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    The Justice Department has filed a motion to appeal a Florida judge's order appointing a special master in its investigation of Donald Trump's handling of classified documents. Officials warned that pausing its probe while the files are reviewed by a third-party would cause 'irreparable harm' to national security, according to a Thursday court filing. Prosecutors' appeal was widely expected after Judge Aileen Cannon on Monday approved Trump's request for a special master 'to review the seized property for personal items and documents' that could fall under executive privilege or attorney-client privilege classifications. The Trump-appointed judge also temporarily halted prosecutors' investigation pending the completion of the review. But the Justice Department's Thursday court filing is asking for a reversal of Cannon's order when it comes to the classified documents that were seized from Trump's Mar-a-Lago mansion last month. In a separate Thursday filing, the FBI's assistant director of counterintelligence Alan Kohler argued that allowing the FBI to conduct its own review is critical to the investigation. An FBI-conducted review, it stated, 'will enable the Government to assess the potential harms to...
    The U.S. Dept. of Justice on Monday notified a federal court judge it has completed a preliminary review of all items, including documents and highly-classified documents, and “identified a limited set of materials that potentially contain attorney-client privileged information,” which it will handle according to existing legal procedures. That announcement likely makes Donald Trump’s legal team’s request for a special master “all but moot” as top national security attorney Brad Moss noted. Trump’s legal time was mocked in the media last week for doing little to protect their client, and after cajoling from the right wing press they filed a motion for a “special master,” a third party to review all items federal agents seized when they executed the search warrant on Mar-a-Lago. In a 3-page court filing Monday, posted by Politico’s Kyle Cheney, DOJ adds that it “is in the process of following the procedures set forth in paragraph 84 of the search warrant affidavit to address potential privilege disputes, if any.” “Additionally, the Department of Justice and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (‘ODNI’) are...
    Intelligence officials are planning to assess whether classified material stashed by former President Donald Trump at Mar-a-Lago poses a national security risk. Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines told House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) and Oversight Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) that her office is reviewing whether the "disclosure of the relevant documents" could harm national security. SIX THINGS WE STILL DON'T KNOW ABOUT THE TRUMP RAID AFTER REDACTED FBI AFFIDAVIT RELEASED Pages from the affidavit by the FBI in support of obtaining a search warrant for former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate are photographed on Friday. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick) “The Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) are working together to facilitate a classification review of relevant materials, including those recovered during the search,” Haines wrote in the letter to the pair, which was dated Friday. Haines said that her office is working to collaborate with the Justice Department to "facilitate a classification" review of the documents and stressed that she wants to ensure...
    LONDON (AP) — American technology company NVIDIA’s planned $40 billion takeover of British chip designer Arm Ltd. faces months of delays after the U.K. government asked competition regulators Tuesday to investigate the national security implications of the deal. U.K. Digital Secretary Nadine Dorries asked the Competition and Markets Authority to look into both the deal’s impact on competition and national security. NVIDIA has agreed to buy Cambridge-based Arm, Britain’s largest technology firm, from Japan’s Softbank. Arm’s semiconductor technology is widely used in computing devices, including smartphones, cars and other equipment that connects to the internet. While many of the devices that use Arm technology aren’t considered critical, the government is concerned about the “security and resiliency” of the broader supply chain, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport said in a statement. “Arm has a unique place in the global technology supply chain, and we must make sure the implications of this transaction are fully considered,’’ Dorries said in a statement. “The CMA will now report to me on competition and national security grounds and provide...
    President Joe Biden on Thursday directed his administration to conduct a wide-ranging review of global anti-corruption efforts by U.S. departments and agencies in an effort to improve the countrys fight against international financial crime. "Corruption is a risk to our national security, and we must recognize it as such," Biden said in a statement. "Today, I am issuing a National Security Study Memorandum on the Fight Against Corruption to establish combating corruption as a core U.S. national security interest. With this Memorandum, I am directing departments and agencies to make recommendations that will significantly bolster the ability of the U.S. government to combat corruption." The president noted, "The United States will lead by example and in partnership with allies, civil society, and the private sector to fight the scourge of corruption. But this is a mission for the entire the world. And, we must all stand in support of courageous citizens around the globe who are demanding honest, transparent governance." The Hill reported, the review will involve more than a dozen agencies and offices in the executive branch, and will...
    House lawmakers on Monday will be briefed on a new security review that recommends widespread changes at the U.S. Capitol following the January 6 insurrection. The final report calls for the hiring of more than 1,000 Capitol Police officers, a dedicated quick reaction force and the installation of retractable fencing around the complex, according to a draft obtained by CBS News. The study was led by former Hurricane Katrina Commander and retired Lieutenant General Russel Honore and a task force composed of other former senior military officials.   The 15-page document seeks to streamline the chain of command after significant delays in deploying the National Guard during the riot.  It proposes giving the U.S. Capitol Police authority to request support from the National Guard and outside law enforcement without preapproval from the Capitol Police Board in "extraordinary emergency circumstances".  The board, which oversees the department, is made up of the House and Senate sergeants at arms, the Architect of the Capitol and the Capitol Police chief. Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund told lawmakers in a Senate hearing last...
    The Biden administration has ordered temporary limits on drone strikes outside war zones, rolling back a Trump-era policy, as President Biden reviews "legal and policy frameworks governing these matters," the National Security Council told Fox News. National Security Council spokeswoman Emily Horne, in a statement to Fox News, said that at the beginning of the Biden administration the president "established new interim guidance concerning the United States’ use of military force and related national security operations." WHITE HOUSE CALLS FOR 'NEW APPROACH' TO NATIONAL SECURITY CHALLENGES TO 'PREVAIL' IN COMPETITION WITH CHINA "The purpose of the interim guidance is to ensure the President has full visibility on proposed significant actions into these areas while the National Security Council staff lead a thorough interagency review of the extant authorizations and delegations of Presidential authority with respect to these matters," Horne said. Horne told Fox News that Biden’s review "is now underway and will include an examination of the legal and policy frameworks governing these matters." "This review includes an examination of previous approaches in the context of evolving counterterrorism threats in order to refine...
    A security review ordered by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is recommending establishment of a permanent 'quick reaction force' that would be able to respond to urgent threats to the Capitol. Pelosi ordered the review after the Jan. 6th riot and brought in retired Lt. Col. Russsel Honore to oversee it. Among his recommendations are a 'quick reaction force,' known in military parlance as a QRF. The report calls for a 'QRF that permanently resides within the DC [National] Guard by reestablishing a military police battalion and staffing it with Active Guard Reserve troops who live in or near the city year round, perpetually on active duty,' according to a report by Fox News.   A review ordered by retired Col. Russel Honore is calling for a 'Quick Reaction Force' and a military police battalion It comes amid increasing pushback against a substantial National Guard presence that has been ordered at the Capitol, and that is on track to linger for months. U.S. Capitol police sought a 60-day extension for the 5,000 National Guard troops still in Washington to provide additional security....
    A series of substantial changes will be recommended to bolster security at the U.S. Capitol following a review, including adding additional fencing, according to a report. In addition to the recommendation of "rapidly deployable and removable" walls and fencing around the complex, the draft proposal recommends hiring more than 1,000 additional Capitol Police officers to staff the building and regional offices in members’ districts, CNN reported, citing two sources familiar with the recommendations. The price tag for the additional officers would be close to $100 million, the network reported. The fencing could be in the tens of millions. Long-term, the review may suggest building a wall around the Capitol – although one of the sources cautioned it would likely not be permanent. HOUSE REPUBLICANS TELL PELOSI CAPITOL FENCING ERECTED AFTER RIOT NEEDS TO COME DOWN Both Democratic and Republican lawmakers have been wary of turning the Capitol into something that resembles a "fortress." The review comes in the wake of the security failures in the deadly Capitol riot last month that forced lawmakers to evacuate while certifying the election results and left five...
    The administration of President Joe Biden has reversed attempts by former President Donald Trump to ban the popular video app TikTok, and asked the court on Wednesday to postpone the legal dispute over the measure while the government begins a review of the national security threats posed by Chinese tech companies. Miamimundo / ENH A motion filed with the court indicates that the Commerce Department will review whether Trump’s claims about TikTok’s threat to national security justify attempts to ban the app’s download and deny it critical technical services. Separately, the Biden administration has shelved “indefinitely” a proposal for TikTok to pass into US hands, according to The Wall Street Journal. Last year, the Trump administration negotiated a deal in which US corporations Oracle and Walmart would acquire a huge stake in the Chinese app over national security concerns. The unusual deal stemmed from an executive order Trump issued with the goal of banning TikTok in the United States, unless he agreed to greater American control. White House press secretary Jen Psaki did not contest the report, but noted that...
    A year has passed since the last US service member was killed in combat in Afghanistan — the first such stretch since the war started almost 20 years ago, a report said Tuesday. The last two Americans who died in battle in the country — Army Sgts. 1st Class Javier Gutierrez and Antonio Rodriguez — were slain on Feb. 8, 2020, Stars and Stripes reported. But the period of calm, which coincides with the US-Taliban peace deal, could be threatened if the US decides to keep troops in Afghanistan past a May 2021 deadline, the military newspaper reported. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid told the outlet that if the US rejects the deal, signed last February, insurgents “will definitely return to war.” Under the deal, the US promised the removal of troops in exchange for, among other things, the Taliban preventing terrorist groups from using Afghan soil to attack foreign forces. The future of the deal remains uncertain, with the Biden administration vowing to review it, along with other Trump-era foreign policies. White House national security adviser...
    WASHINGTON -- President Joe Biden has directed law enforcement and intelligence officials in his administration to study the threat of domestic violent extremism in the United States, an undertaking being launched weeks after a mob of insurgents loyal to Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol.The announcement Friday by White House press secretary Jen Psaki is a stark acknowledgment of the national security threat that officials see as posed by American extremists motivated to violence by radical ideology. The involvement of the national intelligence office, created after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks with a goal of thwarting international terrorism, suggests U.S. authorities are examining how to pivot to a more concerted focus on violence from extremists at home.The threat assessment is being coordinated by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security, and will be used as a foundation to develop policy, the White House said. The National Security Council will do its own policy review to see how information about the problem can be better shared across the government."The Jan. 6 assault...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has directed his intelligence community to study the threat of domestic extremism in the United States, an undertaking being launched weeks after a violent mob loyal to Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol. The disclosure Friday by White House press secretary Jen Psaki is a stark acknowledgment of the national security threat that officials see as posed by American extremists motivated to violence by extremist ideology. The involvement of the director of national intelligence, an office created after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to prevent international terrorism, suggests that American authorities are examining how to pivot to a more concerted focus on violence from radical extremists at home. FBI Director Chris Wray has said that, over the last year, the most lethal violence has come from anti-government activists, such as anarchists and militia-types. “The rise of domestic violent extremism is a serious and growing national security threat,” Psaki said. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The House Intelligence Committee, Homeland Security Committee, Judiciary Committee, and Oversight and Reform Committee announced a review of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The panels sent a letter to the nation’s top law enforcement and intelligence officials asking for documents into what “warning signs” were missed prior to the riot, if there were “systemic failures” and how to best address “countering domestic violent extremism.” It comes as media reports have emerged that authorities had intelligence regarding a possible attack on the Capitol when Congress met to certify President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenAzar in departure letter says Capitol riot threatens to 'tarnish' administration's accomplishments House Democrats introduce measures to oppose Trump's bomb sale to Saudis On The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits MORE’s Electoral College victory. “These latter reports, if acted upon, might have prompted more extensive planning for the event, and the infusion of far greater security and other resources,”...
    Reuters November 25, 2020 0 Comments U.S. President-elect Joe Biden will announce his economic team and other key nominees next week, officials for his transition team said on Wednesday, after formal recognition of his election win this week allowed a transition to move forward. Biden communications director Kate Bedingfield told reporters on a call that the transition team was encouraged by the “professional and welcoming response” of civil servants who they were getting in touch with to enable a smooth transfer of power. Transition officials downplayed the impact of the three-week delay in formally beginning the transition, and dismissed President Donald Trump’s continued efforts to cast doubt on the results as a “sideshow.” Biden was expected to receive his first presidential daily intelligence briefing on Monday, said Bedingfield. Biden transition adviser Jen Psaki said classified information was already being shared with Biden’s senior team, and the transition’s agency review teams would focus on fact finding on the COVID-19 response and urgent national security threats, including terrorist or state actors who might seek to exploit the transition period. “On the...
    By MATT O'BRIEN, AP Technology Writer The popular video-sharing app TikTok, its future in limbo since President Donald Trump tried to shut it down earlier this fall, is asking a federal court to intervene. TikTok's Chinese owner, ByteDance, has until Thursday to sell off its U.S. operations under an executive order that Trump signed in August. Trump in September gave his tentative blessing to a ByteDance proposal meant to resolve U.S. national security concerns by placing TikTok under the oversight of American companies Oracle and Walmart, each of which would also have a financial stake in the company. But TikTok said this week it's received “no clarity” from the U.S. government about whether its proposals have been accepted. The deal has been under a national-security review by the interagency Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, or CFIUS, which is led by the Treasury Department. The Treasury Department didn’t return emailed requests for comment this week. "With the November 12 CFIUS deadline imminent and without an extension in hand, we have no choice but to file a petition in...
    The popular video-sharing app TikTok, its future in limbo since President Donald Trump tried to shut it down earlier this fall, is asking a federal court to intervene. TikTok's Chinese owner, ByteDance, has until Thursday to sell off its U.S. operations under an executive order that Trump signed in August. Trump in September gave his tentative blessing to a ByteDance proposal meant to resolve U.S. national security concerns by placing TikTok under the oversight of American companies Oracle and Walmart, each of which would also have a financial stake in the company. But TikTok said this week it's received “no clarity” from the U.S. government about whether its proposals have been accepted. The deal has been under a national-security review by the interagency Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, or CFIUS, which is led by the Treasury Department. The Treasury Department didn’t return emailed requests for comment this week. "With the November 12 CFIUS deadline imminent and without an extension in hand, we have no choice but to file a petition in court to defend our...
    A federal judge ruled on Thursday that the Justice Department’s lawsuit against John Bolton alleging he breached his obligations and improperly disclosed classified information in his new book is allowed to move forward, rejecting the former White House national security adviser’s efforts to dismiss the case. “As a condition of becoming National Security Advisor to President Trump, John Bolton signed three nondisclosure agreements with the United States. Those agreements guard classified information, including classified information about intelligence sources and methods known as sensitive compartmented information,” Judge Royce Lamberth of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia wrote in a 27-page opinion. "Because the agreements imposed both obligations and because the government plausibly pleads that Bolton breached those obligations, the Court will deny Bolton's pending motion to dismiss," the Ronald Reagan appointee added. The Justice Department argued this summer that Bolton’s book, The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir, “still contains classified information” and said this could be confirmed by Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe, NSA Director Gen. Paul Nakasone, Director of the...
    A federal judge on Thursday rejected John BoltonJohn BoltonJudge appears skeptical of Bolton's defense of publishing book without White House approval Maximum pressure is keeping US troops in Iraq and Syria Woodward book trails Bolton, Mary Trump in first-week sales MORE's effort to throw out a lawsuit from the Trump administration alleging that the former national security adviser published classified information in his new memoir, violating nondisclosure agreements he signed with the White House. District Court Judge Royce Lamberth said in a 27-page opinion that the lawsuit will move forward because the administration had sufficiently established a likelihood that Bolton had violated the contracts by bypassing a required prepublication approval for the book. "The government has the power to prevent harm to the national security," wrote Lamberth, who was appointed to the federal court in D.C. by former President Reagan. "While the government may not prevent Bolton from publishing unclassified materials, it may require him to undergo a reasonable prepublication review process." Bolton's attorney did not immediately respond when asked for comment. His lawyers have alleged that the administration improperly...
    Lawyers for former national security adviser John Bolton told a judge Thursday they want to interview White House officials following new allegations that a pre-publication review of his tell-all book was politicized in an effort to block its release. Michael Kirk, a lawyer for Bolton, said the interviews were needed to help establish whether President Donald Trumps political appointees at the White House acted in “bad faith” when overruling the judgment of a career classification official and concluding that Boltons manuscript still contained classified information. A lawsuit over Boltons book, including on the question of whether the Justice Department is entitled to proceeds from the publication, is still pending even though a judge in June denied a request for an injunction to block its release. Arguments in the Justice Departments lawsuit against Bolton over his book, “The Room Where it Happened,” took place one day after a new court filing from a lawyer for Ellen Knight, the White House official with whom Bolton worked for months to ensure that his manuscript was free of classified information that could possibly threaten...
    On Tuesday, The New York Times reported that the Justice Department has opened a criminal investigation targeting former national security adviser John R. Bolton for possibly disclosing classified information in his memoir, “The Room Where It Happened.” In June, after the Trump administration had filed a lawsuit to stop the book’s publication, Judge Royce C. Lamberth of the Federal District Court of the District of Columbia ruled that Bolton could proceed with the publicationof the book, arguing, “With hundreds of thousands of copies around the globe — many in newsrooms — the damage is done. There is no restoring the status quo,” but Lamberth also added, “Bolton has gambled with the national security of the United States. He has exposed his country to harm and himself to civil (and potentially criminal) liability. But these facts do not control the motion before the court. The government has failed to establish that an injunction will prevent irreparable harm.” Lamberth also stated he was “persuaded that defendant Bolton likely jeopardized national security by disclosing classified information in violation of his nondisclosure agreement obligations.”...
    Chinese-owned TikTok’s fate now rests with a review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States and a decision by President Trump following a purchase proposal by U.S.-based Oracle one week ahead of the ban deadline. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin confirmed on Monday that TikTok’s Beijing-based parent company ByteDance had rejected a purchase offer from Microsoft and Walmart, who had teamed up on a proposal, but had instead agreed to a proposal to sell TikTok’s operations to Oracle, a California-based multinational technology firm. Mnuchin said the U.S. government would now need to review the proposal, which remains largely secret, as the Sept. 20 deadline in Trump’s July executive order looms. “There are two processes that we’re going through. One is the CFIUS review, the other is the national security review under the president’s executive order,” Mnuchin told CNBC’s Squawk Box on Monday, adding, "We did get a proposal over the weekend that includes Oracle as the trusted technology partner with Oracle making many representations for national security issues. There’s also a commitment to create TikTok Global...
    A potential acquisition of supplement chain GNC by Chinese-owned Harbin Pharmaceuticals has sparked concern in Congress and among allies of President Trump's "America First" trade policy, who are calling for a national security review of the deal over claims it could grant Beijing-controlled Harbin access to U.S. military bases and service members' sensitive information. Florida Rep. Bill Posey and the Coalition for a Prosperous America, a group that backs domestic companies and supports the Trump administration’s “America First” trade efforts, detailed their concerns in letters to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Thursday. Mnuchin, who leads the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, holds the authority to review foreign investments. The Washington Examiner obtained both letters exclusively. Each is dated Sept. 3. GNC stores are near or on dozens of military bases, such as Andrews Air Force Base, Quantico, 29 Palms, and others, the letters say. The deal would grant Harbin access to consumer data on millions of people, including thousands of members of the military. "If this deal is completed, the Chinese owned Harbin Pharmaceuticals will have direct...
    Democratic House leaders are asking the Defense Department Inspector General’s office to look into whether the Trump administration illegally retaliated against twin brothers Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman and Lt. Col. Yevgeny Vindman. House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., House Armed Services Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., House Oversight Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., and Rep. Stephen F. Lynch, D-Mass., Chairman of the Oversight Committee’s Subcommittee on National Security, sent a letter to the IG’s office following a whistleblower reprisal complaint that accused President Trump and other White House officials of retaliating against Yevgeny Vindman for disclosing information that included details related to Trump’s phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on July 25, 2019. TRUMP OUSTS KEY IMPEACHMENT FIGURES SONDLAND, VINDMAN DAYS AFTER SENATE ACQUITTAL “Based on this new information, it is all the more urgent that the DOD IG immediately investigate whether adverse personnel actions taken against LTC Alexander Vindman and LTC Y. Vindman were carried out in retaliation for their protected disclosures, and that your investigation include a close examination of actions taken by White House officials,”...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI said Thursday that errors in more than two dozen applications for surveillance warrants were not as severe as the Justice Department inspector general made them out to be. The FBI statement appears to counter criticism from Democrats and Republicans alike that its process for conducting secret surveillance in national security investigations is riddled with significant errors that undermine the bureau’s credibility. The Justice Department watchdog has issued a series of critical reports on the topic over the last year, identifying important errors and omissions in applications the FBI submitted to wiretap a former Trump campaign adviser in the Russia investigation. In March, it said it had conducted an audit of 29 wiretap applications and found problems in all 29, including apparent errors or inadequately supported facts in 25 of them. But the FBI said that its own review of the 29 applications found only two material errors, and neither is believed to have affected a judge’s decision that there was probable cause for the surveillance. The FBI says that out of nearly 7,000 facts...
    US Secretary of the Treasury Steve Mnuchin speaks in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin confirmed Wednesday that social media app TikTok is being reviewed by department's Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS). In comments on the South Lawn of the White House alongside President Donald Trump, Mnuchin told reporters his department would be "making a recommendation to the president." CFIUS has authority to review foreign investments, and in this case appears to be looking at a prior acquisition by TikTok's parent company, ByteDance. The company acquired TikTok precursor Musical.ly in 2017 and CNBC previously reported that CFIUS was looking into potential national security risks involved in the deal. "We are looking at TikTok," Trump said Wednesday. "We are thinking about making a decision."  Earlier this month, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the U.S. was looking at banning TikTok as well as other Chinese social media apps, citing national security concerns. Pompeo added that the Trump administration was evaluating TikTok akin to Chinese state-backed tech...
    President Donald Trump has ordered a review of the Chinese-owned TikTok social media company which many have argued presents a threat to national security, the administration announced Wednesday. TikTok is a popular video platform owned by the Chinese company ByteDance, which is in turn beholden to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin confirmed to reporters that he is conducting a review of the company’s ties to China and will make a recommendation on potential action to Trump before next week. An AFP collaborator poses for a picture using the smart phone application TikTok on December 14, 2018 in Paris. – TikTok, is a Chinese short-form video-sharing app, which has proved wildly popular this year. (AFP via Getty Images) Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has previously confirmed the administration is seriously considering a ban on TikTok and other Chinese-owned apps. (RELATED: Report Reveals Role Huawei Had In Transporting US Tech To Iran) “We are taking this very seriously. We are certainly looking at it,” Pompeo told Fox News earlier in July. “Whether it was the problems of having...
    John Bolton’s new tell-all book about the Trump administration has sold more than 780,000 copies in its first week, making Bolton the latest former Trump administration official to cash in on a book bashing the president. Bolton’s book, The Room Where It Happened, is a negative take of the Trump administration during his 18 months as national security adviser. Bolton was reportedly paid a $2 million advance. The Room Where It Happened fell short of former FBI Director James Comey’s A Higher Loyalty in first week sales but still ranks as one of the best-selling books of the Trump era, according to The Hill‘s Joe Concha. Bolton’s memoir came unusually quickly after he left the administration in late 2019 in relation to other books by former officials. Trump has said he fired Bolton, while Bolton claims he resigned. The White House attempted to block Bolton’s book from publishing after he failed to complete a national security review process for former officials, but a judge ruled that it was impossible since advance copies of the book had already been widely distributed. The judge...
    Hong Kong police arrested dozens of protesters Sunday during a demonstration against a controversial national security bill, which China’s legislature has begun to review. A crowd of several hundred opponents of the bill gathered for what was planned as a “silent protest” in the Kowloon district while armed riot police kept watch, Reuters reported. POMPEO: US IMPOSES RESTRICTIONS ON CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY LEADERS UNDERMINING HONG KONG AUTONOMY Protesters ignored police warnings to disperse and began chanting slogans, police said on Facebook. Pepper spray was used to break up the crowd after some protesters charged at police lines in a street of Mong Kok, according to police. Police said 53 protesters were arrested and charged with unlawful assembly. The planned law would criminalize secession, subversion of state power, terrorist activities, and colluding with foreign forces to endanger national security. Critics say Hong Kong's legal statutes already account for such matters and that Beijing is determined to use the law to pursue political opponents. HONG KONG PASTORS FACE ARREST, EXTRADITION TO CHINA WITH NEW SECURITY LAWS: WATCHDOG The central government in Beijing...
    Kaeten Mistry, University of East Anglia Former US national security adviser John Bolton is the latest ex-government official to rebuke the misconduct, ignorance and self-serving behaviour of the president, Donald Trump, in the form of a tell-all book. The Room Where It Happened details Trump’s idiosyncrasies, offers of favours to authoritarian leaders, lack of basic knowledge, and “obstruction of justice as a way of life”. Promoting the book in a series of interviews, Bolton told one reporter that he hopes it will be a one-term presidency: “Two terms, I’m more troubled about,” he said. Yet the battle around the publication is more than another Trumpian political scandal. It centres on the disclosure of US national security information, particularly the concept of “prior restraint” that allows the government to censor speech or expression before it has occurred. The issues originate in whistleblowing in the 1970s when former officials spoke out against government wrongdoing. Bolton is certainly no whistleblower although the legacy of that era informs an ongoing struggle today around first amendment freedom of speech rights and state secrecy. Beyond politics...
    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China's lawmakers have reviewed a draft of the national security bill for Hong Kong during a special meeting held by the National People's Congress (NPC), state media Xinhua reported on Sunday. In the meeting, Shen Chunyao, director of the Legislative Affairs Commission of the NPC's standing committee, presented a review of the bill, Xinhua said. (Reporting by Emily Chow and Samuel Shen; Editing by Tom Hogue) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's tell-all book has been denied.  Judge Royce Lamberth denied the request to block the sale of the former national security adviser's memoir, 'The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir' in a ruling Saturday.   Lamberth, a Reagan appointee, heard arguments Friday over Zoom from Bolton's lawyer Charles Cooper and Deputy Assistant Attorney General David Morrell, representing the government.  This came after the Trump administration sued Bolton on Tuesday in order to postpone the release of his book because of concerns that classified information could be exposed The book was leaked to the media the next day.  It contains a number of explosive claims about President Trump, including that he asked China for help with his re-election bid - a move similar to how Trump interacted with Ukraine, which led to him being impeached.   The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's (left) tell-all book has been denied. The book makes some explosive claims about President Trump (right) The federal judge ruled in favor of...
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