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    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — You’re in the mood for fish and your server suggests a dish of invasive carp. Ugh, you might say. But how about broiled copi, fresh from the Mississippi River? Here’s the catch: They’re the same thing. READ MORE: Officials Release Update On Oil Spill In Flint RiverIllinois and partner organizations kicked off a market-tested campaign Wednesday to rechristen as “copi” four species previously known collectively as Asian carp, hoping the new label will make them more attractive to U.S. consumers. Turning carp into a popular household and restaurant menu item is one way officials hope to rein in a decades-old invasion threatening native fish, mussels and aquatic plants in the Mississippi and other Midwestern rivers, as well as the Great Lakes. “The ‘carp’ name is so harsh that people won’t even try it,” said Kevin Irons, assistant fisheries chief with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. “But it’s healthy, clean and it really tastes pretty darn good.” The federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is funding the five-year, $600,000 project to rebrand the carp and make...
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — You’re in the mood for fish and your server suggests a dish of invasive carp. Ugh, you might say. But how about broiled copi, fresh from the Mississippi River? Here’s the catch: They’re the same thing. Illinois and partner organizations kicked off a market-tested campaign Wednesday to rechristen as “copi” four species previously known collectively as Asian carp, hoping the new label will make them more attractive to U.S. consumers. Turning carp into a popular household and restaurant menu item is one way officials hope to rein in a decades-old invasion threatening native fish, mussels and aquatic plants in the Mississippi and other Midwestern rivers, as well as the Great Lakes. “The ‘carp’ name is so harsh that people won’t even try it,” said Kevin Irons, assistant fisheries chief with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. “But it’s healthy, clean and it really tastes pretty darn good.” The federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is funding the five-year, $600,000 project to rebrand the carp and make them widely available. More than two dozen distributors, processors, restaurants...
    The UK’s red list of endangered birds seems to be ever-growing as four new birds have just been added. The UK’s birds are added to the endangered list when they are believed to be under threat of global extinction. ????New UK Red List for birds: more than one in four species in serious trouble The Red List now stands at 70 species – almost doubling in the last 25 years #BOCC5 #Ornithology 1/10 pic.twitter.com/Qtsf38XG3V — RSPB Science (@RSPBScience) December 1, 2021 The swift, house martin, greenfinch, and Bewick’s swan are the four newly-added endangered bird species. Swifts and house martins populations have dramatically fallen since 1995, going down by 58%.  (1/4) ???? NEWS: More UK bird species than ever before have been placed on the Red list of conservation concern???? We must act now to protect species and prevent further declines: https://t.co/KTSZs2vTRn ⬇️#BOCC5 pic.twitter.com/blHijqXtaG — RSPB (@Natures_Voice) December 1, 2021 These additions increase the number of birds on the red list to 70 species out of the UK’s total 245 bird species. More than...
    The discovery of a preserved Neanderthal milk tooth reveals baby teeth emerged four months sooner among infants of the extinct species than what is seen in modern humans. A team of international scientists analyzed the tooth of a child that lived 120,000 years ago near what is now the city of Krapina, Croatia and were able to determine the tooth appeared when the child was between four and seven months old. Primary teeth in modern babies typically start coming in between six and 12 months. The findings also suggest that Neanderthal children were able to start eating solid foods at an earlier age, which may have been necessary to nourish their much larger brains. The discovery of a preserved Neanderthal milk tooth reveals baby teeth emerged four months sooner among infants of the extinct species than what is seen in modern humans Human infants typically grow teeth in the front of their mouths, known as incisors, with the molars and canines appearing later. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says children can start eating solid foods around six months, but...
    A new species of dinosaur that was four times the size of a king size bed roamed the Isle of Wight 125 million years ago, fossil analysis has revealed.  Brighstoneus simmondsi is the latest in a host of new dinosaur discoveries described by scientists at the Natural History Museum in recent weeks. It follows the announcement of a new species of ankylosaur, therapod and two new spinosaur dinosaurs. The latest discovery is an iguanodontian, a group that also includes the Iguanodon and Mantellisaurus.  A new species of dinosaur that was four times the size of a king size bed roamed the Isle of Wight 125 million years ago, fossil analysis has revealed. Brighstoneus simmondsi is pictured The new dinosaur is an iguanodontian, a group that also includes the Iguanodon and Mantellisaurus (pictured) Brighstoneus simmondsi was found to have 28 teeth (pictured). It also had a bulbous nose, whereas the Iguanodon and Mantellisaurus have very straight noses KEY FACTS ABOUT BRIGHTSTONEUS SIMMONDSI  When did it exist? 125 million years ago Where did it live? Isle of Wight  How long was it? 26ft (8m) How...
    In an honorable example of fair play, giraffes pick similar-sized opponents to ensure a 'square go', a new study reveals. From observations in South Africa, researchers at the University of Manchester found males practiced head butts with males of similar stature.  Giraffe males fight for 'access to a large number of females' by launching their ossicones – the two skin-covered bone structures at the top of their heads – at their opponents, using their long necks for leverage.  The force of a particular powerful impact can cut into flesh, wounding and sometimes even killing a fighter.    Giraffe males practice head butts with males of similar stature, in an honorable example of fair play, researchers at the University of Manchester report. Pictured, two giraffes go at each other in a head-to-head position GIRAFFES STOP REPRODCUING EARLY TO CARE FOR GRANDCHILDRENFemale giraffes have evolved to go through the menopause early so they can help care for their grandchildren, a 2021 study reveals.  Elegant females spend up to 30 per cent of their lives in a 'post-reproductive state' to help raise successive generations...
    Egyptian scientists say the fossil of a four-legged prehistoric whale, unearthed over a decade ago in the country's Western Desert, is that of a previously unknown species. The creature, an ancestor of the modern-day whale, is believed to have lived 43 million years ago. The prehistoric whale, known as semi-aquatic because it lived both on land and sea, sported features of an accomplished hunter, the team's leading paleontologist, Hesham Sallam, told The Associated Press - features that make it stand out among other whale fossils. Photo shows fossilized amphibious four-legged whale bones and a colored photo of an imaginary shape of the whale at Mansoura University Vertebrate Paleontology Centre in Dakahlia province, Egypt, Sept. 4, 2021.  Ahmed Gomaa/Xinhua via Getty Images The fossil was first found by a team of Egyptian environmentalists in 2008 in an area that was covered by seas in prehistoric times, but researchers only published their findings confirming a new species last month. Sallam said that his team did not start examining the fossil until 2017 because he wanted to assemble the best and the...
    08/06/2021 at 4:03 PM CEST In the framework of the protection program for the gray teal (the most endangered duck in Europe), an experimental campaign to eradicate exotic and invasive aquatic species was carried out last July in the El Hondo Natural Park, in Alicante. In this action, a traditional fishing gear has been used, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the control of invasive alien species in the wetland. In total, more than 4.5 tons of species harmful to the environment were removed, especially common carp. Through twenty days of fishing In fact, four tons of common carp and carp have been extracted, as reported by the Association of Naturalists of the Southeast (Anse), based in Murcia, in a statement. The activity has been promoted by Anse y Riegos de Levante, and has been developed by fishermen from the Brotherhood of San Pedro del Pinatar (Murcia) as a reinforcement of the actions to improve the habitat of the LIFE Cerceta Pardilla. “The control of invasive alien species is one of the great...
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Minnesota state Sen. Foung Hawj was never a fan of the “Asian carp” label commonly applied to four imported fish species that are wreaking havoc in the U.S. heartland, infesting numerous rivers and bearing down on the Great Lakes. But the last straw came when an Asian business delegation arriving at the Minneapolis airport encountered a sign reading “Kill Asian Carp.” It was a well-intentioned plea to prevent spread of the invasive fish. But the message was off-putting to the visitors. READ MORE: UnitedHealth Raises Outlook After Surprisingly Strong 2nd Quarter Hawj and fellow Sen. John Hoffman in 2014 won approval of a measure requiring that Minnesota agencies refer to the fish as “invasive carp,” despite backlash from the late radio commentator Rush Limbaugh, who ridiculed it as political correctness. “I had more hate mail than you could shake a stick at,” Hoffman said. Now some other government agencies are taking the same step in the wake of anti-Asian hate crimes that surged during the coronavirus pandemic. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service quietly changed...
    Efforts to map the genome of giraffes has confirmed that there are four distinct species, and they are as different to one another as brown bears and polar bears.  Visually, they are hardly distinguishable, according to LOEWE Centre for Translational Biodiversity Genomics scientists, who carried out the genetic analyses. Despite looking the same, genetically there are four distinct species of giraffe and seven subspecies, explained lead author Dr Axel Janke.  According to their comprehensive genome analyses, the four giraffe lineages have been evolving separately for thousands of years.  Spread from north to south Africa, the four distinct species of giraffe are: Northern giraffe, Reticulated giraffe, Masai giraffe and Southern giraffe.  Efforts to map the genome of giraffes has confirmed that there are four distinct species, and they are as different to one another as brown bears are to polar bears According to their comprehensive genome analyses, the four giraffe lineages have been evolving separately for thousands of years FOUR SPECIES OF GIRAFFE SPREAD THROUGHOUT AFRICA  Southern giraffe (Giraffa giraffa)  Found in: Angola, Namibia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Zambia  Sub species: Angolan giraffe, South African...
    Cliff Hawkins/Getty The exuviae of cicada clings to a tree during the second round of the Barbasol Championship at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Grand National on July 21, 2017 in Auburn, Alabama. A big event in the insect world is approaching. Starting sometime in April or May, depending on latitude, one of the largest broods of 17-year cicadas will emerge from underground in a dozen states, from New York west to Illinois and south into northern Georgia. This group is known as Brood X, as in the Roman numeral for 10. For about four weeks, wooded and suburban areas will ring with cicadas’ whistling and buzzing mating calls. After mating, each female will lay hundreds of eggs in pencil-sized tree branches. Then the adult cicadas will die. Once the eggs hatch, new cicada nymphs fall from the trees and burrow back underground, starting the cycle again. There are perhaps 3,000 to 4,000 species of cicadas around the world, but the 13- and 17-year periodical cicadas of the eastern U.S. appear to be...
    A big event in the insect world is approaching. Starting sometime in April or May, depending on latitude, one of the largest broods of 17-year cicadas will emerge from underground in a dozen states, from New York west to Illinois and south into northern Georgia. This group is known as Brood X, as in the Roman numeral for 10.For about four weeks, wooded and suburban areas will ring with cicadas' whistling and buzzing mating calls. After mating, each female will lay hundreds of eggs in pencil-sized tree branches.Then the adult cicadas will die. Once the eggs hatch, new cicada nymphs fall from the trees and burrow back underground, starting the cycle again.There are perhaps 3,000 to 4,000 species of cicadas around the world, but the 13- and 17-year periodical cicadas of the eastern U.S. appear to be unique in combining long juvenile development times with synchronized, mass adult emergences.These events raise many questions for entomologists and the public alike. What do cicadas do underground for 13 or 17 years? What do they eat? Why are their life cycles so long?...
    More On: hippos Thailand’s oldest hippo celebrates 55th birthday with pile of fruit Inside a Colombian vet’s mission to sterilize Pablo Escobar’s wild hippos Cats and dogs meet their zoo counterparts behind glass Endangered pygmy hippo born at San Diego Zoo for first time in decades Pablo Escobar’s hippos are taking over the marshlands of Colombia — and need to face the same fate as their late owner before they become impossible to control, scientists have warned. The so-called “cocaine hippos” were illegally imported to the country by the notorious drug lord, who was shot dead by authorities in 1993, the Telegraph reported.  But the rapidly-breeding beasts have now grown to become the largest invasive species on the planet — and could reach dangerous numbers in the next two decades. “Nobody likes the idea of shooting a hippo, but we have to accept that no other strategy is going to work,” ecologist Nataly Castelblanco-Martínez told the outlet. When Escobar was killed, authorities took control of his 7,000-acre estate, including a personal zoo. While most of the animals found homes...
    Authorities in Georgia are trying to get rid of some unwelcome lizards from South America, the New York Post reported Tuesday. Argentine black and white tegus have been seen on the loose in two southeast Georgia counties, and they pose a serious threat to wildlife in the Peach State, the New York Post reports. The lizards, which eat the eggs of turkeys, quail, alligators, and tortoises, as well as carrion, pet food, fruits, vegetables, and young gopher tortoises, grow to about four feet long and can weigh up to ten pounds, according to the website of the Wildlife Resources Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The lizards are legal as pets in Georgia, and females can lay up to 35 eggs, which would hatch around June or July. Georgia officials say the lizards are not aggressive towards people, according to the New York Post, but Georgia Wildlife reports that when threatened, tegus can bite or lash at people with their tails. As an invasive species, the tegu is not protected by Georgia’s wildlife laws, meaning that they...
    There are 60 species of flightless birds walking the Earth today, but a new study reveals there would be at least four times the amount if not for human influences. These findings were uncovered by a team at the University College of London who compiled a list of every bird species known to have gone extinct since humans appeared on the planet. A total of 581 bird species have vanished since the Late Pleistocene, 126,000 years ago, and 166 of them lacked the ability to fly. The study determined that flightless birds thrived on most island groups around the world, with particular hotspots in New Zealand and Hawaii.  Scroll down for video  There 60 species of flightless birds walking the Earth today, but a new study reveals there would be at least four times the amount if not for human influences. This pictures shows a group of Moari that went extinct due to humans hunting them Lead author Dr. Ferran Sayol (UCL Centre for Biodiversity & Environment Research and University of Gothenburg, Sweden) said: 'Human impacts have substantially altered...
    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A proposal by the U.S, Fish and Wildlife Service published Tuesday would list a small fish known as the peppered chub as an endangered species and designate parts of rivers in Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and New Mexico as its critical habitat. The minnow-like fish that was once found in each of the four states and in Colorado is now found only in parts of the upper South Canadian River in New Mexico and Texas, one of the four river sections proposed for protection, according to the plan published in the Federal Register. “Three other river stretches are also proposed for critical habitat protection, since the sole surviving peppered chub population could disappear at any time, necessitating swift reintroduction elsewhere to prevent extinction and enable recovery,” according to the proposal. The four river stretches make up nearly 1,100 miles and include 197 miles of the upper South Canadian, 400 miles of the lower South Canadian River in Texas and Oklahoma; 292 miles of the Cimarron River and 179 miles of the Ninnescah River, which both flow in...
    (CNN)The world's wildlife populations have fallen by an average of 68% in just over four decades, with human consumption behind the devastating decline, the World Wildlife Fund warned in a new report released Wednesday. JUST WATCHEDHow Covid-19 affects Africa's wild animalsReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHHow Covid-19 affects Africa's wild animals 03:18The Living Planet Report 2020 assessed the population declines seen in more than 4,392 monitored species of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians between 1970 and 2016. The report says that the kinds of steep wildlife population decreases the Earth has seen in recent decades have not been seen for millions of years.The regions of Latin America and the Caribbean are the world's worst-affected areas, with an average drop of 94%, the report said. The conversion of grassland, savannah, forest and wetland habitats, the overexploitation of wildlife, the introduction of non-native species and climate change are the key drivers of the drop. Read MoreHuman activity has fueled the decline in species, the report found.Humans have significantly altered a staggering 75% of the planet's ice-free land surface, the authors say.And according...
    (CNN)A new species of dinosaur related to the Tyrannosaurus rex has been discovered in England.Paleontologists at the University of Southampton have spent months studying four bones that were found last year in the village of Shanklin, on the Isle of Wight, off the south coast of England. They finally determined that the bones were from the neck, back and tail of a new dinosaur "previously unknown to science," according to a release from the university.The dinosaur would have measured about 4 meters (about 13 feet) long, and is a type of theropod dinosaur -- a group of carnivores that typically walked on two legs instead of four, which includes the Tyrannosaurus rex. It lived in the Cretaceous period, about 115 million years ago, according to the release.Scientists named the dinosaur Vectaerovenator inopinatus -- a name that refers to large air sacs in some of the bones, which are commonly seen in theropods, and which helped the researchers identify the species. The sacs are also seen in modern birds; they likely helped create an efficient breathing system in these dinosaurs, while...
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