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    A TIKTOKER has posted an iPhone hack for separating messages from known and unknown numbers. Texts from mysterious numbers can be a warning sign that your information is circulating on the internet. 2Motto Marketing posts videos of all sorts of iPhone tips and tricksCredit: TikTok/mottomarketing 2The latest trick is focused on the Messages appCredit: Getty - Contributor A TikToker with almost 36,000 followers has posted a quick and easy hack for organizing your Messages inbox. Go to Settings and open the Messages tab. Toggle on Filter Unknown Senders. This will give your Messages inbox an additional menu from which you can select if you want to view messages from known or unknown senders. Read More in TikTokTIKTOK SOLIDARITY What to know about the 10k summer break challenge on TikTokTIKED OFF TikTok issues 'account warning' to MILLIONS of users - here's how to fix it The unknown sender inbox will have messages from numbers that are not in your contact list. The known senders list will have messages from numbers that are saved as contacts in your phone. You...
    CHICAGO -- The text message is clear: Scammers want to steal from you in a new way.For the second year in a row, spam texts have outnumbered spam calls.According to the annual RoboKiller Phone Spam Report, 87.8 billion spam texts were sent in 2021, which far surpasses the 72.2 billion spam calls in the same timeframe.Here is what you should do to stop them: Try replying "STOP" to opt-out and unsubscribe your number from the mailing list Block the number: If the same number continuously sends you spam, you can always block the number. Blocking a number varies by cell phone manufacturer -For iPhones, tap the contact information from the Message App and click "block this caller"-On Androids, tap the conversation in the message app. Locate the three dots and click details. From details, you should find a button to "block and report spam" Report messages: You can protect yourself from spammers by forwarding the text to 7726 (SPAM). You can also go to ReportFraud.ftc.gov or notifying your cell carrier
    IF YOU'RE sick of unwanted emails clogging up your iPhone inbox, there's a quick and easy way to stop them. Blocking contacts who inundate your Mail app with messages is a great way to digitally detox and makes you less likely to fall victim to a phishing scam. 3To block a spammer in the Mail app, open the message and tap the 'from field', then tap the name of the sender to open their contact sheetCredit: The Sun Blocking emails will stop a sender’s email from dropping into your inbox. Depending on which email provider you use, the unwanted emails will either be diverted into your Spam folder or be automatically deleted. If an email from a blocked sender still appears in your inbox, the sender might have changed their email address. Users will not be notified that they have been blocked. If you're trying to stop spam, IT experts say it can be more effective to report them as spam in your email client, so they can be forcibly stopped from sending nuisance emails. Most read in TechGAME ON PS5 stock...
    More On: police officers NJ cop busted for running meth lab out of home Finest not welcome: Cops banned from participating in NYC Pride events Man angered by Texas deputies in yard killed them: cops Officer tries to revive dying COVID patient in India A Florida sheriff’s deputy was fired Monday for making unsolicited sexual advances to two women — including one whose father’s death was probed by the cop, department officials said. Pinellas County Deputy Brian Overton, who joined the department in 2013, was terminated after two separate internal investigations found he had inappropriate contact with two women beginning last summer, Sheriff Bob Gualtieri said in a statement. The first probe was launched after a woman who met Overton during an investigation into her father’s death told authorities in July of unsolicited and unwelcome text messages from the deputy, Gualtieri said. The initial messages were connected to the death investigation, but they soon contained comments from Overton that were “sexual in nature” and not related to his official duties. Gualtieri said Overton had claimed he merely “wanted to...
    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday tossed out a lawsuit accusing Facebook Inc. of violating a federal anti-robocall law. The justices, in a 9-0 decision authored by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, sided with Facebook in its argument that text messages the social media company sent did not violate a 1991 federal law called the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). The case highlighted the challenge for the justices in applying outdated laws to modern technologies. The ruling sparked calls for Congress to update the law, enacted three decades ago to curb telemarketing abuse by banning most unauthorized robocalls. "By narrowing the scope of the TCPA, the court is allowing companies the ability to assault the public with a nonstop wave of unwanted calls and texts, around the clock," Democratic Senator Edward Markey and Democratic Representative Anna Eshoo said in a joint statement. The court ruled that Facebook's actions — sending text messages without consent — did not fit within the technical definition of the type of conduct barred by the law, which was enacted before the rise of modern...
    Twenty-one men have accused John Weaver, co-founder of The Lincoln Project and a longtime Republican operative, of sending unwanted sexual messages, The New York Times reported on Sunday. One of the men was still in high school when Weaver began messaging him about his body, according to the Times. Accusations against Weaver were first reported by Forensic News. Several of the men were looking to get into politics, and they told the Times that they felt Weaver—who served as an adviser on John McCain and John Kasich’s presidential campaigns—was using his influence to pressure them into sex. The Times featured some of the messages Weaver sent the young men including one promising to “spoil you when we see each other. Help you other times. Give advice, counsel, help with bills. You help me … sensually.” Other young men told the Times of Weaver’s alleged sexual suggestiveness, and how they felt he was “exploiting his power” in conversation and messages with them. In a statement, Weaver, who has a wife and two children, told the Times, “I am so...
    The Supreme Court has agreed to hear Facebook’s defense after an appeals court determined it violated anti-robocalling rules. The court will examine whether Facebook’s automated alert texts count as an “automatic telephone dialing system,” establishing a clearer definition of illegal phone spam. Facebook was sued in 2015 by non-Facebook user Noah Duguid, who complained that he’d been receiving unwanted text messages from the site. The alerts told Duguid that someone was trying to access his nonexistent Facebook account, and he couldn’t get Facebook to stop sending them. Duguid argued that Facebook had violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, which is supposed to protect Americans from unwanted auto-dialed calls. The court just ruled on a key robocalling issue Facebook said the texts were sent by mistake, and it claimed its automated system was functionally similar to a standard smartphone, so a ruling against it could make ordinary phone calls illegal. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed with this logic and said Facebook’s texts clearly fit the category of “automated, unsolicited, and unwanted” phone messages. The Supreme Court will settle...
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