watching whether CEOs lay off or furlough workers, as well as how they treat their employees during this time. As billionaire Mark Cuban said in April, customers who see companies laying off employees will...
    LONDON (AP) — Official figures show that unemployment in the U.K. edged up in July even though large sections of the British economy reopened after the coronavirus lockdown. The 104,000 rise in the number of people unemployed during the three-month period to July raised the unemployment rate by 0.2 percentage points to 4.1% — the biggest increase since the pandemic began. The increase in unemployment came even after the reopening of the hospitality sector in early July, following on from the reopening of shops selling items deemed as nonessential, such as clothes and books. Analysts worry that unemployment will start to rise more markedly in the coming months as a salary-support government package, which encouraged over a million companies to keep nearly 10 million employees on payroll rather than fire them, is coming to an end. Some firms have started laying off staff ahead of the end of the Job Retention Scheme on Oct. 31, and some just never took part in the program. The statistics agency said another 36,000 people fell off the payroll of private companies in August,...
    London (CNN Business)Britain has stumbled through a highly political pandemic. Virtually every move Boris Johnson's government has made in response to the Covid-19 crisis has sharply divided the weary nation — starting with his refusal to sack a roaming chief aide in May, and encompassing since his struggles on testing, contact tracing, technology, schools and lockdown restrictions.But as the country enters a new stage in its coronavirus response and cases tick upwards at an alarming rate, the political back-and-forth is entering a new arena: the lounges, bedrooms and studies of millions of British workers.Nearly half of the United Kingdom's 30 million employees have worked from home during the pandemic, according to the country's statistics body, with an additional 9 million placed on the country's furlough scheme. They were sent there by the government, who ordered workplaces to shut as the virus started spreading.Read MoreBut now, despite rising cases and a growing public desire for flexible work arrangements, the government desperately wants employees back in offices. Ministers and business leaders cite the economic impact on city centers as the driving force...
    A sign hangs above an entrance to a branch of Barclays Plc bank in the City of London, U.K.Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images Barclays is being probed by the United Kingdom's privacy watchdog, the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), over allegations that the British bank spied on its staff, the agency said on Sunday. Earlier this year, Barclays said it was changing a system that the bank was piloting, which tracked how employees spent their time at work, after critical media reports accused the bank of spying on its staff. The ICO said on Sunday a formal probe was ongoing but it could not say when the investigation would conclude. "People expect that they can keep their personal lives private and that they are also entitled to a degree of privacy in the workplace," an ICO spokesman said. "If organisations wish to monitor their employees, they should be clear about its purpose and that it brings real benefits. Organisations also need to make employees aware of the nature, extent and reasons for any monitoring", he added. The probe was reported...
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