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    Marios Lolos/Xinhua via ZUMA Press This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The Russian tanks and armored vehicles had barely begun to roll into Ukraine before the fossil fuel industry in the US had swung into action. A letter was swiftly dispatched to the White House, urging an immediate escalation in gas production and exports to Europe ahead of an anticipated energy crunch. The letter, dated February 25, just one day after Vladimir Putin’s forces launched their assault on Ukraine, noted the “dangerous juncture” of the moment before segueing into a list of demands: more drilling on US public lands; the swift approval of proposed gas export terminals; and pressure on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, an independent agency, to greenlight pending gas pipelines. By the winter of 2022, there should be “virtual transatlantic gas pipelines” flowing from the US to Europe, the authors envisioned. “Just weeks after those demands were laid out, President Biden was turning industry wishes into policy.” Six months on from the letter, Russia’s invasion has stalled and in places retreated,...
    In this article PXDMehmet Oz, US Republican Senate candidate for Pennsylvania, speaks during a campaign event in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, US, on Thursday, June 9, 2022.Hannah Beier | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesDr. Mehmet Oz has championed the oil and gas industry as he vies to win a coveted Senate seat in Pennsylvania. The former TV personality's vocal support for the energy business follows years of industry donations to his nonprofit and then his campaign, according to financial records reviewed by CNBC. Oz also has a personal stake in oil and gas through investments in two major energy companies, according to his financial disclosures. Pennsylvania's next senator will be a key vote for the energy industry, as it has a major presence in the Keystone State. Pennsylvania is the nation's second-largest natural gas producer after Texas and the third-largest coal producer, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Oz backed the energy industry this year as Americans felt the strain from spiking gas prices. In a recent interview, he ripped President Joe Biden after he called on companies that run...
    With the confirmation by the U.S. government that the fracking process causes earthquakes, the list of fracking's deadly byproducts is growing longer and more worrisome. And while the process produces jobs and natural gas, the host of environmental, health and safety hazards continues to make fracking a hot-button issue that evenly divides Americans. To help keep track of all the bad stuff, here's a roundup of the various nasty things that could happen when you drill a hole in the surface of the earth, inject toxic chemicals into the hole at a high pressure and then inject the wastewater deep underground. But first, let's take a look at some of the numbers: 40,000: gallons of chemicals used for each fracturing site 8 million: number of gallons of water used per fracking 600: number of chemicals used in the fracking fluid, including known carcinogens and toxins such as lead, benzene, uranium, radium, methanol, mercury, hydrochloric acid, ethylene glycol and formaldehyde 10,000: number of feet into the ground that the fracking fluid...
    What are the companies saying? Exxon Mobile explained in a statement Wednesday they have been investing in production — to the tune of $50 billion over the last five years. Importantly, Exxon Mobile also said the government plays a key role in the gas price crisis. The statement suggested the government's promises to move away from oil and gas are discouraging oil companies from further investments in oil and gas. After all, why would a business pour tens of billions of additional dollars into an industry if that investment will be worth nothing in the near future? "In the short term, the U.S. government could enact measures often used in emergencies following hurricanes or other supply disruptions — such as waivers of Jones Act provisions and some fuel specifications to increase supplies," the statement said. "Longer term, government can promote investment through clear and consistent policy that supports U.S. resource development, such as regular and predictable lease sales, as well as streamlined regulatory approval and support for infrastructure such as pipelines," the statement added. In a statement provided to...
    The White House is stepping up criticism of oil refineries, claiming they have a patriotic duty to stop "taking advantage of the war" with high prices and profits. President Joe Biden sent letters to seven large integrated refinery operators saying their profits are "not acceptable" and threatening to use emergency powers to increase refinery capacity. White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre reiterated that stance Wednesday afternoon. BIDEN GOES AFTER OIL REFINERS FOR DRIVING UP GAS PRICES "We see it as a patriotic duty," Jean-Pierre said. "There's a war happening right now in Ukraine that was caused by Russia, which is why we're seeing these hikes in gas prices, especially since Russia has started amassing troops on the border, we've seen a $2 increase in gas prices." Despite that, American oil companies have a duty to lower prices when possible, she continued, sharing a slide that showed profits and prices rising in tandem. "They have responsibilities too," Jean-Pierre said. "What they have been doing is taking advantage of the war. As I showed earlier, they...
    The American Petroleum Institute's 10-point plan urges the Biden administration to destroy federal lands and waters and exploit workers in a dying industry under the guise of "energy leadership." The same day that President Biden spoke at the AFL-CIO convention championing workers, the American Petroleum Institute (API) put out a 10-point “energy leadership” plan for the U.S. that includes nary a mention of unions, instead urging the administration to “support the training and education of a diverse workforce through increased funding of work-based learning and advancement of STEM programs to nurture the skills necessary to construct and operate oil, natural gas and other energy infrastructure.” What that looks like is unclear but it’s extremely doubtful it would be equitable or something the White House would take interest in given its own climate ambitions. API nevertheless sent a letter to Biden, also copying heads of agencies like Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm and Interior Secretary Deb Haaland. There’s nothing forward-thinking about the lobbying group’s policies, though its timing on unveiling such a plan sure is interesting given a recent information request...
    A natural gas wellhead in the rural community of Pavillion, Wyoming. Dustin Bleizeffer/AP This story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. For the past year, Roishetta Ozane has been trying to stop new liquified natural gas, or LNG, export terminals from being built in southwest Louisiana. “We are already inundated with LNG and oil and gas,” said the clean energy organizing director with Healthy Gulf, who lives in the town of Sulphur. “We’re surrounded by it.” Ozane, who lost her home to back-to-back hurricanes in 2020, was already fighting the growing number of terminals, where companies supercool and condense natural gas to load it onto specially-built tanker ships. Now, the ripple effects of Russia’s war in Ukraine are making her work even more urgent. Ozane and other climate and environmental justice advocates fear that the industry is using the war to lock in long-term sales contracts and financing for a flood of new export terminals. They say this would do little to alleviate the current energy crisis, but could push...
    London/Berlin (CNN Business)Siempelkamp Giesserei has seen its fair share of crises in its 99 years. But pandemic shutdowns, supply chain disruptions and soaring energy prices have thrown the Düsseldorf metals factory into uncharted territory. "There has never been anything like this before," Georg Geier, the company's managing director, told CNN Business. The major difference between past and present? Customer demand is high, but Siempelkamp either can't find, or can't afford, the supplies of the iron, nickel and energy it needs.It is a similar story at many of Germany's manufacturing businesses, which contribute almost a fifth of its GDP, according to the World Bank. Industry behemoths like Volkswagen (VLKAF) and Siemens (GCTAF) are grappling with supply chain bottlenecks too, but it is Germany's roughly 200,000 small and medium-sized manufacturers who are less able to withstand the shock. These companies are a vital part of the "Mittelstand," the 2.6 million small- and medium-sized enterprises that account for more than half of German economic output and nearly two-thirds of the country's jobs. Many are family-owned and deeply integrated into rural communities. A...
    Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, attends a House Energy and Commerce Committee markup in 2021. Tom Williams/Congressional Quarterly via ZUMA Press This story was originally published by the HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Executives from six major oil and gas companies testified during a congressional hearing this past week as gasoline prices neared record highs and a calamitous report on the urgency of fighting climate change was released. The hearing before a House Committee on Energy and Commerce subcommittee focused on whether the industry is prioritizing profits over increased domestic production, and lawmakers from both parties called on industry executives to get to work and boost output in order to provide relief at the pump. It was also, however, a rare opportunity for lawmakers to press major oil executives on what they are doing to combat climate change, which their industry has played an outsized role in driving. This week, a new United Nations report warned that global greenhouse gas emissions must peak no later than three years from now, then be slashed nearly in half by 2030 in order to stave off the...
    Environmental advocates and other critics of the right-wing U.S. Supreme Court were outraged Wednesday by a 5-4 decision reviving a Trump administration policy that undermines the power of states and tribes to protect water quality from energy infrastructure projects. The Supreme Court "just further poisoned your water," journalist Jordan Chariton tweeted in response to the unsigned decision, opposed by Chief Justice John Roberts and the three liberals. The contested rule about the Clean Water Act Section 401 certification process was proposed in August 2019 and finalized in June 2020, under former coal lobbyist and then-Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler. The policy—which imposes a one-year deadline for permitting decisions and limits the scope of what state and tribal officials can consider for projects like fossil fuel pipelines—was part of a wave of anti-environmental actions pursued under former President Donald Trump. Earthjustice senior attorney Moneen Nasmith—whose group challenged the rule in federal court—blasted the high court's move in a statement. "The court's decision to reinstate the Trump administration rule shows disregard for the integrity of the Clean Water Act...
    Tuesday on Fox News Channel’s “The Faulkner Focus,” Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) slammed his Democratic colleagues over their push for green energy as oil prices hold steady at record-level highs. Kennedy called on President Joe Biden “to take his boot off the throat of the oil and gas industry” to cut off Russian President Vladimir Putin’s cash flow in its invasion of Ukraine. He lamented the push for clean energy, saying that “too many” of his Democratic colleagues were “determined to win the uber-woke socialist sweepstakes.” “The president has got to take his boot off the throat of the oil and gas industry,” Kennedy emphasized. “He hasn’t. The other day, he said well, we are going to start selling more LNG to our friends in Europe. Yeah, but read the fine print. He said, but I only want to sell LNG that is produced through clean energy. I don’t know an LNG plant that runs off wind or solar, and then he said, ‘And by the way, I am not going to change the regulatory environment through which I am...
    Donald Trump drew a great deal of criticism from environmentalists and Democrats when he displayed his “Trump digs coal” signs during his 2016 presidential campaign, but one Democrat who never said anything negative about Trump’s pro-coal signs was Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia. The centrist Democrat has been a consistent defender of fossil fuels, and an article by New York Times reporters Christopher Flavelle and Julie Tate takes a look at how profitable coal has been for the 74-year-old senator over the years. Manchin, Flavelle and Tate note, earned a fortune from a plant in Grant Town, West Virginia, which is 15 miles south of the Pennsylvania state line. “Mr. Manchin’s ties to the Grant Town plant date to 1987, when he had just been elected to the West Virginia Senate, a part-time job with base pay of $6500,” the Times reporters explain. “His family’s carpet business was struggling. Opportunity arrived in the form of two developers who wanted to build a power plant in Grant Town, just outside Mr. Manchin’s district. Mr. Manchin, whose grandfather went...
    Attendees during the 2022 CERAWeek by S&P Global conference in Houston, Texas, U.S., on Wednesday, March 9, 2022.F. Carter Smith | Bloomberg | Getty Images The annual CERAWeek by S&P Global energy conference in Houston, which wrapped up Friday, could not have come at a better — or more fraught — time. Energy executives, policymakers and thousands of others gathered in Texas this week as Russia's invasion of Ukraine has thrust energy — prices, security, the transition to renewables — into the headlines, alongside the tales of human suffering. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm was a keynote speaker, and she surprised the audience with a strong call to pick up the pace of oil production. Across hundreds of panels, and between every session in the conference's halls, experts debated what happens next, and what the global energy complex should look like going forward. Should the U.S. drill more oil and gas? Does energy security mean building out renewables and moving away from dependence on hydrocarbons? Will natural gas be the bridge fuel? What role do investors play in production policies?...
    by Stephanie Catarino Wissman   Within hours of taking office on January 20, 2021, President Joe Biden signed an executive order cancelling the cross-border permit for the Keystone XL pipeline as part of a plan to phase out natural gas and oil, eliminating thousands of family-sustaining jobs. At the same time, the Biden administration promised plenty of “good-paying” positions would be available in the renewable energy sector. But the reality is that natural gas and oil jobs don’t easily transfer to the renewables sector, as a new analysis by Cicero, in coordination with North America’s Building Trades Unions (NABTU) and American Petroleum Institute (API), shows. Careers in the natural gas and oil industry pay seven times the federal minimum wage and over 70 percent more than the average U.S. job, one of the factors making transferability both unreasonable and economically unsustainable for families. The analysis found that only two of the 18 most common natural gas and oil jobs are reasonably transferable to the 18 most in-demand renewable energy jobs. Painting industry jobs with a broad brush fails to consider how skills, education,...
    Several groups concerned with the environment are asking California to stop sending subsidies to dairy farms who are turning “animal waste into a form of energy called biogas” to sell to fossil fuel companies. The policy has been in effect since 2011 and was intended to recycle waste and help the fossil fuel industry reduce their emissions. Critics argue, however, that it will incentivize factory farms to expand to produce more waste, which will ultimately end up creating more pollution. Although it’s also been shown that the profits would come from subsidies and grants from the government, rather than from fossil fuel companies, because of the cost of producing gas from the animals. Phoebe Seaton, from the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability, acknowledges the dangers of sending more money into an industry that is already fueling a plethora of our environmental problems. “The revenue from the low carbon fuel standard-related subsidies is actually driving this ongoing intensification of the dairy industry and intensifies local impacts.” The biogas industry is projected to grow into an enormous industry and California...
    President Joe Biden publicly announced today that the U.S. will release 50 million barrels of crude oil (a half a day’s worth of global crude oil consumption) from its Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The White House as has been signaling its intention to do this for the last several weeks, allowing enough time for the event to be priced into the market.  But yesterday, in reaction to the official announcement, WTI crude oil on the NYMEX settled 2.3% higher at a five-session high of $78.50 per barrel.  All told, the SPR release, coordinated among the U.S., India, China, Japan, South Korea, and the United Kingdom, is a short-term scheme for the White House to give the appearance that it is addressing rising prices. It is for optics only and it smells of political desperation. Let us keep in mind that the SPR was created in response to the Arab oil embargo in 1973. The SPR was NOT created to bolster sagging poll numbers. President Biden's scheme to address rising gas prices is for optics only and it smells of political...
    Eleven U.S. Senate Democrats have called on President Joe Biden to do something about rising gas prices while also expressing support for policies that energy industry says are contributing to seven-year high costs at the pump, including oil and gas tax increases embedded in the Build Back Better Act. The 11 senators wrote this month that they support the president’s commitment to the development of “clean renewable energy” but “must ensure that Americans are able to afford to fill up their cars at the pump in the meantime.” The average cost for a gallon of gasoline Friday was $3.41 a gallon, according to AAA. That's $1.20 more a gallon than this time last year. Under the Trump administration, the U.S. led the world in oil production and was energy independent. Under the Biden administration, gas prices are the highest they’ve been since 2014 within eleven months of him taking office. In their home states, the Democratic senators write, “high gasoline prices have placed an undue burden on families and small businesses trying to make ends meet, and have proven especially...
    "The way we basically get rid of those carbon financiers is we starve them of their sources of capital," she said at a virtual roundtable on "investment and decarbonization," again hosted by the Jain Family Institute. Investment and Decarbonization www.youtube.com Why does it matter?The unearthed videos are not good news for Omorova's chances at confirmation. With all 50 Republicans expected to oppose her nomination, the 55-year-old Cornell Law professor needed unanimous support from Democrats in the chamber. But Axios reported over the weekend that at least three Democrats — Sens. Jon Tester (D., Mont.), Kyrsten Sinema (D., Ariz.), and Joe Manchin (D., W.Va.) — have raised concerns over her nomination. Speaking with the Daily Caller, AAF founder Thomas Jones said, "I just don't understand how the White House is going to go explain this to the Jon Testers or the Joe Manchins of the world, that she wants to bankrupt employers who employ a significant number of the constituents in their state. I think it's unconscionable." "At the end of the day, these are people's lives, people are...
    Aberdeen, Scotland (CNN Business)The people who made their fortunes in the oil capital of Europe need a new plan. For decades, Aberdeen, a port city on Scotland's northeast coast, has served as the commercial gateway to the North Sea, where powerful companies have navigated deep and dangerous waters to extract tens of billions of barrels of crude. But the basin isn't what it used to be, even with oil back above $80 per barrel. Production has been on the decline since the turn of the century. Downturns caused by twin price shocks — one in 2015 and one triggered by the Covid-19 pandemic — are harrowing reminders of what happens when a boom turns bust.Then there's the COP26 climate summit in the Scottish city of Glasgow, which kicks off Sunday. The United Nations and partner scientists have delivered a clear message: The world needs to "immediately and steeply" cut back on fossil fuel production to maintain a livable planet. Attention is focused on huge energy producers like Saudi Arabia, Russia and the United States and top consumers like China and...
    Christopher Pike/Bloomberg/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Plastics are everywhere. From the stomachs of deep-sea fish to human feces, Arctic snow to gusts of wind in the remote wilderness, the oil and gas byproduct has, barely a century after it was first synthesized in a laboratory, become a ubiquitous feature of virtually every ecosystem on Earth and every aspect of modern life. It’s also playing a key role in permanently changing the climate of the planet it has come to dominate. Plastics already produce 3.8 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions throughout their lifecycle, roughly double the planet-heating pollution spewed by airplanes. By the end of this decade, the plastics industry in the United States alone is on pace to eclipse the carbon footprint of the country’s remaining coal-fired power plants, according to a new analysis from Bennington College’s Beyond Plastics think tank. Newly compiled data on the 10 stages of plastic production, usage and disposal show the U.S. plastics...
    Sen. Joe Manchin discusses his budget agenda with reporters on Capitol Hill, September 30, 2021.J Scott Applewhite/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. In the tumult of negotiations over the most consequential climate legislation ever proposed in the US, there is growing scrutiny of the fossil fuel industry connections of the man poised to tear down the core of the bill—the West Virginia senator Joe Manchin. Manchin, a centrist Democrat, has objected to key provisions of a multitrillion-dollar reconciliation bill that would slash planet-heating emissions and help the US, and the world, to avert catastrophic climate breakdown. In a finely balanced Senate, Democrats need all 50 of their senators to vote for the bill, with no Republicans willing to vote for the climate measures. Guardian graphic. Source: OpenSecrets. Note: Data as of July 16, 2021. The legislation would steadily retire the coal industry that once formed the backbone of the West Virginia economy...
    STAVANGER, Norway (AP) — North Sea oil and gas has helped make Norway one of the wealthiest countries in the world. But as Norwegians head to the polls on Monday, fears about climate change have put the future of the industry at the top of the campaign agenda. The ruling Conservatives, led by Prime Minister Erna Solberg, and the opposition Labor Party, which is leading in opinion polls, both advocate for a gradual move away from the fossil fuels that continue to underpin the economy. But the larger parties rarely rule alone in Norway; smaller players are usually required to build a majority coalition, and they can have an outsize influence on the government agenda. Some are demanding a more radical severing with the country’s dominant industry and income stream. “Our demand is to stop looking for oil and gas, and stop handing out new permits to companies,” says Lars Haltbrekken, climate and energy spokesman for the Socialist Left party — a likely coalition partner for Labor. He claims that after eight years in charge the government is protecting a...
    VIDEO3:3003:30JBS: Majority of North American plants will be operational Wednesday after cyberattackSquawk Box Cybersecurity is a topic that often fails to get the attention of the public until a headline hits about a company that has their personal information, including credit card and Social Security numbers, being the victim of a hack. But over the past month, a different threat has taken precedence that goes much deeper into the psyche, and everyday lives, of Americans: ransomware attacks that take down major energy and food supply infrastructure and raise fears about being able to buy key consumer commodities like gas and meat at affordable prices. A month ago, the hack of the Colonial Pipeline, which controls 45% of fuel in the Eastern U.S., led to panic buying of gas. This week's ransomware attack on the world's biggest meat processing company, JBS, escalated concerns about the potential for a spike in meat prices and food supply as a national security threat. These cyberattacks have evolved beyond theft of data to physical assets with consumer impacts. Hackers often encrypt data on systems...
    Despite being touted as the ultimate 'green' crop, cannabis is having a major impact on the environment, a new study suggest. Researches at Colorado State University found in Colorado that growing the drug indoors produces more than 30 percent more greenhouse gases than the state's coal mining industry. The team found that the larger carbon foot print is due to plants requiring a lot of energy, such as high-powered lighting and climate-control systems. Although the drug is legal recreationally in 15 US states, many have banned outdoor growing and many keep plants inside to ward off thieves – resulting in a large amount of energy consumption needed to keep them alive.  Scroll down for video Most state where weed is legal require cannabis to be grown indoors. That requires a lot of energy for grow lights and environmental controls, which is generating a lot of greenhouse gases Colorado residents voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2012. By 2017, the state government was collecting more than $247 million in taxes, licensing fees from the crop. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1...
    In order to help guarantee the supply of electricity in the face of the effects of a lack of natural gas in the north of the country, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador called on the population to reduce consumption between 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. Meanwhile, the Mexican Association of the Automotive Industry (AMIA) reported staggered and even definitive stoppages in five states and in a letter asked the government to guarantee electricity and industrial gas in order to maintain investments. During his conference at the National Palace, López Obrador admitted that he did not ask before to reduce consumption because he did not want to generate alarm and to avoid attacks by his opponents. “It will help a lot if we all participate and that we can, in these peak hours, lower our consumption… from 6 to 11, is what I would propose, because it will help in any circumstance. « Telling the Mexicans to help us, I did not want to do it from the beginning because we have all the pressure from our adversaries … (and) a greater...
    On Tuesday’s broadcast of the Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends,” Rep.-elect Yvette Herrell (R-NM) stated that 2020 Democratic presidential nominee former Vice President Joe Biden’s comments about the oil and gas industry “really got people out to the polls.” Because of the importance of the energy industry to New Mexico. Herrell said talking about defunding the police “just doesn’t work. Because we already know their departments are stressed. They’re understaffed, under-budgeted. But the oil and gas situation really got people out to the polls. Because that is such a huge part of New Mexico industries. That’s our largest industry.” She added, “We’re very much a pro-life, pro-God, pro-business, pro-family district, and the values that Nancy brings to Washington, D.C. are her own, and they are not conducive, they don’t mesh well with a lot of the districts throughout the state — or throughout the country.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
            by Bethany Blankley  Both Republicans and Democrats are pushing back on comments Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden made about “transitioning away” from the oil industry. At the presidential debate Thursday night, Biden said, “I would transition away from the oil industry, yes. The oil industry pollutes, significantly. It has to be replaced by renewable energy over time.” Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, replied, tweeting, “Biden wants to ‘transition’ away from the oil industry. He just killed paycheck[s] earned by hardworking families in Texas. Joe just wants to transition away from Texas. Remember that on election day.” While Texas’ governor pushed back against Biden’s comments, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham seems to embrace them. New Mexico, the third largest oil-producing state in the U.S., accounts for more than 30 percent of onshore natural gas production in the U.S. and nearly 60 percent of all onshore oil production. But Lujan Grisham, for at least the second time during the campaign, plans to join an event Thursday being held by “Clean Energy for Biden.” “Joe Biden...
    CENTERVILLE, Pennsylvania — Bill Nichols does not work in oil and gas. But almost all the customers at his feed and garden supplies store do. “The companies buy a lot of grass seed, topsoil, and hand tools to work with,” he said as he tucked into his breakfast of eggs, bacon, a biscuit, and gravy at the Chuck Wagon diner. “About every business here owes their existence to oil and gas.” The trucks parked outside the Chuck Wagon as the sun rises above the Pennsylvania hills are a sign that this is energy country. It was coal country until the mines closed. Now, it is fracking country, dotted with wells that use the new technology to force gas out of shale deposits and up to the surface. Washington County, just outside Pittsburgh, was once blue-collar, union Democrat country. But in 2016, about 60% of voters went for Donald Trump, not far off the proportion that voted for Barack Obama in 2008. That flip, in concert with a slew of other rural counties, helped Trump win Pennsylvania by about 44,000 votes....
    During the second and final 2020 presidential debate on Thursday, Joe Biden made a stunning promise to “transition from the oil industry.” “Would he close down the oil industry?” Trump asked. “Would you close down the oil industry?” “I would transition from the oil industry, yes,” responded Biden, who later added that the oil industry “has to be replaced by renewable energy over time.” Biden’s plan to replace America’s massive oil industry with much more expensive, much less reliable wind and solar generation is, on its own, a remarkable and radical promise that proves Biden’s commitment to far-left, wildly misguided environmental groups is much stronger than his dedication to the millions of people who depend on the affordable energy created by oil or the jobs the oil industry supports. LIZ PEEK: WINNERS AND LOSERS AT FINAL PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE – WHAT THE TRUMP, BIDEN SCORECARD LOOKS LIKE NOW But make no mistake about it, Biden’s proposal to eventually eliminate the oil sector is just the tip of the iceberg. By the time Biden’s first term is over, should he win in...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will ban the sale of new gasoline-powered passenger cars and trucks in 15 years, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday, establishing a timeline in the nation’s most populous state that could force U.S. automakers to shift their zero-emission efforts into overdrive. The plan won’t stop people from owning gas-powered cars or selling them on the used car market. But in 2035 it would end the sale of all new such vehicles in the state of nearly 40 million people that accounts for more than one out of every 10 new cars sold in the U.S.More Stories: – Wildfires taint West Coast vineyards with taste of smoke – California ban on fracking by 2024 criticized as too late – Utility equipment eyed as possible source of fire near LA California would be the first state with such a mandate while at least 15 other countries have already made similar commitments, including Germany, France and Norway. Newsom used the hood of a red, electric-powered Ford Mustang Mach-E to sign an executive order directing state regulators to develop...
    New York (CNN Business)IBM's next big bet is ... the oil industry.In partnership with oilfield services giant Schlumberger (SLB), IBM will create a digital platform where oil and gas companies can access real-time data and software give them a competitive advantage.The platform will layer Schlumberger's suite of apps, called DELFI, onto IBM technology to provide digital tools to oil and gas companies — which rely heavily on computing-heavy processes like surveying a drilling site. The software could, for example, help determine if the soil and landscape in a certain area are good for drilling, or which angle is the best to drill to access the most oil over time. "Digital has become an imperative for our industry," Schlumberger CEO Olivier Le Peuch told CNN Business. "The whole industry recognizes that this is what can unlock the next level of efficiency, productivity and performance."A tech platform for oil and gasRead MoreThe Schlumberger partnership is part of IBM's big bet on "hybrid cloud" — a technical setup that lets companies manage data using multiple clouds in addition to their own on-premises servers....
    As the coronavirus pandemic contributes to a glut of fossil fuels, groups like Greenpeace are calling on Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden to ban fossil fuel interests from his campaign and administration, if he wins, even as he recently declared at a campaign stop that he “will not ban fracking.” We discuss the politics of fossil fuels with reporter Antonia Juhasz, who says the end of oil could be near, and look at how the industry has profited from the COVID bailout. “The pandemic has taken essentially every weakness that already existed in the oil industry and then made each of them much, much worse, leaving the oil industry in a situation where I would argue it is at its weakest since its inception,” she says. This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. AMY GOODMAN: Longtime Massachusetts senator and Green New Deal champion Ed Markey won his primary against challenger Congressmember Joe Kennedy III Tuesday, marking a victory for progressives and the first time a Kennedy has lost an election in the state...
    (Bloomberg) – Efforts by US President Donald Trump and the world’s largest oil producers to prop up crude prices have failed to stem a barrage of bankruptcies in the industry, with more to come. The devastating effects of the covid-19 pandemic on the oil market is spreading throughout the supply chain, from explorers to companies that provide workers and equipment. London-based Valaris Plc, owner of the world’s largest fleet of offshore platforms, became the latest victim on Wednesday. In North America alone, dozens of oilfield producers and service providers have gone bankrupt in 2020, and Mizuho Securities USA predicted earlier this year that up to 70% of U.S. shale producers could go bankrupt. . Crude prices surpassed a free fall following an agreement by OPEC and its allies, pushed by Trump, to reduce production. But after embarking on aggressive growth plans when crude was trading above $ 100 a barrel a few years ago, the industry is still grappling with a crushing debt load, and demand for oil and petroleum products remains very strong. below normal as nations struggle to...
    LONDON (AP) - Energy company BP said Monday that its global workforce will be trimmed by 10,000 jobs as the COVID-19 pandemic slams the oil and gas industry. Chief Executive Bernard Looney said that the roles will be office-based and come mostly this year. The company’s current global workforce is 70,000. The changes are expected to significantly impact senior levels, cutting the number of group leaders by a third. The company said it will make the senior structure flatter. TOP STORIES Abraham Lincoln monument torched in Chicago: An absolute disgraceful act Bigger than life: George Floyd known for big heart, good works, struggles with drugs, crime Lincoln Memorial, WWII Memorial defaced by vandals in rioting The job cuts come amid a time of tremendous change for BP. The energy producer has said it wants to eliminate or offset all carbon emissions from its operations and the oil and gas it sells to customers by 2050, an ambitious target born out of pressure to help combat climate change and keep making money. The global energy industry has meanwhile been hit...
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