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    Mohammed Abdelsalam remembers the scene as a war zone. The 32-year-old asylum seeker from Egypt said that he and other detainees were peacefully protesting ongoing lockdowns at the Adelanto ICE Processing Facility near Victorville earlier this month when more than a dozen guards in riot gear shot pepper bullets and pepper spray at them. The chemical irritant instantly caused his eyes to blur and his throat to close up. Abdelsalam, who has asthma, said he had to be taken to the facility’s medical center and given oxygen. “I lost my breath and almost passed away,” he said. “My heart almost stopped.” Alexx Pons, a spokesman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said that the incident occurred when more than 150 detainees became disruptive and refused directives from staff, necessitating “the use of non-lethal force to preserve order” after attempts at deescalation were unsuccessful. Detainees paint a different picture of what happened. Abdelsalam and others said the facility had been under lockdown since June 7, when protesters damaged several vehicles in the parking lot and broke...
    SAINT LUIS – President Donald Trump on Tuesday visited the United States border with Mexico and tried to attribute the containment of illegal immigration and the coronavirus to his new wall. However, his visit took place the same day that public health officials testified in Washington about the current threat from COVID-19 and pointed to Arizona as one of the states with growth in the number of cases. In the scorching summer heat, Trump made a brief stopover to inspect a new section of the wall, a reinforced concrete structure, where he and other officials wrote their signatures. “It stopped COVID, it stopped everything,” Trump said. Antonia Mejia details the issues that the President addressed during his visit to Phoenix. Trump is trying to regain momentum for his campaign after his weekend rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, which was meant to be a sign of the nation’s reopening and a display of political strength, but instead had thousands of empty seats. and raised numerous doubts about the leadership of the President’s campaign and his arguments for remaining four...
    The decision has has larger implications for nondiscrimination protections beyond the workplace, in housing, education, and health care. LGBTQ groups that are already suing the Trump administration to stop the elimination of protections for LGBTQ people in health care say the Supreme Court decision in Bostock bolsters their case. In the second case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California against the Department of Homeland Security's attempt to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which provides protections for undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children. Under the program, recipients are granted renewable two-year periods of deferred action on deportation and are eligible to receive a work permit. The court's decision on the DACA program was based on procedural issues. U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court: "We do not decide whether DACA or its rescission are sound policies. ... We address only whether the agency complied with the procedural requirement that it provide a reasoned explanation for its action." In ruling that...
    By ASTRID GALVAN and DEB RIECHMANN PHOENIX (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday he will renew his effort to end legal protections for hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought to the United States as children. Trump denounced a Supreme Court ruling that the administration improperly ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in 2017. Splitting with Trump and judicial conservatives, Chief Justice John Roberts joined the four liberal justices in the 5-4 vote Thursday. Through executive action, Trump could still take away the ability of 650,000 young immigrants to live and work legally in the U.S. And with no legislative answer in sight in Congress, uncertainty continues for many immigrants who know no other home except America. In a tweet Friday, Trump said, “The Supreme Court asked us to resubmit on DACA, nothing was lost or won. They ‘punted,’ much like in a football game (where hopefully they would stand for our great American Flag). We will be submitting enhanced papers shortly.” Many believe Trump could modify the rescinding of DACA in the same way he changed a...
    WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump says he will renew his administration's effort to end legal protections for young immigrants after Supreme Court blocked the first try. In a tweet Friday morning, Trump said, “The Supreme Court asked us to resubmit on DACA, nothing was lost or won. They “punted”, much like in a football game (where hopefully they would stand for our great American Flag). We will be submitting enhanced papers shortly.” THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s previous story follows below. The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld legal protections for young immigrants, but President Donald Trump could still take away the ability for hundreds of thousands of them to live and work legally in the United States. With no legislative answer in sight, that means the uncertainty of the last eight years isn't over for many who know of nowhere else as home. Activists are vowing to keep fighting for a long-term solution for 650,000 immigrants who were brought to the country as children. They face a White House that's prioritized immigration restrictions and a divided Congress...
    By MARK SHERMAN WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trump’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, the second stunning election-season rebuke from the court in a week after its ruling that it’s illegal to fire people because they’re gay or transgender. Immigrants who are part of the 8-year-old Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program will retain their protection from deportation and their authorization to work in the United States — safe almost certainly at least through the November election, immigration experts said. The 5-4 outcome, in which Chief Justice John Roberts and the four liberal justices were in the majority, seems certain to elevate the issue in Trump’s campaign, given the anti-immigrant rhetoric of his first presidential run in 2016 and immigration restrictions his administration has imposed since then. The justices said the administration did not take the proper steps to end DACA, rejecting arguments that the program is illegal and that courts have no role to play in reviewing the decision to end it. The program covers people who have been...
    DOWNTOWN — Chicago’s DACA recipients and advocates are celebrating a victory over President Donald Trump — but are also keeping up work on advocating for immigrants. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday morning the Trump administration cannot immediately end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, a policy from former President Barack Obama that granted amnesty to roughly 700,000 people. The program protects people from being deported if they are undocumented but came to the United States as young children. For people to be eligible for the program, they must meet certain requirements, like not having been convicted of a felony. The ruling “reaffirmed the future” for many DACA recipients, Mayor Lori Lightfoot said in a statement. Lightfoot said she remains committed to supporting immigrant communities and working to ensure their “rightful place” in the United States. “Here in Chicago, we will always champion the contributions our immigrant and refugee communities have made throughout the life of our city — DACA or otherwise — and continue to make every single day,” she said. Lightfoot became emotional during a morning press conference...
    Just weeks after Democratic primary voters ousted an Ohio sheriff who for years collaborated with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), another sheriff with ties to the mass deportation agency is out of a job. The Appeal reports Athens-Clarke County, Georgia sheriff Ira Edwards lost the Democratic primary to challenger John Williams, who ran on a platform of no longer honoring ICE’s unlawful detainers. “Edwards, the incumbent, had come under fire from immigrants’ rights advocates for agreeing to honor so-called ICE detainers,” the report said. “These are warrantless requests that a sheriff’s department voluntarily keep people detained in jail beyond their scheduled release to give federal agents more time to come and claim custody.” The Appeal reports that Edwards announced in 2018 that he would no longer honor ICE’s demands, criticized by local advocates like Athens Immigrant Rights Coalition for helping ICE with its mass deportation efforts. But, “At the time, advocates told the local press that they did not trust that Edwards would maintain that policy given some of his other statements,” the report said. “Williams, who works as a detective in the Athens police department, met with immigrants’ rights advocates...
    PHOENIX (AP) — Among the thousands who march each day in support of the Black Lives Matter movement are immigrants and their advocates. But protesting for them has an added risk: inadvertently winding up in immigration custody. All over the country, immigrants are expressing solidarity with the movement that has taken off since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The same organizations that advocate for migrant rights are lending their support to Black Lives Matter, and many feel compelled to also march, often saying they relate to the struggle black people face with punitive policing and racism. But with the deployment of federal immigration authorities to marches around the country, and with the existing relationships many local jails have with them, even marching peacefully — or in some cases, being at the wrong place at the wrong time — can upend someone’s life as they know it in the U.S. At least four immigrants were arrested by Phoenix police as marches were beginning to take hold. Three of the four are protected through the Deferred Action...
    The Government Accountability Office dinged Homeland Security’s border agency Thursday for misspending some of the money Congress approved last year to handle thew surge of illegal immigrant families, saying spending should have gone for medical care or food, not dirt bikes or security cameras. GAO said it came across the problem while investigating how Customs and Border Protection handled the surge, which saw hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrant parents and children rush north from Central America, overwhelming the border. Congress, after fighting for weeks over blame, passed a bill with $112 million in emergency funding to be used on “consumables and medical care,” and another $708 million to be spent on “migrant care and processing.” TOP STORIES Jeffries, Bongino clash over Black lives matter slogan Mass. college deeply sorry for letting police officers use restroom: It will not happen again Bigger than life: George Floyd known for big heart, good works, struggles with drugs, crime GAO investigators said Thursday that CBP spent some of the medical and consumables money on things that didn’t actually qualify. “CBP obligated the...
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