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    Formula One appears to be entering a new era, but this is not about who is taking the baton from Lewis Hamilton - it may be much greater than that. The 2022 campaign already looks markedly different from any other we have seen in recent times, with new looking and closer running cars having improved racing, and Hamilton not being in title contention for the first time in nearly a decade. Yet there appears to be a shift taking place in the sport, one that has not been as significant since the foundation of the championship in 1950. In essence, it's 'Formula One goes to America' and in the process it appears to slowly be moving out of its European home where much of the race calendar has been based throughout its entire existence. The calendar grows year by year and the European influence appears to be fading. It's a red herring to claim this is a modern feature of the F1 season though. While 20 years ago you could expect two-thirds of a season to be dominated by European...
                      by Kurt Hofer  “Europe will be your revenge,” are the purported words of West German Chancellor Conrad Adenauer to French Prime Minister Guy Mollet in 1956. The quip was related to America’s siding with Egypt and the USSR during the Suez Canal Crisis against Great Britain, France and Israel. Regardless of Adenauer’s precise intention, the quote underscores the fact that the North Atlantic Alliance (NATO) has always suffered fissures, even if it held together long enough to win the Cold War and longer still, for NATO and the EU to expand into Central and Eastern Europe. Whether the Suez Crisis in the 50s, Charles de Gaulle’s unilateral withdrawal of France from NATO’s high command structure in the 60s, Willy Brandt’s overtures to the East via Ostpolitik in the 70s, or Reagan’s placement of strategic intermediate range nuclear warheads in West Germany in the 80s against the wishes of the German left, European-American rivalries and conflicts of interest have always been part and parcel of the Atlantic Alliance. And yet the alliance remains...
    “Europe will be your revenge,” are the purported words of West German Chancellor Conrad Adenauer to French Prime Minister Guy Mollet in 1956. The quip was related to America’s siding with Egypt and the USSR during the Suez Canal Crisis against Great Britain, France and Israel. Regardless of Adenauer’s precise intention, the quote underscores the fact that the North Atlantic Alliance (NATO) has always suffered fissures, even if it held together long enough to win the Cold War and longer still, for NATO and the EU to expand into Central and Eastern Europe. Whether the Suez Crisis in the 50s, Charles de Gaulle’s unilateral withdrawal of France from NATO’s high command structure in the 60s, Willy Brandt’s overtures to the East via Ostpolitik in the 70s, or Reagan’s placement of strategic intermediate range nuclear warheads in West Germany in the 80s against the wishes of the German left, European-American rivalries and conflicts of interest have always been part and parcel of the Atlantic Alliance. And yet the alliance remains important, because North America and Europe share indissoluble bonds that cut...
    Hard-right House Republicans on Friday are discussing forming an America First Caucus, which one document has described as championing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' and warning that mass immigration was putting the 'unique identity' of the U.S. at risk. The paper, which was first reported by Punchbowl News, a news outlet covering Capitol Hill.  Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., said he was joining and indicated that fellow conservative Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., was also behind it. Several House Republicans, led by Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene are forming a caucus that calls for a 'common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions.' U.S. Congressman Paul A. Gosar (Arizona) is also said to be involved in the caucus The document was being circulated as the GOP is struggling to determine a clear direction as it prepares to try winning back control of the House and Senate in the 2022 elections.  Among the party's divisions are how closely to tack behind Donald Trump, and the caucus' seven-page policy platform clearly embraces the former president's world view. 'The America First Caucus (AFC) exists to promote...
    The relationship between the European Union and the United States continues its reconstruction after the Trump era and the president Joe Biden will participate as a guest at this Thursday’s summit of the European Council after receiving the invitation of Charles Michel. The idea is that they address what transatlantic links should look like in the coming years. “It is time to rebuild the transatlantic alliance,” said Michel, who hopes to receive Biden’s views precisely on the relations between the blocks. The meeting will take place by videoconference given the restrictions in Belgium due to the pandemic. It should be remembered that Pedro Sánchez and Joe Biden have not yet spoken since the democrat arrived at the Oval Office last January. On the agenda of the summit is the vaccination passport, European funds, measures against the potential new wave of Covid, vaccines or relations with Turkey. The debate on Russia has been removed from the agenda, as Michel prefers to address it in person. The spokesman for the Belgian politician, Barend Leyts, added on that social network that the...
    US President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential candidate and former US Vice President Joe Biden are seen during the first presidential debate on a YouTube video displayed on a screen of a smartphone. United States presidential election scheduled on November 3, 2020.Pavlo Conchar | LightRocket | Getty Images LONDON – The relationship between the U.S. and Europe has been bitter over the last four years, but EU officials are hoping tensions will ease after the upcoming presidential election.  Transatlantic ties have fractured since President Donald Trump arrived at the White House in 2017, with clashes over trade, defense and technology. In addition, unilateral decisions by the American president have upset many in the European Union, in particular his call to close borders to European travelers in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. However, there's a hope among some officials in the EU that things may improve at least slightly if Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Joe Biden wins the Nov. 3 election.  Biden will be "more conventional," a European government official told CNBC under the condition of anonymity due to the...
    Peter Altmaier (CDU), Federal Minister of Economics and Energy, speaks at the virtual Gaia-X expert forum of the Federal Ministry of Economics.picture alliance The two biggest economies in the European Union hope they have an answer to the domination enjoyed by American and Chinese companies in the cloud computing industry: Gaia X Amazon, Microsoft, Google and Alibaba are the four main players globally when it comes to cloud services. However, European policymakers have grown anxious about their dependence on a small number of major tech companies, which aren't European. That has been the case in particular since the United States enacted a law in 2018 that compels U.S. firms to hand in data to American authorities even if the latter is stored elsewhere in the world. Germany and France have concerns that the data of European citizens is at risk. "Gaia X is a two-fold approach to a problem we face in Europe and a problem that every company in the world faces right now," Marco-Alexander Breit, head of Task Force Artificial Intelligence at the German economy ministry, told CNBC's...
    Native Americans from modern-day Colombia reached Polynesia around 1200 AD on a Kon-Tiki-like voyage, colonising the area before Europeans reached Easter Island. Researchers from the US and Mexico used large-scale genetic analyses to show that modern-day Polynesian populations contain traces of Native American DNA. Statistical analysis revealed that prehistoric Polynesian populations first met and interbred with people from what is today Colombia around the year 1,150 AD. This event — which took place on the island of South Marquesas — occurred at  roughly the same time Polynesians first arrived in the area from the west. The finding finally confirms a long-running theory that the two groups had met — and explains why sweet potatoes from the Americas can be found in Polynesia. Native Americans from modern-day Colombia reached Polynesia around 1200 AD on a Kon-Tiki-like voyage, colonising the area before Europeans reached Easter Island, geneticists found. Pictured, an illustration showing the diverse genetic routes of modern Polynesians Researchers from the US and Mexico used large-scale genetic analyses to show that modern-day Polynesian populations contain traces of Native American...
    The EU is planning to ban American travellers when it reopens on July 1, but those from countries with lower infection rates - like China - are set to be welcomed. The decision - which still needs to be formalised in member states' capitals - risks angering Donald Trump who has been widely criticised for his handling of the crisis. The United States, Russia, and several other countries are considered too risky because they have not controlled the coronavirus outbreak, EU officials said Friday. The list of safe countries was put together by senior diplomats in Brussels following discussions on how to reopen the bloc to business and tourism following lockdown.    The EU is planning to ban American travellers when it reopens on July 1 but those from countries with lower infection rates - like China - are set to be welcomed. The decision is likely to anger Trump (pictured)  One of the 'safe countries' will be China - but only if it allows European Union travellers to visit as well, the officials said. EU officials disclosed earlier this week...
    The European Union is reportedly discussing plans to reopen member states to foreign travel, although they may keep Americans off the list of acceptable visitors due to the rise of coronavirus cases in the United States. Neither of the two lists of acceptable visitors included the U.S., Russia, and Brazil amid concerns from E.U. officials that the three countries had not sufficiently responded to the pandemic, The New York Times reported. China, however, was included despite reports that the country has not been transparent about the spread of the virus. The move represents the first coherent effort by the E.U. to synchronize migration policies among the 27 member states since the outbreak began.. Once officials agree on a final list, it is expected to be presented as early as July 1. Foreign travelers were barred from visiting E.U. countries in March as countries like Italy and Spain were hit hard by the coronavirus. The move was reciprocated by the U.S. as President Donald Trump also barred travel from the E.U. around the same time. American tourists with protective face masks at...
    One need only review Johns Hopkins University data to see how destructive the coronavirus pandemic was earlier this year in Europe, where the death counts on Tuesday afternoon ranged from 34,675 in Italy to 28,325 in Spain to 29,666 in France. But as staggering as those numbers are, the U.S. is now worse off: according to Hopkins, more than 120,000 people have died from COVID-19 in the U.S. — a larger death toll than Italy, Spain and France combined. And the New York Times’ Matina Stevis-Gridneff is reporting that the European Union is considering a ban on travel from the U.S. this summer because it “has failed to control the scourge.” The Times reviewed the EU’s “draft lists of acceptable travelers” from other parts of the world — and it is possible that the EU will “lump American visitors in with Russians and Brazilians as unwelcome.” Brazil, according to Johns Hopkins figures, now has the second highest coronavirus death count in the world: more than 51,200. “European nations are currently haggling over two potential lists of acceptable visitors based on...
    BRUSSELS — European Union countries rushing to revive their economies and reopen their borders after months of coronavirus restrictions are prepared to block Americans from entering because the United States has failed to control the scourge, according to draft lists of acceptable travelers seen by The New York Times. That prospect, which would lump American visitors in with Russians and Brazilians as unwelcome, is a stinging blow to American prestige in the world and a repudiation of President Donald Trump’s handling of the virus in the United States, which has more than 2.3 million cases and upward of 120,000 deaths, more than any other country. European nations are currently haggling over two potential lists of acceptable visitors based on how countries are faring with the coronavirus pandemic. Both include China, as well as developing nations like Uganda, Cuba and Vietnam. Travelers from the United States and the rest of the world have been excluded from visiting the European Union — with few exceptions mostly for repatriations or “essential travel” — since mid-March. But a final decision on reopening the borders...
    The European Union wants to slap tariffs on American industries that are politically near and dear to President Trump and congressional Republicans this election year, a new report says. The EU has asked the World Trade Organization for permission to impose tariffs on $11.2 billion worth of US exports that would hammer farmers, coal producers and fisheries, Bloomberg News reported Tuesday. The move could reportedly hit parts of the US that are politically crucial for Trump and top GOP lawmakers. For instance, the EU’s coal tariffs may target Missouri — which has two Republican senators — while House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s California district could be vulnerable because it produces fruits and nuts, according to Bloomberg. House Minority Whip Steve Scalise’s Louisiana district could also be affected by tariffs on roughly $700 million in seafood exports, the news service reported. The EU’s request is reportedly the latest episode in a lengthy trade dispute with Washington over aerospace subsidies. The WTO gave the US a $7.5 billion award last year over the EU’s illegal subsidies for European planemaker Airbus. Europe...
    The European Union wants to slap tariffs on American industries that are politically near and dear to President Trump and congressional Republicans this election year, a new report says. The EU has asked the World Trade Organization for permission to impose tariffs on $11.2 billion worth of US exports that would hammer farmers, coal producers and fisheries, Bloomberg News reported Tuesday. The move could reportedly hit parts of the US that are politically crucial for Trump and top GOP lawmakers. For instance, the EU’s coal tariffs may target Missouri — which has two Republican senators — while House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s California district could be vulnerable because it produces fruits and nuts, according to Bloomberg. House Minority Whip Steve Scalise’s Louisiana district could also be affected by tariffs on roughly $700 million in seafood exports, the news service reported. The EU’s request is reportedly the latest episode in a lengthy trade dispute with Washington over aerospace subsidies. The WTO gave the US a $7.5 billion award last year over the EU’s illegal subsidies for European planemaker Airbus. Europe now...
    The Associated Press By BRUCE SCHREINER, Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — American whiskey distillers have watched more than $300 million in export revenues evaporate in the two years since becoming entangled in a trade dispute between the Trump administration and the European Union, according to estimates in a new report. Exports of American whiskey — mostly bourbon, Tennessee whiskey and rye whiskey — to the EU have fallen 33% since the EU imposed a retaliatory tariff on those products on June 22, 2018, according to the report issued Monday by the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States. The EU targeted American whiskey and other U.S. products in response to President Donald Trump’s decision to impose tariffs on European steel and aluminum. Those duties amount to a tax, which producers can either absorb in reduced profits, or pass along to customers through higher prices — and risk losing market share in highly competitive markets. The new report shows that the tariffs “derailed a great American export success story," said Chris Swonger, the council's president and CEO. “American distillers enjoyed...
    London (CNN Business)US whiskey distillers have lost out on nearly $340 million in sales to the European Union over the past two years because of a tit-for-tat trade spat between Washington and Brussels.Exports to the European Union of bourbon, Tennessee whiskey and rye whiskey have declined by a third since a 25% tariff went into effect in June 2018, according to a report released Monday by the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States. The trade war is hurting Jack Daniels, but customers arent paying for it"The tariffs have derailed a great American export success story," Chris Swonger, CEO of the Council, said in a statement. "American distillers enjoyed two decades of unparalleled growth in the EU prior to the implementation of these retaliatory tariffs," he added.Tariffs act as a tax on exports and are either absorbed by producers in the form of reduced profits or passed on to consumers in higher prices. The European Union imposed tariffs in 2018 on $3 billion worth of US goods, including whiskey, motorcycles and denim, in response to US tariffs on EU steel...
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