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    An Oregon woman's petition to change a new law that puts period products in all girls and boys' restrooms has been rejected.  Cherylene 'Chery' Stritenberg, 49, of Medford, filed a petition in late June. requesting the Menstrual Dignity Act be changed to limit the number of bathrooms period products can be freely distributed from.  As the law currently stands, all bathrooms - both girls and boys - are required to have a selection of tampons and maxi pads offered to students K-12, as well as at public colleges. The purpose of the law is to help students of all gender identities through their periods.  'These students deserve access to products that will help them stay in school, engaged, and ready to learn,' the representative from the Oregon Board of Education told DailyMail.com on Tuesday.  Many schools have already begun implementing the law in schools, which requires educational institutions to have dispensers in every bathroom and clearly mark in two languages that the products are free.   Stritenberg, who is also a school board member at Eagle Point, petitioned the number be limited...
    (CNN)An Arizona Superior Court judge could rule as early as Tuesday on whether a 1901 ban on nearly all abortions in that state can be enforced, a court case that has created confusion about the current law in Arizona and could energize female voters to turn out in greater numbers in the state's hotly contested US Senate and governors races.The case, which is likely to see an appeal whichever way the ruling goes, gets to the issue of how restrictive abortion law should be in Arizona, a swing state that President Joe Biden carried by fewer than 11,000 votes. It's a controversial topic that has divided Republicans in Arizona and is reflective of a pitched debate nationwide in the wake of the US Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade in late June, with many GOP-led states passing increasingly restrictive measures that run the risk of alienating moderate voters.Earlier this year, before that US Supreme Court decision, the Arizona Legislature passed a law outlawing abortion after 15 weeks, which was signed by Republican Gov. Doug Ducey and was slated to take...
    Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley accused the New York State Attorney General’s office of leaking to the press a list of donors to her conservative nonprofit, Stand for America. The list of anonymous donors was controversially published by Politico this week, and Haley told Fox News on Tuesday that she believes New York State Attorney General Letitia James could be behind the leak. Haley said materials from Politico had a New York Attorney General Office “stamp” on it. Leaking a confidential tax return is against state and federal law… and look whose stamp is on the last page of the @StandForAmerica filing leaked to the media this week. Liberal corruption strikes again. pic.twitter.com/JQ3hvLoDA6 — Nikki Haley (@NikkiHaley) August 27, 2022 “We look at the last page from the what Politico provided and it has the New York state attorney general’s office stamp on it. So that office leaked it to the press,” the former ambassador said. Haley revealed she is filing a lawsuit against the office and will be trying to get the attention of...
    A Louisiana woman has shared her fury after her state's abortion law denied her a termination despite her fetus developing without a skull - a condition that means it will not survive  Nancy Davis, who is 15 weeks pregnant, said she will travel out of state next week for a 'medically necessary' abortion because the fetus she is carrying suffers from acrania, a fetal abnormality that is fatal. The law forbidding Davis bans all abortions except if there is substantial risk of death or impairment to the woman if she continues her pregnancy and in the case of 'medically futile' pregnancies Davis was told that if she brought the pregnancy to full term and gave birth, the baby would likely survive for a very short amount of time - anywhere from several minutes to a week.  She doesn't want to go through the trauma of that labor - and blasted the woolly language of her state's abortion bill for making her suffer.   'Basically, they said I had to carry my baby to bury my baby,' Davis said. 'They seemed confused...
    (CNN)A federal judge in Texas has blocked Department of Health and Human Services guidance that medical providers who are required to provide emergency care to pregnant patients regardless of their ability to pay for it under a 1986 law must also provide abortion services in life-threatening or health-saving situations and will be protected if those actions violate state law.On Tuesday, US District Court Judge James Wesley Hendrix ruled that the guidance, which cites the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), was "unauthorized.""That guidance goes well beyond EMTALA's text, which protects both mothers and unborn children, is silent as to abortion, and preempts state law only when the two directly conflict. Since the statute is silent on the question, the Guidance cannot answer how doctors should weigh risks to both a mother and her unborn child. Nor can it, in doing so, create a conflict with state law where one does not exist," Hendrix wrote in his opinion granting a preliminary injunction against HHS enforcing the guidance in Texas or against members of the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians...
    President Joe Biden briefly celebrated unemployment rates decreasing at both the federal and state levels Friday, claiming the development is the "latest sign" that his economic policies are "working." Biden and top administration officials have consistently pointed to the strong labor market as a sign that the economy is not slipping into a recession, despite posting two consecutive quarters of negative growth to start the year. "Americans all across the country are back at work in record numbers. 22 states — a record high — have unemployment rates at or below 3 percent, and 14 states now have their lowest unemployment rate on record," Biden wrote in a statement. "This is the latest sign that my Administration’s economic plan is working. Last month, America created 528,000 jobs and matched the lowest unemployment rate in 50 years." BIDEN PREPS MIDTERM ELECTION TOUR "My infrastructure law and CHIPS and Science law are already bringing investments to make more here in America and create good jobs, and the Inflation Reduction Act will build on that even further," he continued. "We are finally...
    SACRAMENTO —  State lawmakers on Thursday approved legislation that will allow some Californians with criminal convictions to have those records sealed if they maintain a clean record, a move cheered by criminal justice reform advocates and harshly criticized by law enforcement. Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, a Los Angeles Democrat who wrote Senate Bill 731, said sealing the records would remove burdens on previously incarcerated individuals who face discrimination once they reenter society, including when applying for jobs and places to live. Because California law keeps criminal records public, even long after a person’s sentence ends, those convictions often surface during background checks. “About 75% of formerly incarcerated individuals are still unemployed after a year of their release,” Durazo said. “So something’s wrong there. We expect them to get back on their feet, but we’re not allowing them the resources to get jobs and [have] careers.” The Senate approved the bill in a 28-10 final vote, and it will head next to Gov. Gavin Newsom for his consideration. The Assembly passed the legislation in June. If signed into law, criminal...
    Nashville (CNN)Across Tennessee, pitching a tent on public land outside of designated camp sites is now a felony offense. Tennessee is the first state in the nation to take such a draconian step, but it's just one of a number of states essentially criminalizing homelessness in an effort to reduce the number of unhoused people sleeping on the streets, at bus stops and in city parks."They're trying to run us out of Nashville," says Momma V as she stood in the mud outside her tent pitched on the banks of the Cumberland River. "We're out here homeless. We're trying to struggle to make it and they're just trying to make it worse on all of us by criminalizing it."A felony conviction would make it even harder for an unhoused person to find a home or a job. "It's a huge deal," says Lindsey Krinks, an outreach worker with Open Table in Nashville. "A felony offense carries up to six years in jail, a $3,000 fine and the loss of voting rights."Similar bills are now under consideration in Arizona and Georgia....
    When his spokesperson tweeted that Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis would be making a “MAJOR announcement” resulting in “the liberal media meltdown of the year,” it seemed it might have had something to do with his presidential intentions. It didn’t—and it did. DeSantis announced at a press conference that he was suspending Hillsborough County state attorney Andrew Warren, a duly elected Democrat linked to George Soros—thus further presenting himself as the champion against all things 'woke'. Warren’s selective prosecutions have led to him being seen as soft on crime. He also has made it known he will not enforce restrictions on abortion and gender-affirming treatments for juveniles that he views as contrary to the Florida constitution. “When you flagrantly violate your oath of office, when you make yourself above the law, you have violated your duty, you have neglected your duty and you are displaying a lack of competence to be able to reform those duties,” DeSantis said. Interestingly, DeSantis seemed most bothered by something Warren did that has nothing to do with violent crime. “In June of 2021, [Warren]...
    PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan judge on Wednesday extended an order that bars county prosecutors from enforcing a 1931 ban on abortion. Oakland County Judge Jacob Cunningham agreed after lawyers for Gov. Gretchen Whitmer argued that pulling the plug on his Monday order would cause chaos around the state. READ MORE: Storms Knock Out Power To More Than 100,000 Across Michigan“If you need one, you need one today or very, very soon,” Assistant Solicitor General Linus Banghart-Linn said of abortion services. “We don’t want more confusion.” The restraining order will hold at least until the next hearing on Aug. 17. Michigan’s decades-old abortion ban makes it a crime to perform abortions unless the life of the mother is in danger. A Court of Claims judge in May suspended the law in a different lawsuit, saying it’s probably unconstitutional. That step had kept abortion legal in Michigan even after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June. But the status became clouded this week when the state appeals court said the decision applied only to the attorney general’s office, not...
    (CNN)Just weeks after Oklahoma's governor called for a special audit of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the State Board of Education voted to downgrade the district's accreditation status for violating a law that restricts teachings on race and gender.In a 4-2 vote on Thursday, the board based its decision to downgrade to "accreditation with warning" in response to a complaint stating a mandatory training session for teachers violated state law 1775.A teacher filed the complaint with the state after she claimed training videos she was required to watch "...specifically shame white people for past offenses in history, and state that all are implicitly racially biased by nature." This is the first penalty enforced against a district for violating HB 1775, according to the Oklahoman.TPS issued a blistering response to the state board's decision and said the schools "are teaching our children an accurate -- and at times painful, difficult, and uncomfortable -- history about our shared human experience," according to the statement.Read MoreOklahoma's HB 1775, which does not include the term "critical race theory," is intended to stop discrimination, according to...
    FARGO, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota judge blocks trigger law that was set to outlaw abortion in state starting Thursday. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Californians can sue anyone who manufacturess, distribute, transports, imports or sells dangerous firearms, including so-called ghost guns, under a bill Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law on Friday, July 21, during an event in Santa Monica. Newsom on Friday also touted several other bills aimed at preventing gun violence, which he signed the day before. State Senate Bill 1327, which the governor signed on Friday, allows private citizens to sue those who contribute to assault weapons, .50 BMG rifles, ghost guns or ghost gun kits ending up on the streets. Ghost guns are untraceable firearms. The bill is the first of its kind in the nation, according to state Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, who co-authored the legislation. It was based off a Texas law that allows indicuduals to sue those who facilitate abortions. Newsom’s visit to Southern California came about a month after the U.S. Supreme Court expanded gun rights for the first time in more than a decade, ruling Americans have the right to carry firearms in public for self-defense. The court overturned a New York law that...
    INDIANAPOLIS -- Leaders of Indiana's Republican-dominated Senate on Wednesday proposed banning abortion with limited exceptions - a move that comes amid a political firestorm over a 10-year-old rape victim who came to the state from neighboring Ohio to end her pregnancy.The proposal will be taken up during a special legislative session that is scheduled to begin Monday, making Indiana one of the first Republican-run states to debate tighter abortion laws following the U.S. Supreme Court decision last month overturning Roe v. Wade. The Supreme Court ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states.The Indiana proposal would allow exceptions to the ban, such as in cases of rape, incest or to protect a woman's life.Republican state Sen. Sue Glick, who is sponsoring the bill, said the proposal would not limit access to emergency contraception known as the morning-after pill or limit doctors from treating miscarriages or ectopic pregnancies.The bill would prohibit abortions from the time an egg is implanted in a woman's uterus."Being pro-life is not about criminalizing women," Glick said. "It's about preserving the dignity...
    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia’s attorney general asked a court on Tuesday to stay a ruling that struck down a state-sponsored education voucher program. Attorney General Patrick Morrisey filed his motion with the state Intermediate Court of Appeals. It seeks a stay, pending appeal, of a Kanawha County judge’s ruling July 6 involving the Hope Scholarship program. A law passed last year would have funneled state money into the program that incentivized families to pull their children out of K-12 public schools. “The lower court’s ruling undermining parents’ freedom to choose how they educate their children is legally wrong and deeply disappointing, and we are ready to appeal as soon as the lower court issues its written order confirming its ruling from nearly two weeks ago,” Morrisey said in a statement. “In the meantime, we are urging the appellate court to stay the decision so that thousands of West Virginia families can receive the money the Legislature intended for the upcoming school year — which starts in a matter of weeks.” Circuit Court Judge Joanna Tabit ruled...
    Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. George Gascón wants the California Supreme Court to decide whether he has the authority to bar his prosecutors from seeking harsher punishment for repeat offenders. After being elected in 2020 on a pledge to radically change how the country’s largest prosecutorial office addresses crime, Gascón issued a “special directive” forbidding his deputies from using a defndant’s prior convictions for serious or violent felonies to obtain longer prison sentences. Under California’s Three Strikes law, enacted in 1994, people convicted of repeated felonies are subject to longer prison terms, as much as 25 years to life for so-called third strikers. Gascón also required his deputies to withdraw strike allegations in cases brought under his predecessor, Jackie Lacey. Saying the policy was in the “interests of justice and public safety,” Gascón argued strikes and other sentencing enhancements did not deter crime. The union representing some 800 deputy district attorneys working under Gascón sued, claiming his directives forced prosecutors to violate their obligations under the Three Strikes law. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant sided with...
    AUSTIN, Texas -- The state of Texas sued the federal government Thursday after the Biden administration said federal rules require hospitals to provide abortions if the procedure is necessary to save a mother's life, even in cases where state law mostly bans the procedure.The lawsuit, which names the Department of Health and Human Services and Secretary Xavier Becerra among its defendants, says the guidance issued by the Biden administration earlier this week is unlawful, and that the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act does not cover abortions."The Biden Administration seeks to transform every emergency room in the country into a walk-in abortion clinic," Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said as he announced the lawsuit. He said the federal government isn't authorized to require emergency healthcare providers to perform abortions.RELATED | Indiana doctor's lawyer defends steps in 10-year-old girl's cross-state abortionThe legal wrangling is causing concern for doctors. Dr. Ghazaleh Moayedi, a Dallas-based OB/GYN and former abortion provider, said emergency departments may face these situations frequently - when patients experience miscarriages or ectopic pregnancies, or when a woman's water breaks before...
    In Minnesota, abortions after fetal viability outside the womb can only be performed when a mother’s life or health is in danger. At least that’s a common interpretation from some politicians and abortion rights advocates. The online Abortion Finder directory says if a pregnancy is at viability or past it — which the site says is usually around 24 to 26 weeks of gestation — a person must travel outside of Minnesota for abortion unless they meet a legal criteria for an exception. And the website for the Guttmacher Institute, an abortion rights advocacy organization, declares that in Minnesota “an abortion may be performed at or after viability only if the patient’s life or health is endangered.” But there’s an issue. There are viability restrictions in state law, yet several legal experts say they’re not enforceable because of a federal court order issued in 1976. So unless that decision is lifted, there is no viability standard in Minnesota. And while a Ramsey County judge on Monday struck down a long list of restrictions on abortion in Minnesota, the district court...
    This is an important detail because Ohio law requires mandatory reporters, like physicians, to report cases of child abuse to law enforcement. The rape of a 10-year-old child, resulting in a pregnancy, should have been immediately reported to law enforcement, who presumably would have opened a criminal investigation into the case. But Yost told Fox News host Jesse Watters his agency has not heard even a "whisper" about the alleged victim or alleged perpetrator. "So, Dave, have you had anybody come to you in your state to say we're looking into this? A police report was filed?" Watters asked. "Not a whisper, and we work closely with the centralized law enforcement system in Ohio. We have regular contact with prosecutors and local police and sheriffs," Yost confirmed. "Not a whisper anywhere." Not only has the Ohio attorney general's office not heard of any case like this, but the state crime lab has received no evidence of any crime, which would have been collected in a case of child sexual assault. "Something maybe even more telling, Jesse, is my office runs...
    Washington (CNN)The liberal website Salon has changed a headline that had falsely said a bill signed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis forces Florida's students and professors to register their political views with the state. The 2021 law does require public colleges and universities in Florida to administer annual surveys on the subject of "intellectual freedom and viewpoint diversity." But contrary to the inaccurate initial Salon headline, the law does not require anybody to register their political views. Students and faculty members can decide whether to participate in the surveys, which are anonymous. Salon published the headline in June 2021. Its revision on Wednesday, more than a year later, came after the article went viral among some Democrats on Twitter amid talk of a possible DeSantis run for president. Before Salon's revision, its false claim was promoted this week by various Democratic commentators, by Florida agriculture commissioner and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Nikki Fried (who subsequently deleted the tweet that linked to the Salon article), and even by renowned novelist Stephen King, who has more than 6.7 million Twitter followers and has...
    The Kentucky Supreme Court would denied on Tuesday the state's attorney general's appeal that would reinstate a law making nearly every abortion illegal in Kentucky. Attorney General Daniel Cameron issued the emergency appeal after a circuit court judge blocked the near-total abortion ban last week – allowing exceptions only when the life or physical wellbeing of the mother is at risk. 'The Supreme Court's decision to continue delaying enforcement of Kentucky's Human Life Protection Act and Heartbeat Law is disappointing,' Cameron said Tuesday. He added: 'We will not be deterred in defending these important laws, and our team will make a strong case tomorrow in Jefferson Circuit Court to have the laws reinstated.' Kentucky is one of the 13 states that had so-called 'trigger laws', meaning that once the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last month, laws went back into effect in the states banning abortion. The Kentucky Supreme Court denied the state's Attorney General Daniel Cameron's request to reinstate a near-total abortion ban that was temporarily blocked by a lower court pending Wednesday's hearing Pro-abortion protesters march June...
    AUSTIN, Texas -- The Texas Supreme Court blocked a lower court order late Friday night that said clinics could continue performing abortions, just days after some doctors had resumed seeing patients after the fall of Roe v. Wade.It was not immediately clear whether Texas clinics that had resumed seeing patients this week would halt services again. A hearing is scheduled for later this month.SEE ALSO: 2 abortion clinics continue to operate in Houston after TX AG files emergency motionThe whiplash of Texas clinics turning away patients, rescheduling them, and now potentially canceling appointments again - all in the span of a week - illustrated the confusion and scrambling taking place across the country since Roe was overturned.An order by a Houston judge earlier this week had reassured some clinics they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. That was quickly followed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton asking the state's highest court, which is stocked with nine Republican justices, to temporarily put the order on hold.SEE ALSO: Abortions before 6 weeks allowed to resume in Texas after...
    SACRAMENTO —  California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday signed a controversial bill to repeal a provision of state law that bans loitering for the intent to sell sex — a proposal that deeply divided Democrats in the Legislature and pitted transgender rights activists against advocates to stop human trafficking. Anti-loitering laws have been contentious nationwide, in part because they are often vague in their definition of what constitutes as loitering, which gives police wide latitude to arrest or disperse individuals. While New York state and cities such as Seattle have repealed anti-loitering laws, California now becomes the largest state to do so. In his signing statement released on Friday, Newsom alluded to the difficult political debate around the bill, but noted that it “does not legalize prostitution.” “It simply revokes provisions of the law that have led to disproportionate harassment of women and transgendered adults,” Newsom wrote. “While I agree with the author’s intent and I am signing this legislation, we must be cautious about its implementation. My Administration will monitor crime and prosecution trends for any possible unintended consequences...
    Bill Gates has secured legal approval for the controversial purchase of thousands of acres of prime North Dakota farmland, after the deal drew fury from the state's residents.  The state's Republican Attorney General Drew Wrigley had inquired into the land sale, and on Wednesday issued a letter saying the transaction complied with an archaic anti-corporate farming law.  The Depression-era law prohibits corporations or limited liability companies from owning farmland or ranchland, but allows individual trusts to own the land if it is leased to farmers, which Gates intends to do. Gates is the largest private owner of farmland in America after quietly amassing some 270,000 acres across dozens of states, according to last year's edition of the Land Report 100, an annual survey of the nation's largest landowners.  Bill Gates has secured legal approval for the controversial purchase of thousands of acres of prime North Dakota farmland from the state's Republican AG Drew Wrigley (right) Gates' firm, Red River Trust, purchased $13.5 million worth of land in two counties from wealthy northeastern North Dakota potato growers Campbell Farms However, the billionaire's holdings make...
    (CNN)A Kentucky state court on Thursday halted enforcement of two Kentucky laws passed in 2019 that had stopped abortion services in the state last Friday, after the Supreme Court's ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.The two measures are Kentucky's so-called "trigger law" and a "heartbeat" law restricting abortions at around six weeks of pregnancy.The court granted a request for a restraining order filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, its Kentucky chapter, and Planned Parenthood Great Northwest. A hearing for the temporary injunction has been scheduled for July 6, according to the ACLU, which brought the case on the behalf of abortion providers.The plaintiffs argue that the two state laws violate the rights to "privacy, bodily autonomy, and self-determination" in the Kentucky Constitution."We're glad the court recognized the devastation happening in Kentucky and decided to block the commonwealth's cruel abortion bans," the groups who sought the restraining order said in a statement. "Since the Supreme Court overturned Roe last Friday, numerous Kentuckians have been forced to carry pregnancies against their will or flee their home state in search of essential care."Read...
    Now that the Supreme Court has removed the right to obtain an abortion and handed the control of wombs over to state politicians, conservatives are moving onto the next step: How can they compel forced birth if there’s even one blue state out there still making abortion available? The answer they’ve found is based on the Texas law paying bounties for anyone who has “aided and abetted” obtaining an abortion.  That Texas bounty law was specifically upheld by the Supreme Court in a ruling last December. That included the court greenlighting the bounty scheme; one where anyone, absolutely anyone, is empowered to accuse their relative, neighbor, or a complete stranger of assisting in obtaining an abortion. It “deputizes” everyone with the power to sue and it provides a big payday, allowing them to collect a cash judgement of $10,000, plus all legal costs, from those they sue. And if they happen to lose, or if it turns out the person accused had nothing at all to do with providing an abortion for anyone, the vigilante deputy who lodged the suit in the first place...
    Share this: New York will ban people from carrying firearms into many places of business unless the owners put up a sign saying guns are welcome, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced Wednesday, describing a deal with state legislative leaders that is being finalized. Hochul said lawmakers have agreed on the broad strokes of a gun control bill that the Democratic-led Legislature is poised to pass Thursday. The legislation — hurriedly written after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the state’s handgun licensing law — will include provisions that make it harder to apply for a permit to carry a gun outside the home and create more rules around firearm storage in homes and vehicles.
    Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed official guest host Aaron Gulbransen in-studio to further dive into the repercussions of Nashville DA Glenn Funk’s refusal to adhere to state law after Roe v. Wade was overturned. Leahy: We are joined in-studio by the official guest host of The Tennessee Star Report and the lead political reporter at The Tennessee Star, Mr. Aaron Gulbransen. Aaron, you had a very interesting story at The Tennessee Star about Nashville District Attorney Glenn Funk. Your headline says he vows to violate state law and defend abortion. Tell us about this story, Aaron. Gulbransen: So he said several months ago that if Roe v. Wade was overturned that he would not honor the state trigger law, which is with the Human Life Protection Act. Leahy: That law was passed in 2019, signed into law by Governor Bill Lee. Tell us what that law does. Gulbransen: What it does is...
    by T.A. DeFeo   Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling on abortion could allow Georgia to reinstitute its fetal heartbeat law that bars most abortions after about six weeks. On Friday, the nation’s highest court overturned Planned Parenthood v. Casey and Roe v. Wade, a ruling that established abortion as a constitutional right. The opinion comes in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, a challenge to Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban. Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr said he is asking the Federal 11th Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse a district court decision on the state’s heartbeat bill in light of the Dobbs decision. “I believe in the dignity, value and worth of every human being, both born and unborn. The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs is constitutionally correct and rightfully returns the issue of abortion to the states and to the people — where it belongs. “We have just filed a notice in the 11th Circuit requesting it reverse the District Court’s decision and allow Georgia’s Heartbeat Law to take effect.” In a statement, Gov. Brian Kemp said he hoped the ruling would reinstate Georgia’s House Bill...
    Overturning Roe v. Wade and declaring New York’s fascist conceal carry law unconstitutional are not only progress for the cause of human and civil rights–they will also save countless innocent lives. It need not be pointed out how this week’s 5-4 Supreme Court decision concerning Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization finally ended the moral and legal atrocity of Roe v. Wade or how it will save lives. The slaughter of innocent, unborn babies will end in any number of states, come under heavy restrictions in others, and likely save millions of lives. Unfortunately, this mass butchering will likely continue in the demonic blue states. Out of defiance, it might even increase. Overall, though, the infanticide numbers will almost certainly decrease. And those numbers are almost too horrific to comprehend. Since Roe became the law of the land in 1973, 63 million innocent babies have been slaughtered. Sixty-three million lives were snuffed out, almost all for convenience purposes. Every life saved by the Supreme Court’s Dobbs decision is an innocent and precious life. The pro-life movement still has a long way to...
    The six Republican-appointed justices in the majority agreed with the families. They held that because Maine offered its citizens a benefit, denying that benefit to families who wanted to use it for religious schools unconstitutionally discriminated against those institutions "solely because they are religious." Chief Justice John Roberts authored the majority opinion. He wrote that the principles outlined in two recent cases, Trinity Lutheran v. Comer and Espinoza v. Montana, were sufficient to decide this cases. Those cases concerned a religious preschool in Missouri that was denied benefits from a state program and a Montana scholarship program that excluded private religious schools, respectively. In both of those cases, the court ruled in favor of the religious schools. "[A]s we explained in both Trinity Lutheran and Espinoza, such an 'interest in separating church and state "more fiercely" than the Federal Constitution ... "cannot qualify as compelling" in the face of the infringement of free exercise,'" Roberts wrote. "Justice Breyer stresses the importance of 'government neutrality' when it comes to religious matters ... but there is nothing neutral about...
    Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to speed on the most essential Texas news. SAN ANTONIO — As the frosted-glass window slides open, a dozen heads pop up, all with the same anxious, expectant look. One by one, women are called up to the desk at Alamo Women’s Reproductive Services to learn whether and when they can get an abortion. For months, the clinic has had to be the bearer of bad news, telling clients that they were too far along to terminate their pregnancies in Texas. It doesn’t get any easier, employees said, explaining again and again that the state has banned abortions after about six weeks, a point at which many don’t even know they are pregnant. But recently, the clinic has had to flip that script. Many of the women who were seen for an initial appointment on a recent Tuesday weren’t too late for an abortion — they were too early. One patient said she took two pregnancy tests, one positive, one negative, so she decided to come in just...
    WASHINGTON  —  In a victory for California employers, the Supreme Court on Wednesday sharply limited a state labor law that has authorized private lawsuits on behalf of groups of workers, even if they had agreed to resolve their disputes through individual arbitration. In an 8-1 decision, the court ruled the Federal Arbitration Act preempts or overrides the state law. California is the only state to authorize such private suits as a means of enforcing its labor laws. But in doing so, the state has allowed employees to escape binding arbitration agreements they signed when they were hired, the court said. The justices ruled for Viking River Cruises, which sought to block a broad private lawsuit brought on behalf of one of its former sales agents in Los Angeles. “This is a huge win for employers and for arbitration,” said Jack Sholkoff, a Los Angeles attorney. California Atty. Gen. Rob Bonta called the decision disappointing but said that “key aspects of [the Private Attorneys General Act] remain in effect and the law of our state.” He said workers can continue to...
    (CNN)City and law enforcement officials across New York state are worried that a looming US Supreme Court decision could lead to more people concealing and carrying guns -- and officials are considering legislative efforts to counter the potential ruling. A ruling from the Supreme Court on the legality of New York's gun permitting system could come as early as this week, with some in the state worrying that a decision to overturn the state's law will make gun access easier and gun crime more common. At a press conference Monday, Eric Adams, mayor of New York City, said the potential for New York's law to be overturned "keeps me up at night." "We're going to look at the ruling because the ruling could be on several different levels. We're going to look at the ruling and see what powers we have and what are we going to need from our federal lawmakers to sort of put laws in place that could prevent the Supreme Court ruling from impacting our cities," he said. Read MoreOfficials stressed that even if this does...
    (CNN)In March 2018, then-Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed into law a piece of legislation that, among other things, raised the age at which individuals could legally buy firearms in the state to 21."If you look at the federal government, nothing seems to have happened there," Scott said in signing the measure, which was prompted by the murder of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, just weeks prior. "You go elect people, you expect them to represent you, get things done."Prior to the new law, it was illegal in Florida for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase a handgun. Following the law's passage, it became illegal for an individual in Florida to buy any firearm -- including long guns like the AR-15 -- if they were younger than 21. Scott's statement is worth remembering now, as the country seeks to respond to the murder of 19 children and two teachers in Uvalde, Texas. Scott is now a US Senator representing Florida after defeating Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson in 2018. On Monday, he had an...
    Robert Reich is breaking down and criticizing the newly-enacted Texas state law that now prohibits companies from discriminating against gun manufacturers. "A new Texas law went into effect that bans state agencies from working with any firm that 'discriminates' against companies or individuals in the gun industry," Reich wrote regarding the law passed in September 2021. "Texas’s new pro-gun industry law requires banks and other professional service firms submit written affirmations to the Texas attorney general that they comply with it." Using J.P. Morgan Chase as an example, Reich noted how banking relationships with gun manufacturers changed significantly after the 2017 Parkland shooting. Chase was one banking institution to notably distance itself from gunmakers. But under Texas state law, such action is frowned upon and it puts companies a compromising position to face punishment. "JPMorgan’s dilemma since Texas enacted its law has been particularly delicate because Jamie Dimon, its chairman and CEO, has been preaching the doctrine of corporate social responsibility: repeatedly telling the media that big banks like JPMorgan Chase have social duties to the communities they...
    President Joe Biden's top spokeswoman on Monday slammed Louisiana's new law that would increase the criminal consequences on healthcare professionals who provide abortions. White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said that the new law from the deep red state's legislature is part of a 'growing attack against the fundamental freedoms of Americans.' 'Louisiana's extreme bill will criminalize abortion with no exceptions for rape or incest and punish reproductive healthcare professionals with up to ten years in prison,' Jean-Pierre wrote in a Monday statement in response to the abortion law. 'The President is committed to protecting the constitutional rights of Americans afforded by Roe for nearly 50 years, and ensuring that women can make their own choices about their lives, bodies, and families,' she added. 'An overwhelming majority of the American people agree and reject these kinds of radical measures.' Jean-Pierre is referencing recent polls that show more than half of Americans consider themselves pro-choice and around two-thirds are in favor of keeping Roe v. Wade in tact. Louisiana's bill passed Thursday that would increase prison terms for abortion providers from...
    (CNN)A federal judge Wednesday dismissed a lawsuit from gun industry groups challenging a New York law that permits civil lawsuits against companies for conduct found to have endangered public safety.US District Judge Mae D'Agostino -- a Barack Obama appointee for the Northern District of New York -- rejected the arguments that the challengers had made that the state law violated the US Constitution.Supreme Court may soon loosen gun laws as nation reels from massacresThe judge concluded that the New York law did not preempt a 2005 federal law limiting the liability gun manufacturers and dealers can face. Citing an appellate court opinion in a separate case, D'Agostino said the New York law fit within an exception laid out in the federal statute.The judge also dismissed the claims that the New York law violated the Commerce Clause for discriminating against in-state competitors, as well as the challengers' arguments that the law was unconstitutionally regulating conduct happening outside of the state. She additionally rejected arguments that the law was written in an impermissibly vague way.An executive for a firearms trade association that...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) — A leaked U.S. Supreme Court draft opinion that would overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade abortion decision ignited a sense of urgency Tuesday among Florida Democrats while drawing praise from Republicans. Authored by Justice Samuel Alito, Jr. and supported by other members of the conservative majority of the Supreme Court, the draft opinion was reported Monday night by Politico. Chief Justice John Roberts on Tuesday confirmed that the leaked document was authentic. READ MORE: Cutler Bay Residents Concerned Plan To Build High-Quality Housing At Southland Mall Site Will Price People OutThe 98-page draft, if it comes to fruition, would rescind the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling and allow states to make their own decisions on abortion. However, a news release that accompanied Roberts’ statement Tuesday said the draft “does not represent a decision by the court or the final position” of any of its members. The draft was made public just shy of two months before a new Florida law will go into effect prohibiting most abortions past 15 weeks of pregnancy. Gov. Ron DeSantis last month...
    (CNN)Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt on Tuesday signed into law a bill modeled after the controversial Texas abortion law, which allows private citizens to take civil action against abortion providers to enforce the law.The "Oklahoma Heartbeat Act," Senate Bill 1503, takes effect immediately and prohibits abortions at the time when a physician can detect early cardiac activity in an embryo or fetus, which can be as early as six weeks into a pregnancy -- before many women even know that they are pregnant. The measure provides exceptions for medical emergencies, but not for rape or incest."I am proud to sign SB 1503, the Oklahoma Heartbeat Act into law," Stitt, a Republican, said in a tweet with photographs of him signing the legislation. "I want Oklahoma to be the most pro-life state in the country because I represent all four million Oklahomans who overwhelmingly want to protect the unborn." Abortion rights on the brink: Catch up on the developmentsSB 1503 would also allow private citizens to bring a civil lawsuit against a person who performs or induces an abortion, intends to perform...
    OKLAHOMA -- Oklahoma lawmakers on Thursday gave final approval to a bill modeled after the controversial Texas abortion law, which allows private citizens to take civil action against abortion providers to enforce the law.It's one of a number of bills passed this month by Oklahoma's legislature to restrict abortion rights and comes amid a movement by Republican-led states to severely curtail the procedure.The "Oklahoma Heartbeat Act," Senate Bill 1503, would prohibit abortions at the time when a physician can detect early cardiac activity in an embryo or fetus, which can be as early as six weeks into a pregnancy -- before many women even know that they are pregnant. The measure provides exceptions for medical emergencies.WATCH NOW: Hit play in the video player above to watch the ABC7 Los Angeles 24x7 Streaming channelThe state Senate later Thursday also passed House Bill 4327, similar to SB 1503, allowing private citizens to bring civil lawsuits against abortion providers. House Bill 4327, however, would prohibit abortions at any point of pregnancy, with exceptions for medical emergencies or if the pregnancy was a result...