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    While scientists are sadly accustomed to rangy mountain lions killed by cars when they try to cross roadways like the 101 Freeway in San Fernando Valley, this year a cougar was killed by a disease far from the freeways, a state agency reported on Monday, Sept. 26. P-65, a five-year-old adult female, is the first mountain lion in Southern California to perish from mange — a common skin disease caused by a mite parasite — during the 20 years of U.S. National Park Service (NPS) research into local cougars. Scientists found her body on March 4, 2022, near a mountain stream in the central Santa Monica Mountains. “All of these animals recovered from their mange disease, as best as we could tell from remote camera photos or later examination,” said Jeff Sikich, a wildlife biologist in the park, in a prepared statement. Sikich and other NPS biologists working in the 150,000-acre Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area were unaware of P-65’s condition until after she died. NPS biologists say the lion’s immune system was compromised by the effects of rat...
    From offering a pacifier to desperately singing lullabies, most exhausted parents will go to any lengths to get their baby to stop crying. Now, a study claims to have the 'recipe' to lull a baby to sleep – and it's surprisingly simple. Researchers from the RIKEN Centre for Brain Science in Japan claim that the trick to soothe a crying infant is to carry them in your arms for five minutes, then sit with them in your arms for five to eight minutes, before placing them in their cot. 'For many, we intuitively parent and listen to other people's advice on parenting without testing the methods with rigorous science,' said Kumi Kuroda, corresponding author of the study. 'But we need science to understand a baby's behaviours, because they're much more complex and diverse than we thought.' From offering a pacifier to desperately singing lullabies, exhausted parents will go to any lengths to get their baby to stop crying. Now, a study claims to have the 'recipe' to lull a baby to sleep – and it's surprisingly simple (stock image) Researchers...
    CALLS for Brits to be forced back into isolation if they get Covid have been made - as scientists say people are still infectious after five days. Self isolation periods were scrapped after a mammoth vaccine rollout across the UK. 1Scientists have said Brits who get the bug should be isolating for up to ten daysCredit: Reuters That coupled with prior infection, and the fact that Omicron strains are less severe than those that came before it, has meant Brits can get back to normality. The most recent data from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) states that across the country, Covid infections have decreased in the last week. Director of clinical programmes at the UKHSA, Dr Mary Ramsay said it's very encouraging that case rates and hospitalisations are now at low levels. But despite this, scientists have said Brits who get the bug should be isolating for up to ten days. Read more on Covid-19VIRAL CLUES The top 3 most common Covid symptoms right now revealed Writing in the Lancet, medics found that two thirds of Brits who catch the...
    MORE than five million people would die following a nuclear war between the US and Russia as decimated civilizations would be thrown into a battle for food, a study reveals. Scientists believe the fallout from a mega nuke apocalypse would have a disastrous impact on food production - wiping out whole populations from starvation. 4Scientists believe billions would starve to death following a nuclear warCredit: Getty 4Australia would have one of the top survival rates in terms of starvationCredit: Getty 4 Boffins at Rutgers University have completed details analysis of the impact of a nuclear winter - and the results are chilling. They believe the catastrophic repercussion of a nuke battle would see more than five million people starve to death globally in the years after, on top of the vast numbers killed in the war. Countries including the UK, US, Germany, France and China would see sheer devastation, with almost everyone dead by the second year, according to the study. On the flip side, countries such as Argentina and Australia would thrive in comparison, with zero deaths despite...
    Every day, around a thousand people in the UK are diagnosed with cancer. And although those dealt this blow come from all walks of life, they will be united by one terrifying question: is there a cure? The answer isn’t simple because cancer isn’t a simple disease — there are more than 200 types. Though they share a common mechanism — the rapid division of abnormal cells, which then destroy healthy tissue — there are multiple variables, from genetics to where the disease occurs in the body, that help determine your chance of survival. Consequently some forms — such as skin or testicular cancer — have, when detected early, a ten-year survival rate of 98 per cent. For others the prognosis is more bleak. For pancreatic cancer — which is very difficult to detect, meaning it has more time to spread and become resistant to treatment — the five year survival rate is 7 per cent, with 90 per cent of patients dying within two years of diagnosis. Yet with so much global brain power devoted to waging war on...
    Only a small minority of parents with children less than five years old would vaccinate them against Covid, a survey has found — as many scientists doubt shots are needed for the age group. Just 18 percent of those questioned said they would 'definitely' get their child two doses of the vaccine if it was approved for use in the age group. For comparison, almost two in five parents said they would refuse to get their child inoculated or only do so if it was required. More than 1,800 parents took part in the survey by health pollster the Kaiser Family Foundation, including 181 with children younger than five years. It comes as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers approving Moderna's jab for children aged six months to five years. Pfizer is also expected to apply for its shot to be used in the age group later this month. Many scientists have raised concerns over vaccinating children, however, because they face only a small risk of serious illness from the disease. Many scientists have raised concerns over vaccinating the...
    A BILLIONAIRE was made every 17 hours in 2021 – and you could be next, with the right five personality traits. With loads of charisma, a low degree of anxiety and a dash of blind confidence, the world's riches could be yours. 1Find out what traits you share with the world's richest individuals What separates the ultra-rich from the rest of us when it comes to psychology and personality? Researchers have found five traits that distinguish the billionaire mindset from the middle or even upper class mindset. Though these traits are not the end all, be all of wealth, Forbes completed a comprehensive interview process with some of the world's richest players and affirmed an undeniable pattern. Although you'll need a billion-dollar idea to get uber rich, it helps to have a billion-dollar personality. Read More in BillionairesMOVE OVER META Elon Musk is 'giving serious thought' to building new social media platformGATES CLOSED Inside Bill Gates’ $80B property empire - as neighbors brand him a 'nuisance' Mindfulness is key The world's wealthiest people keep close attention to the...
    Scientists have identified the five key personality traits that are common among famous psychopaths, including serial killer Ted Bundy, disgraced fraudster Bernie Madoff and robber Clyde Barrow.  The US academics looked for shared traits in six men - Ted Bundy, Bernie Madoff, Clyde Barrow, James Bond, Sherlock Holmes and Chuck Yeager - who have previously been identified as psychopathic.  They found that Bundy, Madoff and Barrow are all psychopaths guilty of callousness, manipulativeness, dishonesty, arrogance and cruelty. However, Bond, Holmes and Yeager likely are not psychopaths, and may have been misidentifed in the past due to their fearlessness and boldness, the experts say.    Psychopathic traits common among serial killer Ted Bundy, robber Clyde Barrow and fraudster Bernie Madoff were callousness, manipulativeness, dishonesty and cruelty PSYCHOPATHS OR JUST FEARLESS? THE CONTENDERS REAL PEOPLE Ted Bundy (1946-1989): Ted Bundy was one of the most prolific serial killers. He confessed to 36 murders, but the true total could be higher. He said of himself: 'I'm the most cold-hearted son of a bitch you'll ever meet.'   Clyde Barrow (1910-1934): Along with Bonnie Parker, Clyde Barrow went on almost...
    In the latest United Nations report on climate change, scientists document the stark toll inflicted by global warming through more intense heat waves, droughts, floods and other disasters, and present a dire warning that humanity should act quickly to move away from fossil fuels and cut planet-heating emissions. The report goes beyond past assessments not only by detailing the latest science but also by focusing on how the world, while reducing emissions, can better adapt to the accelerating effects of climate change to reduce risks and protect especially vulnerable people. The report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, stresses that the threats to people’s health, livelihoods and lives disproportionately affect those who lack resources to weather the blows. In pursuing climate solutions, the report’s authors say, there should be a focus on equity and justice, because the effects are exacerbating inequality and hitting especially hard for low-income people, marginalized communities and developing countries. The scientists also warn that the natural world, from coral reefs to mountain forests, faces grave threats, but that nature can help in various...
    Scientists at the U.K.-based JET laboratory announced they have achieved “record-breaking” results on a landmark nuclear fusion experiment. According to researchers at the Oxfordshire-based lab, the team successfully squeezed together two forms of hydrogen for a period of five seconds, allowing them to produce 59 megajoules, or 11 megawatts, of energy, more than double the record set in 1997. While the energy output itself is nothing to write home about — it’s enough to boil roughly 60 kettles of water — scientists say it’s a major validation of their design choices in crafting a fusion reactor, a bigger version of which is currently being built in France, and puts scientists one step closer to creating what would be an abundant supply of low-carbon, low-radiation energy. DAILY ON ENERGY: NEW PHASE IN WAR OVER OIL AND GAS LEASING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO “The record, and more importantly the things we’ve learned about fusion under these conditions and how it fully confirms our predictions, show that we are on the right path to a future world of...
    THROUGHOUT history, scientists have performed some strange and often unethical animal experiments -- here are the most shocking. For centuries, scientists have proclaimed that animal experimentation has been necessary to better humans' understanding of fields like medicine, genetics, and physiology. 3Some animal experiments throughout history will blow your mind Still, despite these scientific gains, animal testing is considered a very unethical and controversial practice. And it's no surprise why when one looks back at some of the craziest animal experiments performed throughout history. Here we have rounded up five of some of the strangest, jaw-dropping animal experiments ever. Pig-to-human heart transplant Just earlier this month, the first-ever genetically modified pig heart was transplanted into a human patient. What makes it even stranger is that the procedure would have likely failed without the use of cocaine, which extended the viability of the porcine organ. Most read in News TechBEAM ME UP New rocket will scatter ashes and DNA of "Star Trek" fans and actors in spaceGOING NUCLEAR Nasa's plan to build nuclear plant on Moon could be crucial for...
    A MIND-boggling optical illusion that appears to show horses on a mountain top has caused a row between the painter and scientists - but who's right? Optical illusions typically cause a stir online but a recent painting said to show several horses on a mountain top has caused a feud between its creator and a bunch of scientists - but how many can you see? 2How many horses can you see?Credit: Bev Doolitte/National Institute of Enviromental Health Sciences Bev Doolitte's portrait of five patch-skinned horses standing together on a snow ledge has been a mainstay on the National Institute of Environmental Health Services' (NIEHS) website for a while now. In it, what appears to be four white and brown horses and a foal are bunched together and blend into the brown rock and snowy background, giving the picture an optical illusion. But scientists say Doolitte's image actually has seven horses and not five, as its creator claims. According to the group, the picture is of made of seven horses including some partial horses like a horse head and rear. If...
    Scientists have regrown missing frog legs using a five-drug cocktail – and they aim to test their technique on mammals next.   On adult frogs, which are naturally unable to regenerate limbs, the team triggered leg regrowth using the drugs, applied in a silicone wearable attached to wounds. Over the course of 18 months, the frogs had 'almost fully functional' limbs restored, including boneless toes, which they used to help them swim.  The US academics hope their method could bring the field a step closer to the goal of limb regeneration for humans.  Currently, regaining function through natural regeneration is out of reach for millions of patients who have lost limbs, either due to trauma, diabetes or other reasons.  On adult frogs, which are naturally unable to regenerate limbs, the US team were able to trigger leg regrowth using the five-drug cocktail applied in a silicone wearable called a BioDome (pictured) THE FIVE-DRUG COCKTAIL - BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor) - 1,4-DPCA (1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3carboxylicacid) - RD5 (resolvin D5) - GH (growth hormone) - RA (retinoic acid) The work has been conducted by experts at...
    HEALTH chiefs are under growing pressure to slash Covid self-isolation to five days after admitting giving ministers faulty advice. Boris Johnson yesterday added to calls for the UK Health and Security Agency to revisit guidance that says Brits should quarantine for at least a week. 4Boris Johnson said self-isolation could be cut to five days if scientists recommend itCredit: Getty 4Health minister Ed Argar said slashing quarantine could help alleviate workforce shortages His remarks came as boffins were forced to admit they were wrong to slap down calls to slash isolation with untrue claims the US rules are different. The UKHSA has already recommended moving from ten to seven days last month as long as people test negative on days six and seven. But in a blog last week the agency said our rules couldn't be compared "like with like” with America's, where people can quit quarantine on day 5. It claimed isolation in Britain was counted from the day someone experienced symptoms, whereas in the US people had to wait for a positive test. However, the agency has now...
    Scientists have found worrying signs of weakness in the Antarctic ice shelf that holds back Antarctica’s most dangerous glaciers. Scientists have found evidence that the important ice shelf could potentially shatter in 3 to 5 years. This comes as a shock as the Antarctic ice shelf has until now been considered a very stable part of the Antarctic. The new data has shown that the warming ocean is eroding the eastern ice shelf from below, creating cracks that could more than likely spider out and put the shelf in danger of completely shattering. If the shelf shatters, it would spit icebergs into the water, raising the sea levels and putting millions of people in coastal areas at risk of flooding. Without the ice shelf, there would be a domino effect as it could cause ice cliffs to collapse in the Thwaites as well.  This is a grave concern for many scientists as the ice shelf holds a lot of responsibility and would cause severe and long-term damage if it were to shatter. The Antarctic has such a delicate...
    (CNN)As the rapidly heating planet alters the landscape of the Arctic region up north, scientists have discovered disturbing and alarming signs at the southern end of the planet, particularly in one of the ice shelves safeguarding the Antarctic's so-called "Doomsday glacier."Satellite images taken as recently as last month, which researchers presented at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union Monday, suggest the critical ice shelf keeping together the Thwaites glacier in western Antarctica — an important defense against global sea level rise — could shatter within the next three to five years. Antarctica's Thwaites glacier is known as the "Doomsday glacier," due to the serious risk it poses during its melting process. It has dumped billions of tons of ice into the sea, and its demise could lead to irreversible changes throughout the planet. The glacier, which equals the size of Florida or Great Britain, already accounts for about 4% of annual global sea level rise, loses roughly 50 billion tons of ice each year, and is becoming highly vulnerable to the climate crisis. The fall of the ice...
    The sun sets at the Davis Station, Antarctica.Rachael Robertson An ice shelf holding a critical glacier in Antarctica could shatter within the next five years, scientists warned on Monday during an American Geophysical Union meeting. The Thwaites Glacier is a Florida-sized sheet that's already responsible for about 4% of global annual sea level rise as it slowly melts into the ocean. But the glacier sits on an ice shelf vulnerable to failing due to newly detected fissures on its surface and a major fracture across the entire shelf, according to satellite images. Hotter ocean temperatures, fueled in part by human-caused climate change, are eroding the eastern ice shelf. If the shelf breaks apart, the glacier's contribution to sea level rise could eventually increase by as much as 25%, the scientists said. Ice loss in Antarctica has been growing worse in recent years and research suggests that a dangerous amount of sea level will occur if global warming reaches about three degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) above preindustrial levels. The Earth has already has surpassed one degree Celsius of warming.More from CNBC Climate:Read...
    TUCKED in a remote corner of Turkey amid dirt tracks and stone houses live a family that appears to throw out four million years of evolution. Originally touted by Turkish scientists to be evidence of "backward evolution", several members of the Ulas family extraordinarily walk on all fours. 8Five siblings from a family in Turkey walk on all fours instead of uprightCredit: Getty - Contributor 8Hüseyin wanders for many kilometres on his hands and feetCredit: BBC 8Scientists believe it is down to genetic and developmental circumstancesCredit: BBC 8The siblings spend most of their time at the family's home in southern TurkeyCredit: BBC Out of 19 children born to Resit and Hatice Ulas - who walk upright - five siblings walk using their feet and the palms of their hands with astounding agility in what researchers first thought was a relapse of the evolutionary leap to standing upright. It is so tough and unnatural for humans to walk in this way that it is often used as an endurance task in the US military - but for this family it is...
    Thousands of people are landing in the United States from South Africa every week, despite a new COVID-19 variant sparking such concern that Britain and Israel on Thursday effectively halted travel from the region. The variant is predominately found in Botswana - from where there are no direct flights to the U.S. - and also in neighboring South Africa. United Airlines currently fly direct from Johannesburg to New York City seven days a week, with the 16-hour flight leaving at 10pm and arriving at 7am in Newark. United also fly direct to New York City from Cape Town three times a week, on Monday, Thursday and Saturday. United flies Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners, which can hold 290 people. Delta fly direct from Johannesburg to Atlanta on Saturday, Monday, and Thursday. They use Airbus A350-900, which can seat between 300 and 350 people. On Thursday Britain's health secretary, Sajid Javid sounded the alarm over what he termed the 'worst-ever' super-mutant COVID variant. A baby cries as her mother receives her Pfizer vaccine against COVID-19, in Diepsloot Township near Johannesburg, South Africa on...
    Mars is one of the most mysterious and strange planets in the solar system. The rovers and satellites sent there repeatedly sent strange and mysterious photos to Earth, which initially surprised even scientists. Ufologists and proponents of the theory of the existence of intelligent life on Mars, which is hidden from us, are generally pleasing. So, in this article we will understand what the five mysterious photos of Mars hide. Mars Forest These were taken by the “Forest Belts” near Mars’ North Pole, photographed by the Mars Observatory Orbiter in April 2008, and released in late 2015 by NASA’s Astronomical Daylight. This photo is like an abstract painting or dark trees rising from the surface of Mars. The dark brown lines are actually very similar to the trunks of a tree, but in reality they are only an optical illusion. Scientists believe that these “trees” formed as a result of the melting of dry ice (solid form of carbon dioxide) located on top of the dunes. This process reveals brown sand, which leaves strange traces and slides down the...
    THE BEST places to survive a global societal collapse have been ranked by scientists in a new study. New Zealand came out on top, followed by Iceland, the island state of Tasmania in Australia, Ireland and the UK. 2 2New Zealand came out on topCredit: Getty Each place ranked differently for different things like protected boarders, the ability to grow food for the population and sufficient energy and manufacturing infrastructure. The US was 6th on the list. It didn't make the top five because it's connected to other countries. Professor Aled Jones, Director of the Global Sustainability Institute at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) and study researcher, told us: "The US actually comes 6th in the study - so just outside the top five. "The main reason for them not being in the top five is because of our measure of isolation - if collapse did happen how connected or exposed are countries to their neighbours. "Islands do much better on this score than countries with land borders." Jones worked alongside Nick King to examine what factors could lead to...
    More On: fossils Park ranger discovers 400-lb. ‘monster salmon,’ more in prehistoric fossil trove New species of crested dinosaur identified in Mexico ‘Tree’-like dinosaur multiplied in size during prosperous years ‘Living fossil’ rediscovered in Pacific Ocean after 273M years The coelacanth — a giant weird fish still around from dinosaur times — can live for 100 years, a new study found. These slow-moving, people-sized fish of the deep, nicknamed a “living fossil,” are the opposite of the live fast, die young mantra. These nocturnal fish grow at an achingly slow pace. Females don’t hit sexual maturity until their late 50s, the study said, while male coelacanths are sexually mature at 40 to 69 years. And maybe strangest of all, researchers figure pregnancy in the fish lasts about five years. Coelacanths, which have been around for 400 million years, were thought extinct until they were found alive in 1938 off South Africa. Scientists long believed coelacanths live about 20 years. But by applying a standard technique for dating commercial fish, French scientists calculated they actually live close to a century, according to...
    Scientists have revealed the five types of relationships between cats and their humans — among which are 'friendship', 'co-dependence' and 'remote association'. Researchers from the University of Lincoln polled 3,994 cat owners about their own behaviours towards their feline friends — and vice versa. Alongside the study, the team have also published an interactive quiz so that cat owners can find out what kind of relationship they have with their pets. Scientists have revealed the five types of relationships between cats and their humans — among which are friendship, co-dependence and remote association 'Cats form close emotional relationships with humans, yet little is actually known about this,' said paper author and animal behavioural expert Daniel Mills of the University of Lincoln. 'As with any complex social relationship, the type of cat-owner bond is a product of the dynamic between both individuals involved, along with their certain personality features,' he added. 'While many cats may be aloof, it seems that this is not as common as might be portrayed.' RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next These cats ain't loyal! Felines...
    THE DEEPEST manmade ocean hole in the world has just been drilled off the coast of Japan. Scientists created the hole in the hope of understanding the reasons for past earthquakes better. 3 3The hole was dug using a long thin drillCredit: COURTESY OF JAMSTEC The new hole is 26,322 feet (5 miles) deep and was created on May 14. It's in the Pacific Ocean along with the Mariana Trench, which is the deepest oceanic trench on Earth. The Mariana Trench formed naturally and is 36,201 feet deep. The deepest manmade whole in the world is the Kola Superdeep Borehole, which was drilled into the Earth on the border between Russia and Norway. 3Sediment from the new hole could teach us about past earthquakesCredit: COURTESY OF JAMSTEC The Kola Borehole is 40,230 feet. The new ocean hole is located near the epicentre of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake that resulted in the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster. The hole has revealed samples of debris from older earthquakes. Nobuhisa Eguchi, the director of the operations department at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth...
    Killer flies 'divebomb' towards their prey but often lose control in the air and miss their target, a new study shows. A team of researchers led by the University of Cambridge filmed the species with cameras as it tried to catch prey in transparent tanks in the lab.   The species, Coenosia attenuata, can reach accelerations of more than 3g when aerial diving to catch their prey, they discovered. But at such high speeds they often miss because they can't correct their course and end up having to awkwardly recalibrate in mid-air.   Incredibly, the species, which is native to Southern Europe, travels five times faster than a falcon, despite reaching 0.1 inch in length.  The study has been conducted by researchers at the University of Cambridge, the University of Lincoln and the University of Minnesota.  'Insects that predate aerially usually contrast prey against the sky and attack upwards,' they say in their paper.  'However, killer flies (Coenosia attenuata) can attack prey flying below them, performing what we term "aerial dives".  'Killer flies are fast and highly manoeuvrable dipteran predators, who hunt prey flying...
    A dangerous rise in global temperatures above the 1.5C limit set by the UN could happen in just five years, warn scientists. There is a 40 per cent chance that annual temperature rises will go beyond the level set by the 2015 Paris Agreement, agreed to by 196 countries, it is claimed. The report published by the World Meteorological Organisation also warns of a very high likelihood – a 90 per cent chance – of at least one year between 2021 and 2025 becoming the warmest on record, outstripping 2016's record heat. Global average temperatures of 1.5C above 19th century levels are seen as a threshold beyond which the most dangerous impacts of climate change will be felt.  Scientists warn that temperature rises above 1.5C will lead to more heatwaves, extreme rainstorms, water shortages and drought, greater economic losses and lower crop yields, higher sea levels and destruction of coral reefs. A dangerous rise in global temperatures above the 1.5C limit set by the UN could happen in just five years, warn scientists (melting ice near Sirmilik National Park...
    Thanks to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, researchers have tracked down the origins of several mysterious fast radio bursts (FRBS) to five distant galaxies.    In total, the locations of eight FRBs -- intense flashes of energy found in various parts of the sky that last just a few milliseconds -- were traced by researchers from the University of California, Santa Cruz. These galaxies with spiral-shaped arms are in deep space, ranging between 400 million and 9 billion light-years away. One light-year is approximately 6 trillion miles. The researchers were able to find the FRBs, thanks to the ultraviolet and near-infrared light spotted by the Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3. They pinpointed five of the FRBs exact locations, however three remain inconclusive. The findings, which are slated to be published in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal and can be read on the arXiv repository, surprised the researchers because most times, they are not even sure where to begin their search. Scroll down for video  'Our results are new and exciting,' the study's lead author, Alexandra Mannings said in a statement. 'This is the first...
    London Zoo has rescued one of the world's rarest – and strangest – turtles from extinction. Cantor’s giant softshell turtle, which can grow up to six feet long, was thought to have permanently vanished from India after it had not been sighted for 10 years. It's the world's biggest freshwater turtle – and considered one of the strangest as it spends much of its life buried in sand with only its eyes visible. A tiny baby Cantor’s giant softshell turtle with a coin for size reference. The species (Pelochelys cantorii) can grow up to six feet long RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Not so exotic after all! Giant turtles usually found in... Region in the Bermuda Triangle is a destination for green... Scientists find plastic in sea turtles' MUSCLES for the... British coast is facing an invasion of SHARKS as a result of... Share this article Share But it can suddenly dart forward faster than a king cobra to catch a crab or fish – crushing bone with one snap...
    Following one of the most adventurous ocean expeditions ever, scientists have returned precise measurements for the deepest points in each of the world's five major oceans.  Data from the Five Deeps Expedition (FDE), which performed dives over the course of 10 months from 2018 to 2019, confirms for the first time the locations of the deepest points of Indian Ocean and the Southern Ocean.  The deepest point of the Indian Ocean is at 7,187 metres, within the Java Trench, just off the coast of Indonesia, the data reveals, while the deepest point of the Southern Ocean has a depth of 7,432 metres, within the South Sandwich Trench.  Prior to FDE, the deepest parts of some oceans were relatively well known, such as lowest point on Earth – the Challenger Deep, inside the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean.  At a whopping 10,924 metre (6.8-miles), the Challenger Deep still holds the record for the deepest point on Earth, the expeditions confirmed. While the deepest point in the Atlantic Ocean is called Brownson Deep in the Puerto Rico Trench, which descends an impressive 8.378...
    CHINESE scientists probed weaponising coronaviruses five years before the Covid pandemic, bombshell documents reveal. Documents obtained by the US State Department reportedly show People's Liberation Army commanders predicted that World War 3 would be fought with biological weapons. ???? Read our coronavirus and green list announcement live blog for the latest updates 3Chinese scientists reportedly considered weaponising coronaviruses back in 2015Credit: AFP US officials obtained the papers which were written by People’s Liberation Army scientists and senior Chinese public health officials in 2015 as part of their own investigation into the origins of Covid-19, reports The Australian. Chinese scientists described SARS ­coronaviruses as heralding a “new era of genetic weapons”. They boasted the viruses could be “artificially manipulated into an emerging human ­disease virus, then weaponised and unleashed in a way never seen before”. Tom ­Tugendhat MP and Australian politician James Paterson said the document raises major concerns about China's transparency into the origins of Covid-19. Mr Tugendhat said: "China’s evident interest in bioweapons is extremely concerning. Even under the tightest controls these weapons are dangerous. "This document raises major...
    MENLO PARK, Calif. — Three more gray whales have washed up dead in the San Francisco Bay, adding to the fatal beachings of five others in the region over the last month, including a 46-foot fin whale, scientists from the Marine Mammal Center and the California Academy of Sciences said Thursday. In 2019, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced it was going to investigate an unusually high number of gray whales found dead along the North American west coast. The investigation is continuing. Although the number of dead whales may seem alarming, the numbers are actually lower than they have been the last two years, said Michael Milstein, an NOAA spokesman. In 2019, 214 washed up on the beaches and coasts of Mexico, the United States and Canada — 34 in California, 13 in San Francisco Bay. The following year, the numbers remained high: 174. California ‘It’s alarming’: 4 gray whales found dead on Bay Area beaches in 9 days California ‘It’s alarming’: 4 gray whales found dead on...
    (CNN)The brain of a former NFL player who police said shot and killed five people before taking his own life will be studied by researchers at Boston University, officials said Friday.York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson said on Wednesday that Phillip Adams, 32, shot two air conditioning technicians -- killing one -- outside the home of a prominent doctor in Rock Hill, South Carolina. He then forced his way into Dr. Robert Lesslie's home. Lesslie, his wife and two grandchildren, ages 5 and 9, were killed inside.York County Coroner Sabrina Gast said Friday her office reached out to Boston University to study Adams' brain to see whether he had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.Scientists believe that CTE results from repeated head trauma. Read MoreIn football, this can happen not just from hard hits that result in concussions but from the constant rattling of the brain inside the skull that occurs during tackles and other plays. These repeated hits are known as subconcussive hits and can result in a buildup of an abnormal protein called tau.What we know about the mass shooting...
    Human embryos could be the next test subjects of a groundbreaking study that kept mouse embryos alive outside of the womb that developed a heart, stomach, head and limbs in six days. A team of Israeli scientists grew filled small jars with nutrients inside that were placed on rotating roller and pumped each with a pressurized oxygen mixture to simulate the natural process. The embryos were able to grown in the artificial womb for up to 12 days and researchers say they plan to continue the work to grow human embryos to week five. Although this study is deemed groundbreaking, the team understands attempting human trials would spark ethical debates due to the fact human embryos will be lost during the research. Scroll down for video  Human embryos could be the next test subjects of a groundbreaking study that kept mouse embryo alive outside of the womb that developed its heart, stomach, head and limbs in six days Jacob Hanna, a developmental biologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science, who led the research team, told MIT's Technology Review: 'I do...
    (CNN)Scientists and global health officials are investigating whether the current Ebola outbreak in Guinea may have been triggered by a person who was first infected with the virus during the Ebola epidemic in the region five years ago. The World Health Organization (WHO) is carrying out further investigations into the individual who appears to have had the virus lay dormant in their body. This would suggest infections may persist once people recover and have the potential to start a future outbreak. Countries in West Africa on high alert after Ebola outbreak in GuineaInternational researchers, including a team at the University of Conakry in Guinea, sequenced the genome of nine samples taken from people infected during the current outbreak and compared them against sequences from previous outbreaks to help identify the cause. The results suggest the latest outbreak "is the result of the resurgence of a strain that previously circulated in the West African outbreak," the authors wrote in their analysis.Read MoreThe team found that the strain of the Ebola virus circulating resembled that of the Makano variant, responsible for the...
    TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Natural underground caverns on the moon could be used to store frozen samples of Earth’s species in order to protect biodiversity in the event of global catastrophe, according to a University of Arizona scientist and his students. Jekan Thanga, a professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, and five of his students presented a paper earlier this month on the concept during the international IEEE Aerospace Conference, which was held virtually this year, the Arizona Daily Star reported. Thanga said the underground biological repository would serve as a backup copy of frozen seeds, spores, sperm and egg samples from most Earth species. The specimens would be kept safe inside the caves carved by molten lava hundreds of feet below the surface of the moon. The caves, some large enough to hold a 30-story building, can be reached by rocket from Earth in four to five days and provide an environment essentially undisturbed for the past 3 to 4 billion years, scientists said. University doctoral candidate Álvaro Díaz-Flores Caminero and undergraduate student Claire Pedersen were the lead...
    Dogs are known to have evolved from wolves, yet until now, determining exactly when and where this occurred has proved difficult for scientists.  Several examples of ancient canines have previously been found, dating back thousands of years. Some resemble wolves, some look like dogs, and some sit awkwardly between the two groups.   Now, a new study has found the transition from wolves to dogs may have first occurred in a cave in southwest Germany between 14,000 and 16,000 years ago.  Analysis of eight canine fossils in the Gnirshöhle cave revealed a huge genetic diversity wide enough to include everything from a wild wolf to a pet pooch. Experts from Germany believe the Magdalenian people, who spanned Europe between 12,000 and 17,000 years ago, tamed wolves, turning them into dogs. The theory states the Magdalenians did this with a range of wolves from many lineages, and this diversity gave rise to the entire spectrum of breeds we see today.  Scroll down for video   Eight ancient dog fossils found in the Gnirshöhle cave were analysed and had a genetic diversity wide enough to include almost...
    RULES on children wearing masks in the classroom were in chaos today as a leading scientist said schools should just open windows instead. Professor Calum Semple, who sits on the Sage group that advises Government policy, revealed he's "not a fan" of asking young kids to don face coverings. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 5Kids are returning to schools in Wales and Scotland from today His remarks came as a senior Cabinet minister admitted it's up to teachers whether or not they want to enforce mask wearing. Some primary schools have already announced they are going to make pupils as young as five use face coverings at almost all times. But Prof Semple said that is unnecessary because young kids present the "lowest risk to both themselves and society". He told the BBC: "There is really good data coming out that shows that children are half to a third as likely to acquire the virus. "When it comes to transmitting, they are probably half as likely to transmit it as adults. "That risk actually gets...
    Fed up with kitty bringing home 'little presents'? Playing with your cat and feeding them meat-rich foods can deter them from hunting wildlife, a study has found. Domestic cats with outdoor access can represent a major threat to local wildlife, including birds, small mammals, amphibians and fish. Researchers from Exeter, however, have demonstrated that there are some simple strategies that can help temper Mr Tiddles' murderous impulses. These include ensuring that cats get all the micronutrients they need from their human-provided diet, so that they are not driven to seek extra food. It is also important to ensure cats lead enriched lives and have opportunities to explore their natural hunting impulses through play with toys. Fed up with kitty bringing home 'little presents'? Playing with your cat (like with a feather wand, pictured) and feeding them meat-rich foods can deter them from hunting wildlife 'Keeping cats indoors is the only sure-fire way to prevent hunting,' said paper author and ecologist Robbie McDonald of the University of Exeter. However, he added, 'some owners are worried about the welfare implications of restricting...
    SCIENTISTS have discovered five genes that put you most at risk of catching a severe case of coronavirus. UK researchers said this sheds light on what underpins severe coronavirus symptoms and could lead to potential new drug treatments for the killer bug. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 2Scientists have found five genes that put you at risk of catching a severe case of coronavirusCredit: EPA 2Researchers compared the genetic information of Covid-19 patients in ICU with samples from healthy volunteers from other studiesCredit: AFP or licensors Dr Baillie and his team did the study on 2,244 critically ill patients with Covid-19 from 208 intensive care units across the UK. Researchers compared the genetic information of Covid-19 patients in ICU with samples from healthy volunteers from other studies. The team found that variations in five genes - IFNAR2, TYK2, OAS1, DPP9 and CCR2 - was associated with patients developing a severe illness with Covid-19. The scientists said that they were able to pinpoint that antiviral immunity and lung inflammation are associated with the...
    A woman is standing at a vending machine for disposable face masks in a Riga train station. Alexander Welscher/Getty Images Latvia has introduced the world's first vending machine for coronavirus tests. 100 more will be rolled out across the country, according to Reuters. Results from the tests are available within 24 hours. The vending machines remove the need for between two to five medical workers. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A vending machine that issues COVID-19 tests and stores the samples has been installed outside a hospital in Riga. It's the first of its kind in the world and the first of 100 to be rolled out in Latvia, according to Reuters. The machine at the Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital in Riga dispenses PRC swab tests.  PRC tests involve taking a swab of the throat and nose and testing for the genetic code (RNA) of the virus. The majority of tests performed globally use this method. Once the tests have been retrieved from the vending machine and placed back for storage, a technician collects the...
    A team of scientists has pioneered a new method to uncover clues about an 1,900-year-old mummy without damaging the ancient corpse.  CT scans and X-rays were combined for the first time to study an Egyptian mummy that was discovered in Hawara, an archaeological site in Egypt.  While X-ray technology has been used to examine mummies for almost 100 years, combining X-ray diffraction with CT scanning is completely new and provides much higher resolution imagery, according to findings published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface on Tuesday.   A CT can was deployed to form a 'three dimensional roadmap' of the contents of the mummy,' lead author Stuart Stock told CNN.  Experts then shone X-ray beams thinner than a human hair onto the corpse to identify objects contained within its wrappings. While X-ray technology has been used to examine mummies for almost 100 years, scientists combined X-ray diffraction with CT scanning in a completely new way, providing much higher resolution imagery, according to research published on Tuesday A CT can was deployed to form a 'three dimensional roadmap' of...
    'Covid toes' that turn purple from the disease can last for at least five months after survivors beat the infection, scientists have found.  Inflammation of the toes caused by Covid-19 can lead to red or purple skin, swelling and chilblain-like blisters. The symptom typically develops within a week of getting infected and goes naturally within a fortnight. But in some people, the skin problem has become a manifestation of 'Long Covid', lasting for months after patients have fought the virus off. Dermatologists who conducted the research fear the cases they have seen are 'just the tip of the iceberg', and that it is in fact a common presentation of the virus. Previous research estimates that around one in 12 people with coronavirus develop some kind of skin complaint, and experts have repeatedly called for health chiefs to recognise it as an official symptom. 'Covid toes' that turn purple from the disease can least for five months after infection, scientists have found RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Public health expert is blasted by GMB viewers for...
    British scientists have developed a rapid coronavirus test they say can spot the disease in less than five minutes. The Oxford University team behind the device hope it will be ready to be rolled out nationwide in the middle of next year. It works using a nasal swab that is inserted into a cartridge that scans for antigens, or proteins found on the surface of Covid-19.   The test can also tell the virus apart from other infections such as flu and seasonal human coronaviruses, according to a small study of its efficacy. Its creators envisage it being used to test people en masse at airports and in offices to keep the economy afloat.  If proven to work on a large scale, the device will be three times faster than current rapid tests being reviewed by the UK Government. Ministers are in the market for quick antigen tests, which would play a key role in Boris Johnson's 'Operation Moonshot' project to carry out 10million tests a day. British scientists have developed a rapid coronavirus test they say can spot the disease in...
    Covid-19 carriers with no symptoms are just as likely to transmit the coronavirus as those who feel ill, according to scientists. Two studies published today have given further clues about the role played by 'silent' spreaders – who make up around one in five of the infected.  One study of South Korean Covid-19 cases revealed asymptomatic patients had the same viral load as those with signs of the disease, such a fever, a new and persistent cough or a new loss or change of taste or smell. Viral load is a measure of how many viral particles someone has circulating in their body and how likely they are to transmit the virus to others by coughing or talking, for example.  It has previously been speculated that those who do not have tell-tale symptoms are infected with a smaller amount of the virus and, therefore, are less likely to spread it. But some studies say asymptomatic spread accounts for the majority of transmission of the disease, given that people do not self-isolate if they are unaware they have the virus. The...
    A pain-free laser used for just five minutes could boost a woman's libido, scientists have discovered. In a study, reported in the Journal of Lasers in Medical Sciences, scientists examined the effect of the fractional CO2 laser on a woman's sex drive. Researchers found that the device, which creates small wounds inside the vagina, not only helped improved sexual function in menopausal women but also helped increase the number of orgasms they experienced. A study, reported in the Journal of Lasers in Medical Sciences, found a laser could he;p boost a woman's sex drive. (Stock image)  The results of the study come just months after scientists found more than a third of women in the UK were not interested in having sex. During the new study, scientists compared the effect of the machine to regular hormonal creams in 50 women who were going through the menopause  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next How sunshine cuts blood pressure - and makes you thinner!... Why fit, healthy women are the most at risk of long Covid:......
    Matthew Rozsa August 17, 2020 9:48PM (UTC) A new study that examined five different types of seafood found that traces of plastic contaminants were present in every single sample — suggesting that humans ingest a large amount of plastic pollution from eating seafood both wild and farmed. The study, which was conducted by a group of scientists led by doctoral candidate Francisca Ribeiro from the University of Queensland's Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences, investigated 10 raw samples of wild sardines, 10 raw samples of farmed tiger prawns, 10 wild squid, 10 oysters and five wild blue crab. The authors' goal was to develop a simple quantitative means to improve plastic contamination detection methods. : The researchers found that every single one of the samples had plastic in them, although the extent varied quite a bit. The researchers measured the amount of plastic pollution per gram of seafood tissue, and found that sardines had the highest percentage: about 0.3 milligrams of plastic per gram of tissue, meaning that one would ingest 30 milligrams of plastic after consuming an average serving...
    A group of 20 Harvard and MIT scientists and volunteers have been quietly mixing and trialing coronavirus vaccines in a private lab, but are yet to find out whether or not any are effective.  The group's efforts have nothing to do with the FDA or the government. They have been working in a lab in Boston to try to come up with a safe, effective vaccine like hundreds of others around the world.  They have not yet published results or explained whether any of the volunteers ever tested positive for COVID-19.  The group claims that because people are mixing the ingredients at home after receiving them in drop-off packages, and because no money is changing hands, it is legal.   Calling themselves Rapid Deployment Vaccine Collaborative or Radvac, the group formed in March. It is being led by Preston Estep, a scientist who has a PhD in genetics from Harvard, who said he was alarmed by the government's timeline of producing a vaccine in 12-18 months. He wondered whether they could privately come up with their own using readily-available ingredients.  Preston Estep...
    There is a 'rising chance' that the world will exceed the key 1.5°C (2.7°F) global warming limit set by the Paris Agreement in the next five years, scientists said. The warning comes from the UK Met Office, who conducted a five-year climate assessment on behalf of the World Meteorological Organisation. World leaders agreed in 2015 to keep warming this century under 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. However, experts found that there is one-in-five chance that global mean warming will exceed this limit for at least one year before 2024.  Scroll down for video  There is a 'rising chance' that the world will exceed the key 1.5°C (2.7°F) global warming limit set by the Paris Agreement in the next five years, scientists said (stock image) 'This study shows — with a high level of scientific skill – the enormous challenge ahead in meeting the Paris Agreement on Climate Change target,' said World Meteorological Organisation secretary general Petteri Taalas. The research revealed that the annual mean global temperature is likely to be at least 1°C...
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