Saturday, Sep 24, 2022 - 23:47:16
119 results - (0.006 seconds)

California Trail:

latest news at page 1:
123
    If everything had gone according to plan, Mary Davison, an 81-year-old long-distance hiker, may have died in the Mosquito fire. Her goal of tackling hundreds of miles of the coast-to-coast American Discovery Trail this summer led her right into the thick of California’s biggest blaze of the year, which has burned more than 76,000 acres. But Davison’s trip was delayed a few days as she tried to miss the worst of California’s scorching heat wave at the beginning of the month. “If I had gone then, I would have been in the fire or trapped by the fire,” Davison said Friday from under a juniper tree in eastern Nevada on another part of the American Discovery Trail. California ‘Starting to look a lot better’: Rain aids Mosquito fire battle, but brings flood, mudflow risk Rain showers that started Sunday afternoon are bringing welcome moisture to the Mosquito fire, but also an increased risk of mudflows and floods in a heavily forested corner of Northern California. The Mosquito fire, which broke out Sept. 6, has continued to burn through historically...
    A HIKER who went missing after he went searching for water for his girlfriend in the mountains has turned up dead. A days-long search for Tim Sgrignoli ended on Thursday after authorities found his lifeless body in the mountains of southern Santa Barbara County in California. 1Authorities found the body of Tim Sgrignoli, after he went missing in the California mountains seeking water for his girlfriendCredit: Facebook More to follow...For the latest news on this story, keep checking back at Sun Online. The-sun.com is your go-to destination for the best celebrity news, sports news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures and must-see video.Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheSunUS and follow us from our main Twitter account at @TheUSSun.
    A hiker who disappeared on Sunday while searching for water for his parched girlfriend in California's Gaviota state park has been found dead by authorities. The body of Tim Sgrignoli was found Thursday morning after a four-day search and rescue operation off a trail near Santa Barbara, a sheriff's spokeswoman said.  Sgrignoli, a 29-year-old Ventury resident, had been hiking the Gariota Hot Springs trail in the Ynez mountains with his girlfriend at the weekend when she began to suffer mild heat exhaustion on account of the blistering temperatures. The hiker's girlfriend, whose identity has not been released, was rescued by authorities on Sunday afternoon but Sgrignoli never returned.  His cause of death has not yet been established but no foul play is suspected and it is thought he likely died of heat exhaustion, dehydration and exposure. It comes as a blistering heat wave continues to bake the western United States, particularly California, Nevada and Arizona. Temperatures in Sacramento tipped 116F on Tuesday - the hottest day ever registered in the California state capital.  Sgrignoli, a 29-year-old Ventury resident, had been...
    A stretch of the Mist Trail will be closed most days for more than two months, requiring hikers to take a longer route to some of Yosemite’s most popular destinations. The closure for maintenance and repairs affects the half-mile of the Mist Trail along the Merced River from just above the Vernal Fall footbridge to the Silver Apron area, at the top of the waterfall. From Monday, Aug. 29, to Sept. 23, the stretch will be closed from 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. From Sept. 26 to Nov. 4, it will be closed the same hours Monday through Friday. In addition, park officials said, it may sometimes be closed overnight without advance notice. The detour, which is a mile longer, follows the John Muir Trail from the footbridge to Clark Point — an elevation gain of 1,600 feet —  and then takes a connector to rejoin with the Mist Trail at the top of Vernal Fall. Hikers will need to take the alternative route to go from Happy Isles Trailhead in Yosemite Valley to the top...
    After a nearly one-month closure, Yosemite National Park’s famed Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias reopened to the public this week, drawing hundreds of people who came together to celebrate the survival of the towering trees after they had been threatened by wildfire. The 4,886-acre Washburn fire, which had posed danger to the grove’s 500 mature sequoias, was 100% contained, Yosemite park ranger Scott Gediman said, though some fire crews remain doing mop-up work and extinguishing hot spots. The crews will probably stay in the area for about another week or two, Gediman said. Only a few trails in the grove remain closed, including the Washburn trail, the western portion of the perimeter trail, and the trail from Mariposa Grove to Wawona, but the most popular trails opened Wednesday, Gediman said. “There’s definitely evidence that a fire came through. If you’re a visitor and you drive up, you’re going to see the burned area between the depot and the grove, but once you get to the grove and go up, everything’s great,” Gediman said. California Two California fires...
    (CNN)As a massive wildfire continues to cut a path of destruction through a Northern California forest, residents are left to contend with lost homes and treasured family items.The McKinney Fire, the largest in California so far this year, broke out Friday afternoon in the Klamath National Forest near the California-Oregon border and exploded in size, quickly scorching more than 55,000 acres and forcing thousands to flee, not knowing if their homes will still be there when they return. The fire had zero containment as of Monday.2 dead in the McKinney Fire in Northern California, the states largest blaze this yearOn Sunday, two people were found dead inside a vehicle that burned in a driveway in the fire's path near Highway 96, according to the Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office. Video from Highway 96, along the Klamath River, shows trees burned black, charred vehicles on the side of the road with wheels melted off and destroyed structures, including the Klamath River Community Hall.Resident Mike Nowdesha surveyed the rubble Monday where his home once stood, a house he and his wife recently renovated.Read...
    Dozens of hikers were rescued from the Pacific Crest Trail over the weekend as the McKinney fire continues to ravage Northern California’s Klamath National Forest. Sixty people were rescued Saturday afternoon on the California side of the trail at Red Buttes Wilderness, officials with the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon said. The evacuation was an assist with the Siskiyou County sheriff’s search and rescue team. “The difference with the hikers on the trail is they’re not as mobile,” Jackson County sheriff’s public information officer Aaron Lewis said. “[We] went to trailheads near roads and started gathering hikers. They weren’t necessarily in immediate danger.” The hikers were transported from Road Junction 1055 to Seattle Bar at Applegate Lake before being taken to Medford or Ashland, Oregon authorities said. California 2 found dead in car as raging McKinney fire grows to become California’s largest of year The McKinney fire has ripped through 52,498 acres in Klamath National Forest. A red flag warning is in effect, and storms are expected. As of Monday morning, the McKinney fire —...
    MARIPOSA, Calif. -- A tourist from Michigan who tried to retrace the steps of a family who died during a grueling summer hike in Northern California had to be rescued last week after getting lost, a frustrated sheriff said.The man, who has not been identified, was reported missing near the trail in Mariposa County where officials last year found the bodies of Jonathan Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter Aurelia "Miju" Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski, Mariposa County Sheriff Jeremy Briese said in a statement posted on social media.Editor's note: The video in the media player above was used in a previous report.The mysterious deaths grabbed international headlines. More than 30 law enforcement agencies painstakingly reviewed - and ruled out - causes of deaths such as murder, lightning strikes, poisoning, illegal drugs and suicide.After a two-month investigation, authorities determined the family and their dog died of extreme heat exhaustion after running out of water while hiking last year on a sunny August afternoon when temperatures reached 109 degrees Fahrenheit in the steep mountain terrain.On June 29, a hiker...
    MARIPOSA, Calif. (AP) — A tourist from Michigan who tried to retrace the steps of a family who died during a grueling summer hike in Northern California had to be rescued last week after getting lost, a frustrated sheriff said. The man, who has not been identified, was reported missing near the trail in Mariposa County where officials last year found the bodies of Jonathan Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter Aurelia “Miju” Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski, Mariposa County Sheriff Jeremy Briese said in a statement posted on social media. READ MORE: Michigan Matters: Ric DeVore’s Next Chapter, Plus A Celebration of Theater & The Performing ArtsThe mysterious deaths grabbed international headlines. More than 30 law enforcement agencies painstakingly reviewed — and ruled out — causes of deaths such as murder, lightning strikes, poisoning, illegal drugs and suicide. After a two-month investigation, authorities determined the family and their dog died of extreme heat exhaustion after running out of water while hiking last year on a sunny August afternoon when temperatures reached 109 degrees Fahrenheit (43 Celsius) in...
    MARIPOSA, Calif. (AP) — A tourist from Michigan who tried to retrace the steps of a family who died during a grueling summer hike in Northern California had to be rescued last week after getting lost, a frustrated sheriff said. The man, who has not been identified, was reported missing near the trail in Mariposa County where officials last year found the bodies of Jonathan Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter Aurelia “Miju” Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski, Mariposa County Sheriff Jeremy Briese said in a statement posted on social media. READ MORE: New Wildfire Near Truckee Prompts Evacuation Order For One ZoneThe mysterious deaths grabbed international headlines. More than 30 law enforcement agencies painstakingly reviewed — and ruled out — causes of deaths such as murder, lightning strikes, poisoning, illegal drugs and suicide. After a two-month investigation, authorities determined the family and their dog died of extreme heat exhaustion after running out of water while hiking on a sunny August afternoon when temperatures reached 109 degrees Fahrenheit (43 Celsius) in the steep mountain terrain. On June 29,...
    MARIPOSA, Calif. (AP) — A tourist from Michigan who tried to retrace the steps of a family who died during a grueling summer hike in Northern California had to be rescued last week after getting lost, a frustrated sheriff said. The man, who has not been identified, was reported missing near the trail in Mariposa County where officials last year found the bodies of Jonathan Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter Aurelia “Miju” Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski, Mariposa County Sheriff Jeremy Briese said in a statement posted on social media. The mysterious deaths grabbed international headlines. More than 30 law enforcement agencies painstakingly reviewed — and ruled out — causes of deaths such as murder, lightning strikes, poisoning, illegal drugs and suicide. After a two-month investigation, authorities determined the family and their dog died of extreme heat exhaustion after running out of water while hiking on a sunny August afternoon when temperatures reached 109 degrees Fahrenheit (43 Celsius) in the steep mountain terrain. On June 29, a hiker called authorities after noticing the man’s car...
    Nearly one year after a family died on a remote trail in Northern California, a man from Michigan who tried to retrace their steps had to be rescued last week, drawing the ire of the local sheriff. According to the Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office, a call came in June 29 reporting a man missing in the Hites Cove/Savage Lundy Trail area, near where the bodies of Jonathan Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter Aurelia “Miju” Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski were found in August 2021. The caller said they had spoken with the man around 7 a.m. June 28 about the deaths of the family, according to the Sheriff’s Office. “He was not a local man and spoke to the reporting party about the previous deaths and the determination of those deaths, which he found ‘odd’ and wanted to do some personal research on his own,” the Sheriff’s Office said in a statement. The next morning, June 29, the caller noticed the man’s rented vehicle was still parked at the trailhead and contacted authorities, deputies said. A search...
    (CNN) — Several people were hurt when an Amtrak train derailed in Missouri, according to a statement by the passenger rail company. The company said the train struck a dump truck at a public crossing near the city of Mendon at about 1:42 p.m. CT. Amtrak is aware of the incident with Train 4 and is working with local authorities.Please continue to check back for updates.We're currently experiencing longer than usual hold times, but if you need immediate assistance, please call or text 1-800-USA-RAIL https://t.co/YUBDqL7Zn2 — Amtrak Alerts (@AmtrakAlerts) June 27, 2022 READ MORE: WHO Says Monkeypox Is Not An International Public Health Emergency, But It Should Continue To Be Monitored“There are approximately 243 passengers onboard with early reports of injuries,” company officials said. “Local authorities are currently assisting customers and we have deployed Amtrak resources to assist.” Chillicothe Fire Department Chief Eric Reeter confirmed the derailment and said his department is on standby should authorities need them to assist. READ MORE: Delivery Driver Accused Of Breaking Into Turlock Woman’s Home, Attempting To Attack HerNo other details were available....
    Extreme drought conditions prompted the open-ended closure of a popular hiking trail in Joshua Tree National Park to ensure water access for bighorn sheep. The closure of the Fortynine Palms Trail began last week and “will remain in place until summer monsoons provide adequate rainfall to increase water availability,” the National Park Service said in a statement. Bighorn sheep, with their iconic curled horns, increasingly must rely on an oasis spring in the trail area as drought has made surface water more difficult to find in other areas of the park. The Fortynine Palms Oasis is one of a small handful of areas in the park with reliable access to water for wildlife. The oasis itself is always off-limits to hikers as it is a “sensitive biological area” and a “crucial water supply for plant and wildlife,” according to the National Park Service. California Parts of Southern California used 26% more water in April, despite conservation pleas The South Coast hydrologic region, which includes Los Angeles, used 25.6% more water this April than in April 2020 Joshua Tree...
    A hiker in Northern California died after being swept into the Pacific Ocean by huge waves that inundated a seaside trail and another hiker who rushed into the water to attempt a rescue was hospitalized, authorities said. Rescue crews sent Sunday afternoon to the Lost Coast Trail near Shelter Cove in Humboldt County found one person treading water in frigid 15- 20-foot (5-6 meter) swells and another person face down about 50 to 100 yards offshore, Nick Pape, chief of the Shelter Cover Fire Department, said in a statement. Pape said the hikers were part of a group of hikers at a portion of the trail on a beach known for sleeper waves, or sneaker waves. The dangerous waves often strike without warning and can catch beachgoers by surprise and toss them into churning waters. When the first hiker was swept into the water, the second removed their backpack and tried to help but was carried deeper into the ocean. The conscious person was taken by helicopter to a hospital and was in stable condition, Pape said. The second person...
    A ruling by federal regulators has put a damper on plans to turn 300 miles of rail line from Humboldt County to Marin County into the Great Redwood Trail. The Surface Transportation Board issued a decision Tuesday that it will not prioritize trail use and, in so doing, cast aside the established process for considering offers from the North Coast Railroad Co. and the Mendocino Railway to acquire or subsidize rail service along either the entire corridor or a stretch of the line. The ruling said an offer of financial assistance to acquire or subsidize rail lines “should take priority over a trail use proposal because of the strong congressional intent to preserve rail service wherever possible.” Mike Hart, chief executive officer and founder of Mendocino Railway’s parent company, Sierra Energy, said his intention is to ensure the rail line in Mendocino County, from about the Willits area going south, remains connected to the interstate rail network. He said he has no interest in operating the line north of Willits heading into Humboldt County. “It’s a mud glacier,” Hart said....
    After the once-secret location of a famed grove of ancient redwoods in Northern California was made public, visitors flocking to see the towering trees caused significant damage looking for the off-trail behemoths. Now, a new 1,300-foot boardwalk through the Grove of Titans will give visitors a chance to see the old-growth redwoods, many reaching 300 feet tall, without threatening the forest’s fragile ecosystem. The path, which is elevated around the grove, opened Saturday and will provide year-round access from the newly realigned Mill Creek Trail in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park in Del Norte County. “People had been walking off-trail to access the Grove of Titans,” said Erin Gates, deputy superintendent for the Redwood National and State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District. “So we realigned the trail so that people could meander through the grove without putting a single footprint on the ground.” The location of the grove had been kept secret since the park was established in 1929, but finding it became a popular quest after researchers came across the stand of trees in 1998 and named...
    A California hiker narrowly avoided being mauled to death by a mountain lion thanks to her fierce Belgian shepherd, Eva, who suffered serious injuries helping stave off the attack. 'I will ever be able to live up to how amazing and loyal she is to me,' the dog's owner, Erin Wilson, 24, said. Wilson was hiking with her pet on the Big Bar Pass on May 16 in the rural Trinity River area of Northern California when the wild cat attacked her, swiping at her left shoulder thorough her jacket. 'I yelled 'Eva!' and she came running,'  the 24-year-old hiker said. 'And she hit the cat really hard.' Wilson said that the moutain lion appeared to be emaciated, but still out-classed the 55-pound Belgian malinois, who is 2 and half years old. 'They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying,' Wilson said. The cougar sunk its fangs into Eva's head and held on even as Wilson beat it with her fists, rocks, sticks and what ever else she could find. The hiker even tried gouging...
    Aaron Gagnon, with the San Bernardino National Forest, at Upper Big Falls in September 2015, shortly before the trail was closed for a year because of the high number of hiker injuries and other emergencies.  A man who went missing in the San Bernardino Mountains was found dead at the base of a waterfall notorious as a danger zone for hikers. Robert Carey Jr., 33, of Calimesa (Riverside County) was reported missing by his family on Saturday when he failed to return from a hike on San Gorgonio Peak, the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department said in a news release. Additional calls came in from people saying they had heard someone yelling for help in the Forest Falls area, the sheriff’s department said. On Saturday evening, a sheriff’s helicopter crew saw an unresponsive man at the base of Big Falls, and a rescuer lowered to that site determined the man was dead. Because of the risk of a nighttime operation, the recovery of the body was delayed until the next morning. It is believed that Carey died of traumatic injuries...
    FRESNO, Calif. -- If you've never been to California's beautiful Fresno County Blossom Trail, you're missing out.For a few weeks every Spring, it turns into a sight of breathtaking beauty - rows and rows of peach, apricot, nectarine, almond, plum, and apple trees draped in pink and white flowers in full bloom.More than 20,000 visitors from around the world visit the trail and drive down the 62-mile loop of fruit orchards every year to take in the sight. But there's more to the Blossom Trail than just its beauty.It's also one of the largest pollination events in the world.California's Central Valley, home to these orchards, is known as the 'bread basket' of the world.Its 80,500 farms and ranches alone are responsible for 11% of total U.S. food production.So, not long after the Blossom Trail's flowers fade, the fruits that feed America ripen and are harvested and shipped off to different parts of the country."We get to enjoy the beauty right now, but for the Valley and Valley farmers, it's economic activity. This is this year's crop that's in preparation," says...
    A California woman who had gone missing while on a hiking trip has been discovered dead from a suspected suicide, according to her family. The Placer County Sheriff's Office stated that the body of 26-year-old Kerina Blue was found on Sunday in the vicinity of Green Valley Trail near the small town of Alta, which is located about 60 miles northeast of Sacramento. In the early hours of Saturday morning, the sheriff's office received a call from the Sacramento Police Department concerning Blue, who had been reported missing by her parents. She was described as being at-risk because of an unspecified medical condition.   The body of California hiker Kerina Blue, 26, was discovered by searchers on Sunday near Alta, California  After Blue's body was recovered, her family released a statement, revealing that she had been struggling with depression and likely took her own life  Dozens of searchers, K-9 units and helicopters spent more than a day scouring the rugged, steep and densely forested terrain  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next NYC and DC Mayors tell...
    Where better to get hiking tips than the The Broke Backpacker? Originally launched by backpacker and entrepreneur Will Hatton, the blog is staffed these days by an array of travel writers, adventurers and self-styled swashbucklers. The site recently broke out a list of the best hikes in the U.S, “absolutely epic trails” that will take you to 25 spectacular corners of the country for anywhere from a day — hello, Point Reyes — to multiple-week treks for intrepid backpackers. The list runs the full gamut from the lava fields of Hawaii to the mountains of Maine. And California accounts for five of the 25, including Yosemite’s Half Dome, the John Muir Trail and Point Reyes’ Tomales Point Trail. Here’s a peek at the top 10. Find the rest of the list and all the hiking and backpacking details at www.thebrokebackpacker.com/best-hikes-in-the-usa. Best Hikes in the U.S. 1 Lost Coast Trail, California 2 Tonto Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona 3 Trans-Catalina Trail, California 4 Mount Katahdin, Maine 5 Kalalau Trail, Kauai, Hawaii 6 The Wave, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Arizona 7 Cracker Lake, Glacier National Park, MontanaRelated...
    (CNN)Family selfies, nature photos, an unanswered text and several calls that were never connected detail the final hours of a California couple and their child before they died on a hiking trail near Yosemite last August. Jonathan Gerrish, Ellen Chung and their 1-year-old daughter, Miju, died from hyperthermia, the condition of having a high body temperature, with possible dehydration due to environmental exposure. After several months of investigating with the FBI, Mariposa County Sheriff's Office pulled data from Gerrish's cell phone, allowing it to retrace the family's last steps.Authorities were able to pull a text message from Gerrish's phone at 11:56 a.m. asking for help. It was never received due to lack of cell service in the area."Can you help us," the text read. "On savage lundy trail heading back to Hites cove trail. No water or ver (over) heating with baby." Read MoreInvestigators finally release the cause of death for a family who mysteriously died hiking near Yosemite About 13 minutes following the unsuccessful text, Gerrish's phone showed that he tried calling multiple numbers, not including 911, but again,...
    It was high summer, and temperatures were climbing swiftly on a remote trail in the Sierra Nevada near the small community of Mariposa. Jonathan Gerrish and his wife, Ellen Chung, knew they were in trouble. Out of water, exposed and overheating, they had to ascend the rugged and steep Savage Lundy Trail to return to their vehicle at the Hite Cove trailhead. Their 1-year-old daughter, Aurelia “Miju” Chung-Gerrish, and dog, Oski, were with them. Gerrish took out his cellphone and typed a message. 11:56 a.m. Aug. 15: "[Name redacted] can you help us. On savage lundy trail heading back to Hites cove trail. No water [over] heating with baby.” The plea never went through, stymied by the lack of cellular reception in the area. Gerrish’s attempted message was among several key pieces of new information released Thursday by the Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office that shed further light on the family’s final hours. Gerrish-Chung family hike map A map provided by the Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office shows a re-creation of the Gerrish-Chung...
    A hiker who went missing Saturday on the popular Sierra Buttes trail was found dead the following day, the Sierra County sheriff’s office said. The man had been reported lost Saturday afternoon by his brother, with whom he had hiked to the Sierra Buttes lookout that morning. The two had taken different routes back to the car. When the one did not show up, the other went back to look for him but had no success. The search started that afternoon and involved multiple agencies, using snowmobiles, a helicopter and a fixed wing aircraft. On Sunday afternoon, searchers saw the body above Young America Lake, and it was recovered by a team in a California Highway Patrol helicopter. The man had apparently died from injuries suffered when he fell from the ridge that overlooks the lake. Related Articles East Bay community marches for missing woman Alexis Gabe Sheriff’s affidavit: Missing woman’s body, wrapped in carpet, dumped in California mountains Down the true-crime rabbit hole: Why we’re fascinated with cold cases, serial killers and the...
    Bay City News Service NAPA — The Silverado Trail is closed between Yountville Cross Road and Oak Knoll Avenue in Napa due to downed power lines, public works officials said Saturday morning. Pacific Gas and Electric and county road crews are at the scene working to fix the power lines, according to the Napa County Public Works Department. There is no estimate as to when the roads will open. Motorists are asked to use alternate routes. Related Articles Fairfield: High winds down trees, block section of Airbase Parkway Nearly 30,000 PG&E customers in Bay Area lost power in windy overnight weather A widespread windstorm could deliver hurricane-force wind gusts in Northern California California water districts to get more water than expected Climate swings help endangered salmon return to Bay Area creeks for the first time in years
    ”Survey says” looks at various rankings and scorecards judging geographic locations while noting that these grades are best seen as a mix of art and data. Buzz: In a nod to Martin Luther King Day, let’s acknowledge that a Black household in California is 43% less likely than a White family to live in a home they own and rejected for a mortgage at a 48% faster rate. Sources: Ownership data from 2019 U.S. Census Bureau and Zillow’s analysis of federal loan rejection data from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act from 2020. Details In California, 36.2% of Black residents own their homes. That’s the 28th best rate among all the states. South Carolina was the top state for Black homeownership at 52.5%, followed by Maryland at 51.7% and Mississippi at 51%. The worst state was North Dakota at 5.2%, Wyoming at 17.5% and Montana at 19.7%. Now, compare that with California’s White homeownership at 63.1%, which is well-above the Black rate but still third-lowest in the nation. Top homeownership rates in the U.S. for White households were found in...
    Children on winter break? It’s a great time to take them on this easy 2.4-mile hike to Stairstep Falls in Samuel P. Taylor State Park. Kids often like a hike with a destination, and this hike has that as well as the added bonus of a chance of seeing salmon in the creek. There’s even a bench for a snack or picnic lunch by the falls. If you can go right after a rain, the waterfall will be at its best. The hike starts at the signed Devil’s Gulch. This is the part of the park where Samuel and Sarah Taylor built their home, called the Heights. At first, you walk on the paved Devil’s Gulch Road paralleling the creek. This section has the best chance of seeing any salmon that have come in the spawn, as later the trail is farther away from the creek and the view is obscured. The creek is lined with Oregon ash, buckeye and bigleaf maples that have lost most of their leaves, as well as always-green California bays and California torreyas with their...
    California investigators believe they have determined what caused a young family to die on a hiking trail in mid-August. The investigators discovered the hikers, John Gerrish, his wife Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter, Miju, and pet dog, Oski, only carried a total of 84 ounces on their hike in the Sierra National Forest. The water amount was far short of the 320 ounces recommended for hiking the trail they were on, which can reach up to 109 degrees during the summer. A survival trainer believed the family was "caught off guard" by their circumstances, according to the San Francisco Chronicle . “It is likely the child began to succumb first, which hurried the parents’ efforts up the hill," the trainer told investigators. "When one could no longer continue, they stayed behind to care for the child and pet, while the other tried to forge on and get help for their loved ones. It is a tragedy of the highest order.” CHEF SENTENCED AFTER UNDERCOOKED MEAL LED TO ONE DEATH, 30 CASES OF FOOD POISONING The...
    The California couple that died in August on a remote hiking trail in the Sierra National Forest along with their 1-year-old and family dog likely succumbed to the extreme heat, the lack of water and exertion, according to a report.  John Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter, Miju, and their dog were all found dead on a hiking trail near Hite’s Cove in the Sierra National Forest.  A family friend had reported them missing after they didn’t return from their one-day hiking trip.  Gerrish also missed work as a software engineer. Their deaths were considered mysterious and theories ranged from homicide to possible exposure to toxic gases from nearby abandoned mines.  The San Francisco Chronicle obtained 77-pages of reports into their deaths, and investigators determined that there was a fatal combination of "disastrous choices" that lead to the tragedies. The report said authorities first located the bodies of Gerrish, the child and the dog. The search continued for Chung, and her body was discovered "on the upside of a hill," about 13 feet higher than her family. Sierra National Forest....
    A British Snapchat engineer and his wife tried to save their baby daughter, who died of hyperthermia and probable dehydration, before they succumbed to high heat while on a remote California hiking trail hike last summer, according to a recent investigation.  Jonathan Gerrish, 45, Ellen Chung, 31, and their 1-year-old daughter, Miju, and dog, Oski, all died in the 100F heat, investigators had concluded after the tragic family was discovered in August. A survival trainer involved with the case wrote an email to detectives that the young couple likely died while attempting to save their infant daughter. 'Sadly, I believe they were caught off guard, and once they realized their situation, they died trying to save their child and each other,' the unidentified trainer wrote.  'It is likely the child began to succumb first, which hurried the parents' efforts up the hill. When one could no longer continue, they stayed behind to care for the child and pet, while the other tried to forge on and get help for their loved ones. It is a tragedy of the highest order.'  The...
    By Jude Coleman, Santa Cruz Sentinel The Pacific Crest Trail winds through blistering desert, ragged mountains and dense forest on its 2,653-mile journey from California’s southern border to Canada. Thousands of hikers attempt the border-to-border trek each year, but many return home, defeated by trail conditions or unforeseen difficulties. But Kelly Flynn, a 37-year-old Santa Cruz Mountains resident, triumphantly completed the famous route in September, despite having juvenile diabetes. And she did it alone. Following an unsuccessful attempt to complete the trail in 2019, the UC Santa Cruz alum laced up her boots and stepped back onto the trail this past April. With a 30-pound backpack full of only the essentials, she was determined to finish this time. For 15 years the trail had called her name, after being inspired by an old professor’s book on long-distance hiking. “I never felt like giving up,” said Flynn, seated at a table in Santa Cruz’s Abbott Square on a recent drizzly morning. “Having quit once before, I knew I didn’t want to.” Flynn, a former English teacher at Mountain View’s Graham Middle School...
    A Northern California family and their dog who were mysteriously found dead in a remote hiking area most likely died from hyperthermia and probable dehydration, authorities said Thursday.  The Mariposa County Sheriff's Office previously said the updates on the deaths of John Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter, Miju, and their dog, Oski, would be the final investigative update on the case.  CALIFORNIA AUTHORITIES TURN TO CELLPHONE DATA AND SOCIAL MEDIA IN MYSTERIOUS DEATHS OF FAMILY John Gerrish and Ellen Chung had recently moved to the Marisopa area with their 1-year-old daughter and dog. The family and dog all died of extreme heat and dehydration, authorities said Thursday.  (Steven Jeffe) The family was found dead on Aug. 17 on the Savage Lundy Trail near the Merced River in the Sierra National Forest. A friend had reported them missing after Gerrish, a software engineer who formerly worked at Google, failed to report for work.  The area where they were hiking had temperatures between 107 degrees and 109 degrees at one point and there was little shade, Mariposa County...
    In a final report on a family found dead on a hiking trail in the Sierra Nevada foothills, the Mariposa County sheriff released a map of their route. John Gerrish, Ellen Chung and their year-old daughter, Miju, are believed to have died of hyperthermia and probable dehydration on Aug. 15, Sheriff Jeremy Briese said in a news conference Thursday. They were found about 1½ miles from their car, having apparently completed more than 6 miles of their intended loop. The last stretch of the route was steep uphill in full sun, and the temperature reached 109, Briese said. He gave these notes on their route, keyed to the numbers on the map above: 1/ They are believed to have started walking shortly before 8 a.m. from a trailhead around 3,900 feet. At that time, the temperature is estimated to have been 74-76 degrees. 2/ After 2.2 miles of downhill, they reached the South Fork of the Merced River. The elevation there is 1,900 feet, and the temperature was 92-99. 3/ A flat stretch of slightly less than 2 miles...
    A Northern California family and their dog who were found dead in a remote hiking area are believed to have been killed by hyperthermia and possible dehydration, the Mariposa County sheriff said Thursday. Sheriff Jeremy Briese held a news conference to discuss the investigation into the mysterious deaths of John Gerrish, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter and their dog. The family had gone hiking on a trail near the Merced River in the Sierra National Forest and were found dead Aug. 17 after a family friend reported them missing the previous night. They were found about 1½ miles from their car, apparently having completed about 6 miles of their intended loop on the Hites Cove and Savage-Lundy trails. They had one 85-ounce water bladder with them; it was empty. Much of the route, inside the Ferguson Fire footprint, has little shade, and temperatures on Aug. 15 reached 109 in the area. Hyperthermia is abnormally high body temperature caused by the failure of heat-regulating mechanisms. Mariposa County sheriff’s investigators had already ruled out several potential causes: a gun or any other...
    A family of three found dead on a Northern California hiking trail in August died of heat exposure and possible dehydration, the local sheriff’s office revealed Thursday. “Heat-related deaths are extremely difficult to investigate,” Mariposa County sheriff Jeremy Briese said at a press conference, citing an official cause of death of hyperthermia. The bodies of John Gerrish, Ellen Chung, and their 1-year-old daughter Muji were found mid-August on the Savage Lundy Trail, a remote area of Sierra National Forest. Their dog Oksi was lying next to them, also dead. The family had been hiking on a trail where temperatures were sky-high, between 107 and 109 degrees, Briese said Thursday. There was little shade due to an earlier fire in the area. Sheriff’s deputies only found one empty water container with the family. Initially, officials were unable to discern a cause of death and approached the family’s bodies wearing Hazmat suits. Speculation ran rampant, and the sheriff’s office ruled out multiple possible causes of death in the intervening months. The bodies showed no wounds or trauma, and even autopsies did...
    A California sheriff has revealed a British Snapchat engineer, his wife and daughter died of hypothermia and probable dehydration. Mariposa County Sheriff Jeremy Briese held a news conference on Thursday to discuss the mysterious deaths of John Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter, Miju, and their dog.   The Northern California family went hiking on a remote trail close to the Merced River in the Sierra National Forest, where they were found dead August 17 after a family friend reported them missing. The family were found 1.6 miles from their vehicle.  There was one 85 ounce bladder for water with them, which was empty. There were no other water containers with them, Briese said.  Jeremy Briese of Mariposa County Sheriff's Office held a press conference on Thursday to reveal the cause of death of the family, after months of speculation The Northern California family went hiking on a remote trail close to the Merced River in the Sierra National Forest, where they were found dead August 17  The bodies of the family of three and their pet were found...
    The hiker who claims to have spoken to Brian Laundrie on the Appalachian Trial has told DailyMail.com how his 'heart dropped' when he realized he had come face-to-face with the man suspected of killing Gabby Petito.   Dennis Davis, 53, says he was stopped by Laundrie around 12.30am Saturday morning on a deserted road near the Tennessee/North Carolina border - 700 miles away from where the 23-year-old fugitive was last seen near his home in North Point, Florida. Showing DailyMail.com where he encountered Laundrie in his first video interview, Davis said he didn't realize it was him at first, until about 15 minutes later when he pulled up a photo of him, saw the matching beard and mustache and immediately dialed 911 and the FBI.     'When I first saw him I kind of thought he was on drugs because he was acting weird,' Davis told DailyMail.com of their interaction, adding that Laundrie spoke of heading to California to see his 'girlfriend'.  'But as I thought about it, I don't necessarily think he was on drugs because he was talking very clearly. And...
    A HIKER is convinced he saw Gabby Petito's fugitive fiancé Brian Laundrie on the Appalachian Trail looking disheveled. On October 2, 2021, Dennis Davis was making a three-point turn on Waterville Road in Hartford, Tennessee, he spotted when a man in a white pickup truck flashing his lights and waving. 3A hiker called police after he said he ran into Brian Laundrie asking for directions to CaliforniaCredit: Gabby Petito/Instagram 3Hiker Dennis Davis called police after he looked up photos of Laundrie and said he was 99 percent sure it was the man he had encounteredCredit: Dennis Davis Davis, 53, described the driver as looking "messed up" at around 12:35AM local time and recalled how the man he believes to be Laundrie admitted that he was lost. The hiker told Fox & Friends First: "And I said, ‘Well, I’m not from around here. Where are you trying to go?’" At this point, the mystery man told Davis that he was trying to go to California and said: "'My girlfriend and I got into a fight, but she called me...
    Davis said that he initially suspected the driver of the white pickup truck was on drugs, but after speaking with him, concluded that he was "mentally shot." The driver of the vehicle then reportedly told Davis that he was headed to California after fighting with his girlfriend. "He said 'Me and my girlfriend had a fight, and man, I love her, and she called me, and I need to go out to California to see her,'" Davis recalled of the conversation. Davis said that he advised the driver to take a quicker route on Interstate 40 West, but the driver shrugged off the suggestion and said that he was going to take the far more rural route to travel to California. Davis said that after the encounter, he pulled into a parking space and immediately began searching the internet for pictures of Laundrie. "[T]he thing when I was talking to him which really stood out to me was he had a very full but very short, very thick, dark...
    MARIPOSA COUNTY, Calif. -- Weeks after a family was found dead on a hiking trail in California, investigators are still working to determine the cause of their death.On Thursday, the Mariposa County Sheriff's Office released new information detailing possible death causes that detectives have ruled out.RELATED: Cause of death still undetermined in case of family found dead in Mariposa CountyOfficials say the 45-year-old Jonathan Gerrish, 30-year-old Ellen Chung, one-year-old Aurelia Miju Chung-Gerrish and their dog did not die by a gun or other weapon, lightning strike, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, cyanide exposure, illegal drugs or alcohol or suicide.Detectives are working with a toxicologist, an environmental specialist and the FBI to narrow down an official cause of death.Last month, investigators said they collected water samples in the area where the family's bodies were found. The results haven't been revealed yet, but officials have not ruled out the possibility of poisonous toxins in the water, including toxic algae bloom.The sheriff's office says that many toxicology reports have returned, but the contents of those reports will not be disclosed at this time.RELATED: New...
123