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    JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said in no uncertain terms that his bank will not stop financing the production of fossil fuels. 'Absolutely not, and that would be the road to hell for America,' Dimon said on Wednesday, in a clash with Michigan Democrat and Squad member Rashida Tlaib. Tlaib asked banking executives to respond ‘yes' or ‘no’ to whether or not they have a policy 'against funding new oil and gas products' - to meet their collective pledge to work towards net zero emissions by 2050. In response to Dimon's resounding no, Tlaib advised citizens to remove their accounts from the banking giant.  'Sir, you know what, everybody that got relief from student loans [that] has a bank with your bank, should probably take out their account and close their account,' she said, referencing President Joe Biden's plan to forgive up to $20,000 in student loan debt. 'The fact that you're not even there to help relieve many of the folks that are in debt, extreme debt because of student load debt, and you're out there criticizing it.'  The congresswoman...
    Sponsored Content Bret Talley is an entrepreneur and the founder of Talley Digital Media, a digital marketing agency that helps high-profile clients get the most out of their web presence. Bret started in the industry early on, working for several large media companies and entering the world of digital marketing when it was in its infancy. He soon recognized the potential for internet marketing and started Talley Digital Media to help businesses achieve their goals online. Bret Talley and his team have years of experience in the digital media industry and have helped hundreds of businesses and high-profile individuals grow their online presence. Talley has a proven track record of success, and Bret is passionate about helping businesses succeed online. Talley has worked with clients throughout the world, and Bret and his team deeply understand what it takes to create a successful online presence for businesses and organizations. They offer a full suite of services, including search engine optimization, digital marketing, and web presence. What Challenges Do You Face When Working with High-Profile Clients? The biggest challenge is always...
    When you meet Mark Maier, a lawyer and the leader of the government contracts practice at Shulman Rogers, you’re struck by the calm demeanor but also by a rambunctious level of constrained energy. He’s the definition of a Washington multi-hyphenate. A retired Army colonel, who spent 20 years in the reserves following his service, Maier also has an engineering degree in addition to his J.D. and a few cybersecurity certifications to boot. WTOP talked with Maier about helping businesses who work in the federal contracting arena and what matters today, especially in navigating both the challenges of contracting but also the different aspects of supporting the federal government. Q1: Tell us about the slice of government contracting that Shulman Rogers and your team focuses on for clients. MAIER: My practice is driven in part by my background, with our focus areas being primarily technology and cyber related to government contracts. I have a background in engineering and in those practice areas, so those types of clients tend to gravitate toward me. Also, the government spends a ton of money in...
    An associate of disgraced former lawyer Alex Murdaugh has been indicted on charges that he helped launder and misuse funds.  Palmetto State Bank CEO Russell Laffitte was charged by a federal grand jury on Wednesday on counts of conspiracy, wire fraud and bank fraud.  Prosecutors allege Laffitte schemed with Murdaugh to swindle two young sisters out of money they received after their mother and brother were killed in an accident in 2005.  The pair hatched the plan in 2011, while Laffitte worked as a conservator for sisters Alania Spohn and Hanna Plyer, and Murdaugh represented them. Even though Laffitte was paid over $400,000 for watching over the sister's money, they attempted to embezzle $990,000 for Murdaugh and $355,000 for Lafitte.  Russell Laffitte, CEO of Palmetto State Bank, faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted of charges he helped Alex Murdaugh swindle hundreds of thousands of dollars Disgraced legal heir Alex Murdaugh arrived at a South Carolina court Wednesday for a hearing over last year's brutal murders of his wife and son - as cops now claim they have...
    A Baltimore defense attorney has been sentenced to nearly five years in federal prison for his part in a money laundering conspiracy. Ken Ravenell, 63, of Monkton, Maryland, was sentenced to 57 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release Wednesday, for using his law firm escrow account to launder proceeds from drug trafficking, according to a statement by the U.S. Attorney’s Office. More Maryland News More Local News Evidence brought forward during the trial showed that Ravenell received money from clients and associates who engaged in drug trafficking, and used bank accounts of the law firm to launder more than a million dollars, according to a news release. He also used the law firm’s bank accounts to receive drug payments, and to make payments to attorneys hired to represent other members of the conspiracy. Prosecutors also said Ravenell used the firm’s bank accounts to invest on behalf of a drug trafficker client, concealing and misrepresenting the source of the funds while promoting the client’s crimes. Trial evidence also showed that Ravenell received substantial cash payments...
    Fossil fuel firms were recently busted for spending big bucks to make ads that look like Google search results, something activists have criticized as being “sneaky” and immoral. Now, scientists are chiming in in agreement with the activities, demanding advertising agencies and PR firms stop working with fossil fuel clients and “Big Oil.” According to Reuters, more than 450 scientists joined together and asked the executives of major advertising and PR firms to cut ties with their fossil fuel clients. The scientists claimed the advertisements and PR work was spreading disinformation about climate change. Collectively, the scientists sent a letter to companies including WPP, Edelman, and IPG. They also reached out to the companies’ clients who have supposed sustainability goals, such as Unilever, Amazon, and Microsoft. “As scientists who study and communicate the realities of climate change, we are consistently faced with a major and needless challenge: overcoming advertising and PR efforts by fossil fuel companies that seek to obfuscate or downplay our data and the risks posed by the climate crisis,” the scientists wrote, according to the Washington Post....
    WHILE many businesses floundered in lockdown, Sarah Butcher’s was buzzing - literally. The 30-year-old from Bournemouth is a self-proclaimed “kink educator” who helps thousands of people around the world live out their sexual fantasies. 4Sarah helps couples live out their sexual fantasiesCredit: Supplied 4Sarah's kinky workshop business was booming in lockdownCredit: Supplied Sarah, who posts under the domain @subinthecity, quit her job in marketing as demand grew for her kinky workshops in lockdown. One of Sarah’s most popular workshops is BDSM 101 - an introduction to kink - and her spanking class.  Up to 100 people a time will join these workshops online and up to 50 will participate in real life sessions.  Sarah - who got into BDSM (which stands for bondage, discipline, sadism, masochism) over 10 years ago - uses her own experiences in the kink world to educate her clients.  She tells The Sun: “When I first started exploring kink there wasn’t much out there. The internet was a dark and scary place. I made my own mistakes and learnt through trial and error.  “But I don’t...
    Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.The Afghanistan government’s collapse on Sunday brought an unceremonious end to the longest war in American history. It also, with shocking speed and clarity, signaled the return of the Taliban to power after two decades of guerrilla warfare against the United States and its allies. An Afghanistan newly under Taliban control poses an enormous threat to Afghan women, human rights activists, and the legions of Afghans who supported the US military effort such as translators, cooks, and cleaners.  Few Americans understand the plight of America’s Afghan allies as acutely as the attorneys who are working to evacuate them. Julie Kornfeld, a senior staff attorney at the International Refugee Assistance Project, told me her organization is representing more than 150 Afghan nationals as they look to leave the country. Many of them have applied for entry to the United States through the Special Immigrant Visa program, which has been wracked with delays and other bureaucratic problems since its creation.    The...
    A lawyer for the QAnon Shaman who claims his client was following President Trump's invitation when he stormed the US Capitol has defended  calling the MAGA mob 'f***ing retarded' in a fiery interview with Chris Cuomo. Jacob Chansley, the self-described QAnon Shaman who was pictured inside the US Capitol wearing a horned hat, is among those awaiting potential prison sentences after being charged over the January 6 riots.  His attorney Albert Watkins defended saying the rioters are 'on the goddamn spectrum' in an interview with CNN's Cuomo on Wednesday while claiming his 33-year-old client's 'vulnerable' mind was poisoned by Trump's tweets and his 'incessant drivel'.   Watkins said Chansley's mind was 'slipping away from him' and claimed that his client's military records 'reflect, indicate and demonstrate concern for the mental health and well-being' of Chansley. He also claimed Chansley was actually helping police on the day he stormed the Capitol building by collecting items 'that had been stolen from them' as well as allegedly stopping a theft.  Jacob Chansley's attorney Albert Watkins (right) defended calling the rioters 'on the goddamn spectrum' in...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — In its 91 years of serving the community, the Hallie Q. Brown Center in St. Paul has never experienced so much need from so many people. The food bank has seen a 4,000% increase in clients since March. Thanks to WCCO viewers, they’ve been able to meet their needs. But with the holidays getting closer, requests for help are going up. Volunteers were busy unloading trucks outside the St. Paul charity Friday. The goods they packed will be used to fill the hundreds of food baskets that will be going to families across the metro. “There will be 750 families that will not go without food this holiday season,” Dawn Selle, director of external affairs, said. Selle says last year the center handed out 250 boxes of food, and the increase proves more families are in need. Members of Firefighters United St. Paul are helping with donations and unloading the goods. They know firsthand how families are fighting to keep food on the table. “We see a lot of hardships when we go into homes to help...
    Capital News Service — The coronavirus pandemic has increased the strain on groups that work to prevent homelessness in Maryland, with experts saying single mothers and people of color are being hurt the most. Multiple advocacy groups have expanded their programs to try to handle the surge in cases, as one agency said requests for help have nearly tripled from March to early October. “It was already concerning last year because we had 239 clients total, all of 2019, and (as of Oct. 14), I have 600,” said Carol Ott, tenant advocacy director at the Fair Housing Action Center. “And the overwhelming majority of these people are Black, single women with children.” Of all 2020 tenants through early October who needed financial assistance at the Fair Housing Action Center, 67% are women and 57% are Black. “Sadly, those two numbers rarely change much. We always see a majority of Black women, most with children,” Ott said. But the high numbers recently have been triggering a lot of alarm bells, she said. In April, people rushed to file for unemployment once...
    Luis Alvarez | DigitalVision | Getty Images The Covid-19 pandemic has pushed more financial advisors to figure out how to meet virtually with clients. Advisory firms have had to find ways to be able to adapt through the use of virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients. That newfound comfort will probably change advisory practices well into the future. To that point, the first Zoom video meeting that the advisors at Salem Investment Counselors had earlier this year to discuss financial markets was not a resounding success. "We spent half the time troubleshooting people's connections, and then it shut down after a half-hour," said Kip Keener, chief compliance officer for the Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based firm. Salem was ranked No. 1 on CNBC's FA 100 ranking this year. Keener immediately switched to a corporate Zoom account and says that videoconferencing between employees and with clients has quickly become an integral part of the firm's operations.I've been amazed at how quickly employees and clients have adapted to this changed environment.Mark MirsbergerCEO of Dana Investment Advisors"Historically we've been pretty low-tech in...
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