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    A CHEAP pill already taken by millions of Brits could slash your risk of developing deadly diseases.  The pills – which cost just 2p per day– are typically used to lower cholesterol, but experts have now discovered the drug could provide more life-saving benefits to millions of people 1The life-saving pills cost just 2p per dayCredit: Getty - Contributor Researchers have found that statins could actually reduce women’s chances of developing autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune disorders, which affect around four million people in the UK, are a group of conditions which cause your immune system to attack healthy body tissues, organs, and cells. There are more than 80 known autoimmune diseases which include rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, type 1 diabetes and alopecia.  Most autoimmune diseases are not fatal, however, some can be deadly or lead to life-threatening complications. Read more on immunity SEXUAL HEALING 10 ways sex gives you lust for life - from boosting immunity to easing painVIRAL LOAD How long...
    (CNN)United States border officials have a message for travelers who bring food items from overseas: Violations will cost you. Last month, a passenger traveling from Indonesia to Darwin Airport in Australia's Northern Territory was fined $1,874 after two egg and beef sausage McMuffins -- along with a ham croissant -- were found in their luggage. (Australian authorities had imposed tough new biosecurity measures on all arrivals after a foot and mouth disease outbreak in Indonesian livestock.) In a separate incident a few days earlier, an Australian woman was fined $1,844 after she forgot to declare a leftover Subway sandwich she bought in Singapore. In the past year alone, US border officials have fined passengers for bringing a wide range of undeclared food items in their luggage, including balut eggs, pork bologna and turkey ham. Border officials conducted "630,150 positive passenger inspections" in 2021, according to statistics for the fiscal year released by US Customs and Border Protection, and issued thousands of penalties and violations to travelers who failed to declare prohibited agriculture items.CBP officials at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in...
    The doctor maintains that he is not guilty of any abuse against his vulnerable patients. Cruciani’s attorney, Fred Sosinsky, announced on Friday that they plan to file an appeal. Sosinsky stated, “In the end, it appears that the collective weight of six accusers, rather than a fair consideration of each of their problematic accounts, carried the day.” In a previous case, Cruciani pleaded guilty to several misdemeanor charges. As a result, he was required to forfeit his medical license and register as a sex offender. Federal charges will also be filed against Cruciani for the 15 years of abuse that took place at his offices in New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.
    Two beagle dogs have been born in South Korea after being created from cloned skin cells altered by gene-editing for the first time. Scientists hope that the technique could be used to eliminate disease-causing mutations from pedigree dog breeds. CRISPR-edited dogs have previously been created by altering fertilised eggs. However, this is the first time it has been used on cloned cells, which is beneficial because it means the mutations can be removed without affecting other traits, as happens when gene-editing eggs.  Okjae Koo at South Korean biotech company ToolGen said: '[It] is more reliable for generating various pure-bred genome-edited dogs.'  Pedigree dogs are often susceptible to genetic diseases because of years of inbreeding, research has shown. Among the issues are spaniels having brains too big for their skulls and boxers suffering from epilepsy.  Puppies: Two beagle dogs have been born in South Korea after being created from cloned skin cells altered by gene-editing for the first time WHY DO PEDIGREE DOGS HAVE HEALTH PROBLEMS?  Pedigree dogs are often susceptible to genetic diseases because of years of inbreeding, research has shown....
    LONDON (AP) — The number of outbreaks of diseases that jumped from animals to humans in Africa has jumped by more than 60% in the last decade, the World Health Organization said, a worrying sign the planet could face increased animal-borne diseases like monkeypox, Ebola and coronavirus in the future. There has been a 63% rise in the number of animal diseases breaching the species barrier from 2012 to 2022, as compared to the decade before, the U.N. health agency said in a statement on Thursday. There was a particular spike from 2019 to 2020, when diseases originating in animals that later infected humans, made up half of all significant public health events in Africa, said WHO. Diseases like Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers were responsible for 70% of those outbreaks, in addition to illnesses like monkeypox, dengue, anthrax and plague. “We must act now to contain zoonotic diseases before they can cause widespread infections and stop Africa from becoming a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases,” WHO’s Africa director, Dr. Matshidiso Moeti said in a statement. While...
    Two people are believed to have died from the extremely deadly Marburg virus in Ghana as officials gear up for a potential outbreak. The patients, from the country's southern Ashanti region, were not known to each other, suggesting the disease is spreading more widely. Initial tests came back positive for the virus and the samples are being reanalysed by the World Health Organization (WHO).  If confirmed, it would mark only the second time Marburg has been detected in West Africa, after a small outbreak in Guinea last year. The WHO is sending experts to support Ghanaian health officials and track down the close contacts of the victims.  A deadly cousin of Ebola, Marburg kills between a quarter and 90 per cent of everyone who gets infected.  The highly-infectious pathogen has been touted as the next big pandemic threat, with the WHO describing it as 'epidemic-prone'. Infected patients become 'ghost-like', often developing deep-set eyes and expressionless faces. This is usually accompanied by bleeding from multiple orifices — including the nose, gums, eyes and vagina.  Two people are believed to have died from the extremely...
    (CNN)During the Great Recession, something happened that I found surprising -- and very encouraging. When the United States and other wealthy countries faced a financial crisis, I expected they might cut foreign aid. But instead, from 2007 to 2009, data we analyzed from The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development show that donor nations increased their commitment to global health aid by 16% -- and millions of lives were saved. Bill GatesRight now, we're at risk of a very different outcome. In a typical year, G7 nations donate about $122 billion to address long-term health, economic development and welfare needs in low-income countries. But this is not a typical year. The crises the world faces have multiplied: Covid-19, the war in Ukraine, food shortages, inflation. Some countries are considering redirecting aid to immediate humanitarian assistance, such as housing Ukrainian refugees. Efforts to fight diseases in low-income countries stand to lose billions of dollars. We cannot turn away from those affected by war. But we don't have to accept extreme suffering in one part of the planet to alleviate it...
    A Maryland man seemed to skip right past the barbecue and head straight to takeout when he brought home three pounds of bat meat from a recent trip from Ghana The Germantown was stopped by agents at Washington Dulles International Airport on April 5, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said.  While the bushmeat is a popular protein staple in Africa, it is illegal to bring it to the Unites States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This is because bats are known for spreading diseases such as Ebola, CBP said.  “Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists play a very challenging frontline role in protecting the public, our nation’s agricultural industries, and our economic vitality every day against the deliberate or accidental introduction of potentially crippling animal diseases," said CBP's Area Port Director for DC Daniel Escobedo.  “CBP strongly encourages all international travelers to know what they can and cannot pack in their baggage before visiting the United States.” CBP seized the beat meat, along with 12 pounds of tetraplura, eggplants and turkey berries, and turned it...
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes, "Zoonotic diseases are caused by harmful germs like viruses, bacterial, parasites, and fungi. These germs can cause many different types of illnesses in people and animals, ranging from mild to serious illness and even death. Animals can sometimes appear healthy even when they are carrying germs that can make people sick, depending on the zoonotic disease." The CDC says that 60% of all known infectious diseases and 75% of new or emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic. The researchers are targeting zoonotic diseases because wild animals are extremely difficult to vaccinate, but a self-spreading vaccine could immunize large populations of wildlife. A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) in January states, "Spillover of infectious diseases from wildlife populations into humans is an increasing threat to human health and welfare. Current approaches to manage these emerging infectious diseases are largely reactive, leading to deadly and costly time lags between emergence and control." "Here, we use mathematical models and data from previously...
    A simple saliva test for the compound that triggers gout attacks may help to detect other diseases. A growing body of research suggests that measuring levels of uric acid in saliva may help diagnose more than a dozen conditions, from type 2 diabetes to dementia and cancer. We produce up to two litres of saliva a day and while it’s 99 per cent water, it also contains more than 700 micro-organisms and compounds such as uric acid. This acid is created when the body processes purines, compounds normally produced by damaged or dead cells in the body, but which are also found in some food and drink, including liver, dried beans and beer. A growing body of research suggests that measuring levels of uric acid in saliva may help diagnose more than a dozen conditions, from type 2 diabetes to dementia and cancer [File photo] Uric acid is removed from the body in urine. It is most commonly linked to gout — those affected have high levels of uric acid which forms crystals in the joints, usually the big toe,...
    A WOMAN has revealed how she spent two decades feeling like something was "eating away at her" - all because she was bitten by a tick as a toddler. Briony Hunt, from Bracknell, Berks, has finally been diagnosed with several tick-borne illnesses including Lyme Disease after suffering a "long list of symptoms" for many years. 2Briony Hunt has been diagnosed with a number of tick-borne diseases 2The 26-year-old was bitten by a tick as a toddler. Stock pic The 26-year-old was bitten by a tick at the age of two, a day she says "changed her life forever" as she's endured a "traumatic 20-plus year journey" before finding out what has been "eating away" at her "mentally and physically". She has been diagnosed with illnesses such as late-stage Lyme Disease, Bartonella, Babesia and Analplasma as well as secondary conditions including mitochondriopathy and lymphocytic vasculitis. Briony says she needs to travel to Poland for private Supportive Oligonucleotide Technique treatment and supportive therapies that are unavailable on the NHS. She says it's taken so long to get diagnosed because there is "little...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci is facing a demand from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to divulge information regarding the alleged use of an experimental drug on puppies. Democratic and Republican lawmakers sent a letter Friday to President Joe Biden and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases requesting that they share information regarding the alleged infection of 44 beagle puppies with parasites in order to test an experimental drug on them, the Hill reported . "We write with grave concerns about reports of costly, cruel, and unnecessary tax-payer funded experiments on dogs commissioned by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases," said the letter , signed by Republican South Carolina Rep. Nancy Mace and 23 other lawmakers. BUZZ: PETA CHEERS NIH RESIGNATION, NEWSBUSTERS' NOYES RETIRES, BILL MURRAY CRUSHED OBAMA IN PUTT-PUTT The letter continues on to state that according to invoices obtained through a Freedom of Information Act filing, cordectomies were performed on six- to eight-month-old dogs. "As you are likely aware, a cordectomy, also known as 'devocalization,' involves splitting a...
    THE hellhole UAE jail where British footballer Billy Hood is being held has been accused of torturing prisoners and leaving them to die from diseases. Activists have previously raised the alarm over Dubai's al-Awir prison for their brutal treatment of inmates. 7Billy was sentenced to 25 years after police discovered CBD vape oil in his carCredit: Facebook 7Dubai's al-Awir prison where Billy is being heldCredit: AFP 7Inside Dubai's al-Awir central prisonCredit: AFP According to the human rights NGO Human Rights Watch, prisoners, including some with chronic health conditions, were denied adequate medical care. During the pandemic, Human Rights Watch also claimed that the overcrowded and unsanitary conditions made social distancing impossible for prisoners and authorities in the prison. “Crowded, unsanitary prison conditions and widespread denial of adequate medical care are nothing new in the UAE’s notorious detention facilities, but the ongoing pandemic is an additional serious threat to prisoners’ well-being,” said Michael Page, Middle East deputy director at Human Rights Watch. “The best way for UAE authorities to allay concerns of prisoners’ family members is to allow inspection by...
    Several of the animals airlifted out of Kabul by a former Royal Marine were infected with diseases that could be passed to humans, Government sources said last night. Paul ‘Pen’ Farthing was accused by critics of ‘costing lives’ as a result of his mission in August to evacuate 173 cats and dogs from the Nowzad animal shelter as Afghanistan’s capital city fell to the Taliban. A leaked voice message obtained by The Mail on Sunday at the time revealed the behind-the-scenes bitterness over the airlift, with Mr Farthing telling a Ministry of Defence official he would ‘spend the rest of my time f****** destroying’ him if he did not secure clearance for a flight out of the country. Several of the animals airlifted out of Kabul (pictured) by a former Royal Marine were infected with diseases that could be passed to humans, Government sources said last night Now sources at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs say some animals on the airlift were infected with Brucella canis, a bacterial infection that can cause spontaneous abortions in affected animals...
    The coronavirus prevention measures they have helped prevent pandemic waves from becoming even more intense than they have been and continue to be. But they have not only been effective against SARS-CoV-2. Also against other respiratory diseases. In fact, during the winter of 2020, in Australia, a 90% fewer deaths from flu. This, by boat soon, is a cause for celebration. However, lately we are seeing that it also involves certain risks, since it decreases the immunity against these viruses, for having reduced the population’s contact with them. This phenomenon, baptized by some pediatricians as “Debt of immunity”, began to be seen first precisely in Australia and New Zealand. Also in other countries, such as France. In Spain we are beginning to see its effects through an increase in cases of bronchiolitis In children. This disease, caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) it is typical of autumn and winter. At these stations, pediatricians celebrated the drastic decrease in cases, noting that preventive measures were also effective against him. However, an explosion of cases is beginning to be seen now,...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- A haze over the Chicago area in recent days due to wildfires on the west coast is prompting an Air Quality Alert in the city's Metro area Monday, according to the National Weather Service.People with chronic respiratory issues are being advised to limit prolonged outdoor activity.Smoke from the raging wildfires in the western U.S. and Canada has created poor air quality, resulting in "elevated ozone levels and fine particles."RELATED: Wildfire smoke casts haze over Chicago skies, impacting air qualityWhile most of the smoke is aloft, some is also making it to ground level and affecting our Air Quality Index, also called the AQI."What you have to know about the AQI is that 100 is the level where unsafe starts to happen, where the air is labeled unhealthy," said Brian Urbaszewski, director of environmental health programs at Respiratory Health Association. "And that can be from ozone/smog, it could be from fine particulate matter, like soot. It could be from any number of air pollutants as well."The alert is for the Chicago metropolitan area counties in Illinois, NSW tweeted...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci claimed Saturday that the U.S. would not have been able to eradicate smallpox or polio if misinformation had been a factor. Fauci spoke with CNN’s Jim Acosta about the White House’s plan to push back on what it deemed “misinformation” on coronavirus vaccines, arguing that scientists may have failed to convince people to get vaccinated against smallpox or polio if they had been forced to navigate through social media misinformation. (RELATED: Tucker Carlson Torches Biden Admin For Vaccine Policies, Says They’re No Longer ‘Pro-Choice’) WATCH: “He says misinformation has gotten so bad that the era of defeating a disease like polio in this country may be long gone,” Acosta began as he introduced the interview. “Disinformation and misinformation is really, really a problem,” Fauci told Acosta, alleging that when he spoke with people in the community about the reasons they did not want to get the coronavirus vaccines, many of those reasons were rooted in false information. “The numbers that you mention, Jim, are striking. You can’t run away from those. 99.5% of the deaths...
    As the battle against coronavirus continues, the world is yet to breathe a sigh of relief - as deadly diseases continue to emerge across the globe at a frightening rate. Cases of "zoonotic" diseases - infections that jump from animals to humans - are relentlessly cropping up as the world grapples to control the current pandemic. 14It is feared the globe could continue to be plagued by zoonotic diseasesCredit: AFP or licensors Highly contagious with high fatalities, these diseases threaten to further disrupt civilisation as we know it - and out of the 1.67million unknown viruses on the planet up to 827,000 of these could have the ability to infect people from animals, according to the EcoHealth Alliance. Experts have even warned the next pandemic could be on the same scale as the Black Death, which is estimated to have killed 75million people. As the human population swells and moves further into animal habitats, the risk of the transmission of diseases to humans grows - so what do we know about what are we facing right now? 14Up to 827,000 of...
    Talk of zoonotic diseases has increased in public discussion since the rise of COVID-19, however, diseases that are transmitted from humans to animals have had a long history. In fact, 6 out of every 10 infectious diseases in people are zoonotic. The prevalence of zoonotic diseases is mostly due to human encroachment on animal habitats as well as human consumption of animals. Contemporary farming practices have only exacerbated these problems. In order to maximize profit, most farms keep animals in cramped, unsanitary facilities where diseases spread rapidly. To survive in these squalid conditions, animals are given an excessive amount of antibiotics. The abhorrent treatment of animals in the agricultural industry is obviously detrimental to the animals themselves and the environment. Now, in the midst of a pandemic, more people are becoming aware of the ways that the consumption of animals also directly affects public health. For a better understanding of the history of zoonoses, here are 10 examples of diseases that have spread from animals to humans. 1. Mad Cow Disease “Mad Cow Disease” is a degenerative neurological disorder...
    More On: ticks Exotic tick species found in Rhode Island for the first time: officials Tick-bite disease with coronavirus symptoms on the rise in NY Ticks carrying multiple diseases are ‘taking over’ Long Island Maine reports first case of rare, deadly tick-borne virus since 2017 That’s a lot of medical grief from one nibble.  In a case of cosmically bad luck, a 70-year-old man contracted not one, not two, but three illnesses as a result of a single tick bite. His situation is so uniquely unfortunate that researchers wrote a study about his case. The paper, titled “One Man, Three Tick-Borne Illnesses” and published in April by BMJ Case Reports, begins with the unidentified patient coming to an emergency department with “fevers, ankle edema and nausea following a presumed insect bite on his ankle one month prior.” Laboratory studies further revealed him to be anemic, that he had an acute kidney injury as well as a low blood platelet count. Based on his recent travels in the Northeastern US, doctors suspected ticks were at play.  Further bloodwork confirmed he...
    A bill passed by the New York state lawmakers on Tuesday that seeks to prevent workers from being exposed to airborne diseases is now headed to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, but while labor advocates hailed its passage, business groups fear it will harm small businesses across the state. On Wednesday, The Alliance for a Greater New York (ALIGN) held a news conference hailing the passage of the NY Hero Act and called for the governor to sign the bill into law. If he does, New York would be the first state in the country to require companies to protect workers. Cuomo has issued emergency regulations during the COVID-19 pandemic that have covered some industries, but lawmakers pointed out it does not cover all workers. “We know that many people died over the last year because of unsafe working environments,” said state Sen. Michael Gianaris, D-Queens. “Employers were not taking basic precautions as it relates to PPE usage, social distancing, air filtration, all the things that we know are very common tactics that we use to avoid the spread...
    An invasive frog with sharp claws has been confirmed in parts of southern Florida that could outcompete native species. Formally known as Tropical clawed frog, the small amphibian has protruding eyes, a flattened body and short talons attached to each limb. Although a frog with claws may sound startling, scientists at the University of Florida say 'people need not fret over them,' as the creature use them to shred and break apart prey – insects and other aquatic vertebras. However, the invasive frog may have the potential to spread diseases that could impact Florida's native amphibians. Tropical clawed frogs is associated with tropical regions along the rain forest belt in sub-Saharan Africa, but how they arrived in the US remains a mystery. An invasive frog with sharp claws has been confirmed in parts of southern Florida that could outcompete native species. Formally known as Tropical clawed frog, the small amphibian has protruding eyes, a flattened body and short talons attached to each limb DailyMail.com has reached out to the University of Florida for comment and has yet to receive...
    A microscopic 'living robot' made from frog embryo stem cells have been designed with self-healing powers and the ability to keep memories. The innovation pulls from previous work released last year, called Xenobots, but has been upgraded to move more efficiently and perform more complex tasks. Dubbed Xenobots 2.0, the machines are able to self-propel using hair-like 'legs' of cilia, while its predecessor relied on a muscle to move, allowing it to travel faster along surfaces. However, the greatest advancement is the ability to recall things such as radioactive contamination, chemical pollutants or a disease condition in the body that can be reported back to researchers for further analyses. Scroll down for videos  A microscopic 'living robot' made from frog embryo stem cells have been designed with self-healing powers and the ability to keep memories. The innovation pulls from previous work released last year, called Xenobots, but has been upgraded to move more efficiently and perform more complex tasks Both machines were developed by biologists and computer scientists from Tufts University and the University of Vermont (UVM), which used...
    A few weeks into the Covid-19 pandemic last spring, doctors across the world started noticing something strange. Among the thousands of patients being admitted to hospital with coronavirus, some also appeared to have another problem — the sudden onset of type 1 diabetes, where the immune system attacks cells in the pancreas, destroying its ability to produce the hormone insulin. Insulin is vital to control the body’s blood sugar levels and a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes usually means a lifetime of daily insulin injections to stay healthy.  Among the thousands of patients being admitted to hospital with coronavirus, some also appeared to have another problem — the sudden onset of type 1 diabetes Without this, blood sugar builds up, triggering inflammation that damages blood vessels and vital organs. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition and typically begins in childhood (unlike type 2, which is linked to diet and lifestyle). It has long been suspected that infections — even something as minor as a cold — may trigger type 1 by causing the immune system to malfunction and...
    NBA : Her Eurohoops team/ [email protected] The decision of the government, after a suggestion of the infectious disease specialists, to put a padlock on the amateur championships again, caused tensions and as it seems it is expected to be lifted immediately! According to APE, in the meeting of Infectious Diseases with the Deputy Minister of Sports, Lefteris Avgenakis and the General Secretary of Sports, George Mavrotas, it was found that due to incorrect data and impressions of Infectious Diseases, a new “padlock” entered the Amateur Football League. Thus, Avgenakis and Mavrotas asked for this mistake to be corrected and insisted on the immediate opening of the championships and the training sessions that closed, emphasizing that this must be done tomorrow, otherwise sports in the country will explode. In fact, they used tables and data (tests, positivity, etc.) on how few cases there are in organized sports, while they exercised strong criticism, as they were not informed about the “padlock”, nor were they asked to participate in the meeting or submit their opinion. According to the...
    Javier Zayas Photography/Getty Images People who eat five servings of fruits and vegetables daily may have a lower risk of death from certain diseases. Leafy greens and berries yield more health benefits than peas and potatoes. Experts said, in general, try to eat more fruits and vegetables.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Eating fruits and vegetables on a daily basis isn't just good for your overall health. A new study has found that people who eat  two servings of fruit and three servings of vegetables daily have a lower risk of death from certain diseases. The study, conducted by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, found that people who ate five servings of fruits and vegetables a day had a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and respiratory disease, compared to those who ate two servings of fruits and vegetables. Eating more than five servings of fruits and vegetables did not provide significant benefits compared to eating five servings.  Dr. Sean Heffron, a preventative cardiologist at NYU Langone Health who...
    THE WORLD Health Organisation (WHO) has an alert list of diseases which could the biggest threat to mankind as scientists have warned we need to prepare for the "Big One". WHO chiefs have compiled the list of nine pathogens - which currently includes Covid-19 - which they label "priority diseases" for scientists to develop humanity's defences against should they become a danger. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 9 Experts at the transnational medical body describe the diseases as ones which pose the "greatest public health risk" - either due to their "epidemic potential" or the lack of countermeasures against them. Covid-19 is currently public enemy number one as it continues to ravage the world, so far killing almost 2.5million people and infecting more than 112million. But the other eight diseases on WHO's list for research and development are also deadly and could pose a major threat unless action it taken against them. The horror infections can make your brain swell, leave you bleeding out of your eyes, trigger shrunken head birth defects, and or...
    By John Revill and John Miller ZURICH (Reuters) - Switzerland plans to make its first "cautious steps" towards ending its coronavirus lockdown next month, the government said on Wednesday, contrasting with neighbours that are sticking with many restrictions. In the first step, shops, museums and libraries are due to reopen from March 1. Zoos, gardens and sports facilities will also be reopened, with a final decision to come on Feb. 24. Ministers have been caught being caught between health experts supporting stricter limits and struggling businesses calling for a reopening, but a easing in the number of infections has allowed the government to change course. "The efforts of the last few months are now paying off, the population has been very disciplined," said Health Minister Alain Berset. "New infections have halved within a month, so the situation is not so bad. We would all like to do more activities again, such as sports." With the initial reopening, private events with up to 15 people would also be allowed, said the government, up from the current limit of five. Switzerland's reopening...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States has "deep concerns" about the way the findings of the World Health Organization's COVID-19 report were communicated, the White House said on Saturday, calling on China to make available data from the earliest days of the outbreak. White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan said in a statement that it is imperative that the report be independent and free from "alteration by the Chinese government". (Reporting by Ted Hesson, Andrea Shalal and Michael Martina; editing by Diane Craft) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, vaccines, public health, United States, coronavirus, World Health Organization, education
    You may not know it, but you have an army of microbes living within you that are essential in fighting threats, including the virus that causes COVID-19. In the past two decades, scientists have learned that our bodies are home to more bacterial cells than human cells. This community of bacteria that lives in and on us – called the microbiome – resembles a company, in which each species of microbe does specialized work, but all work to keep us healthy. One of the jobs of the bacteria in our intestines is to balance the response of our immune system against other bacteria and viruses that do cause disease (we call them pathogens). Bacteria train the immune system and ensure that the response is effective against pathogens but not so violent as to cause collateral damage to the host (you!) The bacteria in our intestines can elicit an effective immune response against viruses that not only infect the intestine, such as norovirus and rotavirus, but also those that infect the lungs, such as the influenza virus, which causes the flu....
    LONDON (Reuters) - England's deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam urged people on Monday to take the COVID-19 vaccination if offered, saying that a so-called South African variant of the disease would not overtake the current virus in the next few months. Britain's government are increasingly concerned that people might decide not to get vaccinated now because they believe that new vaccinations will have to be made to tackle new variants. "Early data on modelling ... does not suggest that the South African variant has a distinct transmissibility advantage over our current virus, and because of that there is no reason to think the South African variant will catch up or overtake our current virus in the next few months," he told a news conference. "Please don't delay if you're called, take the advantage to protect yourself against the ... immediate threat." (Reporting by Andy Bruce, writing by Elizabeth Piper, editing by Paul Sandle) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, vaccines, Africa, coronavirus, South Africa, United Kingdom, Europe
    We're regularly told to minimise the amount of saturated fats we consume, but a new study suggests that eating foods rich in these fats could actually offer some protection against certain diseases. Researchers have revealed that eating foods rich in saturated fats, including cakes, bacon and cheese, may reduce your risk of acute pancreatitis. US researchers analysed data from people in 11 countries on how different fats consumed by different nations – either unsaturated or saturated – are linked with acute pancreatitis.  Saturated fat is found in butter, lard, fatty meats and cheese – foods heavily consumed in western societies – while unsaturated fats are mostly found in oils from plants and fish and are prevalent in Asian and some South American diets.  The scientists found that high levels of unsaturated fat stored around the abdominal organs generates more of a certain type of molecule that triggers cell injury, inflammation and even organ failure.    Official advice from the NHS is to swap saturated fats for unsaturated fats in our diet to reduce the risk of heart disease.  While this study does...
    New York : Since early 2021 Patty López de la Cerda She has been in the hospital, but yesterday she finally revealed to her fans that she suffers from two neurological diseases that have brought her to the point of collapse. The sports host used her Instagram account to publicize everything she has experienced in these 20 days, since she was diagnosed with epilepsy and dysautonomia (dysfunction of the nerves that regulate functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, among others). “I have episodes where out of nowhere I stop speaking well and I have no energy except for the essential things. Knowing that from one day to the next this is going to be part of my life forever. “But I am encouraged because I know I will be fine. Thank God epilepsy and dysautonomia can be controlled with medicines so, within all possibilities, I am infinitely grateful that they have found me these two things that I have, ”he explained. The voluptuous added that yesterday she had a very complicated morning, because she could not...
    New York : Since early 2021 Patty López de la Cerda She has been in the hospital, but yesterday she finally revealed to her fans that she suffers from two neurological diseases that have brought her to the point of collapse. The sports host used her Instagram account to publicize everything she has experienced in these 20 days, since she was diagnosed with epilepsy and dysautonomia (dysfunction of the nerves that regulate functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, among others). “I have episodes where out of nowhere I stop speaking well and I have no energy except for the essential things. Knowing that from one day to the next this is going to be part of my life forever. “But I am encouraged because I know I will be fine. Thank God epilepsy and dysautonomia can be controlled with medicines so, within all possibilities, I am infinitely grateful that they have found me these two things that I have, ”he explained. The voluptuous added that yesterday she had a very complicated morning, because she could not speak and...
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sunday reported 349,246 deaths from the new coronavirus, a rise of 2,321 deaths from its previous count. The agency said the number of cases had risen by 284,554 to 20,346,372. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19, caused by a new coronavirus, as of 4 p.m. ET on Jan. 2 versus its previous report a day earlier. (http://bit.ly/33mTSJz) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Radhika Anilkumar in Bengaluru; Editing by Daniel Wallis) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States, coronavirus
    LONDON (Reuters) - Hundreds of thousands of doses of the AstraZeneca-Oxford COVID-19 vaccine are ready to be rolled out in Britain from Monday, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said after the shot was approved by regulators. "We'll get going on this from Monday," he told the BBC. "The number (of doses) that will be ready for next week is in the hundreds of thousands, and then the numbers increase." (Reporting by Paul Sandle) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United Nations, Sweden, environment, coronavirus, transportation, European Union, United Kingdom, Europe, World Health Organization
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President-elect Joe Biden said on Tuesday his administration would seek to determine if an emergency standard was needed to protect workers from COVID-19 and he vowed to make sure the workplace safety agency enforces safety rules. "In the midst of a global pandemic, OSHA has been prevented from using its full range of tools to protect workers from COVID-19," he said in a statement marking the 50th anniversary of the law that created the agency - the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (Reporting by Tim Ahmann; Editing by Eric Beech) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, public health, United States, coronavirus
    By Sangmi Cha SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea on Tuesday reported 40 new coronavirus deaths, a record daily toll, bringing the total death tally to 859, as the country grapples with a third wave of infection centred around nursing homes and a prison in the capital Seoul. South Korean officials have vowed to accelerate the launch of a vaccination programme after detecting the virus variant linked to the rapid rise in infections in Britain. As of midnight Monday there were 1,046 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 58,725, the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA) said. Of the new cases, 1,030 were locally transmitted and more than half were found in Seoul. Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun expressed regret over a mass cluster infection in a Seoul prison, with a total 757 infections, and called for all-out prevention measures. Authorities had ramped up testing to track down potential cases of unknown origin and those that display no symptoms, especially in the Seoul metropolitan area. More than 500,000 tests were conducted in the temporary testing centres in the greater Seoul...
    BEIJING (Reuters) - China will suspend direct flights to and from the United Kingdom, Wang Wenbin, a foreign ministry spokesman said on Thursday, citing the emergence of a new coronavirus strain. "After much consideration, China has decided to take reference from others countries and suspend flights to and from UK," Wang told reporters at a daily briefing. (Reporting by Yew Lun Tian and Stella Qiu; Editing by Christian Schmollinger) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: infectious diseases, Canada, vaccines, United States, United Kingdom, World Health Organization, diseases, United Nations, coronavirus, Asia, Europe
    PARIS (Reuters) - French and foreign truckers can again enter France from Britain provided they have tested negative for COVID-19 in the 72 hours before entry, the French Transport Ministry said in a statement on Tuesday. British authorities would provide testing facilities for truck drivers so that they can quickly get their results and drive to France, the ministry said. In the case of a positive test, drivers will have to isolate on British soil for 10 days, with accommodation provided by UK authorities, the statement said. (Reporting by Geert De Clercq; Editing by Leslie Adler) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, France, coronavirus, United Kingdom, Europe
    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A senior Mexican official said on Tuesday that the World Health Organization does not recommend banning flights from the United Kingdom over a new variant of coronavirus when asked whether Mexico would suspend air travel from Britain. Deputy Health Minister Hugo Lopez-Gatell, Mexico's coronavirus czar, made his remarks when asked about possible flight bans during a regular government news conference. (Reporting by Dave Graham; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, coronavirus, Mexico, United Kingdom, Europe
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sunday reported 17,592,760 cases of the new coronavirus, an increase of 201,490 from its previous count, and said that the number of deaths had risen by 2,624 to 315,260. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19, caused by a new coronavirus, as of 4 pm ET on Dec. 19 versus its previous report a day earlier.(https://bit.ly/3m662x4) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Aakriti Bhalla in Bengaluru; Editing by Daniel Wallis) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Saturday reported 17,391,270 cases of the new coronavirus, an increase of 403,359 from its previous count, and said that the number of deaths had risen by 2,756 to 312,636. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19, caused by a new coronavirus, as of 4 pm ET on Dec. 18 versus its previous report a day earlier.(https://bit.ly/3m662x4) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru; editing by Diane Craft) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States
    LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson sent his best wishes to France's Emmanuel Macron on Thursday after the French President tested positive for COVID-19. "Sorry to hear my friend @EmmanuelMacron has tested positive for coronavirus. We are all wishing you a speedy recovery," Johnson said on Twitter. He also posted the same message in French. (Reporting by William James, Editing by Paul Sandle) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: infectious diseases, Scotland, United Kingdom, diseases, Sweden, France, coronavirus, European Union, Europe, education
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Tuesday reported 14,823,129 cases of the new coronavirus, an increase of 186,215 cases from its previous count, and said that the number of deaths had risen by 1,532 to 282,785. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19, caused by a new coronavirus, as of 4 pm ET on Dec. 7 versus its previous report a day earlier.(https://bit.ly/31Dqz4H) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Trisha Roy in Bengaluru) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States, coronavirus
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sunday reported 14,462,527 cases of new coronavirus, an increase of 206,992 cases from its previous count, and said that the number of deaths had risen by 2,310 to 280,135. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19 as of 4 p.m. ET on Dec. 5 versus its previous report a day earlier. (https://bit.ly/3giPtwA) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Bhargav Acharya in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States, coronavirus
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Saturday reported 14,255,535 cases of the new coronavirus, an increase of 214,099 cases from its previous count, and said that the number of deaths had risen by 2,439 to 277,825. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19, caused by the new coronavirus, as of 4 p.m. ET on Dec. 4 versus its previous report a day earlier. (https://bit.ly/36f8EUx) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Maria Ponnezhath in Bengaluru) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States, coronavirus
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sunday reported a total 13,142,997 cases of new coronavirus, an increase of 143,333 from its previous count, and said the number of deaths had risen by 1,210 to 265,166. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19, caused by the new coronavirus, as of 4 p.m. ET on Nov. 28 versus its previous report a day earlier. (https://bit.ly/36f8EUx) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Maria Ponnezhath in Bengaluru; Editing by Leslie Adler) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States, coronavirus
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Saturday reported 12,999,664 cases of new coronavirus, an increase of 176,572 cases from its previous count, and said the number of deaths had risen by 1,283 to 263,956. The CDC reported its tally of cases of the respiratory illness known as COVID-19, caused by the new coronavirus, as of 4 pm ET on Nov. 27 versus its previous report a day earlier. (https://bit.ly/36f8EUx) The CDC figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states. (Reporting by Maria Ponnezhath in Bengaluru; editing by Diane Craft) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, United States, coronavirus
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