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    New Tennessee Attorney General Jonathan Skrmetti joined Dan Mandis on Nashville’s Morning News, broadcast weekday mornings on Nashville radio station 99.7 WTN to discuss Vanderbilt University’s transgender surgeries on minors, America’s fentanyl crisis, and Title IX gender identity executive order. Mandis: Going to go right to the newsmaker hotline and welcome into the program the new Tennessee Attorney General Jonathan Skrmetti. Jonathan, how are you? Skrmetti: Great, Dan. How are you? Mandis: I’m good. So I appreciate you joining us. You have been a very busy man. You just were sworn in on September 1, so about what, three weeks ago? Skrmetti: Yes, it’s three weeks today. Mandis: So you’ve seemingly done a lot in the last couple of weeks, so you definitely hit the ground running. I want to ask you, first of all, just here in the last couple of days, this Vanderbilt story blew up. Matt Walsh and The Daily Wire, they were just on here in one of the previous segments exposing Vanderbilt University Medical Center of gender mutilation with trans surgeries on minors. Governor Lee...
    Live from Music Row, Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed all-star panelist Aaron Gulbransen in-studio to comment upon recent public statements made by newly elected Tennessee Attorney General Jonathan Skrmetti regarding Title IX and redefining the word “sex.” Leahy: In-studio with us, the official guest host of The Tennessee Star Report, all-star panelist, and now the Tennessee State Director for the Faith and Freedom Coalition. You know, Aaron, you look at this and the country, the state, and we are not at the apex of the constitutional republic. We are, I think, kind of approaching the nadir. Nadir – that’s the bottom, I think, is kind of where we are. I think we will start moving back up eight weeks from today when, if it turns out, as we think, that the Republicans will take back the House. That will be the beginning of a long road back. But wait, we’ve already started a road back here in...
    by Greg Piper   From the feminist Women’s Liberation Front to the conservative Child & Parental Rights Campaign and Parents Defending Education, groups opposing the Biden administration’s proposal to redefine sex as “gender identity” are urging supporters to file comments in the Title IX regulatory proceeding before it closes Monday. An 18-month-old nonprofit unexpectedly joined their ranks last week: the Foundation Against Intolerance and Racism (FAIR), cofounded by black intellectuals including Columbia University’s John McWhorter and Brown University’s Glenn Loury, which fights identity politics in education and government and has focused mainly on race. FAIR urged the Department of Education to refrain from decisions “better left to institutions or through the democratic process” in a Sept. 6 public comment, saying the feds’ proposal “would dramatically alter the nature of Title IX” by requiring schools to “multiply or refashion all of their sex-segregated facilities, to a degree that is cost-prohibitive and unmanageable.” The foundation is also challenging the administration’s proposal to lower the bar for discrimination investigations and remove due process protections accorded to accused students in sexual misconduct proceedings under its predecessor’s Title IX rulemaking two years ago. Polling suggests the...
    Kristin Murphy/Deseret News/AP Facts matter: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter. Support our nonprofit reporting. Subscribe to our print magazine.Nearly two years since former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos implemented controversial rules for America’s schools that lessened their responsibility to respond to sexual harassment against students, the Biden administration on Thursday unveiled a new set of proposed rules that would expand protections for student survivors of sexual assault and other kinds of sex-based discrimination under Title IX, the federal law requiring gender equity in education. The proposed regulations would protect LGBTQ students by clarifying that the Title IX ban on sex-based discrimination includes sexual orientation and gender identity. Among other top-line changes, the proposal would roll back a DeVos-era move that narrowed the definition of sexual harassment, and would expand the obligation of schools to investigate reports of sexual assault involving students off-campus. Schools would no longer be required to hold live hearings in which students who say they were sexually assaulted could be cross-examined. “As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of this landmark law, our proposed changes will allow...
    On a scorching June afternoon, historic Wrigley Field served as a fitting backdrop. Chicago Cubs co-owner Laura Ricketts holds a rare position within men’s professional sports leagues. She is one of a few women currently at the ownership level. And as chairman of the board for Cubs Charities, Ricketts has witnessed firsthand how sports can have an impact on communities. Although she didn’t grow up with aspirations of a career in sports, Ricketts says she was the best athlete in her family. “My brothers would probably disagree about that, but my mom will not disagree. She knows,” Ricketts said with a smile during a recent interview with the Tribune. “So that was my thing.” Born five years before Title IX passed in 1972, Ricketts was among the first generation of girls to benefit from the amendment, which included opportunities in sports. She recalled playing T-ball at 5 years old, and by the time she reached high school, volleyball, softball, basketball and track filled up her calendar. Recently she has started playing tennis with her wife, Brooke. “It’s hard to overstate...
    Commentary on Pac-12 developments on and off the court … Falling: NBA Draft outlook The Pac-12 has one first-round lock this evening at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, Arizona wing Bennedict Mathurin — he’s a likely Lottery Pick and could go in the top five — plus a handful of players considered potential late-round options. Another Wildcat wing, Dalen Terry, is atop that list, followed by UCLA wing Peyton Watson, Arizona big man Christian Koloko and Colorado forward Jabari Walker. (Two well-known players, UCLA wing Johnny Juzang and USC big man Isaiah Mobley, are not viewed as first-round material, but we’re hesitant to completely dismiss Mobley’s chances given his 6-foot-10 frame and 3-point touch.) In other words, the conference isn’t exactly oozing high-end talent. That existence should come as little surprise to anyone who followed the Pac-12 closely last season and must change in order for the conference to regain its position as one of the top basketball leagues in the land. If you’re scoring at home this evening, know this: Not since the 2010 draft, following one of the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Biden administration proposes new Title IX sexual assault rules, expanding protection for LGBTQ students and for victims. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    On a scorching June afternoon, historic Wrigley Field served as a fitting backdrop. Chicago Cubs co-owner Laura Ricketts holds a rare position within men’s professional sports leagues. She is one of a few women currently at the ownership level. And as chairman of the board for Cubs Charities, Ricketts has witnessed firsthand how sports can have an impact on communities. Although she didn’t grow up with aspirations of a career in sports, Ricketts says she was the best athlete in her family. “My brothers would probably disagree about that, but my mom will not disagree. She knows,” Ricketts said with a smile during a recent interview with the Tribune. “So that was my thing.” Born five years after Title IX passed in 1972, Ricketts was among the first generation of girls to benefit from the amendment, which included opportunities in sports. She recalled playing T-ball at 5 years old, and by the time she reached high school, volleyball, softball, basketball and track filled up her calendar. Recently she has started playing tennis with her wife, Brooke. “It’s hard to overstate...
    The 50th anniversary of Title IX has sparked celebration and reflection across college sports. For the Hotline, the moment in time offers an opportunity for prognostication, as well. For all the benefits created by the groundbreaking civil rights legislation, which became the law of the land on June 23, 1972, the next chapter in the evolution of equity is vital, as well. And it comes as a monumental shift unfolds across college sports: Name, image and likeness has changed recruiting and the allocation of resources. The Supreme Court’s ruling on educational benefits could lead to athletes being declared employees. The NCAA is rewriting its constitution to provide the Power Five with greater autonomy. More men are coaching women’s sports, yet the number of female athletic directors across Division I remains embarrassingly low. To address the current state and future direction of Title IX, the Hotline reached out to four leaders in college sports: — Washington athletic director Jen Cohen — Pac-12 deputy commissioner Teresa Gould — West Coast Conference commissioner Gloria Nevarez — Women Leaders in College Sports chief executive...
    Title IX, the law best known for its role in gender equity in athletics and preventing sexual harassment on campuses, is turning 50. It was signed into law by President Richard Nixon on June 23, 1972, after being shepherded through Congress in part by Rep. Patsy Mink, a Democrat from Hawaii who was the first woman of color elected to the U.S. House. The law forbids discrimination based on sex in education, and despite its age remains a vital piece in the ongoing push for equality, including in the LGBTQ community. WHAT DOES TITLE IX SAY? The statue itself is one sentence long. “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” Translation: The law is meant to ensure equity between men and women in education, and it’s broad, covering most K-12 schools and colleges and universities, as well as vocational schools, libraries and museums. That means it applies to tens...
    LOS ANGELES -- With over a billion streams to date, Sofia Carson has carved out her own distinct path in music, film, television and philanthropy.Known for her starring roles in "Descendants," "Feel the Beat," "Pretty Little Liars: The Perfectionists" and Michael Bay's "Songbird," she's earned a number of award nominations including Teen Choice Awards and Radio Disney Music Awards. Carson has performed at high-profile events like the 2020 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and launched her own makeup collection with Revlon, where she's a global brand ambassador.A devoted philanthropist, she is a U.S. Ambassador for UNICEF, the first global ambassador of the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation, a member of the first-ever Ambassadors Council for The Music Forward Foundation and an honorary board member of We Do it Together, a nonprofit production company dedicated to the empowerment of women.Carson has always had a love for storytelling through music and film and hopes that every song and role she plays has the power to impact audiences, especially young girls. Her song "Loud" was released in early 2022 and has already had a massive...
    On June 23, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 will turn 50.The landmark civil rights law's famous first 37 words prohibit sex-based discrimination at educational institutions that receive money from the United States Department of Education. Those institutions include more than 5,000 colleges, universities, vocational schools and trade schools, along with more than 17,000 local school districts.Title IX, as the law is more commonly called, is widely known for its strides toward gender equity for women and girls who play sports. However, the law also protects students from sex-based discrimination in other areas, including: Financial assistance Recruitment Admissions Sexual harassment, assault, and violence Treatment of pregnant or parenting students Treatment of LGBTQI+ students Discipline Employment There have been amendments to the law since its passing in 1972. Among the most recent changes, a federal judge struck down Trump-era provisions of Title IX that required accusers or the accused in sexual assault grievances to be cross-examined to make their cases.The Biden administration has announced that it will propose more amendments to Title IX by April...
    (CNN)Three graduate students in Harvard University's anthropology department are suing the school, claiming it failed to protect students from sexual abuse and career-ending retaliation by a professor, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday.The plaintiffs, Margaret Czerwienski, Lilia Kilburn and Amulya Mandava, allege that John Comaroff, a professor of African and African American Studies and of Anthropology, "kissed and groped students without their consent, made unwelcome sexual advances, and threatened to sabotage students' careers if they complained," according to the lawsuit.The lawsuit further says that the university's failure to act on reports of harassment by the professor demonstrates an "institutional policy of indifference: a system designed to protect the University, its reputation, and the faculty who sustain that reputation at the expense of its students."The plaintiffs are seeking compensatory and punitive damages to be decided by a jury trial, as well as attorney fees, according to the lawsuit.In a statement to CNN, Harvard University said they dispute the allegations in the lawsuit, which they say are "in no way a fair or accurate representation of the thoughtful steps taken by the...
    With new research arguing transgender women athletes hold a competitive edge over biologically female competitors, an Olympic gold medalist and Title IX advocate on Tuesday called for policies to protect fairness and safety in female sports. "I’ve been working with other elite women athletes and researchers and even the International Olympic Committee to get them to reevaluate their quick judgment on promoting a policy that really is unfair for the safety and promotion of women sports in that category," Donna de Varona, 1964 Olympics gold medalist in swimming, told "America Reports." TRANS WOMEN ATHLETES HOLD COMPETITIVE EDGE, EVEN AFTER TESTOSTERONE SUPPRESSION, SCIENTISTS SAY Transgender women athletes who went through typical male puberty during adolescence still hold a competitive edge over their biologically female competitors, and one year of testosterone suppression therapy as required by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) isn’t enough to ensure fairness in women’s sports, some scientists argue. The scientific community is conflicted over the issue of fairness in women’s sports as trans athletes like University of Pennsylvania swimmer Lia Thomas make headlines for dominating on women’s teams. Women’s...
    The Hotline mailbag typically publishes on Friday, with an exception this week. Send questions to [email protected] or hit me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline. Due to volume — and in some cases, the need for research — not all questions will be answered the week of submission. Thanks for understanding. Note: Some questions have been edited for clarity or brevity. Title IX was intended to provide equal opportunity for females to participate in college athletics. An admirable goal no doubt. But did not the goal of equality vanish with the determination to include football scholarships in the calculus? — Jon Joseph Two things are equally true: Title IX has made college athletics a better place; and the inclusion of football in application of the law greatly complicates the situation. On the football piece, we find a divergence between the letter of the law and the on-the-ground reality. According to the NCAA’s website: “Title IX does not require reductions in opportunities for male student-athletes. One of the purposes is to create the same opportunity and quality of treatment for both female and...
    US is falling further behind China and Europe in electric vehicle production 10 Productivity Tips From Elon Musk That Can Put You on the Road to Success BATON ROUGE, La. — LSU football coach Ed Orgeron's involvement in the Title IX lawsuit against LSU's handling of rape and domestic abuse has intensified, according to an amended class action complaint related to the original Title IX lawsuit against LSU filed in April. Most Comfortable Shoes: "These Shoes Are Like Walking On Clouds" Ad Microsoft Don’t Borrow From The Bank - Borrow From Yourself Ad Microsoft Refinance rates at 1.99% APR. Calculate your rate now. Ad Microsoft ...
    Police to provide more information on California shooting that left four dead, including a child Charlottesville gets green light from Virginia judge to remove Confederate statue of Robert E. Lee © Provided by Sports Illustrated Group leaders described the meeting as mostly unproductive, even saying Emmert denied a request to involve more athletes on the call, including women. INDIANAPOLIS — In a meeting Thursday with NCAA president Mark Emmert, a college athlete group dubbed #NotNCAAProperty requested the organization adopt a temporary blanket waiver to grant players the right to earn compensation from their name, image and likeness, as allowed under state laws. Emmert did not immediately agree to the request, and group leaders described the 45-minute meeting with Emmert as mostly unproductive, even saying that the NCAA leader denied the player group’s request to involve more athlete participants on the call, including women. The three leaders of the #NotNCAAProperty movement—Iowa guard Jordan Bohannon, Rutgers guard Geo Baker and Michigan forward Isaiah Livers—are men. In an hour-long call with reporters, the group’s leaders expressed frustration with Emmert not agreeing to...
    President Joe Biden will sign on Monday, International Women’s Day, a pair of executive orders “uplifting the rights of women and girls in the United States.” The orders establish the White House Gender Policy Council (GPC) and directs the Department of Education to review Title IX regulations put in place by the Trump administration, potentially changing how colleges and universities that receive federal funds handle sexual assault and harassment claims. WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 06: President Joe Biden speaks from the State Dining Room following the passage of the American Rescue Plan in the U.S. Senate at the White House on March 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate passed the latest COVID-19 relief bill by 50 to 49 on a party-line vote, after an all-night session. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images) Senior Biden administration officials framed the second order as guaranteeing “education free from sexual violence.” The GPC will be co-chaired by Jennifer Klein, a former senior advisor to Hillary Clinton, and Julissa Reynoso, who served as former President Barack Obama’s ambassador to Uruguay and is currently the chief...
    For more than three years, expelled University of Southern California (USC) football player Matt Boermeester – embroiled in a Title IX assault accusation case – has been fighting the state legal system just for the chance to have his side heard on a federal level. Despite a small and rare legal victory, the one-time National Football League (NFL) hopeful says he has a long way to go in his quest for due process in a life derailed by what he deems an unjust "male bias witch hunt." "The truth is important because the consequences for me have been so devastating. The truth is all I am seeking here," Boermeester told Fox News this week. "You don't realize, you are a kid at the time, that the USC is trying to protect itself and its hundreds of millions of Title IX funding, not you as the student." Late last month, the California Court of Appeal reversed the trial court decision and overturned Boermeester's January 2017 expulsion, ruling that his Title IX proceeding was "unfair." This paves the way for Boermeester, now...
    (CNN)Four Democratic lawmakers are again demanding documents related to controversial new Education Department regulations under Title IX, the federal law that bars gender discrimination in education. The new rule establishes protections for those accused of campus sexual harassment and assault -- including rights to question evidence and cross-examine their accusers -- that critics argue may discourage victims from coming forward. In a letter to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, House Oversight Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney and Reps. Jackie Speier, Ayanna Pressley and Brenda Lawrence asked for documents and communications pertaining to the rules' development, some dating to 2017, by July 3. All of the Democrats on the committee, the letter noted, had requested the same documents in February.The department in February responded that legal authorities prevented them from commenting on a rule after it was been proposed and before it was published in its final form. The lawmakers on Monday dismissed that response as "without merit." The department published the final rule in May "without providing any of the documents or information requested in our letter," the four representatives wrote on...
    SANTA CLARA — Two students suing Santa Clara University, alleging the school failed to protect them from classmates who sexually assaulted them, say their frustrations in seeking accountability risk becoming commonplace under reworked federal rules on collegiate sexual-misconduct response. The women say they were marginalized by investigations into their assault claims, against male students who either acknowledged having or were determined to have had non-consensual sex with them, according to the lawsuit. “My case specifically highlights that even if they do find the person responsible, they still have room to choose not to punish them,” one co-plaintiff said in an interview. “It’s frightening and needs to change.” The women — whose names are withheld in the lawsuit and by this news organization because they are sexual-assault victims — say recent changes to Title IX instituted by U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos will discourage other college sex-assault and harassment victims like them from speaking out. “With these policy changes in place, there’s no point” in reporting, the first plaintiff said. “From a victim’s standpoint, there is no point in going through the...
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