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    A ‘sea monster’ was pulled from the depths off the coast of Australia by fisherman who was surprised when he dragged in a shark with beady eyes and a human-like smile. The shark appeared to have rough, charcoal-colored skin and a small mouth with tiny sharp teeth lining the top and bottom. The image of the dead creature was shared on Facebook, sparking several theories as to what kind of shark it is - some suggest it was a cookiecutter or goblin shark. Dean Grubbs, associate director of research at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory told Newsweek, that it looks like a gulper shark. The creepy creature is said to be a gulper shark that is critically endangered around Australia due to overfishing RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next World's first cloned Artic wolf is born in China: Pup named... Forget being right or left-handed! Octopuses have a... Share this article Share The shark was caught by fisherman Trapnman Bermagui on September 12. He reeled the nightmarish fish to his...
    Humans have left more than 15,000 pounds of trash on Mars in the last 50 years and not a single person has ever stepped foot on the red planet. Cagri Kilic, a postdoctoral research fellow in robotics at West Virginia University, analyzed the mass of all rovers and orbiters sent to Mars and subtracted the weight of what is currently in operation, resulting in 15,694 pounds of debris. The trash includes discarded hardware, inactive spacecraft and those that crashed on the surface - specifically the Soviet Union’s Mars orbiter 2 that made a crash landing in 1971. Not only are humans already polluting another planet, but scientists fear the debris could contaminate samples being collected by NASA’s Perseverance rover that is currently searching for ancient life on Mars. A scientist calculates there is 15,694 pounds of trash on Mars. Most of it stems from discarded hardware like this thermal blanket that protected NASA's Perseverance survive its descent through the hellish atmosphere RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Spectacular image of Jupiter looking like a marble floating... ...
    Stories about the ocean’s surface turning completely white have been passed down from sailor to sailor for centuries, but what sounded like nothing more than legend has been captured on camera for the first time. A superyacht named Ganesha was traveling in waters near Indonesia in the summer of 2019 when it passed through a milky sea that was glowing in the dead of night. The glow appeared to originate from a source that was at least 30 feet below the surface and the swirling, white sea stretched for over 39,000 square miles. The display was a result of ‘luminous bacteria communicating with each other and triggering a glowing response upon reaching critical populations via a process called quorum sensing,’ according to documentation of events published in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences). ‘Both the color and intensity of the glow was akin to glow-in-the-dark stars/stickers, or some watches that have glowing parts on the hands ... a very soft glow that was gentle on the eyes.’ A superyacht named Ganesha was traveling in waters near Indonesia in...
    (CNN)Almost half of the Earth's land surface must be protected to stop the biodiversity crisis, according to a new report published Friday in the journal Science. The research found some 64 million square kilometers (24.7 million square miles) -- 44% of the Earth's land -- needs "conservation attention" to prevent major biodiversity losses."We must act fast, our models show that over 1.3 million square kilometers of this important land -- an area larger than South Africa -- is likely to have its habitat cleared for human uses by 2030, which would be devastating for wildlife," lead author Dr James R. Allan from the University of Amsterdam said in a news release.The study, which used advanced data modeling and algorithmic projections to map optimal areas for conserving species and ecosystems was described by the authors as "a conservation plan for the planet." The authors said those areas didn't necessarily have to be designated as protected areas, but other strategies could be used to conserve ecosystems including policies to control land use.Read MoreThe new research also found that 1.87 billion people, roughly...
    The deep ocean could warm by a further 0.36°F (0.2°C) in the next 50 years, as it continues to absorb the vast majority of 'excess heat' created by humans, a new study warns. Oceans have already absorbed about 90 per cent of the warming caused by humans since the Industrial Revolution began.  Much of this heat is stored in the 'deep ocean' – defined as water more than 2,300ft (700m) below the surface. The resulting underwater temperature increase could cause sea levels to rise and have devastating consequences for ecosystems, the researchers from the University of Exeter and the University of Brest warn. Deep-sea plants and animals which depend on oxygen may no longer be able to survive, and the change will also affect the sea's currents and chemistry. Much of the 'excess heat' stored in the subtropical North Atlantic is in the deep ocean, below 2,300ft, new research suggests.  Extreme storms could help PROTECT beaches from sea level rise  Extreme storms could help protect beaches from sea level rise by bringing in new sand from deeper waters, a new study claims....
    (CNN)The ice sheet covering Greenland is melting rapidly at its base and is injecting far more water and ice into the ocean than previously understood, according to new research, which could have serious ramifications for global sea level rise. "Unprecedented" rates of melting have been observed at the bottom of the ice sheet, caused by huge quantities of meltwater falling down from the surface, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. As the meltwater falls, its gravitational potential energy is converted to kinetic energy, which ultimately warms the water as it pools at the base of the ice sheet. In that process, the study found that the Greenland ice sheet produces more energy than the world's 10 largest hydroelectric dams combined."However, the heat generated by the falling water is not used to generate electricity. Instead, it melts the ice," Poul Christoffersen, a Canmridge University senior scientist who took part in the study, told CNN. Meltwater on the surface of the ice sheet falls through cracks to the base.During warmer months, meltwater pools...
    More than half of the surface of the world's oceans have experienced excessively warm temperatures since 2014 — with extreme marine heat now the 'new normal'. This is the warning of researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium, who analysed a century-and-a-half's worth of global marine temperature data. Extreme marine temperatures can lead to the collapse of crucial marine ecosystems like coral reefs, kelp forest and seagrass meadows, the team said. The findings, they added, are further evidence for the urgent need to reduce climate-changing greenhouse emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. More than half of the surface of the world's oceans have experienced excessively warm temperatures since 2014 — with extreme marine heat now the 'new normal'. Pictured: the fraction of the ocean's surface experiencing extreme heat, divided up by the hemispheres INSPIRED BY KELP The study, the team said, developed out of research into the history of kelp forests growing on the Californian coastline over the last century. As part of this, they realised that they needed to learn the history of local sea surface heat extremes — which...
    Here's one for the Guinness Book of Records — researchers from the University of Lille created the world's longest-lasting bubble, which kept its shape for 465 days. This is a whopping 20,00 times longer than regular soap bubbles, which typically last for a only a matter of minutes — if even that — before they pop. The team's trick lies in creating a special kind of bubble called a 'gas marble', which has a layered shell structure with plastic beads at the surface that make it strong. Scroll down for video Here's one for the Guinness Book of Records — researchers from the University of Lille created the world's longest-lasting bubble (pictured) which kept its shape for 465 days The study was conducted by physicist Aymeric Roux and his colleagues at the University of Lille, in France. 'Soap bubbles are by essence fragile and ephemeral,' the team wrote in their paper. 'Depending on their composition and environment, bubble bursting can be triggered by gravity-induced drainage and/or the evaporation of the liquid and/or the presence of nuclei.  'They can also...
    A team from Caladan Oceanic went hunting for in the Philippine Sea for the USS Johnston, a World War II ship that sank in 1944, when they came across something even more amazing - an world's deepest-dwelling squid. More than 20,000 feet below the surface, the two explorers inside the submarine captured a shadow trailing along the seafloor and a later investigation proved it was a young bigfin squid. The squid, which featured long slender terminal arms and tentacle filaments, is the first to be observed at hadal depths that represents that deepest marine habitats on Earth. The last time a bigfin squid was seen by human eyes was in 2014, but this specimen was just 15,400 feet below the surface. Scroll down for video  More than 20,000 feet below the surface, the two explorers inside the submarine captured a shadow (pictured) trailing along the seafloor and a later investigation proved it was a young bigfin squid Bigfin squid – or Magnapinna – are known for their long arms and tentacles and can measure up to 22 feet in length,...
    The Europe Space Agency (ESA) announced on Wednesday that it has found 'significant amounts of water' hiding in Mars's Grand Canyon. The discovery was made by the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), which spotted the water just three feet below the surface of the Valles Mariners – a massive canyon system that stretches more than 2,400 miles across the dusty Martian landscape. The water-rich area is about the size of the Netherlands and overlaps with the deep valleys of Candor Chaos, part of the canyon system considered promising in the hunt for water on Mars. 'We found a central part of Valles Marineris to be packed full of water – far more water than we expected,' Alexey Malakhov, also of the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and co-author of the study, said in a statement. 'This is very much like Earth's permafrost regions, where water ice permanently persists under dry soil because of the constant low temperatures.' Scroll down for video  The Europe Space Agency (ESA) announced on Wednesday that it has found 'significant amounts of...
    In this article .SPXVIDEO1:2201:22Why recent stock drawdowns present an investor opportunity: Art HoganTrading NationStocks rebounded for a second straight day Tuesday following the waves of recent sell-offs that have swept over Wall Street. In the thick of it last week, the selling came fast and furious. But, with the S&P 500 at its lows last week just 4% from all-time highs set in November, the damage looked to be superficial. Look underneath the surface and the fallout appeared far worse, according to Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities.   "When you pull back the trunk lid a bit and look at what's been going on underneath the surface, you see that there's been a massive sell-off in everything related to momentum and growth, all the pandemic darlings, a lot of the travel and leisure names," Hogan told CNBC's "Trading Nation" on Monday. Nearly half of the S&P 500 on Monday was in a correction or worse, having fallen at least 10% from 52-week highs. Some of the hardest-hit stocks this year including Penn National Gaming, Biogen and Gap...
    An elusive crystal predicted decades ago has finally been discovered trapped inside a diamond from deep Earth.   High-pressure calcium silicate perovskite — a mineral predicted in 1967, but never before seen in nature — was found in a diamond from the lower mantle. Researchers led from the University of Nevada used synchrotron x-ray diffraction to characterise the crystalline compound, which they have called 'davemaoite'.  Based on their results, davemaoite has now been confirmed as a new mineral by the International Mineralogical Association.  The choice of name honours the work of the eminent Chinese-American geophysicist Ho-Kwang 'Dave' Mao in the field of deep-mantle petrology. The diamond with the davemaoite inclusion was formed more than 410 miles (660 km) below the Earth's surface, and was unearthed in the Orapa mine in Botswana. High-pressure calcium silicate perovskite — an elusive mineral predicted in 1967, but never before seen in nature — has been found in a diamond from the lower mantle (pictured) Experts led from the University of Nevada used synchrotron x-ray diffraction on the diamond (pictured) to characterise the crystalline compound, which they have called 'davemaoite'...
    In this article MSFTMicrosoft's Surface Pro 8 has a new tray to securely store and charge the new Surface Slim Pen 2.MicrosoftMicrosoft's new Surface Pro 8 tablet launches Tuesday in tandem with the first big refresh to Windows 11. I've been using the tablet for the past several days. It's a great alternative to the iPad if you want Windows, and Microsoft made a lot of refinements that make this one of the biggest updates to the Surface tablet line in years. With a starting price of $1,100, it's a great computer that may be especially compelling as offices begin to embrace hybrid models of work, with some days in the office and some at home. But you should think of it as a laptop first and a tablet second, and buy the optional $180 keyboard to get the most out of it. I still think Apple's $329 iPad is the best option for people who just want a simple tablet for watching movies, playing games, downloading apps and browsing the web, largely because the iPad is just a lot...
    THE Sun certainly is hot but it’s no match for the intensity of a bolt of lightning. Lightning is one of the most destructive forces in nature and one strike can kill off a tree within days. 2Lightning is one of the most destructive forces in natureCredit: Alamy Live News Is lightning hotter than the sun? Lightning is considerably hotter than the surface of the Sun. According to the National Weather Service in the US, lightning can heat the air it passes through to as much as 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit, that’s nearly 27,800 degrees Celsius. That’s nearly five times hotter than the Sun. Nasa has put the surface of the sun as reaching 11,000 degrees Fahrenheit, equating to just under 6,100 degrees Celsius. The US space agency estimates there are around 2,000 thunderstorms happening around the world at any given time. Around eight million cloud-to-ground lightning strikes happen per day worldwide. Most read in The US SunJOE CALLS THE SHOTS Biden orders staff in companies with 100+ employees MUST get vaccinated'BLOW OVER' Prince Andrew 'convinced' lawsuit will 'blow over' after...
    The ability to survive even in the most extreme environments makes water bears an interesting object of research. Dry, Thrown into space, Force Conflict Because the surface is so fast, water bears can still survive. Not only does it have a solid outer shell, but it also has a shell made of the water bear’s DNA protein. Even if these superpowers are eliminated, the water bears will still be able to survive … adorable moves. Look at this powerful tiny creature that walks on the surface: everyone will love a plump water bear moving back and forth. The new test is going on the water bear gel. Water bears are one of the smallest legged animals that scientists have ever discovered. Jasmine Nirodi, a biologist at Rockefeller University, and colleagues have recorded how the water bear Hippysius Dujardini moves across different surfaces. “The most interesting and perhaps most surprising thing about water bears happening is how smoothly they move. They have a specific gait, which resembles large creatures!“, Ms. Nirodi wrote on Twitter. “We did not force them to do...
    In this article, ComputerHoy could receive a commission for your purchases. More information. One of the best Windows laptops of the moment is on sale, and also with a discount that we have never seen before, which leaves it at its lowest historical price. As with Apple and its MacBooks, Microsoft has its own laptops and convertibles with Windows 10, in which software and hardware are perfectly adapted, and that allows everything to work much more smoothly, precisely the advantage point that they have always had Apple products. Obviously this has its limitations and usually means that Microsoft’s Surface laptops are somewhat more expensive than those of other brands, although not always. Right now for example The Surface Laptop 3 is on sale at a much cheaper price than usual, almost knockdown. PcComponentes sells it for only 698 euros. This Microsoft laptop is available in various configurations, with an i5 or Ryzen 5 processor, as well as variable storage, always of the SSD type. Are exactly 451 euros discount, which is not bad at all. This Spanish online store is...
    The red supergiant star Betelgeuse experienced a massive dip in brightness due to a dark star-spot causing a 300F drop in surface temperature, a study claims. The bright reddish star, the tenth brightest in the night sky, is located in the shoulder of the Orion constellation and can be seen by the naked eye in the night sky.  It is a variable star, so its brightness changes, but from October 2019 to March 2020, Betelgeuse's brightness dropped 2.5 times, the most significant observed drop in 50 years, according to experts from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. The team, led by Professor Zhao Gang, observed the star in near-infrared wavelengths using the Weihai Observatory in Shandong from January to April 2020. They created a new technique to take the temperature of the giant star and measured how warm the surface was at different points over the observation period. At its dimmest in January it was 5,797 degrees Fahrenheit, and as the brightness recovered by April, it had increased to 6,103 degrees Fahrenheit. Study authors say this was likely caused by a large dark...
    A recent expedition to the Titanic has uncovered new images of the famed shipwreck, 12,500 feet beneath the surface of the North Atlantic, including the frame of a stained-glass window. Oceangate Expeditions announced Tuesday it completed the first of numerous dives to the Titanic's hull aboard Titan, a next-generation carbon-fiber-and-titanium submersible. Company president Stockton Rush called last week's dive 'the result of years of purposeful and persistent effort.' 'We had to overcome tremendous engineering, operational, business, and finally COVID-19 challenges to get here, and I am so proud of this team and grateful for the support of our many partners,' Rush said in a statement. The five-person submersible also recorded fragments of floor tile and other debris from the luxury liner, which collided with an iceberg and sank during its maiden voyage on April 15, 1912 around 11:40 p.m. ship's time, taking the lives of more than 1,500 passengers and crew. The dive was the first of many planned to the Titanic over the next month and then annually 'to record the ship's rate of decay, study the marine life found...
    Nearly three years after scientists confirmed that Mars still has lakes filled with liquid water, a new study suggests there may be more water than previously thought, including 'dozens' of lakes less than a mile beneath the surface of the Red Planet.    Researchers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory analyzed data from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter and saw dozens of radar reflections around the Martian south pole similar to the discovery made in 2018. The radar signals were found in a region of Mars known as the South Polar Layered Deposits, home to water ice, dry ice and dust that have lived there for millions of years.  However, many of these findings are in areas that are likely too cold for water to remain liquid, even with the presence of salty minerals known as perchlorates, a fact that's currently stumping the researchers. 'We're not certain whether these signals are liquid water or not, but they appear to be much more widespread than what the original paper found,' said study co-author and NASA JPL investigator Jeffrey Plaut, in a statement....
    NASA is returning to Venus for the first time in more than 30 years, as the space agency unveiled two new $500 million missions on Wednesday that are expected to launch within the next 10 years.  As part of its State of the Agency address, NASA administrator Bill Nelson said the missions, DAVINCI+ and VERITAS, would head to the planet known as 'Earth's evil twin' as part of its Discovery program. 'The missions aim to understand how Venus became an inferno-like world when it has so many other characteristics similar to ours – and may have been the first habitable world in the solar system, complete with an ocean and Earth-like climate,' NASA said in a release.  Scroll down for video  NASA is returning to Venus for the first time in nearly 30 years, launching two $500 million missions The missions, DAVINCI+ and VERITAS, will analyze the planet's atmosphere and surface. Venus has been compared to 'Earth's evil twin' for its extreme surface temperature DAVINCI+ (Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry, and Imaging) will measure Venus'...
    NASA announced Friday that Ingenuity successfully completed its fourth flight, which saw the small helicopter 'fly farther and faster than ever before.' The American space agency received the data downlink at 1:39pm ET that showed the copter took off from ‘Wright Brothers Field’ under the watchful gaze of the Perseverance rover at 10:12am ET. Perseverance, which sat some 210 feet away, snapped a picture of its travel companion’s fourth flight through the thin atmosphere on Mars. Ingenuity was set to fly 16 feet above the surface and head south 267 feet, but NASA has yet to not confirm if these specific marks were hit.  ‘Success. #MarsHelicopter completed 4th flight, going farther & faster than ever before. It also took more photos as it flew over the Martian surface. We expect those images will come down in a later data downlink, but @NASAPerseverance’s Hazcam caught part of the flight,’ NASA’s JPL shared on Twitter. The flight was initially set for Thursday, but the data downlink showed Ingenuity did not transition to flight mode - meaning it never left the ground. Scroll...
    NASA has pushed back the launch of the Ingenuity helicopter's first flight on the Martian surface. Takeoff of the 4-pound (1.8-kilogram) robotic helicopter, currently attached to NASA's Perseverance rover, is now slated for no earlier than April 11.  Deployment of Ingenuity, which has become affectionately known as 'Ginny', had been originally planned for April 8. If successful, Ingenuity will be the first powered and controlled flight of an aircraft on any planet other than Earth.  Ingenuity carries a small amount of fabric that covered one of the wings of the Wright brothers’ aircraft, known as the Flyer, during the first powered, controlled flight on Earth in 1903.  Scroll down for video  In this artist's concept, NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter stands on the Red Planet's surface as NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover (partially visible on the left) rolls away. Ingenuity has lowered all four legs but its still under the 'belly' of Perseverance NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory made the announcement on Twitter but didn't give a reason for the slight delay.  MailOnline has contacted NASA for more information.   '#MarsHelicopter is preparing to...
    China has shared a look at the first moon samples to be brought back to Earth in more than 45 years. The lunar regolith was collected by the nation's Chang'e 5 mission that returned in December with 3.8 pounds of soil and rocks from our natural satellite. The images show the samples as small as dust particles up to larger chunks, along  with samples inside a crystal container that will go on display at the National Museum of China. The container is designed like a ritual Chinese wine vessel, or 'zun,' and holds the lunar dust within a hallow sphere that represents both the moon and the Chang'5 re-entry capsule. Scroll down for video  China has shared a look at the first moon samples to be brought back to Earth in more than 45 years China's moon mission was the first to return with samples since the former Soviet Union's Lunar 24 robotic mission in 1976 and is now the 21st mission to set down on the lunar surface. The Chang'e-5 took off atop the Long March-5 rocket in...
    I must start by making a clarification, when I say that Mars is closer than ever, I’m not talking about the distance between the earth and the red planet and that can be measured in kilometers, miles, light seconds, and so on. Yes, the one that is constantly changing (after all we are talking about two bodies orbiting in space), sometimes getting closer and sometimes moving away. No, I’m talking about how close or far we can, as humanity, feel from Mars. And this February it is undoubted that we will be closer than ever. The reason? In July of last year, there was a rapprochement between Earth and Mars, providing the most favorable circumstances for launches to be made to the red planet. And without a doubt the moment was well used, since there were no less than three missions: NASA’s Mars Perseverance, China’s Tianwen-1 and the United Arab Emirates’ ope Mars, launched respectively on July 30, 23 and 19 from last year. Although there are obviously technological differences between the three ships, the distance to travel has been...
    (CNN)Moon craters formed when meteorites and asteroids slammed into the lunar surface. Like fossils on Earth, they reveal something about the history of the solar system and how planets were formed. Using artificial intelligence, Chinese scientists have estimated that there are more than 100,000 craters on the moon, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. That's far more than the 9,137 officially recognized by the International Astronomical Union and largely detected manually using elevation information and images, the study said.The scientists, using data on 7,895 previously identified craters and 1,411 dated craters, were able to apply machine learning to train a deep neural network. With information from China's first and second lunar orbiters -- Chang'e 1 and Chang'e 2 -- the network identified 109,956 new craters. The two unmanned spacecraft launched in 2007 and 2010, respectively. Using artificial intelligence, Chinese scientists identified over 109,000 previously unrecognized lunar craters on the moon's surface. The moon is shown here, as seen from Buenos Aires on December 21. "Impact craters (are) the most diagnostic features of the lunar surface....
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    Scientists have found a giant, detached coral reef near the northern end of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, that measures nearly 550 yards in height. According to The Guardian, the reef is taller than The Empire State Building and was discovered nearly 80 miles off the northern tip of Queensland, Australia. The reef was discovered as a ship from the Californian non-profit Schmidt Ocean Institute conducted a 3D mapping exercise using an underwater robot to find out more about life on the seabed in the region. The reef is believed to measure one mile in width and the “blade-like” tip that reaches is 43 yards below the sea’s surface. It is the first reef of its kind to be located since the late 19th century when similar formations were discovered in the same stretch of water. Tom Bridge, a scientist from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, said the discovery is one of a kind and shows how little information we still have about underwater ridges like this. “It’s a big reef not...
    New observations of the Moon reveal that lunar water may be more accessible than originally thought. The new data is particularly exciting for NASA, which hopes to leverage the Moon’s resources — notably water ice embedded in the soil — to help future astronauts live and work on the lunar surface. In one study, researchers detected water directly on the lunar surface, finding the molecule on areas of the Moon lit by the Sun. A second study speculates that water ice might be trapped in tiny pockets or small craters littered all over the Moon’s surface, making water potentially more abundant and more accessible than we could have imagined. The two studies were published today in the journal Nature. This isn’t the first time water has been detected on the Moon. But the only water we’ve been able to find and verify up until now is really difficult to reach. It seems to be primarily located in large craters at the lunar south pole that are in perpetual shadow. The frigid craters are dangerously cold — possibly reaching -400...
    There may be more water on the moon than previously believed, and it could be used as a resource during upcoming missions -- like NASA's return of humans to the lunar surface through the Artemis program.The two studies published in the journal Nature Astronomy, and researchers shared their findings during a NASA press conference on Monday.The research is based on data gathered by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, in orbit around the moon since June 2009, as well as the agency's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy airborne telescope, called SOFIA. The latter is a Boeing 747SP aircraft modified to carry a 2.7-meter telescope.In the first study, researchers used SOFIA to observe the moon at a wavelength that revealed the signature of molecular water, or H2O."For the first time, water has been confirmed to be present on the sunlit surface of the moon," said Paul Hertz, NASA's Astrophysics Division director during Monday's press conference.Previous research revealed detections of water on the surface of the moon near the south pole. But the signature of molecular water at the wavelength used in this research...
    (CNN)There may be more water on the moon than previously believed, and it could be used as a resource during upcoming missions -- like NASA's return of humans to the lunar surface through the Artemis program. The two studies published in the journal Nature Astronomy, and researchers shared their findings during a NASA press conference on Monday. Eight nations sign NASAs Artemis Accords that guide cooperative exploration of the moonThe research is based on data gathered by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, in orbit around the moon since June 2009, as well as the agency's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy airborne telescope, called SOFIA. The latter is a Boeing 747SP aircraft modified to carry a 2.7-meter telescope.In the first study, researchers used SOFIA to observe the moon at a wavelength that revealed the signature of molecular water, or H2O. "For the first time, water has been confirmed to be present on the sunlit surface of the moon," said Paul Hertz, NASA's Astrophysics Division director during Monday's press conference. Read MorePrevious research revealed detections of water on the surface of the moon...
    Astronauts returning to the Moon will be exposed to radiation 2.6 times higher than on board the International Space Station (ISS), a new study says.   Scientists used data from China’s 2019 Chang’E 4 lander to determine the amount of radiation humans would be exposed to on the lunar surface. An average daily radiation dose is 1,369 microsieverts per day – about 2.6 times higher than the daily dose for ISS crew, 200 times higher than on the surface of the Earth and five to 10 times higher 'than on a flight from New York to Frankfurt'.  NASA plans to build Moon bases that won't be penetrated by lethal rays when it sends humans back to the Moon in 2024, including the first woman, as part of the Artemis programme.  Scroll down for video  Scientists have used data from China’s 2019 Chang’E 4 lander mission to determine the amount of radiation that humans would be exposed to on the lunar surface in future crewed missions to the Moon RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    Many of the valleys scarring Mars' surface may have formed by water flowing under ancient ice sheets — rather than being forged by open rivers — a study has found. Researchers from the US used a special computer algorithm to study thousands of valleys on the red planet — and reveal the processes that formed them. The team also compared the Martian valleys to the channels found under glaciers in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago — revealing they have striking similarities. The findings throw 'cold water' on the long-standing 'warm and wet' hypothesis that suggested ancient Mars sported widespread rainfall, rivers and oceans. However, an ice-coated ancient Mars would have been more likely to support life, the team said — with an ice sheet offering more stability to the underlying water. Furthermore, the ice coverage would have offered shelter from solar radiation in the absence of a magnetic field — a shield that Mars lost billions of years ago.  Many of the valleys scarring Mars' surface may have formed by water flowing under ancient ice sheets — rather than being forged...
    Volcanoes that appear to be benign can be much more violent than previously feared due to volatile magma hidden deep below the surface, a study shows.  Scientists studied volcanoes on remote islands in the Galápagos Archipelago in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Ecuador.  They found volcanoes that reliably produce small lava eruptions of basalt, an igneous rock, hide chemically diverse magmas in their underground plumbing systems. These include some that have the potential to generate 'explosive activity' and could pose an unexpected safety risk for local authorities in the future.  Scroll down for video  The 2015 eruption at Wolf volcano in the Galapagos Archipelago - an ideal location for studying monotonous volcanism Researchers studied two Galápagos volcanoes – Wolf and Fernandina – which have erupted basaltic lava flows at the Earth’s surface for their entire lifetimes RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Fall of the Roman Republic and rise of the Empire may have... When the world stood still: Ground vibrations caused by... Water deep below the surface of the Earth...
    NASA has unveiled a new rover design that could be used to help explore the surface of Venus. Nicknamed the 'Venus Feelers,' the rover was developed by an Egyptian architect and designer named Youssef Ghali. Ghali submitted his design as part of NASA's 'Exploring Hell' contest, which was an open call for experimental new rover designs capable of surviving hellish conditions on the surface of Venus.  Scroll down for video  NASA has unveiled a new experimental Venus rover design, called Venus Feelers, which was selected as the winner of it's 'Exploring Hell' design contest Ghali's design focused on a tri-wheel 'feeler' structure attached to the front of the rover, which help detect large rocks or deep holes to help keep the rover from becoming stuck in rocky or uneven terrain.  Ghali will be awarded $15,000 for his submission, while NASA engineers will take his design and look at ways to integrate it into a future iteration of their own designs for a Venus rover, according to a report in Engadget. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    A delicate, soft coral garden has been found near Greenland at a depth of 1,600 feet underwater — where the pressures is 50 times greater than at the surface. Experts from the UK and Greenland made the discovery — the first of its kind to have been seen in the region — using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera. The fragile habitat is immediately adjacent to economically important deep-sea trawl fisheries, the researchers reported. Accordingly, they are hoping that the United Nations will recognise a 188 square mile area around the site as a 'Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem' to ensure it is protected. Scroll down for video  A delicate, soft coral garden (pictured) has been found near Greenland at a depth of 1,600 feet underwater — where the pressures is 50 times greater than at the surface 'Coral gardens are characterised by collections of one or more species , that sit on a wide range of hard and soft bottom habitats, from rock to sand, and support a diversity of fauna,' said Chris Yesson of the Zoological Society of London. The...
    NASA is inviting 'innovative designers' to come up with an idea for a 'Lunar Loo' - a toilet that will work in the microgravity of space and on the surface of the Moon. Using the crowdsourcing platform​ ​HeroX​, NASA hopes to find a solution that will let astronauts get some relief when they return to Earth's natural satellite in 2024. They are calling on the 'global community of innovators' to provide design concepts for a fully capable, low mass toilet that will work both in space and on the Moon. Space toilets are already in use on the International Space Station but they only work in microgravity, not under the slightly higher gravitational pull of the Moon. The 'three most compelling design concepts' will win £28,000 in prizes and the chance to talk through the concepts with NASA engineers, with the possibility of one of the designs making it to the Moon as part of the 2024 Artemis mission.  Using the crowdsourcing platform​ ​HeroX​, NASA hopes to find a solution that will let astronauts get some relief when they...
    The giant diamond cut into gems that now adorn the Crown Jewels was formed 400 miles below Earth's surface — three times deeper than other precious stones.  Analysis of similar diamonds by the Gemological Institute of America revealed that the Cullinan was a 'super-deep' diamond — and one of the rarest objects on Earth. The largest gem-quality rough diamond ever found, weighing 3,106.75 carats, the Cullinan was unearthed from a mine in South Africa in the January of 1905. In 1907, the diamond was bought by the Transvaal Colony government, who presented it to King Edward VII as a gift. The King had the rough stone cut by Joseph Asscher & Company of Amsterdam — forming nine major stones (Cullinan I–IX) as well as 96 minor brilliant stones. The largest two stones — Cullinan I and II — now form centrepieces in the Crown Jewels, and sit in the Sovereign's Sceptre with Cross and the Imperial State Crown. Despite originally remaining in Amsterdam, the other seven major stones have over time also been acquired or gifted into the possession of the British royal...
    Toxic man-made mercury pollution has been discovered in the deepest part of the ocean, in the Marianas Trench — more than six miles below the surface.  Researchers from China and the US used submarine robots to identify mercury in the fish and crustaceans living in the deepest part of the western Pacific Ocean. Mercury enters the atmosphere through the burning of fossil fuels, mining and manufacturing. It can then be transported into the oceans via rainfall. The liquid metal — which was once used in thermometers before being banned — is highly toxic and can be ingested via polluted seafood. One of the research teams, from the US, sampled fish and crustaceans from both the Marianas trench off of the Philippines and the Kermadec trench near New Zealand, which reaches around 6.2 miles below the water's surface. Pictured, snailfish in the Kermadec trench 'This is a surprise. Previous research had concluded methyl-mercury was mostly produced in the top few hundred metres of the ocean,' said paper author and environmental scientist Ruoyu Sun of China's Tianjin University. 'This would have limited mercury bio-accumulation...
    An odd-looking “Dumbo” octopus was found rolling in the deep. The cephalopod, which sports fins above its eyes that look like ears, was spotted on the seabed of the Java Trench, 21,000 feet below the surface — more than a mile deeper than previous recordings. Dr Alan Jamieson, who pioneered the “lander” that took the photos, told the BBC the significant finding shows octopi can find potentially suitable habitats on almost any seabed, but it will “have to do something clever inside their cells. … It will need some smart biochemistry to make sure it retains that sphere. All the adaptations you need to live at pressure are at the cellular level.”
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