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    The Advocates for Youth director explained that she uses hula hoops to teach young children about bodily autonomy. The NPR article explained that Gelperin provides each student with one and instructs the children to ask for permission to go inside another student's hula hoop. Gelperin stated, "If someone is touching you inside your boundary in a way that makes you uncomfortable, it's OK to say no and talk to a trusted adult." The Advocates for Youth director recommended that sex education lessons on puberty begin in the fourth grade. Gelperin suggested that middle school students learn about reproduction, biological terms, feelings of attraction, and sexually transmitted diseases. "That for me is a real hallmark of middle school sex education, is kind of really starting to understand how those parts and systems work together for reproduction," Gelperin said. She also recommended teaching middle school students about "gender expression and sexual orientation, as well as gender stereotypes." The article outlined an Advocates for Youth lesson where students are instructed to find examples of gender stereotypes in advertisements. The...
    Governor Brian Kemp this week provided an update on the success of his administration’s teacher pipeline initiatives: “When I took office in 2019, I promised to put students and teachers first, and my administration has done just that,” said Governor Brian Kemp. “During my time in office, we have raised teacher salaries by $5,000, cut certification costs by 67.25 percent, strengthened professional development opportunities for educators, and reduced the number of high-stakes assessments that were creating undue burdens on our teachers and students without sacrificing quality. “In Georgia, teachers know that they have my family’s full support, and I am proud to announce today that our initiatives have positioned us well-above the national average with an overall retention rate of 67 percent,” continued Governor Kemp. “Furthermore, this year, we are projected to have 10,000 teachers entering the workforce in Georgia, and we look forward to continuing to build our pipeline while supporting our brand new educators, existing teachers, and those looking to return to the classroom in the years to come.” Governor Kemp’s education...
    DCPS Persists started in 2020 and is modeled after smaller programs elsewhere around the country that aim to help graduating students who go on to college make it long enough to graduate and get their degrees. WTOP/John Domen Hundreds of students were dropping in at Bancroft Elementary in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood Wednesday to get free swag, some lunch and treats and other items at the first DCPS Persists send-off. WTOP/John Domen A program that’s been helping high school graduates of D.C. public schools since 2020 navigate the college application process, as well as the college experience, finally got to “send off” its students in person. WTOP/John Domen (1/3) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. A program that’s been helping high school graduates of D.C. public schools navigate the college application process since 2020, as well as the college experience, finally got to “send off” its students in person. Hundreds of students were dropping in at Bancroft Elementary in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood Wednesday to get free swag, some...
    America’s second-largest school district is teaming up with various left-wing organizations to promote child transgenderism. The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) has teamed up with a number of leftwing organizations to provide teachers with children’s books that promote transgenderism and corresponding lesson plans. Open Books, previously named Gender Nation, is an organization that aims to “validate children with LGBTQ+ storytelling” by furnishing public schools with books that endorse child transgenderism. The LAUSD Human Relations, Diversity and Equity website explains that the district received “an enormous donation of LGBTQIA-themed books that are developmentally appropriate for elementary and span schools” from the organization. Among the books that the organization provided to the LAUSD is “I am Jazz” by Jazz Jennings, a story about a boy who wants to change his sex. The book description explains “From the time she was two years old, Jazz knew that she had a girl’s brain in a boy’s body.” The book is paired with a document on “Trans Topics” from the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, which recommends the book for students in grades K-five. The document articulates that teachers who read...
    Bulloch County School’s Graduation Performance Academy provides course recovery options for high school students to help them graduate on time with their class. Did you not receive credit for a course? Do you need more credits in order to graduate on time? The Graduation Performance Academy, Bulloch County Schools’ course recovery program, is now accepting high school students for spring semester.   The program allows students to catch up on any of the required 24 academic course credits they need to graduate high school in four years. Interested students should contact their school counselor for more information and an application. Space is limited.   The Graduation Performance Academy’s free sessions give students access to E-2020 online academic course content and a certified teacher. While students may complete coursework at their own schedule and pace, school district faculty are available for virtual office hours and virtual tutoring Monday through Thursday, 4 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. to assist students.   Remember, high school graduation is not based on promotion from one grade level to...
    One of the nation’s largest student loan servicers has agreed to relieve $1.85 billion in loan debt to help settle a blockbuster lawsuit filed by 38 states and the District of Columbia, authorities announced Thursday. Under the terms of the settlement, Navient Corp and its subsidiary Navient Solutions LLC will restitution payments of roughly $260 each to 350,000 borrowers, Acting New Jersey Attorney General Andrew J. Bruck said. It will also cancel more than $1.7 billion in subprime private student loans owed by 66,000 or so borrowers nationwide, he said.The settlement includes approximately $57.2 million in debt relief to 2,040 New Jersey borrowers and $3.1 million in restitution payments to 11,522 other Garden State residents, Bruck said. The state itself will also receive $3 million, he said. The borrowers who will receive restitution or forgiveness "span all generations," the attorney general said. Navient’s "harmful conduct impacted everyone from students who enrolled in colleges and universities immediately after high school to mid-career students who dropped out after enrolling in a for-profit school in the early 2000s," he said. Parents or grandparents...
                 Arizona Governor Doug Ducey on Tuesday pledged to continue in-person learning for students across the state, even if it requires unconventional methods. Ducey created the Open for Learning Recovery Benefit program, which will provide financial assistance to families who may face unexpected barriers due to school closures. Specifically, the new state program will grant up to $7,000 to parents for certain child care, school transportation, and online tutoring or school tuition needs. The funds will be available to parents who meet the income requirements and “a school closes for even one day,” according to the governor’s office. “In Arizona, we’re going to ensure continued access to in-person learning,” said Governor Ducey in a statement. “Everyone agrees that schools should stay open and kids need to be in the classroom. With this announcement, we are making sure parents and families have options if a school closes its doors. Parents are best suited to make decisions about their child’s education. In-person learning is vital for the development, well-being and educational needs of K-12 students. We will continue to work with...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Back 2 School Illinois (B2SI) is a Chicago-based nonprofit and the largest free school supplies program in the state, helping tens of thousands of under-served children get the supplies they need to increase their self-esteem and better perform academically while also lessening the financial burden felt by their families.Each year there are approximately 1.2 million students in Illinois living in low-income households. This year, that number is likely even higher due to COVID-19 and the economic downturn.RELATED: Teen's nonprofit brings holiday cheer to foster kidsEMBED More News Videos This 15-year-old from Spring raised enough money to take 225 foster children shopping for Christmas! ???????????? Its "Make a World of Difference" holiday campaign runs through Friday, and hopes to raise funds to support the nonprofit's ongoing work to provide educational opportunities for underserved Illinois children. The holiday campaign's goal is to raise the funds necessary to distribute 5,000 Back 2 School kits to 5,000 Illinois children and their families this holiday season.A little donation to Back 2 School Illinois' holiday campaign can make a big difference:- $19: Provides...
    California State University Long Beach invited students and staff to take part in a "debrief" event of the Kyle Rittenhouse trial where "Counseling and Psychological Services staff will be present." "Join us for a facilitated conversation to debrief the verdict in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial. This discussion is hosted by the Division of Student Affairs and is open to all CSULB students, staff, & faculty," the event flyer reads.  "**Counseling and Psychological Services staff will be present," the flyer notes. The event was held last Monday in a virtual setting, and school spokesman Jim Milbury described the forum as "unstructured" in a comment to The College Fix. It was hosted by team members from the school’s Student Affairs Division. MASSACHUSETTS UNIVERSITY HOSTS SEGREGATED 'PROCESSING' SPACES FOR RESPONDING TO RITTENHOUSE VERDICT "When there are higher-profile events and issues in the public discourse, it is not uncommon for our university to provide spaces for our campus community to discuss those topics," Milbury said. People walk on the California State University Long Beach (CSULB) campus before the return of students for Fall...
    Victoria Lee loved every minute of her college senior project to identify a real-world problem and design a workable solution based on what she learned during her engineering studies. Then after spending too many years of her career in meetings as both the only woman and the only minority in the room, she decided the thing she loved more than problem solving was teaching engineering skills to young people. She thought her break from her first career would be temporary, just long enough to inspire a generation of girls and increase the number of women in those engineering meetings. But 15 years later, Lee is now the architect and mentor for Project Lead the Way at Charles Herbert Flowers High School in Prince George’s County, Md. She is preparing high school students for engineering careers the way she prepared in college, giving them a head start to working in ways they once believed impossible. “I met so many kids who had misconceptions about what it meant to be an engineer,” Lee explained. “They thought you drove a train!” Engaging students...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – The Pittsburgh Promise Scholarship Program got a major boost on Thursday. READ MORE: Man Sentenced For Damaging Greene County Natural Gas Drilling SiteThe PPG Foundation provided the program with a $1 million gift. With the gift, each year, five students will be selected and named “PPG Scholars of the Pittsburgh Promise.” READ MORE: Report Of A Probation Violation Leads To Drug Bus In Washington CountyThose students will have the chance to build relationships and have mentoring experiences with company leaders as they pursue their degrees. “You have used your resources to bring us hope,” said Dr. Wayne Walters, the Pittsburgh Public Schools interim superintendent. “Hope in possibilities, hope in exposure, hope in mentorship, hope in equitable access for our young people to engage in and experience higher education.” MORE NEWS: West Virginia Man With Ties To Extremist Group Sentenced On Weapons ChargeThe Pittsburgh Promise has helped more than 10,000 Pittsburgh students go to college with more than $154 million in scholarships.
    Mills College, a force in women’s education and leadership for nearly 170 years, is stepping onto a larger stage. Through a historic merger, our beloved East Oakland college is bringing its magic to Northeastern University’s global network of campuses. The demographic and economic forces that brought our two institutions together demand that colleges and universities increasingly consider bold partnerships. Ongoing decline in the number of traditional college-age students, increasing costs of a college education, the imperative for equity and access, and the changing needs of the labor force are fueling a mosaic of threats and opportunities. For an increasing number of excellent, but vulnerable, institutions similar to Mills, the alternative to change is closure. Mills and Northeastern each possess strengths needed to meet the challenges upending higher education. Together, we are stronger and will create robust, flexible, and diverse networks for lifelong learning and innovation, accessible to students from all backgrounds. Together, we will offer students, faculty and staff  opportunities that were impossible without our alliance. Mills College, the first women’s college west of the Rockies, is rooted in women’s leadership and committed to equity, access, antiracism and community engagement. Mills is known...
    FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) — The Fort Worth Independent School District Board of Education has approved a temporary virtual learning option for students who have been unable to return to school due to a documented medical condition. The action came at a regularly scheduled meeting on August 24. READ MORE: Six Months After Winter Storms Consumer Advocacy Group Warns Texas Power Grid Still Isnt Prepared In a statement the Fort Worth ISD said: READ MORE: Johnson & Johnson Says Booster Shot Of Its COVID-19 Vaccine Strengthens Immunity “While we know in-person instruction is best for academic success, we also recognize that some medically fragile students need a virtual learning option. This opportunity will be for those younger students –Kindergarten through Sixth Grade –who are unable to receive COVID vaccinations at this time and have a documented medical condition that prevents them from attending school in – person due to COVID – 19.” The Temporary Virtual Learning Option will begin September 13 and continue through the rest of the fall semester. Registration for the option opens at noon on August 25 and...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Diana Bell is known as the heart of Ascot Elementary School. During the pandemic, she went out of her way to provide after school help to all of her students to make sure they thrived."I heard that some people thought this would be a lost year and I felt that it couldn't be. That wasn't an option," Bell said.During the last school year and at the height of the pandemic, Bell would be at school every day at 7:30 in the morning and often stayed late."I admire that she has a passion for teaching with us. She loves teaching and the reason why she loves teaching is because she loves kids," said one of her students, Jade Prado.After they returned to in-person classes, her class was always full. And even after a full day of teaching, she would still sign up to provide after school tutoring to students."I think she's a miracle worker in getting the kids that are not motivated to really care about their education. She's gone over and beyond the call of duty,"...
    OTC Ogeechee Technical College’s Emergency Medical Responder Certificate will help current and prospective responders meet minimum requirements to retain or obtain their licenses. “Beginning October 28th, there is a new minimum standard for responders looking to retain or obtain a license,” said Chris Page, Paramedicine Technology program director. “Completing the EMR certificate will allow students to sit for the National Registry EMR exam and give them the opportunity to apply for a state license.” The State of Georgia Office of EMS and Trauma recently developed a new policy to recognize the skills gained through this certificate and will be issuing licenses to qualifying applicants. Previously only available to dual enrolled students at OTC, the certificate can be completed in one semester and will prepare students to initiate immediate lifesaving care to critical patients who access the emergency medical system. Emergency Medical Responders function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. For more information regarding the Emergency Medical Responder Certificate please visit www.ogeecheetech.edu/EMSP. OTC
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Coppin State University announced its student debt relief initiative that will clear over $1 million in student balances. The relief fund is federally funded by the 2021 American Rescue Plan Act and is available to students enrolled during the Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 semesters. READ MORE: Police Search For Driver In Hit-And-Run Crash That Killed 16-Year-Old Jayden Baldree In Dundalk Coppin will also provide $1,200 to every student, current and incoming, enrolled during the Fall 2021 semester. The credit provided is slightly above 50 percent of in-state tuition. It is set to assist current students by helping to keep them enrolled and encourage newcomers. READ MORE: Delta Variant Cases Doubling Every 2 Weeks In Maryland; Some Fear Return To Restrictions Get alerts from WJZ first! Follow WJZ on Facebook  download the app. MORE NEWS: Nothing Bundt Cakes In Baltimore County Is Full Of Love & Sweet Aromas  
    NORWOOD (CBS) – Just in time for prom season, the Norwood non-profit “Giving The Glam” is helping some high school seniors look their best. The group foots the bill for clothing, accessories, and other fun items for students that can’t afford them, and that allows the kids to simply enjoy their special day. READ MORE: Man Drowns At White Island Pond In Plymouth This is how “Giving the Glam” lives up to its name. The non-profit is helping 52 teens from five schools enjoy their prom experience without worrying about the price tag. It’s the brainchild of Maristela Rapo. “You know to come to this day, that is a prom day, it takes a lot of work,” Rapo says. The kids get it all: gowns, tuxedos, hair, makeup, photos and even door-to-door car service. But with uncertainty of COVID, this year’s planning was crammed into the last few weeks. READ MORE: Injured Hockey Player AJ Quetta Graduates From Bishop Feehan High School “It’s so rewarding because I know each of my participants life. They not only face the financial challenge,...
    Iowa's Department of Human Services (DHS) this week began issuing grocery vouchers to families of students who missed out on receiving reduced-cost school meals due to the coronavirus pandemic. On Wednesday, DHS announced that families with children in pre-K through grade 12 who did not attend school in person during the 2020-21 school year because of pandemic-related closures would be given "P-EBT" cards to help with groceries. Cards will be distributed through the mail to nearly 150,000 eligible children, according to the Des Moines Register. "We want to make Iowa families aware of the arrival of the P-EBT cards to prevent families from throwing the envelopes away, not realizing what they contain,” said Janee Harvey, a DHS administrator overseeing the effort, according to the Register. With the cards, families will receive benefits from eligible days that were missed from September through December 2020. The benefits are set to be deposited onto the cards in June and July of this year, DHS noted. The P-EBT cards will reportedly be accepted at stores that also take SNAP benefits. The state initiated a similar program last year, distributing $308 grocery...
    'Now that they're home, we feel safer,' one parent said. Before schools shuttered during the pandemic, Ayana Johnson worried every time she dropped her daughters off at school. Johnson, a Black woman, says racism is rampant in her predominantly white Georgia town. At her daughters' school, a student once used racial slurs and told another child he doesn't play with "brown people." She says teachers are quick to punish or reprimand Black children and Ku Klux Klan flyers can be found in mailboxes. "I knew from pregnancy on that this would be something we'd have to deal with," said Johnson, who asked that the town not be identified because she was concerned about the potential fallout. "This is the kind of area we live in, so you can imagine that you're always going to feel protective of your children." As schools reopen across the country, Black students have been less likely than white students to enroll in in-person learning — a trend attributed to factors including concerns about the disproportionate...
                        Gov. Mike DeWine signed a law last week that modifies student requirements to provide relief for end-of-year assessments for Ohio students. The law, which aims at providing students with relief during the pandemic, will apply for a single school year. It was co-sponsored by state Reps. Adam Bird (R-66-New Richmond) and Kyle Koehler (R-79-Springfield). In addition to modifying graduation requirements and extending end-of-year testing windows by two weeks, it also allows students in grades 11 and 12 to use end-of-course grades in place of mandated tests to fulfill graduation requirements, waives the state-only American History assessment and allows students educated at home to skip end-of-year assessments. “With the wide inequity of preparation of schools, teachers and students and the wide variety of learning platforms being utilized during the pandemic, it’s only fair that we provide schools, teachers and students with flexibility when it comes to end of year assessments,” Bird said in a statement last week. The law, named House Bill 67, passed nearly unanimously in the legislature....
    By SIOBHAN McANDREW, Reno Gazette Journal RENO, Nev. (AP) — Victoria Vo watched from the back row of her kindergarten class. Her hands lay on her desk with her fingers interlaced. Her eyes were glued to the screen at the front of the brightly decorated classroom at Alice Smith Elementary School in Golden Valley, north of Reno. She watched her teacher replaying video of Amanda Gorman reciting “The Hill We Climb” at the inauguration of President Joe Biden. Teacher Hannah Thrower explained it was a poem being read in Washington, D.C., in front of a large crowd on an historic day. Thrower admitted that the last few lines make her tear up every single time she hears them. Victoria watched, leaning forward in her seat as Gorman, 22, moved her hands gracefully with each line. Then came the end her teacher was talking about. “For there is always light, if only we’re brave enough to see it. If only we’re brave enough to be it.” Victoria, 6, clapped. “That poem is one that will be talked about and I want...
    What does a teenager know about energy usage and costs in their homes? That is one of the questions that Georgia Southern University’s Kania Greer, Ed.D., will ask local students with a new grant-funded program in Effingham County. Greer, coordinator of the College of Education’s Institute for Interdisciplinary STEM Education (i2STEMe) was recently awarded a $30,000 grant from energy company Constellation, an Exelon company, for a partnership with the Effingham College and Career Academy and the Effingham County Schools STEM Program. The project, called Engaging Students in Engineering Education (E-SEE), will bring the curriculum to over 200 students in Effingham County through the lens of smart home devices. “Smart devices are all around us,” said Greer. “More and more students are utilizing this technology daily to access different aspects of their lives. However, not many students realize how many smart devices are in their home. From simple to complex, these devices can have an impact on energy usage — from regulating temperature to turning off lights.” For the next few...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Despite the pandemic, the Union League Boys and Girls club in Pilsen is continuing to serve its neighbors in the best way it can.When school started this fall, the club opened its doors and provided kids with e-learning assistance, access to wifi and meals - three times a day."If we want to make sure that our kids have all the energy that they need to stay in class and really get their work done throughout the day, we've got to make sure that they have food," Program Director Anabel Hernandez said.The club opened in 1919, intending to serve community youth. Since then, the mission has grown even stronger and the ties to local organizations have too."Through our partnership with the Greater Chicago Food Depository, we've been able to provide over 200,000 meals. Not only our kids that are enrolled in our clubs, but to our families throughout the communities that we serve," said Anastasia Hernandez, club director.Hernandez and her team help more than 100 CPS students every day, ensuring that no kid goes home hungry."I like the...
    The U.S. Congress has approved a $2.3 trillion catchall bill that includes $900 billion in COVID-19 aid and $1.4 trillion to fund the government through the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 2021. The measure, which President Donald Trump is expected to sign into law, provides billions of dollars to American households and businesses that have been hard hit by the country’s coronavirus crisis. But the $2.3 billion bill also funds hundreds of initiatives unrelated to the virus, including a tax cut for corporate meals, a prohibition on surprise medical bills and the restoration of need-based grants for incarcerated college students. Here are some of the highlights of the omnibus bill: Omnibus appropriations Twelve spending bills folded into the $1.4 trillion measure funds government agency operating budgets through September 30, 2021; provides a $12.5 billion increase over existing budget limits for domestic initiatives; cuts Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention and removal expenses by $431 million. Provides sustained defense spending and funding for energy provisions; upholds bans on federal funding of abortion; provides a final $1.4 billion installment for...
    DENVER (CBS4)– A new high school in the Montbello neighborhood is the creation of Denver-native and East High School graduate, Robert F. Smith. The Robert F. Smith STEAM Academy will embrace science, technology, engineering, arts and math. It’s founded on the principles of historically Black colleges and universities. (credit: DPS) “When I think about what it took to create the STEAM academy, it occurs to me it wasn’t actually about starting a school. It was about building a village,” said Smith. The school’s principal and HBCU graduate, Shakira Abney-Wisdom, hopes students will experience the same sense of community that she felt at Florida A&M University. “From the time I was in pre-K through graduate school I went to predominantly white institutions. Just stepping on the campus at A&M, it felt like I belonged, just seeing students who looked like me, professors who looked like me. It’s something that’s difficult to articulate if you haven’t experienced it, but it’s just that sense of community and family,” said Abney-Wisdom. (credit: CBS) According to Denver Public School, the STEAM Academy is grounded in...
    The University of Maryland’s student government association has allocated more than $400,000 for “critical services” to “support students in need,” it said. The University of Maryland Student Government Association said it was able to allocate $410,249 due to a surplus of funds from the fall semester and “as result of the abrupt change in the circumstances of the 2020 spring semester” due to the coronavirus pandemic. The SGA said the surplus will allow it to “follow through with our goals and expand student services through the allocation of $410,249 to various funds, programs and initiatives.” How the SGA funds will be divided up, is broken down below. $48,000 for the supply of free feminine hygiene products is bathrooms across campus $10,000 to provide free mental health first aid training over the next two semesters $5,000 to the Emergency Meal Fund to provide students who face food insecurity with temporary free meals from UMD dinning halls $47,249 to the Campus Pantry to support the installment of a full and functional Culinary Training Center to provide students with a space to...
    The Ogeechee Technical College OASIS Food Pantry partnered with the OTC Foundation to provide 27 student families with a Thanksgiving dinner during the holiday break. In early November, Beckie Snyder, Administrative Assistance to AVPSA, sent out a call to the college for donations to help prepare Thanksgiving dinner packages for families in need. “We had such an overwhelming response from our faculty, staff, and students,” said Snyder. “Within a matter of days, we had enough donated goods to put together meal packages for dozens of families.” Among the items that were donated were canned goods like corn, yams, green beans, and cranberry sauce, as well as boxed and bagged goods like rice, macaroni and cheese, potatoes, and marshmallows. Each thanksgiving meal came with a turkey that the OTC Foundation and the OASIS Food Pantry partnered together to provide. “It was such a pleasure to be able to partner with Beckie to help provide our students with a special meal for thanksgiving this year,” said, Michelle Davis, VP for College Advancement. “We are...
    Eighty-nine schools in more than 30 Tennessee school districts will receive a total of about $700,000 in grants to fund science, technology, engineering and math education (STEM) programs, as well as career and technical education (CTE), the Tennessee Department of Education announced Monday. "Ensuring our students have access to high-quality STEM and career and technical education is essential to building college and career readiness, and that work really begins before a student even enters high school,” Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn said in a statement. The money will be provided to the school districts Dec. 1, and the funding was provided through Gov. Bill Lee’s Future Workforce Initiative, which is designed to increase access to school classroom STEM and CTE training. Grants were awarded after a competitive application process to recipients who prioritize aligning STEM and CTE courses from middle school to high school and provide career advice and job pathways for students. School grant recipients will use the funds to create new ways for students to encounter and explore potential careers. “Cumberland County has three...
    DENVER (CBS4)– Getting food on the table this Thanksgiving could be harder than year’s past due to the economic impact of the pandemic. Strive Prep, a community of public charter schools, is stepping up to help meet their needs in more ways than one. (credit: CBS) Tammy Allmer is a mom of 7 kids. She’s been hit hard by the pandemic. “People’s work got cut, hours got cut, so times are rough,” Allmer told CBS4’s Andrea Flores. “I don’t want my kids suffering. I make ends meet as much as I can, but you can only do so much.” Her family is just one of 70 getting a free turkey from Strive Prep, a system of charter schools in the Denver metro area. “The social workers and psychologists were able to identify families that have the highest, needs whether it’s financial or housing, or they’re struggling overall, so we wanted to be able to give them something to be able to enjoy this Thanksgiving holiday with their family,” said Christina Amparan, Director of Advocacy for Strive Prep. (credit: CBS) Strive...
    SANTA CLARA, Calif. (KGO) -- The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) ensures that riders are safe while riding public transportation during COVID-19. During this time, VTA continues to service students attending Mission College.Located in the heart of Silicon Valley since 1975, Mission College is a two-year community college. The public college offers a VTA smart pass for students when they enroll in classes to ride the transit for free.About 500 students use the VTA smart pass clipper card to ride both the light rail and buses. The nearest light rain stations to Mission College are Great America or Old Ironsides. VTA has direct access by bus lines (20, 57, 59) and nearby light rail service at Old Ironsides Station to Mission College.For more information on VTA services, click here.
    There is still no date set for Montgomery County, Maryland, schools students to return to their classrooms, but the Board of Education did hear from the superintendent on the issue this week. Superintendent Dr. Jack Smith told the board Tuesday, “Everyone understands that we’re not going to open the schools tomorrow,” Smith said. But he said the board would have to keep planning for the eventual return of students, repeating that talking about the plans shouldn’t be seen as a signal that reopening is imminent. “It’s going to take a tremendous amount of planning and logistical building of systems and structures in order to open schools,” Smith said. Board member Patricia O’Neill asked about the progress the school system is making on upgrading HVAC systems and installing filters in order to improve ventilation — a concern tied to making schools safer during the pandemic. “We are doing the work,” Smith said, but he noted that there’s a request for supplemental funding before the Montgomery County Council. “If we don’t receive that supplementary funding, then we’re going to take that money...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — With so many kids doing at-home learning, they need an outlet to socialize, express themselves and exercise. That’s why many families are grateful that musical theater schools in our area have found creative ways to continue teaching and performing. Nothing will stop the kids from dancing, singing and acting their hearts out. Fourteen-year-old Adam Ash at Center for Theater Arts in Mt. Lebanon said, “It gives a sense of normalcy. And with everything else canceled, there’s still at least one thing that I can look forward to for actually seeing other people in person.” The students at the Center for Theater Arts are learning how to act with their eyes, through a clear plastic wall on wheels, and dance big even in a small space. For many of the kids, the center is the only place that they get out of the house because they have to social distance from friends and are doing school at home. Fourteen-year-old Lili Popcak drives an hour from Steubenville to get here. (Photo Credit: KDKA) “To have this...
    The Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) Foundation awarded nearly $100,000 this fall to all 22 TCSG colleges via The Last Mile Fund. The Fund provides financial assistance to students who are at risk of dropping out of college due to the inability to pay tuition or fees to their respective college. “We do everything we can to help ensure our students stay on track to graduate and are ready to join Georgia’s workforce,” said TCSG Commissioner, Greg Dozier. “The Last Mile Fund directly affects the ability of TCSG to retain and graduate more students each year, thereby providing a stronger skilled workforce for our state.” According to a recent economic impact study conducted by TCSG, every dollar invested in a TCSG student results in $7.10 in higher future earnings over that student’s lifetime. The Last Mile Fund plays an important role in helping more students get across the finish line and reap the benefits of their investment. “What we have found is that students who are at risk of...
    SAN ANTONIO – The University of Texas at San Antonio is offering a free online tutoring service that will provide its students with academic help around the clock, a press release said. The TutorMe pilot initiative began this fall semester and is designed to meet to meet the needs of students 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “With the shift to online learning, we knew we needed to enhance accessible, relevant and effective virtual/online academic support to our undergraduate students to better assist them in reaching their educational goals,” said Tammy Wyatt, UTSA vice provost for Student Success. “TutorMe provides that extra layer of support to ensure students are successful in this learning environment.” UTSA said TutorMe currently provides access to qualified tutors from universities around the globe in 21 courses and covers more than 100 sections in the College of Business, College for Health, Community and Policy, College of Liberal and Fine Arts and the College of Sciences. Sessions are recorded so students can play it back at their convenience. Students enrolled in participating courses in the...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — With the new school year officially in full swing, it’s important to make sure every student has access to proper technology and devices for distance learning. That’s exactly why on Friday some students in Baltimore City picked up new Chromebooks thanks to a partnership with Verizon’s innovative learning initiative. This program was actually created before the pandemic, but teachers and parents say with the switch to virtual learning, it couldn’t have come at a better time. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Bridging the digital divide is the goal of Verizon’s innovative learning initiative. “I came to pick up our new laptops for school,” sixth-grader Kattery Magna Delacruz said. Delacruz is just one of the students in Baltimore City Public Schools picking up one of the over 1,300 Chromebooks being distributed thanks to a partnership with the Verizon network. Graceland Park/O’Donnell Heights Elementary/Middle School and four other schools in the city are a part of the program. Johanna Mullaly is the Principal of Graceland...
    SANTA ANA, Calif. (KABC) -- School bus drivers turned into high-speed internet providers Tuesday as part of a pilot program to improve Wi-Fi access to students going to school via distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.Eleven-year-old Brianna Montes is a Santa Ana Unified School District student experiencing a barrier to education made more difficult to overcome by distance learning."The Wi-Fi was too slow, and I couldn't do any of my work because it would log me off of my computer," Montes said.The Sierra Preparatory Academy student said it was impossible for her and her siblings, seven students total, to log on and go to school all at the same time.Paying attention to child's emotions is key to successful virtual learning, teachers sayEMBED More News Videos Even the best designed online courses in reading or math may not be as enriching as they could be if teachers aren't able to get a sense of how students are coping emotionally. "I have a lot of siblings and they all connect to it and if I connect to it, it logs me out...
    SANTA ANA (CBSLA) — Help has arrived for Santa Ana siblings Brianna and Jaden Montes who have been struggling with spotty WiFi since school started. Black vans provided by JFK Transportation park in Santa Ana neighborhoods in order to provide high-speed internet for students. (CBSLA) “It’s going to be way easier than it was before,” Brianna said. The black van on the curb below their apartment window pumps out a 5G wireless signal that allows not only the Montes siblings, but also other students in the densely populated neighborhood, to connect to the internet so they can attend class. The program is a response to families — especially those in communities hardest hit by COVID-19 — telling Santa Ana Unified School District that connectivity was the biggest challenge of remote learning. “To not only help students better learn, but maybe their parents don’t have to go out as much to look for technology or students don’t have to go out to the local McDonald’s or local Starbucks to connect to the internet,” Fermin Leal, SAUSD director of communications, said. “So,...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City With the beginning of the school year just around the corner, elected officials and other organizations gave away supplies and books to local Bronx families last week. On Aug. 19, the Office of the Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr., in conjunction with AT&T, The Fresh Air Fund, and the New York Public Library, hosted a pop-up “Back to School Literacy” event. Deputy Borough President Marricka Scott-McFadden, who was joined by Councilwoman Vanessa Gibson, helped give away over 1,000 kits and books at The Fresh Air Fund Summer Spaces Program site, located at 1155 Cromwell Ave. in Highbridge. The Fresh Air Fund’s “Fresh Air Summer Spaces” program was created in response to COVID-19, offering fun, free, and safe play spaces for children ages 5 through 13. Fresh Air Summer Spaces allowed children the chance to enjoy safe, supervised outdoor summer activities such as arts and crafts, interactive games, and dance parties. “The global COVID-19 pandemic has created hardships for many throughout our...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Technology is now an essential part of learning for many children across Maryland who are about to begin school virtually. But not every family can afford the computers and tablets that are needed to keep students in class. Now, United Way is working to bridge the digital gap. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Tablets are critical school supplies for students at Ben Franklin High School this coming semester. “They’re not able to access teaching and learning if they don’t have technology,” Kelly Oglesbee, Community School Coordinator at Benjamin Franklin High School, said. Every junior and senior is getting an Amazon Fire Tablet so no one misses out on class that’s now gone all virtual. “Having that Amazon Fire is going to help us a lot just because we’ll be able to have access without having to try to find a computer,” Monica Hamilton, a mother of two Benjamin Franklin High School students, said. United Way is paying for all of the tablets through...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Technology is now an essential part of learning for many children across Maryland who are about to begin school virtually. But not every family can afford the computers and tablets that are needed to keep students in class. Now, United Way is working to bridge the digital gap. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Tablets are critical school supplies for students at Ben Franklin High School this coming semester. “They’re not able to access teaching and learning if they don’t have technology,” Kelly Oglesbee, Community School Coordinator at Benjamin Franklin High School, said. Every junior and senior is getting an Amazon Fire Tablet so no one misses out on class that’s now gone all virtual. “Having that Amazon Fire is going to help us a lot just because we’ll be able to have access without having to try to find a computer,” Monica Hamilton, a mother of two Benjamin Franklin High School students, said. United Way is paying for all of the tablets through...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The Los Angeles Unified School District has announced the launch of a COVID-19 testing and contact tracing program.The program will provide regular COVID-19 testing and contact tracing for school staff, students and their families, according to the district.LAUSD will start the program Monday in a "measured fashion with a focus on carefully fine-tuning systems and operational logistics as the new school year starts." Fall semester begins Tuesday.RELATED: Despite online learning this fall, LAUSD rolling out rigorous cleaning practices at all campusesEMBED More News Videos Most students will be starting the new school year online but a lot needs to be done on campuses to ensure students are safe when they eventually return to classrooms. The goal is to get students and staff back in the classroom sooner for in-person instruction.The initial testing will establish a baseline, and the first people to get tested will be staff members who are already back at schools, and their own children who are in L.A. Unified child care programs.Over time, testing will expand to all staff and students."The goal in...
    Academics heading again to NYC faculties are tackling COVID-19 on their very own — by asking for donations to allow them to replenish on protecting gear. Not trusting town to maintain them infection-free, some lecturers are pleading for masks, hand sanitizers and thermometers on websites like Donors Select, the place lecturers usually request money for books and academic initiatives. “It’s positively not regular for lecturers to go on Donors Select, GoFundMe or Amazon Want Record to ask for clearing provides,” stated Annie Tan, a special-ed instructor in Sundown Park, Brooklyn. Mayor Invoice de Blasio is resisting calls by the principals’ and lecturers’ unions, and the Metropolis Council’s schooling chairman, Mark Treyger, to delay the varsity reopening to higher gird towards spreading the virus. However with the Sept. 10 beginning date quick approaching, educators say the DOE has not given them sufficient details about what tools and provides it would present for security and sanitation. “They’ve given us assurances that they’re prepared. They’re clearly not,” Tan stated. Amongst these requested funds on Donors Select: • ”Mr. Kozak,” a instructor...
    Six-wheeled robots independently navigating the streets and sidewalks on Georgia Southern’s Statesboro Campus may look a little strange. But it will soon be commonplace as these ground robots, which look like a cooler on wheels, have been mapping routes to campus locations in preparation for contactless food delivery this fall. Thanks to a partnership with Starship Technologies, Georgia Southern is the first university in the state to provide faculty, staff and students with 20 autonomous delivery robots to deliver food from on-campus dining locations to designated pickup locations. “Eagle Dining Services is excited to offer our students a new means of service with innovative technology,” said Jeff Yawn, executive director of Eagle Dining Services. “These robots allow us to serve more areas of campus, safely and securely in these unprecedented times.” Starting Aug. 10, Starship’s robots will deliver food ordered on the Starship app from University dining facilities and places such as Starbucks, Market Street Deli and Sushi with Gusto to patrons around campus. The robots, which are...
    DENTON, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – About 900 elementary school children are taking part in Denton ISD’s summer learning program at campuses across the district this week, giving insight into what it may look like when students go back to the classroom in late August. “I mean, honestly, it’s not as different as I expected it to be,” said Angie Marshall, who is teaching rising second graders at Cross Oaks Elementary School. Though the changes look big – masks, hand sanitizer stations and smaller classes – she says the learning is the same. Students hadn’t been back in the classroom since they left for Spring Break in March. Denton ISD summer learning program for elementary school kids (Caroline Vandergriff – CBS 11). “Having kids in our building was something we were definitely missing,” said Matt Preston, principal of Cross Oaks Elementary School. “So seeing it even on a smaller scale has brought a lot of joy to our hearts.” The day starts with a health screening for the 55 students who are coming to Cross Oaks for the district’s Jump Start program....
    NEW JERSEY (CBS) – In-person kindergarten through 12th-grade instruction will be permitted starting in September for New Jersey schools. The announcement was made Friday afternoon by Governor Phil Murphy and education officials. Download The New And Improved CBS Philly App! School buildings have been closed since mid-March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Local districts will be required to come up with their own plans to make sure students and staff are practicing social distancing.  Those plans must be submitted to the Department of Education at least four weeks prior to the start of the school year for approval. While some level of in-person instruction is required, the state is encouraging districts to come up with a hybrid approach that includes remote learning. Teachers, staff and school visitors will be required to wear masks. Meanwhile, students are encouraged to wear masks when social distancing isn’t possible. Desks and work stations must be six feet apart from each other. If that is not possible, schools may use physical barriers such as plexiglass to separate students. The same applies to schools buses....
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