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    Globalstock | E+ | Getty Images If you feel like your income hasn't kept up with rising prices, you're not alone. More than half, 55%, of respondents in a new survey from Bankrate.com say their incomes have not kept up with rising household expenses amid persistent high inflation. Only 33% of respondents said their incomes have either kept up with or exceeded higher household expenses. The online survey was conducted between Aug. 17 and 19 and included 2,458 adults. More from Personal Finance:Steps workers worried about job cuts can take to prepare Typical job switcher got a pay raise of nearly 10%, study finds Here are the 'most employable' college degrees New government inflation data released on Tuesday showed inflation in August was higher than expected, as the consumer price index increased 0.1% for the month, and 8.3% over the past 12 months. Bankrate's survey found 40% of employed respondents have received raises in the past 12 months. Meanwhile, 13% got a better-paying job. A lucky 8% got both a pay raise and a better-paying job. The remaining 39% of...
    A protester waves a sign that read unionize near the Country Club Plaza Starbucks store where dozens of Starbucks employees and union supporters protested alleged anti-union tactics by the company Thursday, March 3, 2022.Jill Toyoshiba | Tribune News Service | Getty Images From Starbucks to Amazon to Apple, the recent headlines show that the biggest companies in the world can't duck the union issue. But the issue isn't isolated to a few iconic companies operating in retail. While union membership remains at a multi-decade low, a CNBC survey finds that a majority (59%) of workers across the U.S. and across all sectors say they support increased unionization in their own workplaces. The recent CNBC|Momentive Workforce Survey reinforces recent findings from Pew Research Center and Gallup polls, which both show widespread support for labor unions among the public. And it does not break down into a clearly partisan political issue. While Democrats are about twice as likely as Republicans to have a positive view on unions, the CNBC survey finds bipartisan support, with 46% of Republicans in favor of increased unionization...
    Moyo Studio | E+ | Getty Images The latest inflation read from the government, the core personal consumption expenditures price index, showed on Friday morning that prices may be starting to ease from record levels, but financial stress among workers amid the steepest inflation in four decades remains as high as ever. Two-thirds of American workers say their salaries are not keeping pace with inflation, and the percentage of employees considering quitting a job is at a four-year high, according to a new CNBC|Momentive Workforce Survey. Sixty-six percent of workers say inflation has outpaced any salary gains they've made in the past 12 months, while 19% say increases in their salary have about matched inflation and 13% say their salary has increased more than inflation.  As more American workers at multiple income levels give voice to a frustration that the economic data has been signaling throughout this year — that price gains continue to outpace wage gains — the squeeze is particularly high among middle-income workers. Those with incomes between $50,000 to $150,000 are more likely than high-income and...
    Alex Wong, Getty Images Workers at an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island voted to unionize last week, and some of them say Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) abandoned them. The facility has made headlines since 2020, when workers first began to complain of conditions. Christian Smalls, who attempted to start a union, was fired. In February, he was arrested after he was asked to leave the facility. Last Friday, the Amazon Labor Union he helped found reported workers voted 1518 to 1154 to unionize. Ocasio-Cortez, whom union organizers have said had their support before abandoning them, celebrated on Twitter. She shared the ALU tweet and a flexing emoji. She was quickly called out by podcaster Krystal Ball. Here’s the guy who organized the union drive talking about how you left them high and dry. These are your constituents and you couldn’t be bothered to show up until they’re on the cusp of victory. https://t.co/5wIu3VbbGi — Krystal Ball (@krystalball) March 31, 2022 “Here’s the guy who organized the union drive talking about how you left them high and dry,” Ball said in response to...
    Conservative Disney employees are slamming their coworkers for creating an 'environment of fear' and calling on the entertainment company to remain 'politically neutral' in the face of protests against Florida's Don't Say Gay bill. 'The Walt Disney Company has come to be an increasingly uncomfortable place to work for those of us whose political and religious views are not explicitly progressive,' workers said in an unsigned letter published Monday.  'We watch quietly as our beliefs come under attack from our own employer, and we frequently see those who share our opinions condemned as villains by our own leadership.' They accuse their liberal colleagues of calling them 'bigots' and criticized CEO Bob Chapek's 'evolving response' after he walked back comments saying that corporate statements do nothing but divide a company and its customers. The letter was released a day before Disney workers staged walkouts in Los Angeles over the company's slow response to Florida's 'Parental Rights in Education' bill, which would ban classroom lessons on sexuality, gender identity and sexual orientation 'in a manner that is not age appropriate.'  On Wednesday, actress Raven-Symoné, 36,...
    Her first workday after handing out union cards at the Starbucks where she works, Laila Dalton found herself in a meeting with two managers. The managers had brought a list of complaints against Dalton, typed up the previous day. The managers said Dalton, 19, had “failed to fully meet performance expectations” of her job as a shift supervisor. Dalton offered a different account: she was the leading voice of a union effort at her Phoenix, Arizona, store. She is just one of multiple Starbucks workers across the country accusing the coffee chain of harassing its pro-union employees. “They’re just trying to make me quit at this point,” Dalton alleged to The Daily Beast. Spurred by pandemic-era working conditions, Starbucks employees across the country have moved to unionize their stores. They’re asking for better workplace safety, more transparency around pay and scheduling, more negotiating power in dealings with the coffee corporation. But some of those workers accuse Starbucks of retaliating against them, leading to a wave of firings, disciplinary write-ups, and work-hour reductions. Starbucks denies the allegations, while pro-union workers...
    Brynn Anderson/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.As Donald Trump and his associates scrambled to overturn the 2020 election, they accused ordinary election workers throughout the United States of engaging in an unprecedented conspiracy to hand the presidency to Joe Biden. For many election administrators, workers, and officials, life became nightmarish. Pro-Trump media outlets (and in some cases Trump lawyers) doxxed them for doing their jobs, leading Trump supporters to inundate them and their family members with death and rape threats. Conspiracy theorists online called for their execution. One Georgia election worker told NPR that two strangers had attempted to force their way into her grandmother’s house—where she used to live—and make a “citizen’s arrest. A new survey released by the Brennan Center for Justice, a liberal-leaning nonprofit that supports voting rights, suggests that the toxic environment has persisted past Biden’s inauguration and that it’s taking a toll. One in five election workers reported that they’re “very” or “somewhat” unlikely to stay in their positions before 2024, citing...
    Workers at the Kentucky candle factory that was destroyed in a deadly tornado said supervisors threatened employees that they would be fired if they left their shifts early, NBC News reported.  In an interview, Mayfield Consumer Products (MCP) factory employee McKayla Emery said her colleagues first asked to leave the facility after the tornado sirens sounded outside the factory on Friday.  Workers stated that they asked managers to let them take shelter at their own homes as word of the upcoming storm spread, but managers rebuffed their requests, according to NBC News.  Emery noted she overheard managers telling four employees standing near her that “if you leave, you’re more than likely to be fired.”  “People had questioned if they could leave or go home,” Emery said.  Some workers left their shifts regardless of repercussions, fearing for their safety, the report said. Other employees congregated in bathrooms and inside hallways even before the tornado hit, with several still asking to go home after the immediate danger had passed, NBC News reported.  MCP Employee Haley Conder said team leaders told her they wouldn’t let...
    More than half of Americans who lost their jobs in the pandemic and remain unemployed are not interested in returning to work, according to a new survey suggesting that the dire national labor shortage is likely to persist. The poll published on Thursday by the US Chamber of Commerce found that 53 percent of Americans who became unemployed during the pandemic say they are not active or only somewhat active in looking for work.  Fifty-six percent say they can get by for more than six months before it becomes essential to return to full time work, with 11 percent saying it will be more than a year before it is necessary to return to work, and 15 percent saying it will never be essential.  No detail was given on whether this cohort was comprised of retirees, or how they'll manage to survive without a job.   The poll is a troubling signal amid a worker shortage that is exacerbating supply chain issues and spurring inflation, with businesses across the country struggling to fill millions of open positions. As of September, the number...
    CHEESE sandwiches, a packet of crisps and a bottle of drink are what can usually be found in a standard packed lunch. But one woman has gone to extremes to ensure her husband is satisfied with his lunch - coming up with ever more elaborate dishes on a daily basis. 3The amazing packed lunch that TikTok user Lizatian made for her husband's colleagueCredit: Tiktok/@lizastian In fact, TikTok user Lizastian's creations for her other half are so incredible that even his colleagues have started asking her to make their lunch for them. Liz took to TikTok to document one such lunch that she was preparing for a co-worker, consisting of seasoned rice balls, marinated chicken on skewers and cream cheese filled mini peppers. But the lunch wasn't just one course, as Liz had also made a three-yoghurt bark topped with nuts and berries, which she froze and broke into pieces, for dessert. Most read in LifestyleROUND TWO A SECOND Harry & Meghan Oprah interview would ROCK Royal Family says expertROYAL RAGER Prince Harry 'blew Charles out...
    More than a third of U.S. workers—36%—now say their employer is requiring all of its employees to be vaccinated if they don't qualify for a medical exemption, according to a Gallup tracking poll. That number has quadrupled since July, when just 9% of workers said their employers were requiring them to get vaccinated. Another 39% say their employer is encouraging them to get vaccinated without making it a requirement. That number has declined from 62% in July as more employers began implementing mandates. Since May, about a quarter of U.S. employees have consistently said their employer has no vaccine policy. In September, President Joe Biden began pressing companies with more than 100 employees to either require vaccinations or routine testing of their workforce. At the same time, Biden signed orders requiring all federal workers and contractors to get vaccinated, with opt-outs for medical and religious reasons. Corporate America has largely embraced the president's vaccine mandates while bucking the efforts of GOP governors to imperil Biden's lifesaving vaccine policy.  Vaccine mandates have also been shown to be highly effective at...
    LITTLE VILLAGE — Workers held a rally Thursday at the El Milagro tortilla factory in Little Village, saying the company’s management failed to meet a deadline to talk with workers. Workers have pushed for better pay and working condition at the factory for months. They gave management a deadline of Wednesday to meet with them — but didn’t hear back. Instead, they said, they’ve received threats about being replaced; in response, they’ve contacted the National Labor Relations Board. Organizers said a crowd of about 100 people gathered for the rally Thursday on 26th Street. They marched to the factory, 3050 W. 26th St., while carrying signs and chanting slogans like, “Milagro, listen, we are in the fight,” in Spanish. The crowd grew as workers and organizers held a news conference. The rally followed an incident last week where employees walked out for an hour after informing management of their plans. When they tried to return, the company had locked them out of the factory, not allowing them to get their personal belongings. It was only after hours of negotiations, which...
    by Jack J. Barry, University of Florida; Ann Christiano, University of Florida, and Annie Neimand, University of Florida Are workplace vaccine mandates prompting some employees to quit rather than get a shot? A hospital in Lowville, New York, for example, had to shut down its maternity ward when dozens of staffers left their jobs rather than get vaccinated. At least 125 employees at Indiana University Health resigned after refusing to take the vaccine. And several surveys have shown that as many as half of unvaccinated workers insist they would leave their jobs if forced to get the shot, which has raised alarms among some that more mandates could lead to an exodus of workers in many industries. But how many will actually follow through? Strong wordsIn June 2021, we conducted a nationwide survey, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, that gave us a sample of 1,036 people who mirrored the diverse makeup of the U.S. We plan to publish the survey in October. We asked respondents to tell us what they would do if “vaccines were required" by...
    Nabisco workers now walking picket lines in four U.S. states say their first strike in 52 years is about keeping what they already had as employees producing Oreo cookies, Ritz crackers and other snacks for the global food conglomerate. More than 1,000 Nabisco workers are staying off the job in Colorado, Illinois, Oregon and Virginia, according to their union, the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International, or BCTGM. The labor dispute began with workers at the Nabisco bakery in Portland calling a strike nearly three weeks ago and has since spread, with workers in Chicago joining the labor action on Thursday. "We're fighting for a fair contract, no concessions," Yvette Hale, who has worked at Nabisco's Chicago bakery nearly 22 years, told CBS MoneyWatch. "Everyone is angry, as you never know if you're going to work eight hours, 12 hours or 16 hours." Nabisco workers have been working without a contract since the end of May, with negotiations breaking down after its parent company, Mondelez International, proposed changes that include turning eight-hour shifts into 12-hour ones without...
    More On: employment The pandemic destroyed millions of jobs and many aren’t returning, economic group warns Not clucking around: Fast food chain pays teens $50K amid labor shortage Some companies are OK with remote workers — unless they’re from this state 3.5M workers remain on jobless benefits despite another drop in weekly claims Yes, the US job market has been one long, sad country song for more than a year now. But the “take this job and shove it” indicator may have peaked.The US Bureau of Labor Statistics said its so-called “quits rate” — or the number of jobs lost because of people quitting — sank to 3.6 million in May from 4 million in April. Indeed, the steep quits-rate drop was the big reason the overall number of people who left their jobs fell to 5.32 million in May from 5.8 million in April.The quits rate among private-sector workers — which has hit leisure and hospitality particularly hard — also fell to 2.9 percent from a record 3.2 percent.More people quit when the economy is doing well...
    Some Instacart shoppers claim that the company has wrongfully terminated their accounts in response to fraudulent activity, locking them out of future earnings until they get reactivated, CNN Business reports. The shoppers CNN Business spoke to were identified as having “linked accounts,” which, in Instacart’s terminology, means an account believed to have indicators of fraud, though not necessarily with compromised data connected to a shopper. The shoppers may be the victims of phishing scams The company offers a process for appealing deactivations, but at least one of the shoppers CNN Business spoke to, Rachael Freedman, still hasn’t had her account reactivated because her appeal was denied. Instacart didn’t immediately reply to a request for comment on Friday. The company did tell CNN that “We take the safety and security of the Instacart platform very seriously,” but that “there has not been a breach or hack of the Instacart platform.” The company says it has measures in place for workers who’ve been the victim of a phishing scam to get back into their accounts “in a timely manner.” It’s...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — A new roadblock has been thrown up for contract workers getting unemployment benefits. Many were notified Tuesday that the benefits they are expecting are being cut off. And as CBS 2 Political Investigator Dana Kozlov reported, they did not see this coming – they were blindsided and said they got no notice. READ MORE: Deaths Of Mother And 15-Year-Old Daughter In Auburn Gresham House Fire Ruled Homicides Due To Arson Now, they have lots of concern. “It’s hard to see so many people struggle,” said one woman named Catherine. One woman, Catherine, considered herself one of the fortunate ones when it came to getting unemployment benefits – specifically Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, or PUA. “I was like in the first 500 people that applied,” Catherine said, “and since then, I’d never had an issue.” But that changed this week, when the single mom – who did not want her last name revealed – got a notice from the Illinois Department of Employment Security informing her the “the High Unemployment Period… had ended, and the additional seven benefit...
    Staffers at a Yosemite National Park hotel have revealed that they feared for their safety after hundreds of maskless guests dined indoors at a $103-per-person touchless buffet for Thanksgiving.  Despite the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) issuing guidance for holiday travel and gatherings, the buffet took place anyway at the Ahwahnee Hotel. Hotel employees told SFGate that the buffet was fully booked all week and hundreds of guests showed up for the dinner's multiple indoor seatings between 2-8pm.  The meal cost $103 per adult and $52 per child between the ages of 6 and 12.  Employees said that face coverings were required but there was no real enforcement and many guests went without them.  Staffers at a Yosemite National Park hotel have revealed that they feared for their safety after hundreds of maskless guests dined indoors at a $103 per person touchless buffet for Thanksgiving Despite the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) issuing guidance for holiday travel and gatherings, the buffet menu pictured) took place anyway at the Ahwahnee Hotel Roomskeeper, Lianne Saylor, told the...
    FURIOUS porn stars have said their livelihoods are at risk after Pornhub reportedly deleted almost 80percent of videos on the site over child abuse claims. Adult entertainment sex workers have come forward, after credit card companies including Visa, Mastercard, and Discover, cut ties with the site. 9Adult entertainment workers like Alana Evans have expressed fears that they will not be able to make money after Pornhub scrubbed its site of around 10million videosCredit: Instagram 9Allie Awesome is one of those that says that porn performers will face the brunt of the burdenCredit: Instagram 9Mary Moody poses for a sultry picture. Moody is one of the workers who has been affected after credit card companies cut ties with the porn siteCredit: Instagram The actions from credit card companies and Pornhub came after a column from The New York Times claimed that there were videos of child sex abuse, revenge porn, and rape on the site. Eight performers spoke with NBC about their fears that they will now be the ones to feel the financial hardship – not Pornhub – after 80percent...
    James Wiseman doesnt want to be drafted by Timberwolves? Sleep tips for surviving the time change Mars Wrigley warehouse workers say theyre getting yelled at for washing their hands and wiping down equipment amid an $8 billion boom for candy this Halloween © Hollis Johnson/Business Insider Inside the battle to get hazard pay at a Mars Wrigley's warehouse. Hollis Johnson/Business Insider Workers at an Illinois distribution center for candy maker Mars Wrigley have been demanding the company provide hazard pay and improve safety protocols during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mars Wrigley produces popular candies like Twix, Skittles, and M&M's. Ahead of this Halloween, the National Confectioners Association reported a 25% increase in chocolate sales. Michael Samuel, a former worker at the Mars warehouse in Illinois, told Business Insider supervisors reprimanded him for taking extra time to wipe down equipment. Samuel helped get 100 signatures in a petition for safer working conditions before being fired on October 1, he said. Mars declined to comment on the claims regarding working conditions in its Joliet, Illinois, warehouse because it said the workers are...
    FBI says Virginia Gov. Northam was also targeted in plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Whitmer This Grocery Store Chain is Bouncing Back After Declaring Bankruptcy Black McDonalds workers say they were called ghetto, had their hours cut, and were unjustly fired in a new lawsuit © Provided by Business Insider McDonald's is facing its fourth racial-discrimination lawsuit this year. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson McDonald's workers filed a racial-discrimination lawsuit against the fast-food giant on Tuesday.  Three McDonald's employees said Black workers were called "ghetto," "smelly," and "lazy," and received fewer hours than non-Black employees at a Rock Island, Illinois location.  "We are sick and tired of being considered less than human and not even worthy of life," one of the workers said on Tuesday.  The lawsuit claims that McDonald's has a systemic problem with racism, pointing to three other racial-discrimination suits filed this year.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. McDonald's workers are suing the fast-food giant, in at least the fourth racial-discrimination lawsuit the chain has seen this year.  Load Error On Tuesday, McDonald's employees who...
    Primoz Roglic gave up ski jumping, beat Luka Doncic in Slovenia and now leads the Tour de France 11 States in the White House COVID Red Zone Just 14% of workers say they trust their CEOs and senior managers to safely lead them back to work While cases of coronavirus continue to surge in many communities, some companies are beginning to bring workers back to the office. © Provided by CNBC But according to a recent survey, workers have their reservations.  Public relations firm Edelman surveyed 3,400 workers in seven countries (France, Germany, India, Singapore, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the U.S.) during the week of August 22 and found that 78% of workers feel businesses have a responsibility to ensure their employees are protected from getting — or spreading — the virus. However, only 51% said they believe office spaces are safe and even fewer trusted their CEOs and senior managers to keep them safe. Workers from India were the most likely to see office spaces as safe, with 62% saying so, followed by workers in Germany (54%) and Singapore...
    TREMONT, Bronx (WABC) -- Some bodega workers fear for their lives and want officials to do more to protect them amid violent outbursts from customers who do not want to wear masks in their stores.A growing number of bodega owners are speaking out after multiple instances of people breaking the law by not wearing face coverings. They say they are putting themselves at risk trying to obey a law that is not their responsibility.In the Bronx, a customer was caught on video smacking a worker in the face after he was told to put on his mask."I didn't expect to be smacked in the face, this was shocking to me, I tried to do what the governor asked us," clerk Aneuri Castillo said in a statement. "I told him it was the law, I'm scared, maybe he'll come back and shoot me. It's so hard coming to work not knowing how the day will go. I have a family and they need me, I don't want to die in the bodega."Moments later in the same store, a man who also...
    Matthew Rozsa August 20, 2020 9:43PM (UTC) Uber Eats workers may have overheard the internet buzz about a new browser plug-in, cheekily called "Uber Cheats." The reason for the pun, as the browser extension's author makes clear, is that he claims the food delivery platform underpays its employees. And he has the receipts to prove it.  "I had this one delivery that was an hour-and-a-half long and I got paid $16 and I thought, 'There is no way that's right,'" Armin Samii, an unemployed computer scientist who has been working Uber Eats on the side, told Salon. "I looked into it and found out that Uber paid me for a one mile delivery instead of a four mile delivery. Of course it's all made worse because I'm on a bike and they don't account for that, but that's a separate issue. I called them and said, 'Look, it's one mile instead of four.' And they replied, 'You need to go to email support.'" : Samii then had a prolonged email exchange with Uber Eats, in which the company denied that there was any...
    Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) as she campaigns at the Seattle Center on February 22, 2020.Karen Ducey The coronavirus pandemic has delivered a one-two punch to American workers – a public health emergency paired with a brutal economic crisis. Our country has lost millions of jobs and has already experienced some of the highest unemployment numbers since the Great Depression. Essential workers are risking their safety on the job, often without adequate protections. Senate Republicans have made shielding employers from liability, while dismantling federal labor protections, their top priority for the next relief package. We need to respond to this crisis by putting power in the hands of workers – and a key part of that is ending worker misclassification. Gig economy companies like Uber, Lyft, GrubHub, and Amazon misclassify workers as "independent contractors" rather than employees, enabling them to deny workers collective bargaining rights, health care, a minimum wage, overtime protections and access to unemployment insurance and paid sick leave guaranteed to employees under state and federal law. This model harms workers who rely on these jobs...
    MAIDUGURI (Reuters) - Islamist militants have abducted four aid workers and a private security worker in northeast Nigeria, the hostages said in a video seen by Reuters on Monday. The hostages identified themselves and said they each worked for different organizations. With just their heads and shoulders showing against leafy plants outdoors, they named large aid groups Action Against Hunger, the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and REACH. "I am appealing to the International Rescue Committee to come and rescue me," said one of the hostages, who gave his name as Luka Filibus. The incident underscores the increasing risk for aid workers in northeast Nigeria, where a decade-long conflict with Boko Haram and Islamic State's regional ally has fuelled one of the world's worst humanitarian crises. The abduction is also a sign of how dangerous the region has become since Nigeria's military withdrew into garrison towns they call "super camps", leaving previously safe major roads, much of the countryside and smaller towns unprotected. Nigeria's army has this year touted major victories against the insurgents, but recent attacks and the abductions undermine...
    People stand in line for a temperature check outside an office building.SeongJoon Cho | Bloomberg | Getty Images As many U.S. cities and states begin to enter phases 2 and 3 of coronavirus reopenings, employees around the country are wondering when their office will call them back. With building concerns about a second wave of infections and uncertain progress on a potential Covid-19 vaccine, most large employers have not formally disclosed when, if at all, they plan to bring their employees back from remote work. But there is reason for many workers to be pegging an office return to September. Recent surveys of senior executives conducted by CNBC indicate that many companies expect 50% of their employees or more to be coming back to workplaces in September.   Just about three-fourths (74%) of executives holding senior technology positions at firms across various sectors of the economy say that at least 50%, it not more, of their firm's workers are currently working remote. But that is expected to change after the summer. A little over half (52%) of respondents to a recent CNBC Technology Executive Council survey...
    The men slept inside the warehouse for about three months and were not allowed out Police in Nigeria have rescued 300 people they say were locked in a rice-processing factory and forced to work throughout a coronavirus lockdown. From the end of March the men were allegedly not allowed to leave the mill in the northern city of Kano. The workers were promised an additional $13 (£10) a month on top of their $72 monthly salary – those who did not accept were threatened with the sack. Five managers at the Indian-owned mill have been arrested. The company, called Popular Farms, has not responded to BBC requests for comment. Police spokesman Abdullahi Haruna told the BBC that the plant had now been shut down and the owners were being investigated for “holding the men against their will”. Some of the men say were forced to work most of the time during their incarceration, with little food. “We were allowed to rest for only a short time, no prayers were allowed, no family visits,” 28-year-old Hamza Ibrahim, one of those...
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