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    OAKLAND — Two big Oakland buildings that were transformed in recent years into cannabis cultivation centers have been seized by their lender in a foreclosure proceeding that leaves their future murky. The Cannery and The Tinnery, the two buildings that were seized by a finance firm, have been mired in a long-running dispute over the operation of massive diesel generators that were being used to power pot production inside the structures. A few weeks ago, in late September, the former owner of the property, a group led by Kenneth Greer, a Denver-based real estate executive, removed the diesel generators that had offended community groups and environmental activists. The generators were used as power sources for tenants who were going to cultivate marijuana, Greer stated in a filing in January 2020 in connection with an Alameda County Superior Court civil lawsuit. The Tinnery, a building located at 5601 San Leandro St. in East Oakland. (Google Maps) “The property owner provides power to all tenants by renting diesel generators,” Greer stated in the court filing. “Upon request from a tenant, we order a...
    OaklandWorkers continued Monday to clear the massive homeless encampment along Wood Street in West Oakland. Related Articles Local News | Here’s how Bay Area homeless residents can vote in the November 2022 election Local News | Do tiny homes really work as a solution to homelessness? Here’s what the data shows Local News | Editorial: Taylor for Oakland mayor; Lowe, Joiner, Zazaboi for council Local News | Eight time felon charged in 2020 Oakland fatal stabbing Local News | Santa Cruz RV safe parking program launches Multiple fires have erupted at the city’s largest homeless encampment, which extends for several city blocks and has been home to hundreds of people. In July, a large fire damaged a portion of Interstate 880. Workers have been clearing the sprawling camp in phases, a process that started in July. On Monday morning, workers removed vehicles, furniture and other items from the encampment on Caltrans property underneath the MacArthur Maze. Members of the cleanup crew rolled tires and lifted couches overhead as larger...
    Bay Area Home Report 5823 Nottingham Drive – Google Street View A house built in 1947 located in the 5800 block of Nottingham Drive in Oakland has new owners. The 1,383-square-foot property was sold on Aug. 3, 2022 for $1,671,000, or $1,208 per square foot. The property features one bedroom, one bath, and a garage. It sits on a 5,959-square-foot lot. These nearby houses have also recently been purchased: In March 2022, a 2,344-square-foot home on Merriewood Drive in Oakland sold for $2,000,000, a price per square foot of $853. On Capricorn Avenue, Oakland, in June 2022, a 2,988-square-foot home was sold for $1,550,000, a price per square foot of $519. A 3,798-square-foot home on the 11000 block of Broadway Terrace in Oakland sold in July 2022 for $2,725,000, a price per square foot of $717.  
    Click here for a complete list of our election recommendations. Oakland voters are being asked to double down on a deceptive and ill-planned roads-repair program that has blown through cost projections with no end in sight — a plan that would saddle property owners with more than $1 billion of tax debt over the next four decades. Unfortunately, Measure U on the Nov. 8 ballot ties the roads program to an affordable housing funding plan that, had it been standing alone on the ballot, would deserve serious consideration. But the roads and housing proposals, along with funding to rehabilitate city facilities, are packaged together into one ballot measure. Voters should reject it. They should send a message that, with strong general fund tax revenues, city leaders need to stop reflexively trying to reach into the pockets of property owners for even more money every election year. The issue is not whether the city needs more money to fix its badly dilapidated roads. It does. The issue is that, when city leaders ask for new taxes, they need to come with...
    An attempted traffic stop in Fairfield early Thursday escalated into a pursuit into Suisun City and ended with a crash and two arrests. Events unfolded around 4 a.m. when a Fairfield officer saw a vehicle fail to make a complete stop at a stop sign then speed up in an effort to put distance between it and his patrol car, officials said. The officer activated his overhead lights and sirens and attempted a traffic stop, but the driver accelerated, officials said in a social media post, “frequently changing directions and soaring through a red light at an intersection” as the vehicle headed west towards Pennsylvania Avenue. The driver then sped south on Pennsylvania, entered Highway 12, then headed back into residential areas of downtown Fairfield before heading back towards Suisun City. “The vehicle continued to run stop signs and drive at high rates of speed, making unsafe turns in complete disregard of public safety – until it was involved in a rear-end collision with an unoccupied vehicle in the 1000 block of Main St., Suisun,” the post continued. Related Articles...
    OAKLAND — A vacant commercial building near the Oakland airport that was damaged by a fire in May sustained more damage in another fire Friday morning, officials said. No one was injured in the fire, which took at least 35 firefighters almost two hours to control. There were no reported injuries to firefighters and no one was found inside the building. The fire erupted about 5:45 a.m. Friday at the building at 8407 Edgewater Drive at Pendleton Way, which has fences around the property. Responding firefighters were met by thick black smoke and bright flames. They used hose lines from three aerial ladders to help battle the fire, which was deemed under control at 7:30 a.m. The cause of the fire was under investigation. The May 19 fire at the building was believed to have been started by squatters, officials said. Since then the fence had been erected around the property and after structural inspections it was considered “red tagged,” meaning no one was supposed to be inside, officials said.
    This stylish duplex at 5930 Genoa Street in Oakland checks all the boxes: beauty, location and income!  Live in one, rent the other. This property features a tranquil palette, new designer lighting and new quartz counters in the main kitchen.  This spacious 1898 home features a magnificent staircase, stunning herringbone hardwood floors, elegant fireplace, bay windows and high ceilings. The en suite bedroom is on the main level, plus four bedrooms and two bathrooms are on the upper level. The rear home offers one bedroom and one bathroom with an open concept living/dining room and French doors leading to an oversize deck. This property is near all the best foodie delights North Oakland has to offer. Visit: 5930GenoaStreet.com for more informationListed by: Red Oak Realty’s Cathy Foppoli, DRE#1953316 (510) 225-8827
    OAKLAND — In a victory for tenants, the Oakland City Council voted Tuesday to cap rent increases at 3% instead of 6.7%, which the current law would have allowed come July. “Tenants are facing an unprecedented rent hike,” Councilmember Carroll Fife, who proposed the change to limit the rent increase, said before the vote Tuesday as she urged her colleagues to approve it. Under rent control policy in Oakland, the city allows for an annual rent increase based on the Consumer Price Index, or inflation. This year, that formula allows for increasing the rent (for the same tenants) by 1.9%, but it would jump to 6.7% in July, thanks to increases in indices that are accounted for in Oakland’s formula. A 6.7% rent increase would be the largest increase allowed under the ordinance in its decades-long history. For the last 20 years, the allowable rent rate increases have ranged from 0.6% and 3.6%, depending upon the CPI. Fife’s ordinance — which was approved by six members of the council, excluding Noel Gallo, who voted “no,” and Loren Taylor, who abstained...
    OAKLAND — A century-old foundry site in Oakland has been bought by an Amazon-linked real estate firm that plans a major industrial project on the big property. AB&I Foundry, a scrap metal foundry that began operations in Oakland in 1906, is shutting down in stages and will be completely closed by sometime in early 2023, according to foundry owner McWane Inc. The final pipe-fitting operation is scheduled for this June. Now, Duke Realty, acting through an affiliate, has bought the 15.1-acre site in east Oakland, according to documents filed on April 28 and April 29 with the Alameda County Recorder’s Office. The developer paid $62.8 million in transactions that were completed on the two dates at the end of April, the county documents show. The sellers were McWane Inc. and Bosley Investments. The transactions were all-cash deals, according to the property records. Separately, Duke Realty has filed a proposal for a wide-ranging development of the property, documents filed with Oakland city planners show. “The proposed project represents an opportunity to develop a best-in-class modern industrial building representing a significant investment...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- For 58 years, the Oakland Post has been covering the news in Oakland. On Wednesday, they became the news.Shattered glass covered the floors of the largest African American weekly newspaper in Northern California just hours after they were burglarized."It's obvious that this person was familiar with the building because they went right straight to our office and they went straight to the office above the floor," said Paul Cobb, publisher of the Post News Group.The buildings' manager said surveillance video shows a man breaking into the building at 12:48 a.m. Two hours later, two suspects reportedly went back inside the building.According to Cobb, approximately $10,000 worth of property was stolen.EXCLUSIVE: Days after man robbed at gunpoint outside Oakland hotel another guest burglarized EMBED More News Videos A man visiting from Chicago was burglarized at the same Marriott hotel in Oakland where an armed robbery occurred just days prior. "Some personal items, a coin collection and this rare collection of what is called 'Blacks on the Money.' I had a collection of dollars," said Cobb.Luz Pena: "Do...
    OAKLAND — A downtown Oakland office building that’s nearly a century old has landed a buyer from Silicon Valley, a sign of ongoing investment interest in the urban core of the East Bay’s largest city. An office building at 1504 Franklin St. in downtown Oakland has been bought by an affiliate controlled by Bullock Capital, according to documents filed on March 18 with the Alameda County Recorder’s Office. Menlo Park-based Bullock Capital paid $13.6 million for the office building, the county property records show. The building is two stories and was built in 1923, then renovated in 2018. The building is at the corner of Franklin Street and 15th Street in downtown Oakland. Interior spaces at 1504 Franklin St. in downtown Oakland, a two-story office building built in 1923 that totals 27,400 square feet. (Colliers) Bullock Capital also obtained a loan of $10.5 million from Northern Trust Co. to help finance the purchase of the office building this month, according to the county public documents. The seller, a group of investors that’s headed up by Menlo Park real estate executive Douglas...
    Eight homeowners in Michigan filed a lawsuit in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals against Oakland County Treasurer Andrew Meisner. The suit contends that the foreclosure process is unconstitutional, as the government has taken property for delinquent property taxes and other fees without providing fair equity to the owners. The Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF), the group representing the plaintiffs, provided the example of Tawanda Hall, a nursing assistant in the state. After falling behind on her payments, she and her husband developed a plan to pay back the money. However, Meisner intervened and took their home because of the $22,642 debt. The organization proceeded to sell the house. “Instead of selling the house at public auction, paying off the debt, and returning the surplus (minus interest and penalties) to the homeowners, the county used the Halls’ money to enrich a private company, Southfield Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative, LLC, managed by City of Southfield officials. Through a series of legal transactions, the county took the Halls’ home (and the homes of seven other homeowners party to this case) and transferred it...
    OAKLAND — The Oakland Masonic Center has been bought by an alliance of veteran real estate developers in a deal that could revamp the prominent building as a modern medical office complex. The alliance paid $13.5 million for the three-story Masonic Center building, which is at 3903 Broadway in Oakland, according to documents filed on March 7 with the Alameda County Recorder’s Office. The buyers, acting through an affiliate, are Walnut Creek-based Meridian, a real estate developer whose specialties include medical office projects; and Chicago-based Harrison Street Real Estate, a major player in property investment and development. Meridian and Harrison Street also obtained a loan from Midcap Financial Trust totaling $35.2 million at the time of the purchase, the county property records show. Oakland Masonic Center building at 3903 Broadway in Oakland, shown within the outline. Boundaries are approximate. (Google Maps) The purchase was arranged by Sid Ewing, a senior vice president with Colliers, a commercial real estate firm. Ewing teamed up with Colliers senior vice president Matthew Nebel to market the Masonic Center for possible tenants. Last year, Ewing found...
    OAKLAND — Most of a prominent shopping center in East Oakland has been bought by a real estate and development alliance from California. Roughly two-thirds of Foothill Square, a robust shopping center on Macarthur Boulevard in Oakland, has landed a buying group based in the Los Angeles area, documents filed on Jan. 20 with the Alameda County Recorder’s Office show. The buyers, acting through two affiliates, paid $28.7 million for a share of the retail center, which is located at 10700 MacArthur Blvd. and is near the Oakland Zoo and Interstate 580, according to the county property records. The new owners, which include Beverly Hills-based Axiom Real Estate Investments, which is headed up by developer Abraham Shofet; and a group led by Los Angeles-based medical professional Tourage Soleiman, the public documents show. Western Avenue Capital sold the shopping center to the Axiom and Soleiman groups, according to the property records. Originally built in 1961, Foothill Square is bounded by MacArthur Boulevard, 106th Avenue, Foothill Boulevard and 108th Avenue. For many years in the 1990s and early 2000s, the shopping center...
    OAKLAND — A one-time glass factory site in Oakland that is headed for the wrecking ball and redevelopment has been grabbed by a veteran real estate company that has proposed a revamp for the property. Duke Realty is planning a major development of the property in Oakland’s Fruitvale district through the demolition and replacement of the former Owens-Brockway glass manufacturing plant, according to documents on file with city planners. In a move that further solidifies the Duke Realty plans for the property, the Indiana-based developer has purchased the site, according to documents on file with the Alameda County Clerk-Recorder’s Office. Duke Realty Alameda Ave., the development firm’s affiliate, paid $34.4 million for the 23.9-acre site, documents filed on Dec. 29 with the county show. The developer completed the transaction through an all-cash deal, according to the property records. Owens-Brockway Glass Container sold the property, which is located at 3600 Alameda Ave. in Oakland, the public documents show. “The proposed project is an opportunity to construct a best-in-class modern industrial building representing a significant investment in East Oakland,” Duke Realty stated...
    OAKLAND — A long-time but now-shuttered glass factory in Oakland could be bulldozed and replaced by a modern warehouse under a plan being pitched by a veteran developer whose major tenants include Amazon. The development site occupies 28.8 acres at 3600 Alameda Ave. in Oakland, according to a marketing brochure for the sale of the site that’s being circulated by CBRE, a commercial real estate firm. Duke Realty, a big-time industrial developer, has proposed major redevelopment of the glass container factory site so it could be transformed into a new warehouse, documents filed with Oakland city planners show. Amazon is frequently a tenant for Duke Realty, according to regulatory recent regulatory filings and a conference call by the developer with Wall Street analysts. Indiana-based Duke Realty wants to develop a brand-new warehouse building totaling 472,600 square feet on the site, the planning documents show. The warehouse would be 51 feet high, according to the city planning documents. As an indication of the potential traffic that the warehouse might accommodate, the new project would include 284 parking stalls and 254 parking...
    OAKLAND — While negotiations over the Oakland A’s planned waterfront ballpark continue to get most of the attention, the City Council is poised to move forward Tuesday with plans to redevelop the vast Coliseum site that’s been the team’s home for decades. The council could enter into an exclusive negotiating agreement with one of two groups that are competing for the chance to redevelop the 100-acre property off Hegenberger Road. The chosen group then would be given a year or 18 months to work out a deal to either buy or lease the city’s share of the Coliseum Complex site — the A’s own the other half — and redevelop it into a mixed-use project, according to a city memo. At the end of that period, the city could choose to extend the negotiations, sign a development agreement to set the course for construction or end the talks and hit the reset button with other development groups. Although the city’s staff has indicated there’s no rush to enter an agreement, Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan is urging her...
    By Lindsay Blake | Variety There’s no denying that Bette Davis is Hollywood royalty. But despite her best efforts at chewing up the scenery, even she couldn’t save the 1976 supernatural horror film “Burnt Offerings.” Based upon Robert Marasco’s 1973 novel of the same name, the dark tale sees New York writer Ben Roth (Oliver Reed), his wife Marian (Karen Black), son David (Lee Montgomery) and elderly aunt Elizabeth (Davis) taking up residence at a leased Long Island mansion one fateful summer. As the season progresses, the house slowly begins to possess each member of the family, using them as sacrifices – burnt offerings, if you will – in order to restore itself to its original grandeur. Largely considered a dud, Orlando Sentinel Star reviewer Dean Johnson had some particularly harsh words for the film upon its release, writing “‘Burnt Offerings,’ huh? ‘Boring Offerings’ might have been more fitting. Or ‘Banal Offerings.’ Or, to further a point, take a look at the ‘Burnt Offerings’ initials. There’s a review for you in two letters.” Yikes! Johnson even takes issue with...
    OAKLAND — Five years after it started looking into a former Oakland building inspector accused of taking thousands of dollars in bribes and other payments from people whose properties he was inspecting, the city’s public ethics commission imposed more than $300,000 in fines on the former city employee. The commission fined Thomas Espinosa, who worked for the city between 2005 and 2016, $309,600 — the largest ever fine issued by the commission — for 47 violations that ranged from “misusing” his authority as a city employee to failing to disclose income from people whose properties he was tasked with inspecting. The decision by the commission, which is tasked with investigating and enforcing breaches of the city’s ethics laws, capped a lengthy investigation that had implicated a second former building inspector and found both employees had solicited money from property owners in exchange for a “pass” on certain inspections. “This case is, by far, the most extensive and egregious activity ever investigated by the Public Ethics Commission,” said Michael MacDonald, the chair of the commission, in a statement after the commission...
    OAKLAND — Two long-time industrial sites in West Oakland have been grabbed by a veteran real estate company that intends to revamp the properties as new campuses for advanced manufacturing, life sciences and tech firms. The properties include the American Steel site as well as a nearby property a few blocks away, according to documents on file with the Alameda County Recorder’s Office. A real estate alliance consisting of developer ScanlanKemperBard and an unnamed capital partner paid $82.5 million for the Oakland properties in an all-cash deal, the records filed with the county on Sept. 24 show. “With West Oakland quickly becoming one of the Bay Area’s leading manufacturing, bioengineering and research locations, SKB plans to reposition the manufacturing facility into a multi-tenant industrial campus, catering to a diverse set of users,” ScanlanKemperBard, or SKB, said. Two sites in West Oakland that are slated for a major redevelopment as new advanced manufacturing and industrial campuses, outlined in red. Boundaries are approximate. // Google Maps The two Oakland sites that have just been bought are near each other but aren’t directly connected,...
    OAKLAND — California is investigating whether Alameda County followed the law when selling its share of the Coliseum site to the Oakland A’s in 2019, according to a state agency letter. In the letter to Alameda County Administrator Susan Muranishi, the California Department of Housing and Community Development said it has no record that the county declared its share of the property either “surplus land” or “exempt surplus land,” or notified the appropriate developers that he land is available for sale, as required by state law. The Surplus Land Act requires public entities selling or leasing their land to determine whether the property is considered surplus and to notify developers who may have an interest in developing affordable housing there. The law aims to increase production of affordable housing through such a notification. The county has until Oct. 18 to prove it followed the law or “correct the deficiency,” according to the letter signed by Sasha Wisotsky Kerganwhich, unit chief of Housing Policy Development for the state, . Neither Muranishi nor the county’s lawyer, Donna Ziegler, responded to questions about...
    OAKLAND — As the Oakland A’s promote their plan to leave East Oakland in favor of a new waterfront ballpark, the City Council has kickstarted a process to begin negotiations with the groups and individuals interested in buying the city’s share of the Coliseum home the team will leave behind. The council unanimously approved on Tuesday a resolution authorizing the city administration to begin formal discussions with the five groups who have indicated they may want to buy the site for developments including sports arenas, housing and business campuses. While the Coliseum site was owned jointly by Oakland and Alameda County, Alameda County agreed in 2019 to sell its share of the property to the Oakland A’s for $85 million. The A’s had previously explored building a new stadium at the site, where their current home is, but team and MLB officials have since declared that the only “viable” site in Oakland for them is at Howard Terminal, the port property where they have proposed a mixed-use ballpark development that is awaiting city approval. Now, the...
    A protest that began peacefully in Oakland ended with multiple fires set, several cars damaged and numerous windows shattered. The protest against police brutality began calmly Friday night, news outlets reported. A subsequent march drew around 300 people with some setting fires and breaking windows. A car dealership was among the buildings damaged. At least one car was set on fire. A fire was also set outside a bank. Demonstrators were seen walking past the scene of a car crash. Photos and videos posted online showed marchers with signs and flags. Many chanted the names of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old who was shot and killed by an officer in Brooklyn Center, Minn., and Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old fatally shot by an officer in Chicago. People in the crowd threw bottles and other objects at officers during the march, Oakland police said in a statement. One officer suffered an injury from being struck in the head. A community member was also assaulted, police said. The statement said protesters dragged barriers into the road to block and delay responding officers. Authorities declared...
    OAKLAND — A prime site for development in downtown Oakland has been bought by real estate allies that are eyeing the property as the location of a modern office tower. The property where the office highrise could sprout is located at 1919 Webster St. at the corner of 19th Street in downtown Oakland. Ellis Partners, a veteran Bay Area developer, and Intercontinental Real Estate, a real estate firm with a nationwide reach, have teamed up to buy and develop the property. Situated within the bustling Uptown district of downtown Oakland, as well as being a few minutes from the BART 19th Street Oakland train station, and just down the street from the shores of Lake Merritt, the property appears to have an excellent location. The developers believe the site is a prime location for a transit-oriented project. “This is an important high-rise development site sitting at the center of the rapid changes taking place in downtown Oakland,” said Jason Morehouse, a partner with Ellis Partners. Ellis Partners and Intercontinental Real Estate had previously teamed up to develop The Key at...
    OAKLAND — Downtown Oakland’s Uptown Station office and retail complex has been bought by a buyer based in Singapore. CIM Group, which has been renovating the iconic building at the corner of Broadway and Telegraph, said that it has sold the property. The price was in the range of $435 million, according to property experts familiar with the transaction. At $1,100 a square foot, that would represent a record-setting price for a building in Oakland. Singapore-based Mapletree Investments, a big real estate investment firm, is the buyer of the landmark complex, industry sources said. The eight-story building totals 397,000 square feet, consisting of 362,000 square feet of offices and 35,000 square feet of retail. The offices are leased to Square, a financial services tech firm based in San Francisco. Brokers Steve Golubchik, Tyler Meyerdirk, and Darren Hollak with Newmark, a commercial real estate firm, handled the purchase of the property. “CIM Group delivered on its vision for Uptown Station, bringing a truly modern creative office property to a burgeoning district, that quickly attracted a leading San Francisco technology tenant, with...
    OAKLAND (CBS SF/BCN) — The former Oakland Raiders training facility and headquarters in Alameda may soon be up for sale. The city of Oakland and the County of Alameda jointly own the facility on Harbor Bay Parkway on Alameda’s Bay Farm Island. But with the football team now in Las Vegas, the agencies have no use for the property. On Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 1:30 p.m. the Oakland Redevelopment Successor Agency and the City Council will hold a joint meeting to consider declaring the property surplus land, which will allow the city and county to put the property up for sale. Alameda County made its surplus land declaration for its 50 % interest in the property earlier this month. The property consists of two primary buildings, a weight and locker room and the training grounds. The training facility is roughly 18,000 square feet, while the team’s former headquarters is about 100,000 square feet. © Copyright 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. and Bay City News Service. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten...
    An Oakland compound once owned by Steven Wilson, the son of Oakland’s first black mayor, Lionel Wilson, has been listed for $5.25 million. An Oakland compound once owned by Steven Wilson, the son of Oakland’s first black mayor, Lionel Wilson, is for sale. (Compass)  The gated property dubbed the “Grand Lake Villa,” includes two homes, a pool house and a lush lawn area. The main villa is 3,620 square feet with five bedrooms and three baths, and the second villa is 1,985 square feet with three bedrooms and two-and-a-half baths.  Other highlights include a solar-heated pool, a wine cellar in the main villa and a manicured garden with water fountain and bird bath. An Oakland compound once owned by Steven Wilson, the son of Oakland’s first black mayor, Lionel Wilson, is for sale. (Compass)  An Oakland compound once owned by Steven Wilson, the son of Oakland’s first black mayor, Lionel Wilson, is for sale. (Compass)  Built in the 1920s, the home was originally commissioned by Clara and Adolph Jahnigan, parents of opera singer and actress Bernice Claire. The current...
    OAKLAND (CBS SF) – A domestic dispute led to a shooting Wednesday evening at an Oakland Housing Authority property, police said. Oakland police responded at 5:46 p.m. to the shooting in the 1100 block of Poplar Street where a woman shot a man after using the gun to break out the windows of his wife’s car. The man’s injuries are not considered life-threatening, but he was hospitalized, according to Oakland and Oakland Housing Authority police. The suspect left in a vehicle driven by someone else and both were arrested a short time later. The victim identified both suspects, OHA spokeswoman Greer McVay said. Oakland police and paramedics arrived at the West Oakland property before OHA police, McVay said. “We certainly take this very seriously,” she said. “We are sad that this happened. We are hoping for a speedy recovery for the victim.” © Copyright 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. and Bay City News Service. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
    OAKLAND — The city’s public ethics commission voted Monday to fine a former city building permit inspector $55,000 over accusations that he violated Oakland’s government ethics act by accepting bribes and misusing his position. The seven-member commission, which is tasked with investigating and enforcing breaches of the city’s various ethics laws, voted unanimously to impose a $5,000 penalty for each of 11 violations it found against Anthony Harbaugh, a former building inspector with the city. The violations include soliciting money from property owners in exchange for a “pass” on certain inspections. Harbaugh — who denied violating the city law in a public ethics commission hearing in November — was tipped off to the commission’s investigators several years ago when they started looking into Thomas Espinosa, another former building inspector who is alleged to have taken thousands of dollars in bribes from property owners whose buildings he was inspecting and failed to report to the city that he received large sums in contracting work from people whose properties he was inspecting. That case is still pending and is the subject of...
    OAKLAND — Living conditions at two Oakland apartment buildings were so dire for tenants that an Alameda County Superior Court judge last week granted a request by the City Attorney to take away control of the building from the landlords and transfer it to a new operator to improve the the residences. The judge’s decision comes after Oakland City Attorney Barbara Parker filed a lawsuit earlier this year charging three landlords — King V. Chau, James H. Chau, and Judy N. Chau — with ignoring numerous city notices to fix the properties they owned on 1100 block of East 11th Street, the 1400 block of 8th Avenue and the 1000 block of Foothill Boulevard. The city’s attorneys allege that the property owners rented out illegally converted units, did not provide safety protections such as carbon monoxide or smoke detectors, created fire hazards through unapproved wiring, forced their tenants to live without power and gas, and then subjected tenants to repeated harassment, including one instance described in the lawsuit in which a tenant was locked out of the building and threatened...
    OAKLAND — A historic building near downtown Oakland’s Jack London Square has been jolted by a default on its mortgage, raising the specter of a potential foreclosure on the prominent property. The financial a financial setback that arrives at a time when the property’s owner
    OAKLAND — An auto dealer chain that had previously bought a Silicon Valley site for a vehicle sales business has widened its Bay Area presence with the purchase of an Oakland property for a new dealership. Oregon-based Swickard Auto Group has bought a highly visible dealership site at 7201 Oakport St. in Oakland, according to Alameda County property documents. “We purchased that location and have already moved Audi Oakland’s sales operations to that facility,” said Mike Maloney, vice president of marketing and communications with Swickard Auto Group. With the Oakland deal, Swickard Auto Group now owns five dealership properties in the Bay Area: — Lexus of Fremont — Land Rover Redwood City — Jaguar Land Rover San Francisco — Audi Palo Alto — Audi Oakland The Fremont, Redwood City, and San Francisco expansions occurred in June, the Palo Alto purchase occurred in August, and the Audi transaction occurred in September. Prior to this year, Swickard didn’t have a presence in the Bay Area. Google Maps Sales and showroom building for Audi Oakland, 7201 Oakport St. in Oakland. An...
    OAKLAND — An auto dealer chain that had previously bought a Silicon Valley site for a vehicle sales business has widened its Bay Area presence with the purchase of an Oakland property for a new dealership. Oregon-based Swickard Auto Group has bought a highly visible dealership site at 7201 Oakport St. in Oakland, according to Alameda County property documents. “We purchased that location and have already moved Audi Oakland’s sales operations to that facility,” said Mike Maloney, vice president of marketing and communications with Swickard Auto Group. With the Oakland deal, Swickard Auto Group now owns five dealership properties and operations in the Bay Area: — Lexus of Fremont — Land Rover Redwood City — Jaguar Land Rover San Francisco — Audi Palo Alto — Audi Oakland The Fremont, Redwood City, and San Francisco expansions occurred in June, the Palo Alto purchase occurred in August, and the Audi transaction occurred in September. Prior to this year, Swickard didn’t have a presence in the Bay Area. Google Maps Sales and showroom building for Audi Oakland, 7201 Oakport St. in...
    OAKLAND — TMG Partners has officially completed its purchase of a big mixed-use office complex in downtown Oakland that paves the way for PG&E to shift its headquarters and thousands of jobs to the East Bay’s largest city. As part of TMG’s purchase of the office and retail complex at 300 Lakeside Drive, PG&E has signed a lease for the office tower and has obtained an option to buy an office tower at the site, documents filed on Oct. 30 with the Alameda County Recorder’s Office show. TMG paid $449.8 million for the landmark property, which is perched next to Lake Merritt, according to Alameda County public records. Included in the purchase: a 28-story office tower totaling 824,500 square feet that will serve as PG&E’s future headquarters, an adjacent office and retail complex totaling 130,000 square feet at 344 Thomas L. Barkeley Way, a landscaped rooftop garden, and a 1,339-stall parking garage. Goldman Sachs Bank USA agreed to provide up to $430 million to finance the purchase by TMG, which used affiliate BA2 300 Lakeside to buy the property, the...
    The cities of Portland, Oregon, and Oakland, California, filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday claiming that the Trump administration’s effort to maintain law and order in U.S. cities and to protect federal property was unconstitutional.  The lawsuit said that the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security unconstitutionally took over police duties in those cities, where, in the case of Portland, police have faced almost nightly violent riots that have resulted in property damage, injuries, and even deaths. The genesis of the lawsuit comes from President Donald Trump signing an executive order in June to fulfill the federal government’s responsibility to protect the American people and federal property. Portland and Oakland filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday accusing the DOJ and DHS of unconstitutionally taking over law enforcement responsibilities in the cities under policies implemented after President Trumps EO signed in June. https://t.co/jffUf4tpDB — Wright Gazaway (@WrightKATU) October 15, 2020 The local ABC affiliate in Portland reported on the lawsuit: The cities sued the departments’ leaders, Attorney General William Barr and Acting DHS Secretary Chad Wolf, in their official capacities as well...
    OAKLAND (AP) — Homeless moms who were evicted earlier this year from a vacant Oakland house they occupied say a community land trust has purchased the property and will turn it into transitional housing for other mothers experiencing homelessness. Members of the activist group, Moms 4 Housing, announced Friday that the three-bedroom home in West Oakland was purchased by the Oakland Community Land Trust from a real estate investment company. The property requires extensive renovation for habitation, the group said. A West Oakland house occupied by two homeless mothers. (CBS) The land trust purchased the property for $587,500 and closed in May, but the pandemic and planning for repairs delayed a public celebration. The land trust is a nonprofit organization that holds property for the benefit of low-income residents. Steve King, executive director of the trust, says the house requires extensive repairs, including a new roof and windows. He said his group will work with Moms 4 Housing to figure out a transitional housing program for the property. Money to buy and refurbish the house came from donations and does...
    By JANIE HAR, Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Homeless moms who were evicted earlier this year from a vacant San Francisco Bay Area house they occupied say a community land trust has purchased the property and will turn it into transitional housing for other mothers experiencing homelessness. Members of the activist group, Moms 4 Housing, announced Friday that the three-bedroom home in West Oakland was purchased by the Oakland Community Land Trust from a real estate investment company. The property requires extensive renovation for habitation, the group said. The land trust purchased the property for $587,500 and closed in May, but the pandemic and planning for repairs delayed a public celebration . The land trust is a nonprofit organization that holds property for the benefit of low-income residents. Steve King, executive director of the trust, says the house requires extensive repairs, including a new roof and windows. He said his group will work with Moms 4 Housing to figure out a transitional housing program for the property. Money to buy and refurbish the house came from donations and does...
    There is activity once again on the former Oak Knoll Naval Hospital site in the east Oakland hills. Work at the the Oak Knoll Development continues after an annual city grading ban from Oct. 15 – April 15, and after the coronavirus pandemic clobbered the Bay Area, halting many construction projects for several months. Developer SunCal is constructing more than 900 townhomes and houses, with miles of bike and walking trails, a restored creek, 67 acres of open space and 72,000 square feet of retail. City planners proposed 57 affordable units of varying size including senior and possibly independent living units on the 183-acre former Naval Medical Center property. OAKLAND, CA - OCTOBER 06: The Oak Knoll Development is seen from this drone view in Oakland, Calif., on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020. SunCal is constructing more than 900 townhomes and houses, with miles of bike and walking trails, a restored creek, 67 acres of open space and 72,000 square feet of retail on the 183-acre former Naval Medical Center property just east of Interstate 580. (Jane Tyska/Bay...
    Click here for a complete list of our election recommendations. In a district already rife with wasteful spending, Oakland school officials are putting the proverbial cart before the horse with their request that voters approve a $735 million bond measure for school construction. Voters should reject Measure Y. The district has too many schools for the size of its enrollment. The cost of maintaining buildings, utilities and staff drains money from the classroom, where it’s most needed. District officials have been warning about this for years. Finally, the school board has started to act. It’s in the middle of developing what it’s calling the Citywide Plan, a blueprint for which schools should remain open and which should close to ensure that students are best and most-efficiently served. It’s long-overdue and it’s not near completion. That must come first. Voters should not be asked to upgrade existing schools until they know which ones will remain open. Without a clear closure plan, expending funds on improvements would only compound the district’s already wasteful tendencies. As the Alameda County civil grand jury...
    CBS Detroit – Uri Rafaeli is a retired engineer who lost his Oakland County rental home back in November for not paying his property taxes in full. He owed $8.41, and yes that is correct, he lost his home for about the price of a movie ticket. What’s worse is Oakland County foreclosed and seized his home, auctioning his property off, and kept the $24,500 in excess from the sales. From an article in reason.com, Rafaeli’s home which was in Southfield was purchased in August of 2011 for $60,000. A three-bed, 1500 square-foot home that was at the time a investment rental property, and a way for him to control rent in increases, important for someone who is retired with a fixed income. Later in June of 2012, he was told by the Oakland County Register of Deeds he was behind in property taxes by $496. He made payments and paid his debt on time and in full. According to court records he attempted to settle his unpaid tax debt but made an error with interest, resulting in owing $8.41....
    MICHIGAN Supreme Court dealt a blow to a local county treasurer with a new ruling that could potentially cost the county millions of dollars over a tax enforcement scheme that saw an elderly resident lose his home over a few dollars. The ruling comes after a retiree, Uri Rafaeli, has his home seized over $8 unpaid tax debt at the time of foreclosure. 3Uri Rafaeli, 85, is a retired engineer who lost his home over a small property tax debt of $8.41Credit: Pacific Legal Foundation Rafaeli accidentally underpaid property taxes on a home owned by his business by $8.41 in 2014, causing the county to foreclose on the home. The county pocketed nearly $24,500 from the sale of Rafaeli's property in an auction. “We hold that defendants’ [Oakland County] retention of those surplus proceeds is an unconstitutional taking without just compensation” in violation of the Michigan State Constitution, Justice Brian Zahra wrote in the state Supreme Court's ruling. Oakland County officials –and those in other counties across Michigan – are now concerned because the high court’s ruling will open the...
    Officials in one Michigan county are demanding answers from their treasurer amid concerns that the county could be on the hook for millions of dollars in payments to former homeowners whose properties were seized under a tough forfeiture practice. Oakland County commissioners sent an angry letter last week to Treasurer Andrew Meisner after the Michigan Supreme Court rebuked the county’s decision to seize one homeowner’s house after he underpaid his taxes by $8.41. The commissioners said that they are forming a special investigative committee to look into the forfeiture practices and "make recommendations to protect the Oakland County taxpayers." “It appears your actions as Treasurer to foreclose on an Oakland County retiree’s property for $8.41 has exposed the county to serious risk,” the July 21 letter to Meisner, signed by board Chairman David Woodward and commissioners Mike Gingell and Helen Zack, said, according to the Detroit News. Meisner did not immediately return Fox News' request for comment. LAW FIRMS OFFER TEACHERS LIVING WILLS BEFORE RETURNING TO SCHOOL AMID RISING CORONAVIRUS CONCERNS The Michigan Supreme Court’s rebuke centers on the case...
    After sparking a nation-wide reckoning with the Moms 4 Housing movement, Oakland activist Carroll Fife is taking her fight against homelessness to a new arena — local government. Fife, one of the masterminds behind last year’s takeover of an empty West Oakland house by homeless and insecurely housed women, is running for Oakland’s District 3 City Council seat in the November election. If she wins a spot on the eight-person council, she intends to turn her focus toward redistributing wealth and property to provide housing for all, and abolishing policing as we know it. Her candidacy is another nod to the boiling unrest in this East Bay city. Residents are incensed over recent police killings of Black men and women, fed up with exorbitant rents, and outraged that thousands of people with nowhere to go continue to line the streets in tents and RVs. “All of the things I’ve been fighting for for years are now getting a lot of attention,” Fife said. “I feel like there’s an opportunity to take some bold steps.” But Fife, who received death threats...
    OAKLAND (KPIX 5) — Some renters in Oakland say their building owners are putting their health at risk by inviting investors to tour their apartments. The tenants are now determined to block them. The tenants of this apartment complex are calling it a rent strike. If anyone from the billion-dollar ownership group Mosser Capital tries to come onto the property, they will run into about two dozen protestors ready to face off and block them. The tenants say notices posted on their doors, titled “Intent to Enter Dwelling Unit” puts them at risk for infection from the coronavirus since it claims the tenants do not have the right to refuse or deny entry. “They want to take a tour of investors inside each and every unit in our building. Given the ongoing coronavirus epidemic, this is not ok. It’s not safe,” said tenant Sabeena Shah. “There are a lot of people in this building who are medically fragile. This is a major, major health risk.” Shah has lived here for eight years, and says Mosser raised the rents after claiming...
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