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    China has warned foreign athletes they may face punishment for speech that is "against the Olympic spirit" following a similar warning from human rights activists who worry about public freedoms during the games.  Yang Shu, deputy director general of international relations for the Beijing Organizing Committee (BOC), issued a clear warning that "Any expression that is in line with the Olympic spirit I’m sure will be protected." "Any behavior or speech that is against the Olympic spirit, especially against Chinese laws and regulations, are also subject to certain punishment," Yang stressed during a news conference Tuesday.  Protesters hold protest posters during a protest against Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics by activists of the Tibetan Youth Association in Europe front of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland, Saturday, Dec. 11, 2021. (Jean-Guy Python/Keystone via AP) Rule 50 of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) charter states that "No kind of demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda is permitted in any Olympic sites, venues or other areas," meaning that any political protest is subject to punishment at any of...
    A truck driver convicted in connection with a deadly 2019 car pileup on a Colorado freeway had his lengthy sentence significantly reduced Thursday by 100 years after Gov. Jared Polis commuted punishment in a case that has put sentencing guidelines under a microscope.    Instead of serving the 110 years in prison, Rogel Aguilera-Mederos, he will instead serve 10 years and will be eligible for parole beginning on Dec. 30, 2026. In a letter to Aguilera-Mederos, Polis, a Democrat, called the initial punishment "arbitrary and unjust." The commutation came after Aguilera-Mederos applied for clemency following his sentence earlier this month on 27 charges, including four counts of vehicular manslaughter. The punishment drew outrage and ignited a petition on Change.org that garnered millions of signatures from people who supported a reduction.  Colorado Gov. Jared Polis on Thursday lowered the 110-year prison sentence for Rogel Aguilera-Mederos, 26, to 10 years. He was sentenced in mid-December for a 2019 crash that killed four people. (Fox News) "You were sentenced to 110 years in prison, effectively more than a life sentence, for a...
    White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki criticized Republican Florida Governor Ron DeSantis for threatening to withhold pay from school officials who enact mask mandates. At Tuesday afternoon’s White House daily briefing, the subject of the threat from DeSantis’ office — that the state board of education “could move to withhold the salary of the district superintendent or school board members” who defy DeSantis’ executive orders — came up repeatedly. NBC News White House correspondent Peter Alexander asked Psaki to give the administration’s “take” on the governor’s threat, and Psaki began by praising “the courage and the boldness of a number of leaders in Florida, including in Miami-Dade county. People who are stepping up to do the right thing to protect students and keep schools safe and open.” Psaki added that “We are continuing to look for ways for the U.S. government to support district and schools as they try to follow the science, do the right thing, and save lives,” and referenced federal funds from the American Rescue Plan that have not yet been distributed in Florida. “So in simple...
    CNN's leftwing media guru Brian Stelter suggested that the network's public scolding of his colleague Chris Cuomo over his involvement in his brother's political scandals was sufficient punishment, something critics have strongly disagreed with.  On Sunday's "Reliable Sources," Stelter admitted that the network was facing a "conundrum" with "no perfect solution" over recent revelations that its star anchor had aided Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo as his team responded to allegations of sexual misconduct earlier this year.  Stelter appeared to praise CNN's handling of its beleaguered host. "CNN management said back in May that Chris crossed the line by doing that and he apologized to colleagues for it," Stelter told viewers. "Some critics said he should have been suspended or even fired. But I'm going to level with you."  CHRIS CUOMO AND HIS PROBLEMATIC YEAR AT CNN "Telling a well-off host to hang out by the pool for a couple of weeks is not a real punishment," Stelter said as Cuomo reportedly began his "long-planned vacation."  "Scolding a host in public, saying what they did was 'inappropriate,' that is...
    Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda Solis said in an interview on Sunday that a reimposed mask mandate in indoor public spaces is “not punishment,” but “prevention.” “We still have 4 million people out of 10 million that haven't been vaccinated. And many of them are young people," Solis, a former House lawmaker from California and Labor secretary in the Obama administration, said on ABC’s “This Week.” "And we're seeing that this transmission is so highly contagious that it will cost more in the long run if we have to see our hospitals being impacted, our ICU units, as well as our health care workers.” "It's not punishment, it's prevention."@HildaSolis defends Los Angeles County reinstating a mask mandate—including for those who are vaccinated—as daily cases increase. https://t.co/moZjYZJQqG pic.twitter.com/1SuxqluwC2— This Week (@ThisWeekABC) July 18, 2021 The mask mandate that went into effect in the county on Saturday night requires all people, regardless of whether they are vaccinated or not, to wear masks in public indoor settings. The decision comes amid growing concerns about the delta variant of COVID-19, which has...
    A WOMAN was brutally caned in public just for being “too close” to her boyfriend in Indonesia.  Images of the horrific incident show the woman, dressed in a white hijab, kneeling on the ground. 3Floggings are carried out by Sharia police for a range of offencesCredit: AFP 3The incident took place in Banda Aceh, the capital and largest city in the province of AcehCredit: AFP A person in maroon robes and a face covering stands alongside, and raises a cane, that appears to be made out of bamboo, in preparation to hit her. The woman was reportedly being caned by a member of the Sharia police as punishment, under Aceh province’s Sharia laws, for being caught in close proximity with her boyfriend.  The woman's boyfriend was also publicly caned by a member of the Sharia police as punishment for their "crime". The incident took place in Banda Aceh, the capital and largest city in the province of Aceh on Thursday. Aceh, a deeply conservative province which the majority of residents are Muslim, is the country’s only region with the autonomy...
    This is the horrific moment a woman passes out in pain after receiving 100 lashes for having pre-marital sex under a Sharia law punishment handed out in Indonesia. Footage shows the Indonesian woman collapsing after being flogged in public for having sex before marriage. The woman, whose name was not disclosed, and her male lover each received 100 lashes in the city of Lhokseumawe on Monday. A woman passed out in pain after receiving 100 lashes for having pre-marital sex under a Sharia law punishment handed out in Indonesia The city is in Indonesia's westernmost province of Aceh, the country's only region with the autonomy to enforce Sharia law. Members of the public gathered to watch the woman receive her punishment as she received lashes from officials from the regional Islamic police force, the Wilayatul Hisbah, and the Public Order Agency.  In the footage, the woman can be seen standing on a raised stage, wearing white robes and a headscarf and surrounded by officials and people filming on phones. After receiving multiple lashes, the woman's knees give way as...
    Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) on Thursday signed a bill into law that will increase the punishment for protest-related crimes and strengthen legal protections for law enforcement. The new law, known as the "Back the Blue" bill, will make rioting a felony in Iowa as opposed to a misdemeanor. It will also increase legal penalties for blocking streets or highways, a local CBS affiliate reported. "We encourage First Amendment rights to protest peacefully, but if you break the law, you're going to be held accountable," Reynolds said during the bill signing. She added that Iowans who choose to riot or loot "will be punished to the full extent of the law." "The public peace is too important, and the safety of our officers too precious, to tolerate destructive behavior," Reynolds said, according to KCCI. Critics of the new law, including the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Iowa, have said it will serve as a deterrent for people who want to protest legally. "This law is clearly an effort to shut down well-founded public criticism of abuses by law enforcement and government, especially from Black...
    By LARRY NEUMEISTER | The Associated Press NEW YORK — Prosecutors urged a judge Wednesday to impose a “very substantial” prison sentence on Michael Avenatti for trying to extort millions of dollars from Nike. Prosecutors noted in a Manhattan federal court submission that Probation Office officials recommend an eight-year prison term for the California attorney who gained fame three years ago through his representation of porn star Stormy Daniels against then-President Donald Trump. “The defendant, a prominent attorney and media personality with a large public following, betrayed his client and sought to enrich himself by weaponizing his public profile in an attempt to extort a publicly-traded company out of tens of millions of dollars. This was an egregious abuse of trust, and it warrants real and serious punishment,” prosecutors wrote. The government said Avenatti, representing the director of a youth basketball program in Los Angeles, tried to force the apparel maker to pay him up to $25 million to keep him quiet about allegations of corruption involving Nike and college athletics. Avenatti, 50, was convicted at trial last year. In...
    No, California public employees can’t commit felonies on the job and then keep their pensions earned while they were perpetrating their crimes. “When misconduct turns into outright criminality, it is beyond dispute that public service is not being faithfully performed,” the state Court of Appeal has concluded. “To give such a person a pension would further reward misconduct.” The February ruling in a “felony forfeiture” case from Contra Costa and a similar December appellate court ruling in one from Los Angeles County correctly reject arguments from two firefighters that they are entitled to their full retirement pay despite their felonious conduct while working. Contra Costa Fire Capt. Jon Wilmot stole hundreds of items from county firehouses, everything from tools and toilet paper to binoculars and chain saws, costing his employer $33,000. Los Angeles County Fire Capt. Tod Hipsher while on duty ran an illegal bookmaking operation and directed the physical intimidation of clients who failed to pay their gambling debts. The law firm representing both firefighters has appealed the ruling in the Hipsher case to the state Supreme Court and...
    SAN FRANCISCO — After noting she’d sent a message “that it’s ok to cheat and bribe public officials,” a federal judge sentenced a San Francisco contractor to a ear in federal prison at a Thursday hearing. Florence Kong, 63, pleaded guilty last year to bribing disgraced ex-public works director Mohammed Nuru with a $36,500 Rolex watch, making improvements to his summer home, and to lying to the FBI when they confronted her. U.S. District Judge William Orrick said Kong had harmed the entire San Francisco community, contributing to “a perception in our country that the system is rigged against honest people in nearly every aspect of public and private life.” “Bribery of a public official is near the top of the worst crimes,” Orrick said. He later added “You’ve helped undermind the faith that San Franciscans have in their government…You were a leader in the community and you chose to cheat and then to lie to the FBI when it gave you a chance to correct those lies.” Before she was sentenced, Kong offered an emotional apology in court. “I’m...
    GOP senator: Public criticism of Trump is punishment enough for inciting a riot
    Trevor Lawrence seems ready to embrace his draft fate, whatever it may be Gift Ideas for Teen Boys That We Promise They Wont Roll Their Eyes At Exxon Calls Massachusetts Fraud Suit Punishment for Opinion (Bloomberg) -- Exxon Mobil Corp. told a judge that a fraud lawsuit filed by Massachusetts last year amounts to illegal punishment for the energy giant’s views about fossil fuels, the latest twist in their bitter clash over climate change. © Photographer: Spencer Platt/Getty Images North America NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 28: A sign for an Exxon gas station stands in a Brooklyn neighborhood on October 28, 2016 in New York City. As lower gas prices continue to do damage to oil companies, the world's largest publicly traded oil producer reported a 38% decline in quarterly profit. Exxon shares were down 1% to $86.04 late Friday morning. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) The suit by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey should be dismissed because it violates a state law prohibiting litigation that has the effect of punishing a defendant for statements on public policy...
    Prince Harry is receiving harsh criticism for appearing to suggest that the novel coronavirus pandemic — which so far has infected over 65 million people around the globe and claimed 1.5 million lives — is a form of punishment from Mother Earth after years of human pollution. The redheaded prince made the comments earlier this week while on a video call with WaterBear, per Sky News. The company aims to create environmentally focused documentaries to raise awareness about climate causes. The duke has been vocal about his commitment to eco-related charities, despite receiving criticism in the past about his own private jet usage. During the discussion, Prince Harry repeated a comment by a friend which likened the COVID-19 crisis to a form of punishment from nature. “Somebody said to me at the beginning of the pandemic, it’s almost as though Mother Nature has sent us to our rooms for bad behavior, to really take a moment and think about what we’ve done,” he said. The comments quickly received backlash from members of the public, many of whom called the metaphor...
    A CHILD rapist collapsed and begged for mercy after he was flogged 146 times with a cane during a public whipping. Pictures show a masked member of the religious police carry out the punishment of the 19-year-old in Aceh, Indonesia. 8The 19-year-old was flogged 146 times by a member of the religious policeCredit: AFP or licensors 8A crowd gathered to watch the man being whipped in Aceh, IndonesiaCredit: AFP or licensors 8The was seen by a medic following his collapseCredit: AFP or licensors During the whipping, the man pleaded for the punishment to stop and was briefly treated by a medic before the caning restarted, the Mail Online reported. The teenager was arrested earlier this year on charges that he molested and raped a minor. The paedophile was sentenced to 146 lashes, a serious punishment only keep for the most heinous of crimes. Ivan Nanhhar Alavi, an official from the East Aceh prosecutor's office told reporters that "the maximum sentence is meant to be a deterrent." The punishment is dolled out as part of a version of Islamic religious law - known...
    CINCINNATI — A Shawnee State University professor suing his employer for unlawful punishment tried to revive his case at the Sixth Circuit of Appeals Thursday. This case, originally dismissed by U.S. District Judge Susan Dlott in February, was heard by a panel including U.S. Circuit Judges: Amul Thapar, David McKeague and Joan Larsen. Nicholas Meriwether, a humanities professor at SSU since 1996, claimed his punishment for not addressing a student by their preferred gender pronouns was in violation of religious and philosophical freedoms provided by the First and 14th Amendments. “Here, University officials masquerade their mandated ideology as a mere matter of etiquette and civility,” reads the brief filed by Meriwether. “In reality, they are requiring Dr. Meriwether to say or avoid certain words to convey approval of their substantive view that sex is a matter of subjective self-perception rather than physiology, contrary to his beliefs.” Arguing for Meriwether, Attorney John Bursch of Alliance Defending Freedom claimed past courts had wrongly concluded that his client had no free speech as faculty of a public university and his speech was not...
    Jakarta, Indonesia (CNN)Villagers who refuse to wear masks are being forced to dig graves for victims of Covid-19 by local authorities in one part of rural Indonesia, in the hopes that a little bit of manual labor and empathy will convince others to do their part to help stop the pandemic. Three middle aged men and five minors in Cerme district of Gresik Regency, East Java, were given the unique punishment on September 9, authorities said. Though mask-wearing is mandatory in public throughout Indonesia, there has been a vocal segment of the population that has been reluctant to wear masks and practice social distancing. A coffin containing a coronavirus victim is buried in Indonesia's East Jakarta City. Experts say the lack of public vigilance has made it more difficult for Indonesian authorities to stymie the spread of the virus, which to date has infected nearly 230,000 people in the country. More than 160,000 of those patients have recovered, while at least 9,100 have died.As cases spiked in recent months, Indonesia's government passed a law in July requiring people to...
    NEW YORK - When the New York Police Department fired an officer last year for putting Eric Garner in a deadly chokehold, the officer's union argued that there was little, if any, precedent within the department's internal disciplinary system for such a penalty.  Now, the nation's largest police department is spelling out potential ramifications for officer misconduct, unveiling on Monday a draft of a discipline matrix that will guide punishment decisions similarly to how sentencing guidelines are used in criminal cases. It will be adopted after a 30-day public comment period.  "We wanted to make it very, very clear that if you do certain things there are certain consequences," said Assistant Chief Matthew Pontillo, who helped develop the disciplinary policies with the help from department officials and outside agencies.  Mayor Bill de Blasio called it a "big step forward for transparency and accountability." Fred Davie, chair of the city's police watchdog agency, said he was "encouraged by some of the clear standards laid out in this new set of rules."  Police reform advocates weren't as enthused, arguing the NYPD...
    NEW YORK (AP) — When the New York Police Department fired an officer last year for putting Eric Garner in a deadly chokehold, the officer’s union argued that there was little, if any, precedent within the department’s internal disciplinary system for such a penalty. Now, the nation’s largest police department is spelling out potential ramifications for officer misconduct, unveiling on Monday a draft of a discipline matrix that will guide punishment decisions similarly to how sentencing guidelines are used in criminal cases. It will be adopted after a 30-day public comment period. “We wanted to make it very, very clear that if you do certain things there are certain consequences,” said Assistant Chief Matthew Pontillo, who helped develop the disciplinary policies with the help from department officials and outside agencies. Mayor Bill de Blasio called it a “big step forward for transparency and accountability.” Messages seeking comment were left with the city’s largest police union and the city’s police watchdog agency, as well as various organizations that have advocated for police reform. The NYPD is shifting to formal disciplinary guidelines...
    A BRITISH ex-public schoolboy flogged naked in a Singapore jail for dealing drugs has revealed the beating was so severe it left him unable to sit. Ye Ming Yuen, 31, was strapped to a large wooden A-frame bench before being brutally whipped 24 times in the 'caning room' at Changi Prison. 7London-born Ye Ming Yuen, 31, has been flogged 24 times in SingaporeCredit: Instagram 7He was strapped to a large wooden bench before being caned multiple timesCredit: Instagram Now the shocking extent of his injuries have been revealed after he was beaten with a four ft bamboo cane soaked in water to increase its strength. And the welts on his buttocks are so severe they are still bleeding, reports the Daily Mail. "The first thing Ming said when he came into the prison visiting room was 'see this' and pulled his shorts down at the back and it just looked horrendous," said Ravi Madasamy, who is Yuen’s human rights lawyer. "All over his buttocks were multiple marks and deep lacerations. It was so shocking my female paralegal who was...
    A VIRAL video of a man spanking a child in public has sparked a debate about whether the punishment was too harsh. The video shows a man, who many commenters believe is the child's grandfather, repeatedly smacking a young boy on the bottom. 4A viral video of a man spanking a young boy has sparked a debate onlineCredit: Twitter 4Many believe the punishment was too harsh, while others say it's just part of disciplining a childCredit: Twitter He then tells a female child sitting next to the boy to, "Sit your a** down." The video has been viewed millions of times after being shared on Twitter, Facebook and Reddit, and sparked much debate from commenters about the correct way to discipline children. While many commenters said they were spanked when they were out of line as children and turned out fine, others said making children fear you is a poor way to parent. "This is gross and anyone condoning it is disgusting as well," wrote one Twitter user who goes by the name Zach Hayes. "If you have to...
    Most Major League Baseball players are happy to see their season finally start this month after it was delayed for months by the COVID-19 pandemic. Reese McGuire likely is just happy he is able to re-join his team at all following an offseason run-in with the law. TMZ reported Friday that McGuire, 25 and entering his third season with the Blue Jays, recently pled nolo contendere to a reduced second-degree misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct. The charge stemmed from an incident in February when McGuire was accused of masturbating in his car while parked in a public parking lot. According to TMZ, McGuire’s plea deal let him off with “nothing more than fines and costs,” adding that the original first-degree misdemeanor charge could have landed him up to a year in prison if convicted. The Blue Jays have not commented on McGuire’s plea deal. The incident that occurred in Dunedin, Fla., was explained by TMZ after it obtained the police report: “According to the report … cops say after they rolled up to the parking lot, they saw McGuire with his shirt ‘barely covering his genitals’ and his sweatpants around...
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