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milkweed species:

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    Recently, The International Union for Conservation of Nature, the world’s most comprehensive scientific authority on the status of species, classified the magnificent migratory Monarch butterflies as endangered after decades of declining populations. Source: KPIX CBS SF Bay Area/YouTube Monarch caterpillars can only eat milkweed, and the females deposit eggs on milkweed plants from Texas to Canada. However, habitat destruction and pesticides on these plants have led to a huge decline in these populations. Farmers began using crops that were genetically modified to withstand glyphosate, a herbicide that is used in the weed killer Roundup. This killed milkweed plants that monarch caterpillars are dependent upon. Extreme weather, like droughts and wildfires, has also led to a decline in milkweed plants. The United States Government must act quickly to list the Monarch butterfly under the Endangered Species Act so that they are protected and can be saved! Sign this petition to put pressure on the Fish and Wildlife Service to list the butterflies under the Endangered Species Act! Scientists Are Now Classifying Monarch Butterflies as Endangered Species. Why Won't the U.S. Government Do the Same?Click Here to Sign...
    Close your eyes for a moment and imagine a butterfly. My money says the fluttering insect you’re envisioning has black-veined, reddish-orange wings outlined with white specks — the iconic attributes of our beloved, American, monarch butterfly. Unfortunately, the species, which populates many childhood memories, is in trouble. The migrating monarch butterfly was added last week to the “red list” of threatened species and categorized as “endangered” for the first time by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. That’s two steps from extinct in the wild. Scientists blamed the monarchs’ plummeting numbers on habitat loss, climate change, and pesticide and herbicide use. What can home gardeners do to support the monarch? If everyone reading this planted one milkweed plant, the benefit would be palpable. Milkweed (Asclepias spp.) is the only plant monarch caterpillars eat, and it’s where the adult butterflies lay their eggs. Without it, the species simply could not exist. “But not all milkweed is the same,” says Dawn Rodney, chief innovation and growth officer at the National Wildlife Federation in Reston, Virginia. For instance, “there...
    MONARCH butterflies are part of the Nymphalidae family and are often recognized for their orange color. In July 2022, the insects were declared endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and could soon face extinction. 2Monarch butterflies are now endangeredCredit: Getty Why are monarch butterflies endangered? The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is a governing body that is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education of nature. On July 21, 2022, the Switzerland-based organization added monarch butterflies to its Red List of Threatened Species after rising temperatures and habitat destruction caused a decline in population. According to The Washington Post, the species' population dropped from as many as 10 million in the 1980s to fewer than 2,000 in 2021, an estimated 99.9 percent decline. Read More on The US Sun METEOR MAKER Inside dinosaurs' final days before they were wiped out by Jurassic 'bullet'ONE BIG CAT SCAN! Lion undergoes first CAT scanner made for a big cat at London zoo While the numbers might be startling to...
    (CNN)One of the most popular and recognizable insects is at risk of extinction, according to a global organization focused on conservation and sustainability.The International Union for Conservation of Nature has added the migratory monarch butterfly to its Red List of Threatened Species as endangered, the group said in a release Thursday. "It is difficult to watch monarch butterflies and their extraordinary migration teeter on the edge of collapse, but there are signs of hope," said Anna Walker, a species survival officer for invertebrate pollinators at the New Mexico BioPark Society who works in partnership with the IUCN Species Survival Commission. Nearly two dozen species of birds, fish and other wildlife are set to be declared extinct and removed from the endangered species listThe monarch is the only butterfly known to make a two-way migration like birds, according to the US Forest Service. Every winter, monarchs that live in the eastern part of North America migrate to the Sierra Madre mountains in Mexico, and those in the west migrate to the coastal regions of California, according to the federal agency....
    A monarch butterfly in the butterfly pavilion at the LA County Natural History museum Wednesday, June 1, 2022.David Crane | MediaNews Group | Los Angeles Daily News via Getty Images The iconic black and orange monarch butterfly is threatened with extinction because of habitat destruction and climate change, international conservationists said on Thursday. The monarch butterfly, known for its annual migration across the country, was placed in the endangered category of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species. Every Autumn, millions of the butterflies undertake the longest known migration of any insect, flying thousands of miles from breeding grounds in the eastern U.S. and Canada to spend the winter months in Mexico and California. The monarch population has declined between 22% and 72% over the past decade, scientists said. The western population is at the greatest risk of extinction, declining by 99.9% from an estimated 10 million butterflies to just 1,914 butterflies between the 1980s and 2021. More than 40,000 species are now threatened with extinction, according to the IUCN, as scientists warn...
    By JOHN FLESHER and ELLEN KNICKMEYER, Associated Press Trump administration officials are expected to say this week whether the monarch butterfly, a colorful and familiar backyard visitor now caught in a global extinction crisis, should receive federal designation as a threatened species. Stepped-up use of farm herbicides, climate change and destruction of milkweed plants on which they depend have caused a massive decline of the orange-and-black butterflies, which long have flitted over meadows, gardens and wetlands across the U.S. The drop-off that started in the mid-1990s has spurred a preservation campaign involving schoolchildren, homeowners and landowners, conservation groups, governments and businesses. Some contend those efforts are enough to save the monarch without federal regulation. But environmental groups say protection under the Endangered Species Act is essential — particularly for populations in the West, where last year fewer than 30,000 remained of the millions that spent winters in California's coastal groves during the 1980s. This year’s count, though not yet official, is expected to show only about 2,000 there, said Sarina Jepsen, director of the endangered species program at the Xerces...
    Trump administration officials are expected to say this week whether the monarch butterfly, a colorful and familiar backyard visitor now caught in a global extinction crisis, should receive federal designation as a threatened species. Stepped-up use of farm herbicides, climate change and destruction of milkweed plants on which they depend have caused a massive decline of the orange-and-black butterflies, which long have flitted over meadows, gardens and wetlands across the U.S. The drop-off that started in the mid-1990s has spurred a preservation campaign involving schoolchildren, homeowners and landowners, conservation groups, governments and businesses. Some contend those efforts are enough to save the monarch without federal regulation. But environmental groups say protection under the Endangered Species Act is essential — particularly for populations in the West, where last year fewer than 30,000 remained of the millions that spent winters in California's coastal groves during the 1980s. This year’s count, though not yet official, is expected to show only about 2,000 there, said Sarina Jepsen, director of the endangered species program at the Xerces Society conservation group. “We may be...
    A species of caterpillar gets 'hangry' – angry due to hunger – when food is scarce, a new study reveals.  Monarch butterfly caterpillars (danaus plexippus) become aggressive fighters in their quest to eat milkweed – a herbaceous plant that's toxic to most animals and their favourite food. US researchers found that monarch caterpillars with less access to milkweed were more likely to lunge at others to knock them aside. Caterpillars were most aggressive during the final all-important stages before metamorphosis – the transformation into an exquisite butterfly.  A lack of nutrition during these larval stages can delay development as well as reduce body size, reproductive performance and lifespan after metamorphosis. Scroll down for video  When food is scarce, monarch butterfly caterpillars go from docile to domineering. Pictured, the species in a bucket in a lab scrapping for a scarce form of their favourite food - milkweed RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Aggressive species of shrimp smashes its way into rivals'... From a red palm weevil in a boxing stance to a longhorn... Honey badger is...
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