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    COVID hospital admission have risen by 20 per cent in the last week, sparking fears of a new wave. Despite the recent rise in both cases and admissions, medics have claimed that the end of the pandemic 'is in sight'. 1The current variant of the virus, Omicron, which is circulating in the UK is milder than others that came before it such as Delta and AlphaCredit: Getty Numbers had been declining since July, but government data states that on Monday, 781 patients were admitted to hospital in England. This is up from 519 the week before. Over the seven days from September 12 to September 19, there was an increase of 17 per cent. Hospital rates were found to be the highest in the North East of England with a rate of 7.19 per 100,000 population. Read more on Covid-19NEW THREAT New Covid-like virus discovered in a bat - raising fears it could infect humansAFTER SHOCK Warning to anyone who's had Covid in the last year over killer complication Official government data states that in the last seven days, 28,167...
    A NEW Covid-like virus has been discovered in a bat - raising fears it could infect humans. Scientists in the US have warned that the illness could be resistant to current vaccines. 1The current Omicron strain has been proven to be milder than othersCredit: Reuters Covid-19 has now been circulating for over two years and millions of Brits have been vaccinated or have some sort of protection from prior infection. The current Omicron strain has been proven to be milder than others and globally, many are learning to live with the bug. But this new development adds to a growing body of evidence that sarbecoviruses - members of the coronavirus family - are rife across Asia and eastern Europe. Study lead author Dr Michael Letko, of Washington State University in the US, said: "Our research further demonstrates that sarbecoviruses are circulating in wildlife outside of Asia - even in places like western Russia where the Khosta-2 virus was found - also pose a threat to global health and ongoing vaccine campaigns against SARS-CoV-2." Read more on Covid-19BREATH OF LIFE How...
    Top scientists have assured the public Langya virus is nothing like Covid after reports of the new pathogen in China sparked fears of a repeat of the 2020 pandemic. Langya henipavirus — or LayV — was detected in 35 people in the country's eastern Henan and Shandong provinces between December 2018 and mid-2021.  This means the virus has only infected only a handful of people each year since it was first identified in a 53-year-old female farmer.  It was revealed for the first time last week in a research paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine, sparking fears about another mysterious flu-like virus. But Professor Francis Balloux, an infectious disease expert at University College London, said the current data suggested the virus 'is not spreading fast in humans'. He added there was little evidence LayV can spread easily between people, which means it has a low pandemic potential. 'At this stage, LayV doesn't look like a repeat of Covid-19 at all, but it is yet another reminder of the looming threat caused by the many pathogens circulating in...
    YIKES! Monkeypox! WTF is all that about? Horrible blisters all over your face. A disease from Africa which has decided to come over here for a bit. Transmissible from animal to human and vice versa. Don’t s**g any monkeys, then. And if you must, then wear protection. 8Monkeypox is transmissible from animal to human and vice versa 8I have the feeling that we’re being wound up by folks who seem to be yearning for another pandemic (stock image) There are currently 78 cases of this illness in the UK. It had been largely confined to people in Africa. It is now spreading across Europe, mostly among the gay population — though it looks like the NHS and World Health Organisation are playing down the gay side of it. It has also been reported that we should avoid eating meat, or only eat meat that has been “thoroughly cooked”. What? You can catch it from a medium-rare ribeye steak? How? No, you can’t. I have the feeling that we’re being wound up by folks who seem to be yearning for another...
    (CNN)Arguably the most successful version of the Omicron coronavirus variant to date has been BA.2 -- but it hasn't been resting on its laurels. BA.2 has been picking up mutations, sometimes shifting into sleeker and, incredibly, even faster versions of itself. Global variant trackers have found 21 viral offspring associated with BA.2. Most of these look like underachievers, with mutations of little consequence. But two of these offshoots -- BA.2.12.1 and BA.2.12 -- have been fueling a rise in Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations in central New York state. And one of them, BA.2.12.1, is outpacing BA.2 in other regions, too. Biden says people must make their own call whether to wear masks on planes as administration considers appealing court rulingNew data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that BA.2.12.1 caused 19% of new Covid-19 infections in the US last week, up from an estimated 11% of cases the week before and 7% the week before that. The speed at which BA.2.12.1 is outpacing BA.2 is roughly as fast as BA.2 outcompeted its cousin BA.1, according to...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- As the BA.2 subvariant of omicron continues to spread, researchers are focused on understanding how to treat this coronavirus variant and how it works."They looked at how long the virus remains on a surface and can still be recoverable. They used both plastic and skin from cadavers," said Dr. George Rutherford, UCSF Professor Epidemiology.The study by researchers in Japan was held in a lab which could influence its outcome. Researchers tested multiple COVID variants and noticed that Omicron lasted the longest. If you're on the ABC7 News app, click here to watch liveDr. Rutherford and UC Berkeley Infectious Disease Expert Dr. John Swartzberg agree that the greatest risk of infection continues to be by droplets in the air."At least with the cadaver skin experiments, they were all neutralized within 15 second without ethanol alcohol," said Dr. Rutherford."Either close to somebody where larger droplets can get onto our mouth or nose, or eyes or even distances. Particularly inside 30 feet away if the virus gets inside and floats and we inhale it," said Dr. Swartzberg.VIDEO:...
    By Brenda Goodman, CNN (CNN) — The BA.2 virus — a subvariant of the Omicron coronavirus variant — isn’t just spreading faster than its distant cousin, it may also cause more severe disease and appears capable of thwarting some of the key weapons we have against Covid-19, new research suggests. New lab experiments from Japan show that BA.2 may have features that make it as capable of causing serious illness as older variants of Covid-19, including Delta. And like Omicron, it appears to largely escape the immunity created by vaccines. A booster shot restores protection, making illness after infection about 74% less likely. BA.2 is also resistant to some treatments, including sotrovimab, the monoclonal antibody that’s currently being used against Omicron. The findings were posted Wednesday as a preprint study on the bioRxiv server, before peer review. Normally, before a study is published in medical journal, it is scrutinized by independent experts. Preprints allow research to be shared more quickly, but they are posted before that additional layer of review. “It might be, from a human’s perspective, a worse...
    Health care workers conducting rounds within an ICU filled with COVID-19 patients “Sequela” is a word that few Americans recognize today. Unfortunately, it’s a word that is much more likely to become familiar over the next few years… even decades. A sequela is a long-term pathological effect resulting from exposure to a disease. When the pandemic ends, the damage is not going to be over.  There’s often a tendency in the media—and in social media—to try to frame the damage of COVID-19 to an either-or situation. Someone gets sick for a few days, and they either recover and are fine, or they die and count among the ever-growing total deaths. It’s that sort of all-or-nothing approach that allows people to say things like, “Well, the survival rate is 99.9%, so …” Add more nines to the end of that number, depending on how many right-wing news programs you watch.  Nationally, the actual survival rate is something closer to 98.8%, but that’s not the point. Studies have already indicated that 43% of those who have had at least one symptomatic COVID-19 infection tend to...
    Two years into the pandemic, most of us are fed up. COVID case rates are higher than they’ve ever been and hospitalization rates are once again rising rapidly in many countries. Against this bleak picture, we yearn to get back to normal. We’d like to meet friends in a pub or have them over for dinner. We’d like our struggling business to thrive like it did before the pandemic. We’d like our children to return to their once-familiar routine of in-person schooling and after-school activities. We’d like to ride on a bus, sing in a choir, get back to the gym, or dance in a nightclub without fear of catching COVID. Which of these activities is safe? And how safe exactly? These were the questions we sought to answer in our latest research. SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID, spreads mainly by airborne transmission. So the key to preventing transmission is to understand how airborne particles behave, which requires knowledge from physics and chemistry. Air is a fluid made up of invisible, rapidly and randomly moving molecules, so airborne particles...
    A video of a Florida testing line summed up the explosion of the Omicron variant of the coronavirus in America this week, with hundreds lined up for testing in Miami Thursday. With cars lined up for seemingly over a mile, one Twitter user had to clarify, 'It is from today. It is not from last year.' It also comes after samples taken from sewage revealed that Omicron is now the dominant strain of Covid in Florida's Orange County. Line weren't long in just the Sunshine State: In New York City, people were lined up a long way outside testing sites as the city saw cases have reached over 3,500 the last two days.  CityMD, New York's urgent care provider that stations clinics throughout the Big Apple, said testing volume grew more than 25 percent the past two weeks, with results taking as many as three to five days to come back from their labs.   COVID cases are up 31 percent nationwide over the past two weeks, with 124,413 people testing positive for the virus. Deaths have increased by 28 percent...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – As more countries report cases of the new omicron coronavirus variant, there are concerns about whether it’s more contagious and virulent than the delta variant. “This thing has mutated like crazy,” said Dr. Robert Murphy, an infectious disease specialist with Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “There’s at least 30 mutations in the spike protein. This is like way more than any other variant.” READ MORE: Ravens-Packers Game In December Moved To 4:25 P.M., Team SaysThose mutations could make it easier for the virus to infect the cells. “If you look at the data, it does look like it’s most likely transmitting easier than Delta,” Dr. Murphy said. “We don’t know if it’s really any worse as far as disease progression or death or hospitalization. So, it may be very similar to what we saw with Delta. But all this really has to play out, and it’s gonna take us probably at least one to two weeks.” READ MORE: Rosenbaum Drops Out Of Maryland Governor's RaceAnother concern, how effective current vaccines will be against the new variant,...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles County residents are again required to wear masks indoors regardless of their vaccination status — a new mandate starting this weekend that health officials hope will reverse the latest spikes in coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths. The rule went into effect late Saturday for the nation’s largest county, home to 11 million people, where a sharp increase in COVID-19 cases is led by the highly transmissible delta variant. The vast majority of new cases are among unvaccinated people, LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis said Sunday. “I’m not pleased that we have to go back to using the masks in this matter but, nonetheless, it’s going to save lives. And right now that to me is what’s most important,” Solis said on ABC’s “ This Week.” California has seen a steady rise in virus cases since the state fully reopened its economy on June 15 and did away with capacity limits and social distancing. San Francisco Bay Area health officials last week urged residents to again wear masks inside public buildings, offices...
    ToniAnn Cusumano was a healthy, active and busy real estate broker in Brooklyn, New York, before the COVID-19 pandemic struck last March. She contracted the virus after her husband, Ron, brought it home from a ski trip in Italy - which was an early hotbed that eventually took the world by storm.  Although her infection cleared after a few weeks, Cusumano still experienced symptoms like fatigue and sensitivity to light. The symptoms left her bedridden for an entire year. 'My days used to consist of five appointments, and moving furniture and pitch books and PTA meetings,' she told DailyMail.com. 'Three kids, two dogs, I'd stop, come home, make dinner, go back to work. go do another showing. And now, I've watched the trees in my backyard bloom, turn to fall, turn to winter and bloom again, all from pretty much the same position in my bed.' Cusumano has what is known as long-haul COVID-19, a condition in which people exhibit symptoms of the virus long after recovering. It has left many experts baffled. She is now featured as part of...
    Funeral pyres burn at a makeshift crematorium in New Delhi – AP Photo/Altaf Qadri India’s crematoriums and burial grounds are being overwhelmed by the devastating new surge of infections tearing through the populous country with terrifying speed, depleting the supply of life-saving oxygen to critical levels and leaving patients to die while waiting in line to see doctors. For the fourth straight day, India on Sunday set a global daily record for new infections, spurred by an insidious new variant, undermining the government’s premature claims of victory over the pandemic. The 349,691 confirmed cases over the past day brought India’s total to more than 16.9 million, behind only the United States globally. The Health Ministry reported another 2,767 deaths in the past 24 hours, pushing India’s Covid-19 fatalities to 192,311. Experts say that toll could be a huge undercount, as suspected cases are not included, and many deaths from the infection are being attributed to underlying conditions. The crisis unfolding in India is most visceral in its graveyards and crematoriums, and in heartbreaking images of gasping patients dying on their...
    (CNN)Across the globe, the coronavirus pandemic has brought isolation, shut down travel and shown there are few places to hide from a virus that preys on impatience. But this time of extremis has also yielded unexpected moments of humanity, personal connections and insight about the world, say "Meanwhile" readers. Marcia, who in October moved from the US state of Indiana to Bonn, Germany, has watched a vicious new viral wave overtake her adopted country. "I went from a shelter-in-place environment ... to a near two-month reprieve here of open dining in restaurants, evening drinks on bar terraces overlooking the Rhine, and entries into all manner of stores and services, needing only a squirt of hand sanitizer and a cloth mask," she wrote.Now Marcia is playing "an anxious game to try and beat the odds of catching a mutated version of the virus before receiving the vaccine." But the cherry blossoms and glorious sunsets of Bonn's old city are reasons for optimism. "Hope is blooming, too. I can feel it," she says.A reader in Nigeria suggests that many of his compatriots...
    (CNN)Michigan is in another coronavirus surge and hospitals are again on the front line, but this time they have a new type of patient: younger and healthier.Fred Romankewiz was on his way to get vaccinated, but he didn't feel well so he canceled the appointment and got a Covid-19 test instead. Though he'd been inches from the coronavirus finish line, the 54-year-old construction materials salesman from Lansing now tested positive. "What really is frustrating to me is it's been a year and what -- three months now, and I played it right to the tee. I mean, I did everything correct," said Romankewiz. "And then to have this happen."How one of Detroits churches is tackling vaccine hesitancy to help combat Michigans Covid-19 surgeWatching TV, responding to a steady stream of text messages and cracking jokes from his hospital bed in Lansing's Sparrow Hospital, Romankewiz said he feels upbeat about his prospects for a full recovery but that the virus laid him low."I felt like I went 10 rounds with Mike Tyson," he said. "I was absolutely physically exhausted. I mean,...
    Alarm bells are ringing and red flags are flying for Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as she senses “impending doom” as the number of COVID-19 cases is on the rise amid a possible fourth wave, as the White House announced new actions. An emotional Walensky's voice broke during a briefing on Monday, March 29 as she cautioned Americans not to get complacent as a new wave of the virus could hit the country. “I’m (going to) lose the script and I’m going to reflect on the recurring feeling I have of impending doom,” she said from the White House. "We have so much to look forward to, so much promise and potential of where we are, and so much reason for hope. But right now I’m scared. “I know what it’s like as a physician to stand in that patient room, gowned, gloved, masked, shielded, and to be the last person to touch some else’s loved one because their loved one couldn’t be there,” she continued. “And I know what it’s...
    Since the spread of COVID-19 launched a global pandemic in 2020, over half a million Americans have been killed by the virus. And experts agree the death and infection rates have been much worse in the West—mainly the United States and Europe—than many other places in the East. In other words, while other countries like China, Cambodia and New Zealand were able to temper the spread, the U.S. had its ass handed back to it. There are a lot of reasons for this, says David Wallace-Wells, New York magazine writer and author of How the West Lost COVID, in this bonus episode of The New Abnormal. Factors like population age and geographic location played a role in these places’ ability to control the virus, but ultimately, one of the most “catastrophic” factors that played into the death toll, is something we very much had control over. And that is how our leaders responded and our collective culture, on both a federal and local level.READ THIS LIST Covid-19 Cheat Sheet Politics Entertainment Media Royalist World Half Full U.S. News...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- A year into the pandemic, COVID-19 continues to create major challenges for families. But, there have been some silver linings. Scientific breakthroughs and a sea change in the way doctors collaborate have the changed the world. Even kids are coming away with habits that could help them for years to come, long after the pandemic ends.New healthy habits"Water and soap and dry your hands," shouts 4-year-old Alexander B., who has become a hand washing expert.We asked Alexander, "So when you get home what's the first thing you do?" Alexander was quick to respond with, "wash our hands!"Alexander's mother, Vanessas Rodriguez, says that her son sings his ABC's when he starts scrubbing with soap. "We literally walk in the door and he says, 'mommy don't forget we have to wash our hands first!' For him it's almost like a plaything and that's how I presented it to him."RELATED: 11-year-old East Bay girl inspired by COVID-19 publishes book to help kids her age9-year-old Kaylan Sommer isn't shy about hand-washing either. He's created his own healthy habits, and doesn't...
    New York : The British government recently said it hopes transform COVID-19 into a manageable disease, like the flu. Vaccines and new treatments, argue ministers and their scientific advisers, will reduce the death rate and allow us to live with the virus, instead of constantly fighting against it. But is this possible? Unattainable goal Wiping COVID off the face of the Earth would be great, of course, given the deaths and destruction it causes. But the only problem is that eradication has only been achieved with one virus: smallpox, in 1980. It took decades to get to this point, and scientists and governments were only able to do it thanks to a series of unique circumstances. First, the vaccine was so stable that it did not need to be refrigerated, and when it was supplied it was immediately obvious whether it had worked or not. It was also evident when a person had been infected. It was not necessary to do a laboratory test, which was a great advantage when it comes to containing outbreaks. Covid, as we all...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden came to Washington with big dreams of bipartisanship, but the practicalities are now setting in. With Congress still deeply polarized following former President Donald Trump's acrimonious exit, and with dangerous variants of the coronavirus circulating in the US, the President signaled a new sense of urgency Friday about the need to get his $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief package passed -- even if he is not able to bring Republicans along. Meeting with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen in the Oval Office, the President warned of the "cost of inaction," pointing to alarming new job losses, the hunger that some 30 million Americans are facing every day, as well as the possibility that "an entire cohort of kids" could face "lower lifetime earnings because they're deprived of another semester of school.""We have to act now; there's no time for delay," Biden said.Democrats face their first big challenge to stay united with massive Covid-19 relief billHe punctuated that point less than two hours later on his way to visit Walter Reed National Military Medical Center when a reporter asked him...
    People who have survived COVID-19 may have some protection against getting reinfected after all, a new study suggests.  Scientists at Rockefeller University found that a type of immunity, from memory B cells, lasts at least six months.  B cells 'remember' how to make antibodies against viruses, including the one that causes COVID-19.  And these cells are likely less easily duped by mutations in the spike protein of 'super-covid' variants like the more infectious UK form, B117, compared to antibodies themselves.  The variant has now been found in at least 17 US states, according to DailyMail.com tracking.  At least four other variants have cropped up on American soil, and others from South Africa and Brazil could arrive and fuel a surge in cases any day - especially now that the Trump administration has lifted its travel ban.  Scientists are concerned that mutations to the spike protein that allows coronavirus to infect human cells might make variants less 'visible' to antibodies from previous bouts with COVID-19 or vaccines.  But the B cells may help solve this problem, the new research published Monday...
    No tolerance whatsoever: Justice Department warns against efforts to disrupt Biden inauguration House poised to impeach Trump for second time: Incitement of insurrection The NBA’s new Covid-19 restrictions won’t be good enough Adam Silver knew it was going to happen when the NBA decided to bypass forming another bubble to instead return the league’s teams to their home arenas for a planned 72-game season. The commissioner watched MLB and NFL teams lose an unwinnable fight against Covid-19 that led to positive tests and postponed games even in the best case scenarios. Before the season’s opening tip, Silver called a similar outcome in the NBA “inevitable.” © Photo by Harry How/Getty Images Covid was always coming for the NBA, and in the last week it has fully arrived. The Philadelphia 76ers, Boston Celtics, Dallas Mavericks, Washington Wizards, Miami Heat, and Chicago Bulls are all dealing with outbreaks within the locker room. Games getting postponed have become a daily occurrence. Meanwhile, the virus just killed 4,000 Americans in a single day for the first time since it suspended life as...
    People walk past the closed entrance of the Eurostar terminal at Brussels South railway station after Britain's European neighbors began closing their doors to travelers from the United Kingdom amid alarm about a rapidly spreading strain of coronavirus, in Brussels, Belgium December 21, 2020.Yves Herman | Reuters LONDON — Anxious, angry, and alone. That's how many people in Britain are feeling just two days before Christmas, as a new Covid variant that seems to transmit more quickly spreads across the nation.  The U.K. government said on Saturday that it had no choice but to ban around 18 million people from visiting other households on Christmas Day, scuppering festive plans for people up and down the country. Since then, dozens of countries around the world have closed their doors to Brits in an effort to prevent the new variant spreading among their own populations. Jon from the London suburb of Surbiton, who did not want to share his full name, told CNBC that it feels like it did back in March when the coronavirus first hit Europe, only without the sunshine...
    SAN ANTONIO – As the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine arrived in San Antonio, a new variant of Coronavirus was being researched and detected in parts of England. According to Matt Hancock, the U.K.’s health secretary, A new surge of case counts in southern England may be associated with the new variant. “We’ve currently identified over 1,000 cases with this variant predominantly in the south of England,” Hancock said. Dr. Tyler Curiel—a medicine, microbiology and immunology professor at UT Health San Antonio—said the variant might make the virus more easily transmissible. “As far as we know right now, it possibly makes it easier to transmit from person to person, but it doesn’t look like it makes the disease you get any more serious than if you didn’t have this mutation or if you had some different strain,” Curiel said. Curiel said viruses mutate frequently and that there are at least seven major groups of the Coronavirus. “Viruses are always looking to find the best way to survive,” Curiel said. Curiel said the original L-strain of the virus has already...
    By CEDAR ATTANASIO, Associated Press/Report for America SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico officials say they're “tightening” the definition of essential businesses to exclude some large retailers that sell some essential supplies as the state reports a record-high number of COVID-19 cases for the second day in a row. Just after 4:30 p.m., cellphones around the state buzzed and dinged with an emergency alert reading “Shelter in place except for emergency needs. EXTREME virus risk.” Daily confirmed positive cases swelled to 2,897, the governor’s office reported Wednesday. Twenty-six more deaths were recorded, second only to the slightly higher number reported Tuesday. That brings the total number of New Mexico deaths linked to the disease to 1,290, and the total number of cases to over 70,000. There are 776 people hospitalized because of COVID-19, officials said. In order to accept in-person customers, large retailers will be required to generate more than a third of their revenue from essential goods like food. That means stores like Ross Dress for Less, which mostly sells clothes but occasionally sells food, will have to...
    The most common online scams to watch for Flying car achieves 88 mph takeoff speed — no flaming tire tracks, though Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/7 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life The New 'Terrifying' Nightly Problem COVID Survivors Experience It's hard to know exactly what course your coronavirus case could take, seeing as some people seem to recover quickly, others develop serious organ damage, and still others have lingering symptoms for weeks or even months on end. Many survivors have reported a myriad of subsequent problems, from breathlessness to hair loss. Now, new accounts are pointing to another seriously concerning condition you could develop, even if you just had a mild COVID case: insomnia. "When I fell asleep or started to fall asleep, it felt like I would stop breathing and my body would kick awake and I'd be gasping for air," Franco, an anonymous 37-year-old COVID survivor, told Today. "It felt like...
    Dr. Deborah Birx said Wednesday that new COVID-19 outbreaks are not going to be stopped by shutting workplaces — but rather by people limiting their social interactions. “This is not going to be stopped by shutting workplaces down,” the head of the White House coronavirus task force told The Post after speaking in Long Island. She said hotspots in the South have indicated that the virus is now primarily spreading through family parties and community engagements, and that curbing the spread comes down to people limiting socializing to tight circles. Earlier Wednesday, Birx spoke to reporters after a roundtable talk at Stony Brook University, where she said new outbreaks of the virus are “not going to look like” the first wave that pummeled New York and neighboring states. “This particular area across the Northeast experienced something unique in March and April that was not experienced in the South,” she said. “I think there are still people waiting for the epidemic to look like what it looked like before. It’s not going to look like that. It’s not going to be...
    (Reuters) - Here is a selection of quotes from world leaders and ordinary people about the global COVID-19 pandemic, which has now killed more than 1 million people. AUSTRALIA - Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Sept. 4: "In the absence of a vaccine, we may have to live this way for years." BRAZIL - President Jair Bolsonaro, after testing positive for COVID-19, July 7: "If I had taken hydroxychloroquine preventively, I would still be working (instead of heading into quarantine)." "I trust in hydroxychloroquine. And you?" When asked by journalists about the latest death toll, April 28: "So what? I'm sorry, but what do you want me to do?" After touring streets in the suburbs of Brasilia without a mask, March 29: "This is the reality: the virus is there. We have to face it, but face it like a man, damn it, not like a kid. We'll confront the virus with reality. That's life. We're all going to die one day." BRITAIN - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, asked about the risks of a second surge in infections, July 31:...
    What a pain in the butt. With a new coronavirus lockdown possible in Scotland, people are once again on the hunt for toilet paper, according to the Scottish Sun. Residents have been storming stores to stockpile the basic necessity like they did back in March during the first lockdown, the news outlet reported. The panic buying spree comes as the nation awaits word from First Minister Nicola Sturgeon later Tuesday about the restrictions to stem the spread of the virus. But it is not only TP that people have been after. Shopper Gemma Connolly was shocked to find barren shelves at the Asda store in Govan, Glasgow. “I spoke to a young guy who told me that a woman with a three-day-old baby was in tears because she couldn’t find powdered milk,” she told the news outlet. “He also said an old lady had been in earlier looking for toilet roll and there was none left,” Connolly added. “It’s disgusting the way some people are behaving. It’s like some kind of apocalypse is coming.” Among the measures Sturgeon could announce...
    He’s the bearer of good news — and tons of COVID-19 antibodies. After battling the coronavirus at the start of the pandemic, New Jersey resident Matthew Facendo is now what medical professionals call a “superdonor” — somebody with an unusually high amount of COVID-19 antibodies. And they’re studying him in order to help others fight the disease. On March 10, over a week before New Jersey went on lockdown, Hazlet resident Facendo came down with a fever. The mailman’s high temperature returned the next night and he had a nagging feeling that he may have caught the frightening new virus. Facendo called out of work the next day and went to the hospital, where he underwent a battery of tests, including one for COVID-19. “I had a bad feeling,” Facendo, 60, told The Post. “Because I had triple bypass with aortic valve replacement in September 2018.” For the next 11 days, he grappled with fevers that ran from 99 to 103 degrees, lost his appetite and sense of taste and smell, and was extremely fatigued. Luckily, he never had respiratory issues...
    The Biden campaign is going hard on COVID-19’s threat to older Americans with $14.5 million in battleground state ads. In a moving television ad, a Greenfield, Wisconsin, woman named Jessica talks about her grandmother’s death, alone, from the virus, saying “the president made a huge mistake in downplaying this virus. There was a lack of leadership, a lack of responsibility, and a lack of resources. I felt like our elderly have not been a priority for this administration, that they don’t matter. And I feel like my grandmother didn’t matter.” The campaign is also running a digital ad in which Biden himself says “Our seniors, that are being hit the hardest. Let’s start by caring for aging parents and loved ones. Making their homes safer, but more importantly, giving them peace of mind, helping them live independently. Everyone’s entitled to be treated with dignity. Everyone.” The ads will be running in Arizona, Florida, Michigan, Nevada, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Last week, the Biden campaign spent $15 million on paid media in battleground states—Nevada is an addition this week. The last time a Democratic...
    Mouth lesions and spots on the palate may be a new symptom of the novel coronavirus, a new study suggests. Researchers found that one-third of COVID-19 patients with skin rashes on their arms and legs also had breakouts on the roofs of their mouths.  What's more, these splotches usually appeared about two weeks after people first experienced more well-known symptoms such as fever or shortness of breath.  The team from Ramon y Cajal University Hospital in Madrid, Spain, says doctors and nurses should examine the oral cavities of confirmed or suspected coronavirus patients to see if they are also exhibiting these signs.  A new study from Spain found that one-third of coronavirus patients with skin rashes had enanthem, which are rash-like lesions that usually form in the mouth (above) All the patients with the rash-like splotches were between ages 40 and 69 and four of the six were female. Pictured: The rash on the exterior of a coronavirus patient's body At the onset of the pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded just three symptoms of...
    CORONAVIRUS will be here forever just like the common cold, with local outbreaks and lockdowns around the world becoming the new normal, a leading scientist claims. Professor Paul Davies says we may have to live forever with COVID-19, putting out “spot fires” when they occur. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 4Paul Davies says we may have to live forever with COVID-19 as a vaccine may not be certainCredit: AFP or licensors 4The British but US-based academic fears we may have live with coronavirus foreverCredit: @ChrisMichel The British-born but US-based academic said the two key exit strategies from the crisis – elimination plus a vaccine; and herd immunity – were not certain of success. 'PART OF THE RIDE' “The best compromise, which I think we will end up with, is we take measures but it doesn’t go away totally, and you put out spot fires when they occur,” Professor Davies said. “We may have to live with that forever. The best compromise ... is we take measures but it doesn’t go away...
    Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research. The findings suggest that, like the common cold and flu, the virus could infect people on an annual basis.  This undermines ideas that herd immunity could be a way of defeating the virus. King’s College London scientists looked at the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust. Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months according to new research which shows coronavirus could infect people on an annual basis like the common cold RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Century-old BCG vaccine used to eradicate tuberculosis DOES... Air pollution resurges in London, Paris and Rome as... Covid-19 vaccine could be ready within a year if trials are... Maryland man says he may be first person successfully... Share this article Share 126 shares They found antibody levels peaked three weeks after symptoms and then declined. Lead author Dr Katie Doores told the Guardian: ‘People are producing a reasonable antibody...
    The United States has dipped under 50,000 new coronavirus cases for the first time in four days, but experts fear celebrations for the July 4th Independence Day weekend will act like rocket fuel for the nation's surging outbreak. Johns Hopkins University, which tallies confirmed cases, counted 45,300 new coronavirus infections in the U.S. on Saturday. The new count came after three days in which the daily count reached as high as 54,500 new cases.  The country was reporting under 20,000 new infections a day as recently as June 15.  Experts warned, however, that the lower figure on Saturday does not necessarily mean the situation in the U.S. is improving, as it could be due to reduced reporting on a national holiday. They also expect a further spike after the long weekend. The United States has the most infections and virus-related deaths in the world, with 2.8 million cases and nearly 130,000 dead, according to the university.  Yet the true toll of the pandemic is believed to be significantly higher, due to people who died before they were tested and missed...
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