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    MENDON, Mo. (AP) — Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board were in Missouri Tuesday trying to determine how an Amtrak train carrying more than 200 people slammed into a dump truck, killing two train passengers and the truck driver. Amtrak’s Southwest Chief was traveling from Los Angeles to Chicago Monday afternoon when it struck a dump truck and derailed at the crossing near Mendon. It wasn’t immediately clear how many people were hurt but hospitals near the western Missouri accident scene reported receiving more than 40 patients from the crash. The Missouri State Highway Patrol said the train was carrying about 207 passengers and crew, but Amtrak said in a statement there were 275 passengers and 12 crew. The disparity could not immediately be resolved. The collision derailed seven cars, according to the Missouri State Highway Patrol. The truck was broken into pieces. The crossing in a rural area about 84 miles (135 kilometers) northeast of Kansas City has no lights or other signals to warn of an approaching train, and local residents have complained that the overgrowth...
    This content is provided by MCDOT. For the past 47 years, Ride On has been at the forefront of transit growth and opportunity in Montgomery County. The bus service has continued to learn and adapt to the growing needs of the community, economy and environment. To fully grasp where Ride On is headed, it’s worth looking at where it has been. The Ride On system, the first county-run bus service in the Washington, DC area, debuted in 1975 with 20 buses and was designed to provide service in Takoma Park and Silver Spring where large buses could not travel. The service also included a dial-a-ride operation in Gaithersburg. Deemed to be more efficient economically than other public transportation options at the time, within weeks of its introduction, the bus service was transporting twice the number of riders originally projected – nearly 2,000 passengers each day. Three years after Ride On started service, Montgomery County expanded the popular bus service to 22 routes with 79 buses. This move increased ridership from about 4,000 passengers per day to more than 12,000. The...
    DENVER (CBS4)– Denver International Airport leaders Thursday tried to make the case for the need for a $1.1 to $1.3 billion Phase Three of the Great Hall reconstruction project. (credit: CBS) “This is the best time to finish what we started. This terminal and this airport and this airport is 26 years old and is showing its age,” said CEO Phil Washington. “A new terminal sets us up for the next 20 or 30 years.” Years when the airport is estimated to see an increase of 30% in passenger traffic to as many as 100 million a year. The airport needs city council approval as it hopes to float bonds that would be repaid with airport fees on things like passenger travel and parking. A business committee has already signed off on the plan. “I’ve been around a lot of projects where folks do it halfway and all of that. No, we need to do it right for the benefit of our region,” said Washington. It comes after rough sledding in the early part of the Great...
    Polaris Lounge, United Airlines’ $41 million VIP space for certain passengers awaiting long-haul flights at Dulles International Airport, opens to the public Thursday. The sixth Polaris lounge in the U.S. offers amenities reserved for business-class international passengers. The Dulles lounge, which occupies 21,000 square feet near the Terminal C18 gate, will be the only open United (NASDAQ: UAL) lounge of its kind once it debuts this week. The others remain closed due to the pandemic. The opening of the Polaris Lounge, which promises relaxation areas, dining and spa-like shower facilities, coincides with next summer’s anticipated surge in trans-Atlantic travel, as more borders open to vaccinated travelers, said Mandeep Grewal, vice president of customer strategy and innovation at United who oversees the airline’s lounges. “To go from where we were over a year ago to be opening this lounge now and getting ready to open it to customers is a phenomenal experience,” Grewal said… Read the full story from the Washington Business Journal.
    A woman who used a microphone to deliver a mid-flight anti-Covid rant was handcuffed by flight attendants, a viral video has shown. The woman, who has since been dubbed 'Airplane Karen', told attendants that passengers were enjoying the spectacle because 'I'm not terrible to look at'. Footage posted to TikTok on Sunday by pop musician Jawny showed the unruly woman talking loudly into the microphone, much to the annoyance of the passengers around her.  A woman who used a microphone to deliver a mid-flight anti-Covid rant was handcuffed by flight attendants, a viral video has shown (pictured, still grabs from the video) @jawny someone come get her ♬ original sound - JAWNY Flight attendants are seen struggling to subdue the woman, who is shown wearing a white blouse, dark blue bottoms and a colorful neck scarf. 'I brought my microphone, I'm going to use it,' she tells the exasperated crew. 'The pandemic started because humans have lost a little bit of faith.'  Flight attendants are then shown warning her that if she doesn't return to her seat, they will be forced...
    A flight attendant has revealed that smiling staff greet passengers at the door of the airplane to spot people who are equipped to help them in case of an emergency. Kat Kamalani, from Salt Lake City, Utah, took to TikTok to reveal the secrets of her job, including why flight attendants 'look you up and down' as soon as you board an airplane. In a video, she admitted that staff greet you at the door to find 'able-bodied people' on the flight, meaning people who are able to assist flight attendants in case of an emergency. Kate went on to explain that the term ABPs refers to people including doctors, nurses, and military personnel, who would be able to assist them in a crisis, for example during a security breach or medical emergency.  Kat Kamalani, from Salt Lake City, Utah, took to TikTok to reveal the secrets of her job, including why flight attendants 'look you up and down' as soon as you board an airplane Taking to the social media platform, she explained: 'Have you ever walked on a plane and...
    A Minnesota-based transit manufacturer has just unveiled what it's billing as 'North America’s first heavy-duty automated transit bus.' The 41-foot Xcelsior AV from New Flyer can seat 40, with additional room for standing passengers and two spots for wheelchairs. The electric vehicle uses AutoDrive technology to construct a 360-degree 3-D model of its surroundings via LIDAR, radar, and cameras. and detect pedestrians, vehicles and other obstacles.   New Flyer has already launched a pilot program with the Connecticut Department of Transportation, with a fleet of Xcelsior buses shuttling passengers along a dedicated transit route between New Britain and Hartfort.  Scroll down for video The companies call its new Xcelsior AV electric bus 'North America's first fully operational heavy-duty automated transit bus.' It meets the standard for Level 4 autonomous driving, meaning the vehicle can handle any weather or road condition without human interference According to New Flyer, the Xcelsior meets the requirements for a Level 4 automated vehicle.  The Society of Automotive Engineers's's five-point scale ranges from Level One — a small amount of control, such as adaptive braking if a car gets...
    Financially strapped airlines are pushing an idea intended to breathe new life into the travel industry: coronavirus tests that passengers can take before boarding a flight. Several airlines, including United, American, Hawaiian, JetBlue and Alaska, have announced plans to begin offering testing — either kits mailed to a passenger’s home or rapid tests taken at or near airports — that would allow travelers to enter specific states and countries without having to quarantine. The tests will cost fliers $90 to $250, depending on the airline and the type of test. At Los Angeles International Airport, a design company has announced plans to convert cargo containers into a coronavirus testing facility with an on-site lab that can produce results in about two hours. On Thursday, Tampa International Airport began offering testing to all arriving and departing passengers on a walk-in basis. It’s an idea that has gone global, with a trade group for the world’s airlines calling on governments to create a testing standard for airline passengers as a way to fight the COVID-19 pandemic instead of using travel...
    Reuters September 23, 2020 0 Comments European airlines are pinning hopes on pre-flight COVID-19 tests that deliver results as fast as pregnancy tests to help restore passengers’ confidence in taking to the skies in confined spaces with shared air. Germany’s Lufthansa, at the mercy of government bailouts for survival, is in talks with Swiss drugmaker Roche over deploying so-called antigen tests, according to two people familiar with the discussions, as the airline aims to make them available next month. Italian operator Alitalia, meanwhile, told Reuters that from Wednesday it would add two flights from Milan to Rome, to the two it is already offering from Rome to Milan, exclusively for passengers with negative tests. The tests are administered by health authorities at the airports and included in ticket prices. If they prove popular and safe, these antigen-tested flights will be expanded to more domestic, and later international, routes, the airline said. Unlike laboratory-based molecular tests that have been the staple of health authorities in the pandemic, antigen tests do not require machines to process. Much like pregnancy tests, they...
    By John Miller and Emilio Parodi ZURICH/MILAN (Reuters) - European airlines are pinning hopes on pre-flight COVID-19 tests that deliver results as fast as pregnancy tests to help restore passengers' confidence in taking to the skies in confined spaces with shared air. Germany's Lufthansa, at the mercy of government bailouts for survival, is in talks with Swiss drugmaker Roche over deploying so-called antigen tests, according to two people familiar with the discussions, as the airline aims to make them available next month. Italian operator Alitalia, meanwhile, told Reuters that from Wednesday it would add two flights from Milan to Rome, to the two it is already offering from Rome to Milan, exclusively for passengers with negative tests. The tests are administered by health authorities at the airports and included in ticket prices. If they prove popular and safe, these antigen-tested flights will be expanded to more domestic, and later international, routes, the airline said. Unlike laboratory-based molecular tests that have been the staple of health authorities in the pandemic, antigen tests do not require machines to process. Much like pregnancy...
    A scale mannequin of a futuristic V-shaped airplane that might sooner or later carry passengers in its wings has accomplished its first take a look at flight. The Dutch-built jet, known as the Flying-V, homes the cargo maintain, gasoline tanks and passenger cabin within the wings to chop gasoline consumption. Its quirky design is alleged to decrease gasoline utilization by as much as 20 % in comparison with typical plane. Researchers examined an uncrewed, three-meter scale mannequin of the aeroplane earlier this summer time at a guarded airbase in Germany. Engineers at Delft College of Know-how within the Netherlands labored with Airbus to check takeoffs, landings and aerial manoeuvers “Considered one of our worries was that the plane may need some issue lifting-off, since earlier calculations had proven that ‘rotation’ might be a problem,” stated undertaking chief Dr. Roelof Vos of Delft College. “The staff optimized the scaled flight mannequin to forestall the problem however the proof of the pudding is within the consuming. It’s essential fly to know for certain.” The take a look at largely went as...
    Headrest canopies and fabric barriers between seats could start appearing in airplane cabins as the embattled industry tries to ward off the coronavirus. Airlines desperate for governments to lift travel restrictions and passengers to return are looking at ways to reassure the public that their health won’t be compromised on a flight. New-look seats and fresh cabins could be a start. One of the biggest companies in that business, Recaro Aircraft Seating GmbH, has designed a range of modifications to keep passengers apart and protect them from infection. Airlines are considering installing Recaro’s equipment as temporary cabin makeovers, according to Chief Executive Officer Mark Hiller. They need fittings that are easy to maneuver, lightweight and available at short notice, he said. “There is definitely large interest from across the different regions,” Hiller said in an interview. With a coronavirus vaccine possibly years away, airlines need to persuade the public it is safe to fly when an infected passenger might be next to them. Sporadic flareups around the world are putting people off: Global traffic in July was down almost 80%...
    A reversible middle seat means airlines can maintain their passenger capacity. Avio Interiors The coronavirus has caused a significant drop in air travel. Despite masks being mandatory on most major airlines, and sanitation and hygiene practices being stepped up, designers have come up with their own ways to ensure safer air travel. One 3D-printed product from design firm Teague would attach to the vents above seats to push passengers' breath down, described on its company's website as "an invisible germ isolation unit." Another design firm, Haeco, sees a future in which passengers share the airplane cabin with cargo, allowing for more space between people. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The coronavirus pandemic has already changed air travel. Wearing masks is now required by most major airlines, and no one will blink an eye should you frantically sanitize every nearby surface. Some travel experts predict that airlines will hire in-flight janitors and create a social distance-friendly new class. Design firms are also getting creative when it comes to travel, and are coming up with innovative concepts for...
    VIDEO2:4802:48Take a look inside Virgin Galactic's spaceship cabinNews Videos Virgin Galactic is giving its customers a first look inside the cabin that will carry them to the edge of space and back, as the space tourism company gets closer to finishing development of its spacecraft. "Every seat is a window seat," Virgin Galactic design director Jeremy Brown told CNBC about the interior. The cabin's design is the central piece of the company's product, especially due to the variety of stages during a Virgin Galactic spaceflight. In all, a trip will last about 90 minutes from takeoff to landing. But that will include taking off from a runway under the power of a jet-powered carrier aircraft, a brief free-fall after the spacecraft is released from under the aircraft at about 50,000 feet altitude, a rocket-powered burst of acceleration skyward hitting more than three times the speed of sound and then a few minutes floating weightless in micro-gravity at the edge of space.Virgin Galactic's carrier aircraft releases its spacecraft Unity during a glide flight test.Virgin GalacticThe company's spacecraft is designed to hold up to six...
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