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    People who wear reusable contact lenses are nearly four times more likely to develop a rare eye infection that could rob them of their sight, a study has found. The British scientists behind the research also warned that wearing lenses in the shower, swimming pools and while sleeping raised the risk too. In the study, they looked at more than 200 daily or reusable contact lens users who came to clinics with either an eye infection or another illness. They found Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) — which inflames the surface of the eye and can lead to blindness — was far more common among those who popped the same lenses into and out of their eyes. The infection is triggered when the micro-organisms get onto contact lenses via a contaminated solution or dirty hands, and then enter the eye through tiny tears.  Patients suffer eye pain, redness, blurred vision, a cloudy look to the eye and, in severe cases, may end up losing their sight. Treatment includes antiseptics that must be placed directly onto the surface of the eye, possibly for...
    WATCHING telly with a young child can help rather than damage their development, a study says. It found age-appropriate shows reinforce learning and improve conversation skills. 1Watching telly with a young child can help rather than damage their development, a study saysCredit: Getty Portsmouth University researchers said while too much screen time can harm development of play and language, the emphasis should be on the quality of children’s viewing rather than quantity. Dr Eszter Somogyi, of the university, said: “Weak narrative, fast-pace editing, and complex stimuli can make it difficult for a child to extract or generalise information. “But watching television with your child and elaborating and commenting on what is viewed can help enhance their understanding of the content, reinforcing their learning during educational programmes.” The research, published in Frontiers In Psychology, looked at 478 studies from the past two decades. READ MORE HEALTH NEWSJAB ALERT Diabetics set for HUGE change as once-a-week jab could replace daily meds NEW ARRIVAL I’m an expert - here’s 5 things I wish I knew before becoming a mum to a...
    Babies in the womb like the flavor of carrots and do not like the taste of kale, according to a new study. Researchers at Durham University identified how babies in the womb react differently to the tastes of foods eaten by the mother via 4D ultrasounds of fetuses. Unborn babies smiled when exposed to carrots, but their lips stretched out in apparent grimaces when given kale, researchers found. ANTS OUTNUMBER PEOPLE BY 2.5 MILLION TIMES: STUDY The study, published in Psychological Science, relied on the ultrasound scans of 100 pregnant women after they ate vegetables. The babies showed more “laughter-face” reactions when exposed to carrots, and they showed more “cry-face” reactions when exposed to kale, the study said. The fetuses analyzed in the study were at 32 to 26 weeks of gestational age. The reactions were determined by researchers looking at the "complex facial expressions" induced by "multiple muscular actions." Researchers said the study had implications for the dietary habits of babies' eating habits. "A number of studies have suggested that babies can...
    If you're a Pennsylvanian and you know how true the cringe-worthy "But first coffee" saying is, then you'll be pleased to see that the Keystone State was recently ranked amongst the top 10 best for coffee lovers in the country for 2022. The ranking comes from a study conducted by WalletHub as the company explored America's obsession with the beverage.  While Philadelphia ranked 33, Pittsburgh made the top 10: Seventh overall for the best city for coffee lovers. “Coffee first became popular in the U.S. after the Boston Tea Party, when the switch was seen as ‘patriotic,’ according to PBS,” as the introduction to the study states. “And since Starbucks debuted in 1971, the drink is now accessible almost anywhere you go.” In terms of the study's methodology, it compared the 100 most populated cities over 12 factors such as “Average Price per Pack of Coffee;” “Share of Adult Coffee Drinkers;” and “Google Search Traffic for the Term ‘Coffee.” You can check out the full list here.
    Military veterans are killing themselves at more than twice the official government rate, mostly due to uncounted drug overdose suicides, says an alarming study about the real costs of wearing a uniform. Research by America's Warrior Partnership (AWP), a non-profit, found the actual suicide rate of veterans was ‘much higher’ than is reported by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). And those numbers climb higher still when you add drug overdose deaths.  Military suicide rates are alarmingly high and rising, often attributed to the trauma and stress of serving in post-9/11 anti-terror wars, head injuries, continued access to guns, and the difficulty of reintegrating into civilian life.  The study comes as veterans increasingly complain about poor support from the military, and as the Army faces its worst recruitment crisis in decades and a shortfall of as many as 15,000 troops this year. AWP president Jim Lorraine said the non-profit group’s interim study was a wake-up call about ‘inaccurate data’ on veteran deaths and called for faster ‘progress toward preventing former service member suicide’. America's Warrior Partnership (AWP), a non-profit, says...
    These vanquished “boondoggles” appear in the “victory” column: — The death of the proposed extension of the 241 “toll road to nowhere” through San Clemente, which could have cost billions. — The cancellation of a $6 billion plan to expand the 710 freeway between Long Beach and East Los Angeles, which rattled around for more than 20 years. — Abandonment of a plan to drill twin tunnels to link I-210 and I-710 — which could have exceeded $5 billion — in an attempt to reduce San Gabriel Valley transportation woes. — And the demise of the “High Desert Freeway,” an $8 billion, 63-mile project that aimed to connect L.A. County’s Palmdale and Lancaster with San Bernardino County’s Victorville, Apple Valley and Adelanto. But you can’t win ’em all, even if you’re the rabble-rousing California Public Interest Research Group, intent on steering California away from its automobile addiction: The I-405 Expansion project from the 73 toll road to I-605 is well underway, a $1.9 billion endeavor adding express toll lanes to 16 miles of one of America’s most congested highways. All...
    (CNN)You may have up to a 50% higher risk of developing long Covid-19 if you suffer from common psychiatric issues such as anxiety or depression, a recent study found. Signs of the malady can include breathing problems, brain fog, chronic coughing, changes in taste and smell, overwhelming fatigue, difficulties in performing daily life functions, and disruptions in sleep that can last months, even years, after the infection has cleared the body.Their virus symptoms were minor. Then they had long Covid.People who self-identified as having anxiety, depression or loneliness, or who felt extremely stressed or worried frequently about the coronavirus were more likely to experience long Covid-19, according to the study published this month in JAMA Psychiatry."We found participants with two or more types of psychological distress before infection had a 50% higher risk of getting long Covid," said study coauthor Dr. Siwen Wang, a research fellow in the department of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.About 40 million adults over 18 in the United States live with an anxiety disorder, while over 21 million...
    Approximately 40% of female service members have limited to no access to abortion services where they live or are stationed currently. Roughly 80,000 of the approximately 450,000 active-duty service members serve in states that have implemented or will soon implement additional abortion restrictions, per a new paper from RAND Corporation that was released Wednesday. The other 370,000 male soldiers and their families could also be affected by the push from conservative state legislatures to curb abortion access. UKRAINE SAYS IT SHOT DOWN RUSSIAN-ACQUIRED IRANIAN DRONE IN KHARKIV Five thousand to 7,400 active-duty servicewomen and Defense Department-employed civilian women have abortions annually. Living in states that have imposed abortion restrictions will make getting the procedure more challenging. If one of these women seeks an abortion, there will likely be three choices, per the paper: request permission to travel to another state, have the procedure done in a jurisdiction where it is illegal, or "seek a medication abortion in a state with a full or partial ban and risk judicial punishment." There is roughly the same number of civilians in the department...
    In a little more than a decade, Tesla's computer chips will be able to perform more operations than the human brain, if the car manufacturer continues improving its technology. The electric car company's new microchip, the D1, manages 362 trillion operations per second, the measure of a computer’s processing power. The power of the chip is already working at over 36% of what the human brain can, which is capable of one quadrillion (1,000,000,000,000,000) operations per second, according to a study by Vanarama. "These chips have been instrumental in Tesla’s existing automated driving functions, but there is so much more potential over the next decade," the company said. TWITTER SHAREHOLDERS FINALIZE VOTE TO APPROVE SALE TO MUSK AHEAD OF TRIAL Tesla's microchips are increasing in capability at a rate of 486% every year. By analyzing the company's first chip, an Nvidia component from 2016, Vanarama found that it managed only 12 trillion operations each second, while the D1 chip will manage 362 trillion, a giant increase in the span of only six years. Based on...
    (CNN)Many people eat the bulk of their calories at night, limiting breakfast due to busy workdays and school mornings, and experts have long thought eating late added to weight gain or hindered weight loss. You should eat light at night and make breakfast your biggest meal, earlier research has shown, to give your body time to burn off excess calories throughout the day. The foods you should eat to jump-start your morning, and 2 recipes to try outThe prevailing argument is that eating more calories earlier "shifts metabolism" in ways that favor greater weight loss, said Dr. David Katz, founder and former director of Yale University's Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, via email. Yet eating a big breakfast instead of a larger meal later in the day did not impact weight loss, according to a new clinical trial that compared people eating most of their daily calories at breakfast with those eating the most at dinner."With calories either morning-loaded or evening-loaded, the researchers found nearly identical weight loss," said Katz, who was not involved in the study. In addition, "any magical...
    Health workers sit at a check-in table at a pop-up monkeypox vaccination clinic which opened today by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health at the West Hollywood Library on August 3, 2022 in West Hollywood, California. Mario Tama | Getty Images People living with HIV who have monkeypox are hospitalized more than twice as often as other patients diagnosed with the rapidly spreading virus, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a report published Thursday, the CDC found that 38% of nearly 2,000 people diagnosed with monkeypox between May and July were living with HIV. Among 1,300 monkeypox patients with more detailed clinical data, 8% of HIV-positive individuals were hospitalized compared with 3% of people without HIV infection. The CDC found that HIV-positive individuals in particular with low T-cell counts, which indicates a weaker immune system, and in whom the virus is not suppressed are hospitalized more frequently with monkeypox. But data on the reason for hospitalization is incomplete so it's unknown whether HIV-positive people hospitalized with monkeypox are suffering from more severe...
    Even by working full-time year-round jobs, more than a third of families do not earn enough to cover rent, groceries and other basic expenses needed to keep a household running, according to a new study. Some 35 percent of working families cannot meet their weekly outgoings for housing, food, medical care, transport, child care and other expenses, says the Brandeis University study based on 98,000 households.  Even though gas prices have fallen to $3.78 per gallon and inflation dipped to 8.5 percent in July, the economy and rising prices remain a top concern for millions of cash-strapped voters heading in to November’s midterms. 'Full-time work alone isn’t enough to cover the everyday essentials most families need to support themselves, which creates significant financial hurdles to support children,' said Pamela Joshi, lead author of the 29-page study. The situation is worse for Hispanic and black families, adds the report. More than half cannot afford basic needs, compared to a quarter of white families and 23 percent of Asian and Pacific Islander families. Jesus Montiel, Krista Mason and their daughter Diana, 2,...
    Getty Images The amount of money you drop on subscriptions may be more than you realize, recent research suggests. More than half of consumers (54%) underestimate how much they spend monthly on subscriptions by at least $100, according to a survey commissioned by market research firm C+R Research. For 24%, the difference was $200 or more. On average, consumers spend $133 a month — about $1,600 a year — more than estimated, the study showed. "It's a slippery slope with subscriptions because it just happens automatically and you're not actively making that purchase every month," said certified financial planner Douglas Boneparth, president of Bone Fide Wealth in New York. With the explosion of subscription services over the last decade, keeping track of them can be challenging. For just media and entertainment offerings, the average number of paid subscriptions per consumer was 12 in 2020, according to Statista. Millennials had the most: 17. More from Personal Finance:These steps can help you tackle stressful credit card debtYou may qualify for over $10,000 in climate incentivesAmericans now less likely to tip generously for...
    Somerset, Morris and Bergen counties rank among the wealthiest in the Garden State, according to a new study. The recent study from SmartAsset assessed wealth in U.S. counties by comparing them across three categories: the amount of investment income residents receive, median home value and per capita income.  Somerset County's per capital investment income averaged $18,409. Its median home value averaged  $510,305 And its per capita income averaged $112,825. Morris County's per capital investment income averaged $18,676  its median home value averaged $556,843 and its per capita income averaged $102,227 Bergen County's per capita investment income averaged '$18,852, its median home value averaged $554,875 and its per capita income averaged $91,972 The rest of the top 10 ranked as follows: 4 Hunterdon, $12,778... .$490,393.... $95,088 5 Monmouth, $15,943... $515,167..... $86,091  6 Essex,....... $25,532... $463,534...... $70,497 7 Union, .......$17,274.. ..$440,034.......$72,543  8 Hudson,.... .$9,666.....$488,077.......$71,682 9 Mercer,. ....$18,981 ...$353,155.......$74,218 10 Cape May, $9,594... $427,905..... .$67,836 The study’s methodology and interactive map can be found by clicking here: 
    (CNN)For centuries, people in the sunny Mediterranean would get up after long, leisurely meals and take a walk, often to the town square to see neighbors and socialize. Walking is so much a part of that lifestyle it is listed as a foundation of the über-healthy Mediterranean diet. How to start the Mediterranean diet — meal by mealThat may be one of the reasons studies have found the Mediterranean diet can reduce the risk for diabetes, high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke and some cancers -- all the while strengthening bones, improving brain health, warding off dementia and depression and helping with healthy weight loss.Now you can add another reason to take a post-meal stroll -- it may lower your blood sugar. That excursion doesn't need to take up a huge amount of your time either: Walking as little as two to five minutes after a meal can do the trick, according to a 2022 study in the journal Sports Medicine.Standing after a meal can help, too, but not as much as putting one foot in front of the other, said...
    (CNN)New evidence about the Nile bolsters a long-standing theory of how ancient Egyptians managed to build the massive pyramids of Giza thousands of years ago.Researchers led by geographer Hader Sheisha at Aix-Marseille University in France used paleoecological clues to help reconstruct what Egypt's Nile river might have looked like over the past 8,000 years. They determined the pyramid builders likely took advantage of a "now-defunct" arm of the river to move construction materials, according a study published August 24 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Their findings show "that the former waterscapes and higher river levels around 4,500 years ago facilitated the construction of the Giza Pyramid Complex," the study said.The Great Pyramid stands about 455 feet high and was commissioned by Pharaoh Khufu in the 26th century BC. Comprised of 2.3 million stone blocks with a combined mass of 5.75 million tons (that's 16 times more than the Empire State Building), it's the largest of the group of pyramids at Giza. The other two main pyramids belong to Khufu's son Khafre and grandson Menkaure. Read MoreBuilt on...
    Physical activity guidelines laid out by U.S. health officials - markers that a vast majority of Americans are not reaching - are still inadequate for a person who wants to maximize their lifespan, a new study finds. Researchers from Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, found that reaching guidelines set by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in 2018 was likely not enough. For a person to limit their all-cause mortality risk as much as possible they would likely have to double or quadruple the requirements each week. The HHS recommends for every American adult to get at least 2.5 hours of aerobic exercise each week - or only half of that if the activities are vigorous.  Americans are largely failing to meet these guidelines already, though. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed earlier this week that only around half of Americans are reaching the fitness marker. Sedentary lifestyles have largely contributed to America's issues with diet-related conditions. The CDC reports that more than 70 percent of Americans are overweight, and over 40 percent suffer from obesity....
    (CNN)African American adults who participate in frequent religious activities, or hold deeper spiritual beliefs, are more likely to score higher in indicators linked to good heart health than those who don't, according to new research.More religious participants had better scores for blood pressure, cholesterol and other metrics known to influence cardiovascular health, found a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association last Wednesday.For example, attending religious services was associated with a 15% higher likelihood of achieving an "intermediate" or "ideal" composite cardiovascular health score, which comprises eight measures, including diet, physical activity, sleep and nicotine exposure. The organization behind Black History Month makes health & wellness a top priority for 2022. Here are ways to get started"I was slightly surprised by the findings that multiple dimensions of religiosity and spirituality were associated with improved cardiovascular health across multiple health behaviors that are extremely challenging to change, such as diet, physical activity and smoking," said lead study author Dr. LaPrincess C. Brewer, a preventive cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in a...
    We already knew that dolphins are pretty smart. In fact, some scientists are even debating whether or not we should consider them people. Now, a new study found that dolphins are so clever that they are capable of creating the largest organized social networks outside of humans… all to help them get laid. In a paper published Monday in the journal The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers observed a multi-level alliance network between 121 male bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Western Australia. They found that the males would create cooperative relationship networks with one another in order to help each other court female dolphins. So, just like humans, dolphins also use wingmen to try to woo women. “Cooperation between allies is widespread in human societies and one of the hallmarks of our success,” Stephanie King, a biologist at the University of Bristol and co-lead author of the paper, said in a press release. “Our capacity to build strategic, cooperative relationships at multiple social levels, such as trade or military alliances both...
    (CNN)Statins are an important tool to prevent major cardiovascular problems, but many patients stop taking them because of side effects, including muscle pain. However, for more than 90% of patients on statins who experience muscle pain, the statin is not the cause of the pain, according to a study published Monday in The Lancet and presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Spain. "Our results confirm that, in the majority of cases, statin therapy is not likely to be the cause of muscle pain in a person taking statin therapy," said the study, led by authors from Oxford Population Health and the Medical Research Council Population Health Research Unit at the University of Oxford. "This finding is particularly true if the treatment has been well tolerated for a year or more before developing symptoms." The authors conducted a meta-analysis of 19 randomized double-blind trials of statin regimens versus placebos. All trials had over 1,000 participants and at least two years of follow up. They also looked at four double-blind trials of more and less intense statin regimens. Study...
    A brand-new forecast for the winter of 2022-23 is calling for a cold, snowy winter. It's in the 231st edition of the Old Farmer's Almanac, which says it has an 80-percent accuracy rate with its weather forecasts. “Depending on where you live, this will be the best of winters or memorable for all the wrong reasons,” said Janice Stillman, editor of The Old Farmer’s Almanac. “One half of the country will deal with bone-chilling cold and loads of snow, while the other half may feel like winter never really arrives.” Most of the Northeast will see a “cold, snowy” winter, according to the almanac's forecast graphic.  "The coldest periods will be in early and late January and late February," the Old Farmer's Almanac says. "Precipitation will be above normal. Snowfall will be below normal in the north and above normal in the south, with the snowiest periods in early to mid-December and the first half of January." Areas in the country that will see milder conditions are mainly in the southwest and west, according to the Old Farmer's Almanac. A...
    (CNN)The dangerous levels of heat that have scorched swathes of the northern hemisphere this summer are likely to hit most of the world between three and 10 times more often by the turn of the century, as the impacts of the human-caused climate crisis accelerate, a new study has found.That increase is projected to happen in mid-latitude countries, like the US, China, Japan and those in Western Europe, according to the study, published in Communications Earth & Environment on Thursday by researchers at Harvard University and the University of Washington. "Dangerous heat" is defined as 39.4 degrees Celsius (103 degrees Fahrenheit) and above. By 2050, the number of days of dangerous heat in this region will more than double.Deadly heat waves are currently rare in the mid-latitudes, but they are likely to start happening annually in this region. Chicago, for example, is projected to see a 16-fold increase in dangerous heatwaves by 2100, the study shows.The situation will be even worse in the tropics, where people could be exposed to dangerous heat most days of the year. Days of "extremely...
    Artificial sweeteners used in diet sodas and low-fat desserts should 'not be assumed safe,' an Israeli scientist has warned — after his study found they made it harder for cells to absorb sugar and changed the gut microbiome. Researchers led by the Weizmann Institute of Science near Tel Aviv, Israel, and Johns Hopkins University in Maryland gave 120 people one of four sweeteners or a placebo up to three times a week for 14 days at doses lower than the recommended limits. They found those who got aspartame and stevia — often found in diet sodas and juices — had an altered gut microbiome. But those who got saccharin and sucralose — a common sugar substitute in baking — were also less able to absorb sugar. Dr. Eran Elinav, the microbiologist who led the study, said: 'We should not assume [sweeteners] are safe until proven otherwise. Until then, caution is advised.' Previous studies have also linked sweeteners to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and obesity, but have also shown they can help with short-term weight loss....
    Legalization of recreational cannabis has seen usage rise by 20 percent, according to new research on America’s rapid and risky experiment with a drug that can be damaging — and even deadly — for young people. University of Minnesota researchers say the frequency of pot use in California, Colorado, Oregon and other states that legalized adult recreational use jumped by a fifth, prompting ‘complex questions’ for policymakers. The research counters other studies that recorded no increased use, and pro-cannabis campaigners who argued legalization would not boost consumption as black market pot was always widely available. The Minnesota team studied some 3,500 participants across the U.S., focussing on 111 sets of identical twins — one living in a state that had legalized recreational cannabis use and the other where pot remained illegal. The twins in cannabis-friendly states recorded a 20 percent rise in frequency of use. Researchers called pot an ‘addictive substance associated with negative health and psychosocial outcomes’. Lead researcher Stephanie Zellers called for more investigation into the ‘complex questions around the public health impacts of legalization’ and how greater...
    (CNN)Want to live a longer, healthier life? Pick an activity you enjoy, and get moving. Choose just about anything -- walking, running, swimming laps, playing tennis, cycling, swimming, golf, racquet sports or even walking for exercise. Youll live longer if you move 11 minutes a day. Here are 3 ways to get goingAll of these leisure activities appear to lower the risk of early death, as well as death from cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal JAMA Network Open.The study from the National Cancer Institute analyzed responses from over 272,000 people between the ages of 59 and 82 who completed questionnaires about their leisure time activities as part of the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study, a longitudinal study of the relationship between diet and health.The study researchers followed participants for a dozen or so years and analyzed health records for deaths from cancer, heart disease and any cause.Physical activity guidelines in the United States recommend that American adults do 2.5 to 5 hours of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity or...
    In one of the biggest studies ever run to examine the relationship between psychedelics and mental health therapy, researchers from NYU have found that psilocybin—more commonly known as magic mushrooms—is incredibly effective at treating alcohol use disorder. The study—which was published on August 24 in the journal JAMA Psychiatry and is the first of its kind to involve a placebo-controlled trial—recruited 93 participants with alcohol dependence. The volunteers who received two doses of psilocybin combined with psychotherapy saw an 83 percent reduction in heavy drinking days within eight months of treatment. Meanwhile, those who received an antihistamine placebo paired with psychotherapy only saw a 51 percent reduction. Most encouragingly, 48 percent of volunteers who received the magic mushroom treatment stopped drinking entirely after the eight months, whereas just 24 percent of the placebo group stopped drinking altogether. It should be noted though that all participants received 12 psychotherapy sessions that occurred before and after they were given their drug—so they weren’t just tripping on their own. They were all also offered a third psilocybin session to make sure that even...
    \u201cWhile filming hanging jumping spiders at night, we noticed surprising things happening. Regular phases of curling up their legs and twitching in what seemed like uncontrolled movements. Reminding us a lot of sleeping dogs or cats, we asked: could this be REM sleep? 2/7\u201d — Dr. Daniela R\u00f6\u00dfler \ud83c\udf0e (@Dr. Daniela R\u00f6\u00dfler \ud83c\udf0e) 1659986161 According to the study, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers examined baby jumping spiders, which have translucent exoskeletons, to learn what was happening to their bodies in this sleep state. They discovered that the spiders' retinas were moving along with their twitching and leg curling. \u201cAnd indeed, we found the same phases of twitching and leg curling AND every time that happened, the retinas were moving!!!\ud83d\ude2e 4/7\u201d — Dr. Daniela R\u00f6\u00dfler \ud83c\udf0e (@Dr. Daniela R\u00f6\u00dfler \ud83c\udf0e) 1659986161 "Does this mean spiders dream? We do not know. But the possibility is exhilarating," Roessler tweeted on Aug. 8. "I want to thank a dream team of researchers for starting this wild journey with me. And also three great...
    Los Angeles County will experience triple the number of hot days per year by 2053, according to a new study. The county, where a typical hot day is just under 94 degrees, gets about seven days that exceed that per year, according to the report released this week by the First Street Foundation, a nonprofit, climate-focused research organization based in New York. By 2053, that number will jump to 21, the study found. Los Angeles County is up there with Del Norte and Orange counties as the areas in California that will see the most severe jump in hot days. The increase will result in freak infrastructure accidents and cost the state more than half a billion dollars in air conditioning consumption. “The results will be dire,” First Street Chief Executive Matthew Eby said about the rise in severely hot days across the country. In 2053, California’s Imperial County is expected to have 116 days in which the temperature exceeds 100 degrees. Riverside County is expected to have 55 days of triple-digit heat — the second highest...
    NASA has revealed plans to ramp up its UFO investigations. In June, the US space agency said it would conduct a study on UFOs – now referred to as UAP (unidentified aerial phenomena). 1NASA has revealed plans to ramp up its UFO investigations.Credit: DoD/US Navy Nasa defines UAPs as observations of events in the sky that "cannot be identified as aircraft or known natural phenomena – from a scientific perspective." And now the agency is reassuring Americans that they have not slowed down with their investigation of the phenomena. "We're going full force," said Daniel Evans, assistant deputy associate administrator for research at Nasa's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), on Wednesday. "This is really important to us, and we're placing a high priority on it." Read more on UFOsTRUTH CHASING Odd aerial sighting nicknamed 'Steve' may unlock UFO mystery, expert saysHIDDEN FROM SIGHT I'm an intelligence expert - what the military may know of UFO sightings The study Nasa's study will focus on identifying available data, how best to collect future data, and how they can use that data...
    An 'extreme heat belt' will form across the Midwest by 2053, according to a new study, leaving over 100million Americans regularly experiencing days over 125F. The intense heat belt will cover a stretch of country between the Appalachian mountains in western Kentucky and Tennessee to the eastern portions of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, and consume nearly all of Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Stretches of the Atlantic coast from Georgia to as far north as Delaware will be similarly effected, as well as swaths of Florida, Southern California, and Arizona. The study was released by the New York City based First Street Foundation as a part of an ongoing series of reports intended to show Americans how their homes could be effected by climate change. Previously the group released studies showing expected flooding and fire damage risks. The report comes after a crushing heatwave this year killed at least 19 people, according to Fox News, and left the nation sweltering throughout July. The tail end of a summer has also been marked by a string of unprecedented...
    Share this: Studies have shown that the same active ingredients in sunscreens that protect people from cancer-causing ultraviolet rays can be toxic to a range of species in oceans, rivers and lakes. With both of these risks in mind, a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine finds an urgent need for more information about whether these chemicals threaten aquatic life on a broad scale. The report calls on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to conduct a detailed review called an environmental risk assessment of the likelihood that exposure to one or more of these chemicals, called UV filters, may harm organisms in saltwater and freshwater ecosystems. The study recommends focusing on two types of settings – coral reefs in shallow waters near shore, and slow-moving freshwater bodies like ponds and marshes – that are heavily used for recreation and/or exposed to wastewater or urban runoff. The study recognizes that sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 30 or higher is an effective defense against sunburn and skin cancer, and that making it harder to...
    You can lose up to a stone in three months by eating all your meals between 7am and 3pm, a study suggests. Obese adults who ate within an eight-hour window lost 14lbs (6.3kg) in 14 weeks, on average, compared to 9lbs (4kg) in a control group who ate when they wanted. Both cohorts were given expert advice on how to follow a diet and what foods to eat, and put on the same exercise regime. It suggests limiting the amount of time we spend eating limits the amount of calories we consume by default, according to the researchers. Fasted people in the study were found to consume the equivalent of a Mars bar less food per day compared to the non-fasted group. Intermittent fasting has been a trendy diet plan favoured by Hollywood stars like Jennifer Aniston, Benedict Cumberbatch and Nicole Kidman for years. As well as weight loss, the practice has been linked to longevity and a reduced risk of age-related diseases. The study found restricting eating to between 7am and 3pm each day helped obese dieters shed an extra 5lbs in 14 weeks...
    Dozens sickened after visit to Kansas splash pad, CDC study says
    Many drivers in the District speed through school zones and ignore signs that tell them to slow down, according to a new report from the traffic analytics company INRIX. The company said that it examined “the road network around 27 schools in D.C.” because of the “increased attention being paid to streets around schools.” Researchers looked specifically at traffic data from the first quarter of 2022 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m., when children typically arrived for class in the morning. “In recent years, Washington, D.C., officials have continued to prioritize safety around schools, and more is needed in this area to link causes and effects of speeding and traffic-related injuries around schools directly,” the company said. According to the study, about 20% of drivers went at least 10 mph above the 15 mph speed limit that is posted in school zones. “More speeding is occurring around schools with lower-income students than higher-income students,” the study found. More Local News More DC News For example, roughly 24% of drivers near schools in lower-income areas traveled faster than 25...
    (CNN)Cheer up couch potatoes! Regular stretching and balance and range of motion exercises are as good as aerobic exercise in slowing the progression of mild cognitive decline, a new study has found. Stretching techniques for improved muscle health"My worry in the beginning of the study was 'What if only aerobic makes a difference? Good luck getting the majority of Americans to do aerobic exercise on a regular basis!' It's not sustainable," said study author Laura Baker, a professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, via email. "But we found that cognitive function did not decline over 12 months for either intervention group -- the people who did aerobic exercise or the people who did stretching, balance and range of motion," Baker said.Rudy Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School in Boston, welcomed the findings that a modest amount of exercise -- 120 to 150 minutes per week for 12 months -- may slow cognitive decline in sedentary older adults with mild cognitive impairment.Doing stretching and range of motion...
    (CNN) — Thinking of reaching out to old friends but nervous it will be awkward or that they won’t appreciate it? You should make those phone calls or send a text or email, according to new research. A study published July 11 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that people often underestimate how much their friends and old acquaintances appreciate hearing from them. READ MORE: CBS3 Pet Project: How To Keep Your Cat Off The Counter, And Other High Places“If there’s been someone that you’ve been hesitating to reach out to, that you’ve lost touch with perhaps, you should go ahead and reach out, and they’re likely to appreciate it much more than you think,” said Peggy Liu, the study’s lead author. Liu is the Ben L. Fryrear chair in marketing and associate professor of business administration at the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz Graduate School of Business. The researchers conducted a series of 13 experiments with more than 5,900 participants to see if people could accurately estimate how much their friends value them reaching out and what forms...
    Police are unfairly criticized as heavy-handed and long prison sentences are reserved for hardened criminals, says a new book that takes aim at liberal calls to empty prisons and defund the police. Author Rafael Mangual says his study, Criminal (In)Justice, debunks ‘dominant narratives’ that ‘black and brown men’ unduly suffer at the hands of police and a criminal justice system that is stacked against them. It runs counter to dozens of studies that have found that black people disproportionately suffer from police stops, searches and deaths in custody. A recent opinion poll found that 89 percent of Americans wanted police reforms. Mangual, however, says he has crunched the numbers and found a ‘glaring incongruity between what the harshest critics of law enforcement were saying — about imprisonment and police use of force — and reality’. ‘A sober examination of the data on who goes to prison reveals that lengthy terms of incarceration are reserved for chronic, violent offenders who’ve already been given multiple “second chances”,’ said Mangual. Crime researcher Rafael Mangual says police use force and fire weapons during arrests...
    (CNN) — Higher concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol or THC — the part of the marijuana plant that makes you high — are causing more people to become addicted in many parts of the world, a new review of studies found. Compared with people who use lower-potency products (typically 5 to 10 milligrams per gram of THC), those who use higher-potency cannabis are more likely to experience addiction and mental health outcomes, according to the study published Monday in the journal Lancet Psychiatry. READ MORE: Sacramento County Now Has 30 Confirmed Or Probable Cases Of MonkeypoxScientists have established a “standard THC unit” of 5 milligrams of THC for research. That amount is said to produce a mild intoxication for nonregular users. “One of the highest quality studies included in our publication found that use of high potency cannabis, compared to low potency cannabis, was linked to a four-fold increased risk of addiction,” said study co-author Tom Freeman, a senior lecturer in the department of psychology and director of the addiction and mental health group at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, in...
    (CNN)A longer life may mean scheduling in even more than the recommended amount of weekly exercise, according to a new study.Adults should get 150 to 300 minutes of moderate physical activity or 75 to 150 minutes of vigorous physical activity a week, according to the World Health Organization. But people who surpass those levels live longer than those who don't.How to build a habit in 5 steps, according to scienceResearchers analyzed more than 116,000 adults in a study published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. Participants self-reported their leisure time activity in questionnaires several times over the course of 30 years, and researchers estimated the association between the time and intensity of exercise with rates of death. The highest reduction in early death was in people who reported 150 to 300 minutes a week of vigorous physical activity or 300 to 600 minutes of moderate physical activity -- or an equivalent mix of the two, said study author Dong Hoon Lee, a research associate in the department of nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health."It is...
    (CNN)Higher concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol or THC -- the part of the marijuana plant that makes you high -- are causing more people to become addicted in many parts of the world, a new review of studies found. The bags look like well-known chips or candies, but whats inside could harm childrenCompared with people who use lower-potency products (typically 5 to 10 milligrams per gram of THC), those who use higher-potency cannabis are more likely to experience addiction and mental health outcomes, according to the study published Monday in the journal Lancet Psychiatry. Scientists have established a "standard THC unit" of 5 milligrams of THC for research. That amount is said to produce a mild intoxication for nonregular users."One of the highest quality studies included in our publication found that use of high potency cannabis, compared to low potency cannabis, was linked to a four-fold increased risk of addiction," said study coauthor Tom Freeman, a senior lecturer in the department of psychology and director of the addiction and mental health group at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, in...
    (CNN)Thinking of reaching out to old friends but nervous it will be awkward or that they won't appreciate it? You should make those phone calls or send a text or email, according to new research. A study published July 11 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that people often underestimate how much their friends and old acquaintances appreciate hearing from them. "If there's been someone that you've been hesitating to reach out to, that you've lost touch with perhaps, you should go ahead and reach out, and they're likely to appreciate it much more than you think," said Peggy Liu, the study's lead author. Liu is the Ben L. Fryrear chair in marketing and associate professor of business administration at the University of Pittsburgh's Katz Graduate School of Business. The researchers conducted a series of 13 experiments with more than 5,900 participants to see if people could accurately estimate how much their friends value them reaching out and what forms of communication make the biggest impact. In these experiments, reaching out was defined as a phone call,...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- They aim to intervene and stop violence in Chicago, but street outreach workers often face gun violence themselves. A recent study by Northwestern University and SUNY Albany polled 181 people from 15 organizations in the city.Here's what they found: 60% percent of violence intervention workers said they have witnessed an attempted shooting, 32% saw someone get shot, 20% have been shot at and 2% have been shot and injured on the job.Damien Morris is the Senior Director of Violence Prevention at Breakthrough Urban Ministries. He said street outreach workers are, adding that "the men and women who have local experience, lived experience, they are trustworthy, they are credible and they are committed to seeing a better community."The study's co-lead was Andrew Papachristos. He is a sociology professor at Northwestern University. He is also director of the Northwestern Neighborhood and Network Initiative."Back in 2016 there was another spike in violence in Chicago. And after that outreach organizations in the city were really trying to revamp and rebuild efforts to coordinate. To make sure that best practices were instilled,...
    Many psychiatrists have been aware that low serotonin levels may not cause depression for years but continued to prescribe the medication because it was 'easier', a chair of psychology has said. Dr Jonathan Raskin, who is a psychotherapist at State University of New York, told DailyMail.com that he had been concerned the theory was 'incomplete' for 'a while'. He said depression was an 'extremely complex' diagnosis, and that it was difficult to boil its cause down to just one factor. This week a landmark UK study called into question society's ever-growing reliance on antidepressants like Prozac. The $15billion-a-year industry — set to grow to $21billion in the next decade — sees people prescribed pills like Prozac that claim to treat depression by raising serotonin levels. But after reviewing 17 major studies, the scientists at University College London said they found no convincing evidence that low serotonin causes depression. Researchers from University College London said a review of evidence has found no link between low serotonin levels and depression casting doubt on antidepressants designed to boost levels of the 'feel good'...
    (CBS DETROIT) – Ann Arbor has ranked as the most educated city in the United States, according to a study done by WalletHub. WalletHub researchers compared 150 cities with the largest metropolitan areas across 11 different metrics to determine which cities were the most educated and which were the least. READ MORE: Bay County Man Wins $157K Jackpot After Purchasing Ticket On A WhimSome metrics researchers used include the number of adults aged 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher, the quality of the public school system in that area, and the gender education gap. The city of Ann Arbor ranked No. 1 as the most educated city and Visalia, California, ranked No. 150, as the least educated city. READ MORE: GM CEO Mary Barra Says Headquarters To Stay In Downtown DetroitAnn Arbor ranked No. 1 in multiple metrics, including the percentage of high school diploma holders and the percentage of associate degree holders or college-experienced adults. Here are the other places in Michigan that also ranked on the list: Lansing-East Lansing at No. 30 Grand Rapids-Kentwood...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — On this week’s CBS3 Pet Project, Carol Erickson, an animal advocate with the PSPCA, discussed a study from the University of Michigan and Florida that says people who own dogs or cats might be protected from cognitive decline. Erickson said the association was strongest for people who had their pets for at least five years. “These findings show that this association for pets helping ward off dementia in their owners is because of possibly the less stress the animal can bring to the family,” Erickson said. WATCH THE VIDEO ABOVE FOR THE FULL INTERVIEW.
    American men are sicker and die earlier than men living in other developed nations, according to a new report from The Commonwealth Fund, a non-profit organization focusing on public health issues.The study looked at men from the U.S, Switzerland, Norway, New Zealand, Germany, Australia, the U.K., France, the Netherlands, Canada and Sweden and found that rates of avoidable deaths, chronic conditions and mental health needs are among the highest with American men.Around 29% of American men reported they have multiple chronic illnesses, followed closely by Australian men at 25%, according to the study. Men living in France and Norway were the lowest at 17%."Whether it's stubbornness, an aversion to appearing weak or vulnerable, or other reasons, men go to the doctor far less than women do," the study's authors wrote.Men in the U.S. also die from avoidable deaths, classified as deaths before 75 years old, at a higher rate than men from the 10 other countries listed in the report.The study showed that income disparities also play a factor in one's health. Men with lower incomes tend to partake in...
    (CNN)No amount of alcohol is healthy if you are younger than 40, mostly due to alcohol-related deaths by auto accidents, injury and homicide, according to a new global study.If you are 40 or older without underlying health conditions, however, the new research found small amounts of alcohol might reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes.Drinking alone when younger linked to alcoholism in mid-30s"Those diseases just happen to be major causes of death in a good chunk of the world," said senior author Emmanuela Gakidou, professor of health metrics sciences at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington's School of Medicine."So when you look at the cumulative health impact, particularly among older adults, it shows that a small amount is actually better for you than no drinking. For all other causes, it's harmful at all levels of consumption."Indeed, the study found no protective effect for diseases such as tuberculosis, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, liver disease, epilepsy, pancreatitis and many cancers. Read MoreDrinking alcohol doesn't provide any health benefits to people under 40 but raises the...