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    Suspended Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross isn't appealing his NFL-imposed punishment over tampering allegations involving Tom Brady, but that doesn't mean the billionaire real estate developer is happy. As Pro Football Talk reported Tuesday, Ross is 'going apes***' over the penalty, which includes the Dolphins forfeiting a 2023 first-round pick and a third-rounder in 2024. Furthermore, Ross was fined $1.5 million and banned until October 17. He is prohibited from entering the Dolphins' facility before then. Specifically, Ross and the Dolphins are accused of making impermissible contact with Brady, the legendary Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback, and now-former New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton while the two were under contract. Ross allegedly tried to make Brady a team executive and limited partner. Ross did avoid any punishment over former head coach Brian Flores's tanking allegations. Flores sued the team and the NFL for racial discrimination after being fired in January, and has since taken a defensive assistant position under Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin in Pittsburgh. As Pro Football Talk reported Tuesday, Dolphins owner Stephen Ross (pictured) is 'going apes***' over...
    VICE News reports on civil forfeitures in 2017 resulting from laws that originated from former President Ronald Reagan's War on Drugs in the 1980s. An Alabama town of just over 1,250 people saw more people arrested and accused of misdemeanors than it had residents in 2020, according to an investigation by The Birmingham News. Brookside, which is about 15 miles northeast of Birmingham, experienced a more than 640% increase in fines and forfeitures from 2018 to 2020. The number of vehicles towed jumped from 50 in 2018 to 789 in 2020, the newspaper reported on Wednesday. Let’s call a duck a duck: The allegation here is police corruption. “Brookside officers have been accused in lawsuits of fabricating charges, using racist language and ‘making up laws’ to stack counts on passersby,” journalist John Archibald wrote. “Defendants must pay thousands in fines and fees – or pay for costly appeals to state court – and poorer residents or passersby fall into patterns of debt they cannot easily escape.” Ramon Perez, who was ticketed for allegedly running a stop sign and driving 48 mph in a 40-mph zone, told The...
                 Representative Andrew Clyde (R-GA-09) this month shared how Internal Revenue Service (IRS) agents violated him and his rights several years ago, and he proposed new ways for the agency to reform itself. Clyde made his remarks at a House Oversight and Reform Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties hearing. The congressman said IRS agents seized more than $940,000 of his in 2013 — without warning and without ever charging him with a crime. “How on Earth does the Internal Revenue Service or any other government agency have the power to seize one’s property without charging a person with a crime? It should not. But the IRS had been wrongfully confiscating money from individuals and small business owners across the country through civil asset forfeiture. Specifically, they were accusing people of structuring their legally earned cash bank deposits and that is exactly what they did to me,” Clyde said. “In my case, the Internal Revenue Service offered me a deal to give back two-thirds of the $940,000 of my legally earned money if I would forfeit one-third to...
    Civil asset forfeiture laws have allowed federal, state, and local law enforcement steal money and property from American citizens for decades. What was originally sold to the public as a way to financially debilitate organized crime while pursuing legal recourse has very quickly morphed into a way for law enforcement agencies to make money. It is robbery, plain and simple, and up until the the most recent, high-octane fascist iteration of the GOP, there was bipartisan support for reform. Even as states have attempted to rein in the wholesale robbery of citizens by law enforcement, the egregious practice has found a way to continue relatively unabated. But just when you believe you’ve heard the most egregious examples of asset forfeiture by law enforcement, a new one comes down the line: NBC News reports that four separate Baltimore, Maryland, citizens are suing the Baltimore Police Department (BPD) for unlawfully seizing, searching, and destroying their property. The twist? All of the plaintiffs were the victims of crime, not the suspected perpetrators. Not a twist: Like most law enforcement asset forfeiture, the practice disproportionately affects people of color....
    A military court issued a letter of reprimand to Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller Jr. on Friday and a forfeiture of $5,000 for criticizing the United States’ departure from Afghanistan. The sentence came after Scheller entered a guilty on Thursday to six misdemeanor charges of violating the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The $5,000 forfeiture in pay represented a month’s earnings for Scheller and came in far short of the recommendation from military prosecutors, who called for a six-month forfeiture. The judge, Col. Glen Hines, said he would have imposed a two-month forfeiture if Scheller had not spent nine days in the brig earlier in the month for allegedly violating a gag order that prevented him from posting on social media. “This case represents more than Stu Scheller,” Tim Parlatore, an attorney for Scheller, told the court. “He showed the entire country the emotional roller coaster that a lot of vets are going through.” Scheller, a 17-year veteran of the Marine Corps, was relieved of command at North Carolina’s Camp Lejeune in August for posting his recorded critique on Facebook....
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The Pac-12 Conference will retain its modified forfeiture rule used last season in relation to athletic contests canceled due to COVID-19 exposure, officials said Thursday. “Following consultation with the Pac-12 Athletic Directors Committee, the Pac-12 has determined that its prior longstanding game forfeiture rule that was temporarily modified for this past season due to Covid-19, shall once again be applied for this coming athletic season,” a conference statement said. READ MORE: LAPD Releases Dramatic Bodycam Footage Of Arleta Shooting That Left Armed Pursuit Suspect Dead “In accordance with that rule, if an institution is unable to play a contest through its own fault, it shall forfeit such contest to its opponent. Any forfeited contest shall be regarded as a conference loss for the team making the forfeit and a conference win for its opponent. The Pac-12 rule provides the Commissioner with discretion to determine whether an institution is at fault or primarily at fault for an inability to play a contest based on the facts of the situation.” READ MORE: Norman Martin Of Irvine Convicted Of...
    New Mexico is the only state to receive an “A” grade in a new report from a public interest law firm on states' civil asset forfeiture practices. The libertarian-leaning Institute for Justice recently released the third addition of “ Policing for Profit” detailing each state's laws regarding civil asset forfeiture, a practice which allows police to seize private property from individuals even if they haven’t been convicted of a crime. New Mexico’s “A” grade is a result of the state banning civil asset forfeiture in 2015, IJ said in the report. The state still allows forfeiture but requires a criminal conviction. The state also passed reforms requiring any proceeds from forfeitures go to the state’s general fund rather than to law enforcement agencies, and limited the state’s participation in the federal equitable sharing program, a practice that “allows state and local law enforcement to seize property locally and turn it over to federal prosecutors for forfeiture under federal law.” The IJ report found that between 2000 and 2019, New Mexico law enforcement brought in $51.1 million...
    The U.S. Treasury and State departments on Thursday announced sanctions on 11 entities in Iran, China and Singapore for buying and selling Iranian petrochemicals.  In addition, the Justice Department announced two forfeiture complaints against Iran for the recent seizures of Iranian weapons bound for Yemen and refined petroleum bound for Venezuela.  "The two forfeiture complaints allege sophisticated schemes by the IRGC [Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps] to secretly ship weapons to Yemen and fuel to Venezuela, countries that pose grave threats to the security and stability of their respective regions," John Demers, assistant attorney general for national security, said in a statement. "Iran continues to be a leading state sponsor of terrorism and a worldwide destabilizing force. It is with great satisfaction that I can announce that our intentions are to take the funds successfully forfeited from the fuel sales and provide them to the United States Victims of State Sponsored Terrorism Fund after the conclusion of the case."  According Demers, in November 2019 and February 2020, U.S. Navy ships interdicted flagless vessels carrying "large stocks of weapons, including 171 guided...
    The FCAA Executive Committee met today to review the appeal from Chattooga regarding the forfeiture of the championship game due to quarantined students. After hearing the situation and reviewing the email exchange, the decision was unanimous (5-0 vote) in upholding the decision to follow GHSA guidelines that state “during playoffs, if a team has to quarantine, then their season is considered over and must forfeit”. Voting in the Executive Committee were: Chris Eberhart, Darlington–voted to uphold the GHSA guidelines Jill Thacker, Model– voted to uphold the GHSA guidelines Chad Moore, Armuchee– voted to uphold the GHSA guidelines Joseph Pethel, Coosa– voted to uphold the GHSA guidelines Becky McCoy, Pepperell– voted to uphold the GHSA guidelines Background on the decision: Quarantine takes Championship Game Away from Chattooga Middle School Chattooga County Schools provided the following emails as part of an open records request regarding the championship game.  
              Democratic State Auditor Julie Blaha called for an end to criminal asset forfeiture under $1,500 because she said it unfairly affects low-income individuals. Blaha based her assessment on the newly-released 2019 Asset Forfeitures report, which found 94 percent of the crimes resulting in forfeitures were DUIs and controlled substances. For the past five years, DUI-related forfeitures increased by 21 percent while controlled substance-related forfeitures grew by 13 percent. In the press release, Blaha stated that the revenue generated from these forfeitures was minimal compared to its impact on the owners of the property taken. She added that legislative efforts should continue considerations of reform, referring to the proposed House Bill 4571. “The total net value of forfeitures under $1,500 in Minnesota in 2019 was approximately $1.5 million. On a system level, a change that size is manageable. On an individual level, those changes could make a big impact,” she said. Blaha’s highlights of the report stated a total of 7,708 forfeitures, several hundred less than the previous year. A majority of property seizures were...
    Police departments across the country have come under intense scrutiny recently following the death of George Floyd after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck. Practices and procedures have been reviewed in many cases as some cities consider reforms within police departments. While civil asset forfeiture may not have come across radars, it remains a practice that receives criticism for creating perverse incentives and for infringing upon property rights. Under civil asset forfeiture laws, law enforcement are able to seize property and money that is suspected to have been connected to criminal activity. There’s no requirement that the individual has been convicted or charged with a crime. (RELATED: NORQUIST: Justice Requires The Feds Stop Seizing Civil Assets) Most of the money seized by civil-asset forfeiture are used by police departments for everything from exercise equipment to squad cars and jails. In the past two decades, the federal government has taken in $36.5 billion in assets seized by police, according to the Pulitzer Center.  Many of the seizures take place along highway corridors where drugs are transported, making them prime...
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