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    IN AMERICA people have the right to wear whatever clothes they want and it is often considered one of the rights under the First Amendment. While this might be the case for the United States, people in other countries have died due to their clothing choices, or lack thereof, and now many want to know more about Mahsa Amini's story. 2Mahsa Amini's death sparked a series of political protestsCredit: Twitter Who was Mahsa Amini? Mahsa Amini was an Iranian woman who was born on September 20, 2000, in Saqez, Iran. She ultimately died on September 16, 2022, and her death has since sparked a series of political protests. While her death might have sparked these political protests, she was reportedly a "shy" and "reserved" resident who "never challenged the country's clerical rulers or its Islamic dress code," a source close to the family told The Jerusalem Post. Read More from IranHIJAB CONTROVERSY Why Sun reporter wore hijab to cover Iran team instead of refusingBLOODSPORT How Iran has executed 6 athletes as footballers threatened over anthem snub...
    Iran's football team sung their country's national anthem ahead of their World Cup clash against Wales in Qatar today, after refusing to do so in their first match. Iran's players appeared to back down from their protest following pressure from the Islamic regime. Prior to their kick-off against England in their first group game on Monday, players remained silent as booing filled the ground.  Their previous refusal to sing was a show of solidarity with protesters in their home country, hundreds of whom have been killed in clashes with government security services over the death of Mahsa Amini – a woman who died in custody after being arrested by the Tehran's morality police. Iran 's football team sung their country's national anthem ahead of their World Cup clash against Wales in Qatar today, after pressure from the Islamic republic to back down from their previous protests But many Iranian fans in the stands also displayed slogans supporting the protests on Friday, drawing particular attention to human rights issues and the plight of women. Qatari authorities took particular issue with one female...
    A teenager dubbed the 'Jamie Oliver of Iran' has reportedly been beaten to death by security forced - triggering another wave of protests first sparked by the alleged killing of Mahsa Amini.  Mehrshad Shahidi, a 19-year-old celebrity chef, died on Wednesday while allegedly in the custody of Iran's Revolutionary Guard. It came as protests over the death of Ms Amini, a 22-year-old woman who reportedly died in custody after being tortured by Iranian morality police for not wearing a hijab properly on September 16, reached a 40th day. Amini was initially arrested in Tehran for an alleged breach of Iran's strict dress rules for women based on Islamic sharia law.  Mr Shahidi, meanwhile, is said to have died after receiving injuries to his skull via batons while in custody after being arrested during protests in the city of Arak, human rights organisations have said. His death is claimed to be the 253rd during the demonstrations. The chef's family say they have been pushed by Iranian officials to announce he died from a heart attack, The Sunday Telegraph reports.
    Iranian security forces clashed with mourners who gathered at Mahsa Amini’s grave in her hometown of Saqqez on Wednesday as they sought to mark 40 days since her death. Roughly 10,000 people had gathered at the cemetery, according to Iran's semi-official ISNA news agency, which also reported that the internet in the region had subsequently been cut off. RUSSIA CONTINUES ATTACKS ON KYIV WITH IRANIAN ‘KAMIKAZE’ DRONES Amini, an Iranian Kurd, fell into a coma last month after Iranian authorities seized her over an alleged infraction related to the wearing of her hijab. She died days later. Her death sparked significant demonstrations, which has become one of the largest challenges to the clerical leadership since the 1979 revolution. "Riot police shot mourners who gathered at the cemetery for Mahsa's memorial ceremony. ... Dozens have been arrested," a witness told Reuters. Given concerns about possible protests marking the 40-day anniversary since Amini’s death, security police warned her family that “their son will be arrested” if her family held a memorial procession, rights groups alleged. "It has been 40 days since the death of...
    People participate in a protest against the Islamic regime of Iran and the death of Mahsa Amini in New York, September 27, 2022.Stephanie Keith | Reuters The U.S. Treasury announced a fresh round of sanctions Wednesday against Iranian officials for brutal violence against peaceful demonstrators as protests following the death of Iranian woman Mahsa Amini continue. The new sanctions come 40 days after the 22-year-old Amini's death in the custody of Iran's morality police. Iranian officials have continued their crackdown on protesters while limiting access to internet services. "Forty days after the tragic death of Mahsa Amini, Iranians continue to bravely protest in the face of brutal suppression and disruption of internet access," Brian E. Nelson, under secretary of the Treasury said in a statement. "The United States is imposing new sanctions on Iranian officials overseeing organizations involved in violent crackdowns and killings, including of children, as part of our commitment to hold all levels of the Iranian government accountable for its repression." Treasury designated 10 Iranian officials, two Iranian intelligence actors and two Iranian entities involved in the Iranian...
    A Spanish soccer fan trekking from Madrid to Doha, Qatar, for the World Cup has been arrested in Iran after visiting the grave of Mahsa Amini, according to two reports that surfaced on Tuesday. Santiago Sanchez's family went public earlier in the day with a plea for information on his whereabouts after silence upon entering Iran. The 41-year-old is an experienced trekker, former paratrooper and fervent soccer fan. His family last heard from him in an audio message on October 2. Now, a report from Hengaw - a human rights organization - and another from Iran International say that Sanchez has been arrested after visiting Amini's grave. Hengaw says: 'Sánchez, a 41-year-old tourist from Spain, was kidnapped by Iranian security forces after visiting the grave of Zhina (Mahsa) Amini in Saqqez. 'Hengaw’s sources, whose identity remains protected for security reasons, stated that Santiago Sánchez is being held in the detention center of Iranian Intelligence in Sanandaj.' Amini, 22, died on September 16, three days after being taken into custody by Iran's notorious morality police for supposedly not wearing her hijab correctly while she...
    Iranians protest to demand justice and highlight the death of Mahsa Amini, who was arrested by morality police and subsequently died in hospital in Tehran under suspicious circumstances.Mike Kemp | In Pictures via Getty Images The U.S. Treasury Department on Thursday levied fresh sanctions against Iranian leaders over the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini and violent crackdown on peaceful protesters. The sanctions come after weeks of protest following Amini's death on Sept. 16. The Kurdish-Iranian woman died of an apparent brain hemorrhage in the custody of Iran's Morality Police for allegedly wearing her hijab too loosely. Police have shut down internet access to social media and used lethal force to try to subdue demonstrations throughout the country, according to Treasury. "The rights to freedom of expression and of peaceful assembly are vital to guaranteeing individual liberty and dignity," Treasury Under Secretary Brian Nelson said in a statement. "The United States condemns the Iranian government's Internet shutdown and continued violent suppression of peaceful protest and will not hesitate to target those who direct and support such actions." Treasury sanctioned...
    Standing before her bathroom mirror, Elnaz Rahimpour fluffed her curly hair before braiding the tendrils into four pieces. She reached for the scissors and cut each dark lock with tears in her eyes, as an old Iranian resistance anthem streamed over the video she posted to Instagram — her own gesture of protest in solidarity with the movement that has coursed through Iran in the weeks since a 22-year-old woman, Mahsa Amini, died at a Tehran hospital after reportedly being brutalized by the country’s morality police. Amid protests across Iran, many women in the country have adopted the political symbolism of cutting their hair — at once a statement against oppression and the rules of compulsory hijab for women, and an act of defiance in honor of Amini, who was arrested for allegedly violating the Islamic Republic’s modesty laws. Iranian American artist Samy Rose, left, utilizes theatrical blood as Yadviga Krasovskaya of Belarus cuts her hair during a rally in downtown Los Angeles on Oct. 1, 2022, in solidarity with protesters in Iran. (Damian Dovarganes / Associated...
    Listen to this episode of The Times: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Google Podcasts Mahsa Amini died Sept. 16 in Iran after an encounter with the country’s so-called morality police. Since her death, Iranians have taken to the streets in protest of the country’s modesty laws. But what began as a call for women’s rights in Iran has since ballooned into something so much bigger. Today, we hear from the Iranian diaspora about why they’re protesting in solidarity. Read the full transcript here. Host: L.A. Times podcast producer Asal Ehsanipour Guests: L.A. Times diaspora reporter Sarah Parvini More reading: ‘Woman, life, freedom’: L.A. protest over Iran draws thousands ‘Nothing to lose’: Iran’s protesters step up their defiance as a potential showdown looms In protests over death of Mahsa Amini, internet is key to planning. Can Iran block access? About The Times “The Times” is produced by Shannon Lin, Denise Guerra, Kasia Broussalian, David Toledo and Ashlea Brown. Our editorial assistant is Madalyn Amato. Our engineers are Mario Diaz, Mark Nieto and...
    A human rights group has written to FIFA president Gianni Infantino calling for Iran to be kicked out of the World Cup in Qatar later this year because of the country's oppression of women. Widespread protests have erupted across Iran and now in countries all over the world in response to the death of 22-year-old woman Mahsa Amini in police custody, after she was arrested earlier in September for loosely wearing her veil. The Iranian regime has responded, as it usually does, with force and an internet blackout to make it harder for people to plan protests. At least 83 people have been killed since the protests broke out. Now as reported by Front Office Sports, the organization Open Stadiums, which campaigns for Iranian women's rights, wrote to Infantino saying: 'For over four decades, Iranian women have been denied their most basic liberties. 'We have been banned from enjoying sports, watching games in stadiums, and cheering for our favorite football teams. You repeatedly made a public commitment that FIFA would solve these gross human rights violations but we have, sadly, come to...
    EXCLUSIVE — The protests in Iran entered their 14th day on Thursday, as thousands of Iranians demonstrated against the death of a 22-year-old who died earlier this month after being detained by "morality police" for apparently not wearing a hijab correctly. The protests, which started on Sept. 16, have spread to nearly 140 Iranian cities and 30 provinces, leaving at least 41 dead, the United Nations reported, citing state media. However, the actual number of fatalities is expected to be much higher, based on nongovernmental organizations. The protests over Mahsa Amini's death have also resulted in hundreds of arrests. The Washington Examiner has reached out to the U.N. for comment. Protesters have set fire to police and government buildings, and footage of those protests, largely conducted by women, was shared exclusively with the Washington Examiner by the Organization of Iranian American Communities. CNN ANCHOR WITHDRAWS FROM INTERVIEW WITH IRANIAN PRESIDENT OVER HEADSCARF ROW One video showed unrest in the capital city of Tehran as protesters circled a fire and chanted, "This is a bloody year, as Saied Ali (Khamenei)...
    I WAS ordered by Iran's security to wear a hijab in Austria to interview boss Carlos Quieroz and the players after a friendly with Uruguay. Many have asked why I didn't refuse to wear one as a show of support to the women's rights protests in the country after the death of Mahsa Amini. 4A Sunsport reporter (with Iran midfielder Omid Ebrahimi) was compelled to wear a hijab headscarf to interview Iran’s football team after a match — in Austria 4I had to make a hijab out of a t-shirt as all the shops in Vienna were shut WHAT IS HAPPENING IN IRAN RIGHT NOW? Amini, 22, was beaten to death by Iran's morality police for failing to comply with the country's strict hijab rules, it has been alleged. The incident sparked mass violent protests in the country with the death toll rising each day. Officially at least 76 people have died during 11 days of unrest so far. Women have also been burning their hijabs and the government has shut off the internet in parts of...
    A photo of Mahsa Amini displayed at a protest in Berlin, GermanyMarkus Schreiber/AP Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters. An Iranian journalist who reported on the death of Mahsa Amini has been thrown into solitary confinement, with no information about the charges against her, amid a major crackdown on the press in the country. Niloufar Hamedi, a reporter at the Tehran-based Shargh newspaper, was among the first to write about Amini, 22, who fell into a coma and died on September 16 after Iran’s morality police apprehended her and brought her to a “re-education” center for not wearing her hijab properly. Authorities say Amini died after a heart attack, but her family says she had no prior health problems and accuse the police of beating her. “When we shouted and protested inside the room, they started threatening us that if we didn’t keep quiet, they would rape us.” The 22-year-old’s death ignited massive protests across Iran, organized primarily by women, whose rights have been heavily restricted since the 1979...
    Progressive U.S. lawmakers on Friday expressed solidarity with anti-government protesters that have spread to cities across Iran as people express outrage over the death of a 22-year-old woman who was in police custody after being accused of violating the country's strict dress code. As authorities have cracked down on the protests, which are now taking place in more than five dozen cities, more than 30 people have reportedly been killed and hundreds have been injured or arrested. The protests erupted this past week after the death of Mahsa Amini, a Kurdish Iranian woman, on September 16. Amini had been in a coma for three days following her arrest in Tehran by the country's so-called "morality police." She had been accused of wearing an "improper" head covering. A photo of Amini in a coma sparked outrage when it was circulated on social media. Her family has accused police of beating Amini, rejecting a police report that she suffered a heart attack while in custody. Protests condemning Amini's death have included women tearing off and burning their hijabs, which is punishable by...
    (CNN)Iranian authorities say they will restrict internet access in the country until calm is restored to the streets, as protests over the death of a young woman in the custody of the morality police rock the Islamic Republic.Thousands of Iranians have taken to the streets in protest since the death last week of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who was apprehended in Tehran and taken to a "re-education center", apparently for not wearing her hijab properly. Since Friday, demonstrations have taken place in at least 40 cities nationwide, including the capital Tehran, with protesters demanding an end to violence and discrimination against women as well as an end to compulsory wearing of the hijab.Dozens of protesters have reportedly been killed in the resulting clashes with security forces. CNN cannot independently verify the death toll --  a precise figure is impossible for anyone outside the Iranian government to confirm -- and different estimates have been given by opposition groups, international rights organizations and local journalists. Amnesty International said Friday that at least 30 people, including four children, had died; according to the semi-official...
    (CNN)The father of an Iranian woman who died in police custody last week has accused authorities of lying about her death, as protests rage nationwide despite the government's attempt to curb dissent with an internet blackout.Amjad Amini, whose daughter Mahsa died after being arrested in Tehran by morality police, said doctors had refused to let him see his daughter after her death.Iranian officials have claimed she died after suffering a "heart attack" and falling into a coma, but her family have said she had no pre-existing heart condition, according to Emtedad news, an Iranian pro-reform media outlet. Public skepticism over the officials' account of her death has sparked an outpouring of anger that has spilled into deadly protests."They're lying. They're telling lies. Everything is a lie ... no matter how much I begged, they wouldn't let me see my daughter," Amjad Amini told BBC Persia on Wednesday.When he viewed his daughter's body leading up to her funeral it was entirely wrapped except for her feet and face -- though he noticed bruising on her feet. "I have no idea what...
    (CNN)In the video, a massive crowd cheers as a woman lifts a pair of scissors to her hair -- exposed, without a hijab in sight. The sea of people, many of them men, roar as she chops off her ponytail and raises her fist in the air.It was a powerful act of defiance Tuesday night in the city of Kerman, Iran, where women are required to wear hijabs in public -- and just one of the many protests taking place across the country following the death of Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old woman who died in police custody last week.A woman in Tehran, Iran, cutting off her hair before a cheering crowd of protesters on September 20. Thousands took to the streets Tuesday night, with videos of protests emerging from dozens of towns and cities -- ranging from the capital Tehran to more traditionally conservative strongholds like Mashad. Footage shows some protesters chanting, "Women, life, freedom." Others can be seen setting up bonfires, scuffling with police, or removing and burning their headscarves -- as well as destroying posters of the country's...
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